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ABOUT UMUC

The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it.

Serving Busy Professionals Worldwide

The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

University of Maryland University College (UMUC) specializes in high-quality academic programs that are convenient for busy professionals. Our programs are specifically tailored to fit into the busy lives of those who wish to pursue a respected degree that can advance them personally and grow their careers. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 95,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 25 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

ABOUT THE ARTS AT UMUC Since 1978, University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists and brings art to the community through its own collections, which have grown to include more than 1,900 pieces of art, and special exhibitions. UMUC’s collections focus on both art by Maryland artists and art from around the world. They include the Maryland Artist Collection, the Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, the Asian Collections, the Education Collection, and the International Collection. The university’s collection of Maryland art includes approximately 2,000 works and provides a comprehensive survey of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of nearly 420 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Tang Dynasty (618–907 ad) through the 19th century—a historical reach of 13 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists.

Cover artwork details, left to right: Sean FitzPatrick, Reata 1996 Ellen Hill, Hickory (courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore) Julie Maynard, Train Wreck: No Matter What I Do Helen Zughaib, Circle Home Beit Gregory McLemore, Baltimore Ruins VI (Skyline) Ran Zeimer, The Great Salt Lake from High Above

Artworks are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The main, lower-level gallery in Adelphi is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, and the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week. More than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors come to the Adelphi facilities each year. Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo are open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibit | University of Maryland University College

UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition Presented by University of Maryland University College November 3, 2013–January 26, 2014 | University of Maryland University College | Arts Program Gallery


Š 2013 University of Maryland University College. All rights reserved. Copyright credits and attribution for certain illustrations are cited internally proximate to the illustrations. All rights reserved.


Welcome Dear Patrons of the Arts,

Katherine Lambert

For 35 years, the Arts Program at University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has been providing visual art exhibitions by artists emerging and renowned, local and international. Our second Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition (BMRE) is an exhibition devoted to artists in Maryland; Northern Virginia; and Washington, D.C. It also serves as the opening exhibition for the newly renovated UMUC galleries.

DELIVER ME FROM WRITERS WHO SAY THE WAY THEY LIVE DOESN’T MATTER. I’M NOT SURE A BAD PERSON CAN WRITE A GOOD BOOK. IF ART DOESN’T MAKE US BETTER, THEN WHAT ON EARTH IS IT FOR. Alice Walker

This second BMRE posed a welcome challenge for exhibition jurors Faheem Majeed, artist and assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies for the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts at University of Illinois at Chicago; Nona R. Martin, manager of public programs, Smithsonian American Art Museum; and Amy E. Raehse, chief curator and executive director, Goya Contemporary Art Gallery. They selected 47 diverse works by 42 artists from more than 400 submissions by 200 artists. The selected pieces are original works that were completed since 2010 in the mediums of painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, fiber, glass, ceramics, wood, metal, photography, and mixed media. We are excited to reopen our gallery doors to the public with these innovative works by local artists. I’d like to extend my sincere thanks to the jurors, the artists who participated, and all those who made the BMRE possible. I hope you enjoy the renovated UMUC galleries for many years to come. Sincerely,

Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College

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Introduction Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Steven Halperson

The 2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibit presents the Arts Program with another occasion to reach out to the thousands of practicing artists in our region. This exhibition marks the university’s 35-year commitment to providing quality visual art exhibitions by renowned and emerging artists, both locally and internationally. Thanks to the larger size of UMUC’s renovated Main Gallery, 42 artists from the region will have the opportunity to share their artistic talents and experiences with the general public and reach a new audience with their works. The BMRE provides a forum in which we can learn about these practicing artists and their works. Just as important, the juried competition introduces the Arts Program to new artists in our community while keeping us in contact with familiar names and their artistic careers. Even though some artists are not selected to participate in the BMRE, we often look at the list of submissions for artists to include in other art exhibitions. In short, the BMRE list of artists serves as a resource to the Arts Program and helps us continue to serve as a resource for artists in our community. As a regional exhibit, the project was carefully designed to provide living artists in the Maryland; Washington, D.C.; and Northern Virginia region with another professional environment in which to showcase their works. The works may be available for aquisition directly from the participating artists. This is another way in which the university supports artists while exposing our community, students, faculty, and staff to a wide range of work by a culturally diverse group of artists. The major task for the BMRE rested in the hands of the jurors. They had the sole task of evaluating more than 400 submissions and

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selecting the works for the exhibition. The Arts Program staff could not offer suggestions, comments, or reactions in the selection process, even if they were familiar with the artist and his or her works. This process allowed the jurors— Faheem Majeed, Nona Martin, and Amy Raehse, whose biographies are included in this publication—to apply their combined artistic experiences in making their selections. The face-to-face meeting of the jurors was a lesson in art history and art appreciation. As an observer of the process, I enjoyed hearing the discussions among the jurors. They spoke of contrast, tension, technique, materials, execution, lighting, color palate, balance, skill, and artistic content. The jurors’ goal to select the best works to represent the BMRE meant that not all the works could be included in the exhibit. In the end, the jurors selected 47 works. After a full day of viewing, revisiting, talking, and evaluating, the jurors collectively said that they would offer this advice to all artists: “Explore new technique, continue to create new works, develop an artistic voice, and continue to participate in calls for entries such as those for the BMRE.” This project provides a broad look into the art world within our region, using the creative masterpieces of local artists. Each artistic approach is individualistic, depending on the artist and the environment in which he or she works. The inspirations for and the voices of the artwork are personal yet powerful tools of communication. The works are technical, scientific, mathematic, linguistic, and artistic. In an age of so much art, this project is not an attempt to decide what is good art or what is bad art. It is simply a project to share an expression through the visual arts. The Arts Program at UMUC is glad to present a forum in which art can speak to a new audience. Thank you to all the artists who participated, to the jurors, to the Arts Program staff (Brian Young, Denise Melvin, and Rene Sanjines), and to other UMUC departments, including Marketing, the Office of Institutional Advancement, and the Office of the President. Last but not least, many thanks to our Friends of the Arts contributors, whose financial contributions aid in the presentation of artistic events such as the BMRE.


UMUC and Its Commitment to Art in the Region

Tracey Brown

Brian Young Curator, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

In 2011, UMUC organized and hosted its 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition. The response was positively overwhelming. The result was a well-chosen exhibition juried by three jurors who embody arts professionalism in the midAtlantic. For the Arts Program at UMUC, there was a larger, less measurable benefit: hundreds of artists, visitors, and organizations came to appreciate UMUC as an artistic force in the region. This exhibition enhanced our growing reputation and helped us burnish our image as a central source for established and emerging artists in Maryland and the region. At UMUC, we relish our role as an institution that promotes artists through temporary exhibitions, a rich permanent collection, and our publications and Web presence. Our galleries are located in Adelphi, Maryland, within walking distance of the University of Maryland, College Park campus. Each year, we host nine or ten temporary exhibitions in the Arts Program Gallery, which is approximately 4,000 square feet. At the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, also in Adelphi, three distinct galleries feature the Baltimore artist’s paintings, sculpture, and drawings. Additional galleries are devoted to the work of three other Maryland artists: Gladys Goldstein, Selma Oppenheimer, and Herman Maril. When possible, we provide support to other institutions, and we have recently

worked with the College of Southern Maryland, Notre Dame of Maryland University, the Academy Art Museum, the Greenbelt Federal Courthouse, and the Jewish Community Center in Baltimore. UMUC has one of the best collections of works of art by artists from the region, including nearly 2,000 works by Maryland artists. We have significant holdings by Aubrey Bodine, Walter Folger, Reuben Kramer, Perna Krick, Reini Maters, Ralph McGuire, Raoul Middleman, and the Maryland Printmakers. UMUC produces exhibition catalogs, hosts receptions, and organizes symposia and artist talks as well. Continuing our commitment to preserving and displaying the region’s artwork, UMUC rotates the work in its permanent collections for display among our public spaces, including those in Quantico, Largo, and of course, Adelphi. At the Inn and Conference Center and the Administration Building, visitors can expect to see any number of works by Maryland and Washington, D.C., artists, including Hilton Brown, Nicole Buckingham, David Driskell, Sam Gilliam, Simon Gouverneur, Grace Hartigan, Jacob Kainen, Lila Katzen, Keith Martin, Edward Rosenfeld, Amalie Rothschild, Preston Sampson, Joyce J. Scott, Aaron Sopher, Renee Stout, Alma Thomas, and others. Exhibitions such as the BMRE bring the university’s commitment to art to a significant level. They allow us not only to reach out and establish a dialogue about art but also to highlight works by artists who are members of our community. We are grateful to the artists and jurors who have made the BMRE possible and hope that this exhibition grows into a longstanding tradition.

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BMRE Jurors Faheem Majeed I’m honored to have been a juror in the 2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition. I want to thank and congratulate Eric Key and his staff for their hospitality and production of a quality exhibition. At the completion of the jurying process, we were asked to explain the basis for our selections. For the most part, I think people like what they like. Our tastes and preferences are driven by our experiences and exposure to art. That’s why it’s important to choose a diverse and relatively broad range of jurors. I commend the BMRE for achieving this goal. I found it fascinating that each panelist chose and reviewed work through a very different lens. As an artist and curator, I’m fascinated and inspired by the intentions and concepts of other artists. In my art practice, I find that I’m drawn to odd or broken things . . . . This translates to both objects and people. I think I’m drawn to these kinds of things because of a boundless curiosity, not necessarily to tear things apart to see how they work, but to understand connections and motivations. Although I was able to spend time with a number of amazing and technically sound works of art during the selection process, I always gravitated toward the artwork that challenged me conceptually. This type of artwork taps a deeper emotion and goes beyond just being aesthetically pleasing. It sometimes makes me angry, uncomfortable, reflective, or confused. It challenges my values, beliefs, and ideas about space and composition. It is artwork that has a civic mission or artwork that is just funny as hell. This is the work that I find myself wanting to spend more time analyzing, understanding, and appreciating. Congratulations to all the artists selected to participate in this year’s exhibition. 6

Faheem Majeed is an artist, curator, and community facilitator. Majeed blends his unique experience as a nonprofit administrator, curator, and artist to create works that focus on institutional critique and exhibitions that leverage collaboration to engage the community in meaningful dialogue. From 2005 to 2011, Majeed served as executive director and curator for the South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC) in Chicago. He was responsible for managing operations, staff, programs, fundraising, and curating for the SSCAC. During his time with the SSCAC, Majeed curated exhibitions of numerous artists, including Elizabeth Catlett, David Driskell, Charles White, Jonathan Green, and Theaster Gates. In 2012 Majeed served as artist-in-residence for the University of Chicago’s Arts + Public Life Initiative. Majeed received his BFA from Howard University and his MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). While at UIC, he received both the Abraham Lincoln Fellowship and the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois Fellowship and was nominated for the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant. He was also selected to take part in the New Insight exhibit during Art Chicago. Majeed has participated in multiple panels, committees, and lectures at various institutions, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, 3Arts, and the Hyde Park Art Center. Currently Majeed is an assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies for the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts at UIC.


Nona R. Martin How does one evaluate the aesthetic quality of a work of art? It’s an age-old question that has persisted throughout the history of art. Yet, when viewing a work of art, we strive to determine whether the work has merit and value. Perhaps this is best done through a personal interpretation. It may be when a work of art enlightens, addressing a societal concern, or when it intrigues, encouraging you to ponder and question your value and belief system. Still, a work’s aesthetic quality could be related to its composition, medium, or color palette or linked to your familiarity with the subject depicted. And then again, it could be when the work makes a positive impression on your psyche or just makes you feel good. All the above and more is what I experienced as a juror. From the mysterious quality of Veiled Secrets and Dance of the Goldfish to the detail and precision of Attic, from the use of positive and negative space in Paparazzi to the tranquility of Along the Canal, from the workmanship of Soundgirl Pants to the colors and theme of The Gift, all the works in the 2nd BMRE have aesthetic qualities that I’m confident will entice and fascinate and will increase our appreciation of artists working and living in the region.

Nona Martin has served the arts community in various capacities for more than 20 years. Currently she is the manager of public programs at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM). She is responsible for the initiation, development, implementation, and evaluation of public programs offered by SAAM and its Renwick Gallery. She was also the project director for the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services. Additionally, Martin has been the education director for the African American Museum in Philadelphia and the director of the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia. She received her MA and BA in art history from the University of Pittsburgh with advanced studies in museum studies from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. She serves as board secretary for the Association of African American Museums; a member of the Heritage Preservation’s Heritage Emergency National Task Force; vice president for programs of the Harbor City chapter of the Links, Incorporated; a panelist for the Museums, Leadership, and Diversity program at the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies; and a presenter at the Cleveland Museum of Art and the National Association of African American Studies and Affiliates at Virginia State University.

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Amy Eva Raehse One important phenomena of the Maryland-DC-Virginia area today is our celebration of all things local. Homegrown businesses, native cuisine, resident art stars, and the DIY visual arts movement provide an account of our collective culture—a zeitgeist, if you will. As shared experiences, juried exhibitions are by definition unwieldy. They purport to highlight a collective vision and spirit that speaks to trends and permits jurors to acknowledge a synergy represented in a brief period of time. The idea of a collective culture does not, of course, negate the expansive mix of sensibilities that are representative of the diversity of the public at large, but instead articulates the connection that a group of artists may share. In this way, juried exhibitions, especially regional ones, can be vehicles for Shakespearean-like reflection. They provide a mirror onto what we cannot—or are not always willing to—see: ourselves. Thus, from the conception to the conclusion of a juried regional biennial, the most instrumental constituents are the contributing artists—both those who have been selected and those who have not. As curators, we endeavor to propagate and interpret the talents, visions, and voices of contemporary artists, creating a dialogue among art, the market, and the increasingly globalized landscape of audiences. With this in mind, thematic development is an important implement on the curatorial tool belt. Jurors, however, seldom consider overall thematic principles, but rather allow methodology to live within the union of quality and invention, taking cues from the art itself, but always leaning on the side of quality. There are indeed recognizable standards of aesthetics regardless of style, and there are, therefore, genuine opportunities to learn from the language revealed within this type of barometer.

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Amy Raehse has been both the subject and author of various articles, press pieces, interviews, catalogues, and books. Currently she is the chief curator and executive director at Goya Contemporary Gallery and executive director of Goya-Girl Press in Baltimore, Maryland. She received her MFA and BFA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She also has a certificate in arts management from Amherst College, Massachusetts. She has lectured at the Worchester Art Museum, Mount Holyoke College, American University, Maryland Institute College of Art, and the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore on topics such as collecting art, gallery and curatorial practices, how to approach galleries, the history of Goya Contemporary, and shifts in digital art within galleries. A seasoned art professional, she has curated the works of artists such as Joyce J. Scott, Hermine Ford, Timothy App, Madeleine Keesing, Ford Crull, Diana Jacobs, and Luis Flores. She serves as a member of the board of trustees of the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, a member of the host committee for the Maryland Institute College of Art’s ArtWalk and the Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Baltimore Museum of Art, a curator for the Creative Alliance Marquee Ball Exhibition, and a mentor for Maryland Art Place’s Curators’ Incubator.


As with many juried exhibitions hosted by academic institutions, there is a push toward pedagogical approaches to jurying. Artistic expression has been a function of humanity since prehistory and has played a meaningful role in our sociocultural evolution. Art has acted in many ways to teach us about ourselves because artistic practice is a form of communication through ideas and objects. One’s personal philosophies—theories of aesthetics, belief in reductionism, support for Greenberg or Mallarme—notwithstanding, our collective consciousness accepts that visual language services a communication need that is not achieved through the written word. Our experiences with and relationships to art are visceral and, hopefully, intellectual as well. One might surmise, then, that the job of the jury is to select works that communicate effectively.

The artistic relevance of the mid-Atlantic region is dynamic and has been reinterpreted through generations of artists including Morris Louis, Ken Noland, Gene Davis, Howard Mehring, Sam Gilliam, Anne Truitt, Alma Thomas, Rockne Krebs, Bill Christenberry, Bob Stackhouse, Tom Green, Grace Hartigan, John Waters, Joyce Scott, and many more. Over time, artistic practices in our region have proved to be fluid, innovative, and applicable to the canon of art history. I would like to thank the applicants for presenting overwhelming evidence of the thoughtful artistic energy put forward by this region’s many talented artists. It is with great respect that I tip my hat to our fertile artistic grounds.

It is challenging to look at an ostensibly disparate collection of objects with a critical eye to cohesion. Collectively, the works that stood out were not those that offered just good draftsmanship, but rather those that also offered the audience an unanswered question, a level of complexity, or a statement. I applaud the artists who have taken risks within their practice. Works that display formal, critical, and emotional content (assuming sound craftsmanship) offer the most potential for distinguished relevance. Whether the artist demonstrates only a minuscule gesture or imbues the materials with profound meaning, the work itself needs to have significance. We did not make the choice to include a diverse mix of objects easily. After reviewing a range of works— lambrequins, pastiche, new media, and the simplest forms—we debated our reasons for inclusion and exclusion and arrived at a consensus. Overall, if there is a lesson to be learned, it is for artists to challenge their work to be authentic in both aesthetic appeal and contemplative relevance.

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Anne Bouie • Schroeder Cherry • Sara Dittrich • Steven Dobbin • Erin Fitzpatrick • Sean FitzPatrick Richard Franklin • Peter Guttmacher • Nicholas Harris • Ellen Hill • Karen Klinedinst • Jacqueline Lee Freda Lee-McCann • Janet Maher • David Marion • Sebastian Martorana • Julie Maynard • Mike McConnell Gregory McLemore • Greg Minah • Christine Neill • Karen Norman • Barbara Nuss • Kathryn O’Grady Scott Ponemone • Davide Prete • Marcia Wolfson Ray • Bill Schmidt • Mike Shaffer • Shahin Shikhaliyev George Smyth • Maxine Taylor • Michael Thorpe • Ben Tolman • Darlene Towson • Patricia Weneck Sy Wengrovitz • Andrew Wodzianski • Sharon Wolpoff • Ran Zeimer • Tanya Ziniewicz • Helen Zughaib


Exhibition Awardees ART IS NOT WHAT YOU SEE, BUT WHAT YOU MAKE OTHERS SEE. Edgar Degas

1ST PLACE | President’s Best of Show Award

5TH PLACE | Arts Program Honorable Mention

Helen Zughaib Veiled Secrets

George Smyth Braddock Project #7

2ND PLACE | Jurors‘ Choice Award

6TH PLACE | Arts Program Honorable Mention

Sebastian Martorana New Construction

Sean FitzPatrick Reata 1996

3RD PLACE | Award of Merit

JUROR RECOGNITIONS

Sy Wengrovitz Soundgirl Pants

Nicholas Harris Attic

4TH PLACE | Arts Program Honorable Mention

Marcia Wolfson Ray Metamorphosis

Greg Minah The Sum Total

Helen Zughaib Circle Home Beit

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Helen Zughaib BFA, Syracuse University Veiled Secrets 2013 gouache and ink on board 40 x 30 in.

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1ST PLACE

President's Best of Show Award Helen Zughaib Veiled Secrets The phrase that I have written many times over in Arabic is from an Iraqi proverb loosely translated that means, “There are many secrets hidden under the abaya.� The abaya is the outer black covering that many women in the Arab world wear. As I wrote this phrase over and over again, I began to see the fabric gently moving with each imaginary step she was taking. I visualized layer upon layer of secrets and stories swirling beneath the black robe, possibly revealing a glimpse of hot pink or lime green clothing hidden beneath the black envelope. I wonder if the figure is submerged beneath her layers, fighting for each breath, or could she possibly be emerging out from underneath her surroundings and restrictions? Perhaps after all, she is comfortably hidden from the expectations and demands on her as a woman, as she walks about the dusty streets. Questions I still have.

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2ND PLACE

Jurors’ Choice Award Sebastian Martorana MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art BFA, Syracuse University New Construction 2012 Beaver Dam marble (salvaged Baltimore City stair step) 16 x 8 x 8 in.

John Woo

I have been working for some time now with the kind of stone that I have become familiar with and fond of since moving to Baltimore years ago: the city’s white marble stairs. However, recently I have begun making pieces whose underlying concept speaks specifically to the plight of these iconic marble steps and generally to the loss of the beautiful historical architecture of this city and the part of its cultural identity lost along with it.

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3RD PLACE

Award of Merit Sy Wengrovitz MA, George Washington University BA, City University of New York Soundgirl Pants 2012 basswood, steel hanger, and cardboard labels 20 x 20 x 2 in. My father was a “sample maker,” i.e., a tailor who worked with a fashion designer to interpret the designer’s artistic sketch and produce a pre-production model of a finished garment using actual fabrics. For years I have worked with wood, producing furniture items, carving faces in tree limbs and carving carousel horses, klezmer musicians—and now in this exhibit—clothing. Perhaps I inherited my father’s ability to visualize how a garment is constructed. I find that carving folds and seams and creating details in wood such as button holes, belts, buckles, and zippers is a fascinating challenge. Carving is a new and exciting activity that gives me an opportunity to be creative and make things from wood that fool the eye into believing that what is seen is an actual article of clothing rather than a wood sculpture. I try to create items that are enjoyable and fun to look at. If my creations make you smile, then I know that I have succeeded.

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4TH PLACE

Arts Program Honorable Mention Greg Minah BA, University of Maryland, College Park The Sum Total 2013 acrylic on canvas 42 in. diameter I make paintings by pouring thinned-out acrylic paint onto the canvas and then tilting and turning the stretcher to precisely control the flow of the medium. Often, a layer is partially removed with pressurized water before it completely cures, leaving only the outline of the poured paint and revealing the multiple layers of the work. This method might best be described as a collaborative performance between the creative force of the artist and the natural forces acting on the material.

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5TH PLACE

Arts Program Honorable Mention George Smyth BA, West Virginia University Braddock Project #7 2012 bromoil 16 x 20 in.

At one time Braddock, Pennsylvania, was a city of more than 20,000 people, but the collapse of the steel industry and the infusion of crack cocaine reduced it to a little more than 2,000 inhabitants. The Braddock Project, Part 1 is the beginning of a project for which I will visit the city twice a year over the next decade to document its resurgence. Indeed, a number of these places no longer exist, as the city works its way back.

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6TH PLACE

Arts Program Honorable Mention Sean FitzPatrick BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art Reata 1996 2012 oil and oil paint markers on canvas 48 x 48 in. This collection of paintings is based on a set of my childhood drawings that I rediscovered last year. I had drawn directly on a number of reprinted black and white photographs in a book documenting the American West. Viewing them as an adult, I now see the work of a child attempting to subvert the quaint narrative of the photographs by refusing to play the role of passive observer, and instead injecting his own perceptions into that narrative. In this collection, I explore the underlying psychology and aesthetic choices in the original drawings and transform them into mature works that blend the control of a trained artist with the raw childhood emotion that inspired them.

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Honorable Mention

Juror Recognition Nicholas Harris Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Attic 2012 oil on linen 44 x 52Âź in. Compositions arise from something in my visual experience that evokes an emotional response. Preparatory studies are then done to explore the forms, lines, and colors; edit out extraneous elements; establish the perspective; and crop the image, producing the patterns of shapes that emphasize the meaning the scene holds for me. Finally the dimensions are determined. Generally I favor smaller works for their intimacy and vulnerability. However, there are some images that need to envelop rather than draw in a viewer, and for those a larger format is selected.

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Honorable Mention

Juror Recognition Marcia Wolfson Ray MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art Metamorphosis 2012 marsh elder, dog fennel, and vines 75 x 25 x 25 in. I collect various organic materials, such as bamboo, dog fennel, and hibiscus, and construct my sculptures from them.

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Honorable Mention

Juror Recognition Helen Zughaib BFA, Syracuse University Circle Home Beit 2013 acrylic ink on paper 30 x 30 in. I was born in Beirut, Lebanon, and feel that my Middle Eastern background allows me to approach the experiences I have in America in a unique way. As an Arab American, I remain an observer of both cultures, an outsider looking in. Through my work I hope to encourage dialogue and create understanding and acceptance between the people of the Arab world and the United States.

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Anne Bouie PhD, Stanford University MA, Stanford University BA, University of California, Riverside Earth Shield #1 2011 reclaimed wood, oxidized iron, willow branches, eucalyptus pods, wool, and yarn 49 x 12 x 4 in. I am an artist in the na誰ve tradition and draw heavily upon pre-conversion indigenous cultures. The traditions of southern folk artists are also a source of my inspiration.

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Anne Bouie Testament #3 2012 foundry molds, hemp, oxidized iron, and assorted found objects 48 x 20 x 12 in.

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Schroeder Cherry EdD, Columbia University BFA, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Janus with Schedule 2011 acrylic, glass, metal, thread, and found objects on wood 46½ x 24 x 1 in. My pieces are open-ended stories. I use acrylic paint and mixed media on wood, found objects, and text to construct stories. Viewers are invited to examine pieces and develop their own narratives.

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Sara Dittrich BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art Electric Bow 2012 cherry, music wire, contact mic, amp, and cords 20 x 120 x 2 in.

I adapt musical instruments to investigate the dynamic acts of listening, communicating, and moving. Playing music helps us cope with the physical and mental stresses encountered in daily life. I relate these human strains to the tensions created in the musical instrument. The expanding, cramping, and confinement of air along with tense strings taut across the resonator of an instrument mimic the body’s use of voice and movements of muscles. My work incorporates installation, collaboration, and performance. This multimedia approach, including robotics, wood, performers, and video, allows me to experiment and explore new and exciting ways of engaging the viewer. Every day the sounds of the body, such as a voice, heartbeat, or step, serve as inspiration. My intention is to use these sounds as a tool to shift one’s perspective of a relationship or surrounding space.

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Steven Dobbin MFA, University of Southern California MA, George Washington University BA, University of Maryland, College Park When Did They Stop Drawing the Battle Lines In Crayon? 2012 tins, toy soldiers, maps, wood, metal, and infused paint 15 x 15 x 5 in. My work reflects the concerns and hopes I have for the futures of the emotionally disturbed and developmentally disabled students I teach. I explore the consequences of the often-tragic circumstances of their lives and respond to the impact of their uninformed and seemingly capricious personal choices, which affect them and their families.

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Erin Fitzpatrick BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art Elise and Lane 2011 oil on birch panel 48 x 36 in. Originally titled Baltimore Portrait, this body of work now contains more than 130 paintings and drawings of notable artists, musicians, business people, and my peers. I view this project as “people collecting,� as it is as much about meeting and documenting new subjects as it is about the paintings themselves.

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Richard Franklin Attended Brigham Young University and the Colorado Institute of Art Tornado Alley 2011 acrylic on canvas 96 x 66 in.

John Woo

Philosopher John Dewey described art as the “experience” that takes place between the work of art and the viewer.

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While working as a merchant seaman, I discovered that my orientation to the world of fixed horizons was challenged by complex signals relating to balance and counterbalance. As an artist, I’m interested in the intersection where perception and memory shape (or appear to shape) reality. For art to address that ambiguity, I believe it must reach beyond its own boundaries to touch both its environment and those inhabiting it. Animated by color, this confluence of visual and psychological phenomena has the potential to free us, albeit temporarily, from some of the fixed assumptions we hold about the tangible world.


Peter Guttmacher MFA, New York University BA, Connecticut College Paparazzi 2011 digital photographic print on metallic paper 16 x 10 in. I’ve been around the block, consider myself a country person, and yet have lived in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, and D.C. In those 56 years life has given me the opportunity to do very different things like write a well-received book about Elvis Presley; premier three works with the Pulitzer-winning playwright Tony Kushner; pretend to be an expert on movies for the BBC; write and host my own public access cable show; attend the Oscars and be mistaken for Steven Speilberg; teach young people who are far brighter than I’ll ever be; design jewelry sold at Fred Segal; be a poetry judge for the NEA; eat fried chicken at the feet of John Lee Hooker; insult Wallace Shawn; advise the NIH; bond with two parrots; try the patience of a good woman; and try very, very hard to be interesting.

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Nicholas Harris Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Morning Lace Light on Door 2011 oil on linen 17他 x 13 in.

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Ellen Hill MFA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill BA, Duke University Hickory 2010 acrylic, ink, and carved birch on panel 36 x 30 in. Courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore

I work with wood because it has a warmth and history that it carries with it, and it reflects my strong respect for nature. I like that it comes out of the ground and has a textural and tactile energy to it. Typically my work involves building layers of mark making, painting, and carving images that resonate with me emotionally, and combining them over time in the studio.

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Karen Klinedinst BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art The High Meadow 2012 pigment print on bamboo-fiber paper 15 x 30 in.

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My work is a culmination of a lifelong love of walking and image making. I walk in the mountains and parks every weekend, and walk through the city throughout the week. Walking through a landscape allows me to see and feel the nuances of space, light, and time. This, in turn, influences how I photograph the landscape. My recent body of work is inspired by 19th-century romantic landscape painting, particularly the work of George Inness, and the 19th-century pictorialists, such as Alfred Stieglitz. Although my work is influenced by the romantics and the pictorialists, I use the evolving and cutting-edge technology of the iPhone to create it. All of my images are shot and processed entirely on my iPhone. It allows me to “plein air process� my emotional response to the landscape and create a neo-romantic world of my imagination.


Jacqueline Lee MFA, George Washington University BA, University of the District of Columbia The Gift 2012 fabric, colored papers, wood veneer, pencil, and paint 36 x 36 in. I work in a variety of mediums, usually collage, but for the last couple of years I’ve enjoyed creating quilts. This was not a stretch, considering I’ve been creating fabric collages for over thirty years. I also enjoy photography and jewelry design and love combining mediums in my projects.

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Freda Lee-McCann MA, University of Maryland, College Park BA, University of Maryland, College Park Turbulence 2013 mixed media 36 x 36 in. In my work, I try to depict the tranquility and peace I see and feel in nature. I am interested in both Eastern and Western art, so though my works are out of the Chinese tradition, they reflect a distinctly Western influence.

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Janet Maher MFA, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque MA, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque BS, Southern Connecticut State College Perijud 12 (Sibs) 2012 collaged book pages with oil transfer, found object, and acrylic on wood 77⁄8 x 57⁄8 x 1¼ in. My goal is to produce imagery that is intriguing on an artistic level while it disguises and, hopefully, transcends its specific content. If the works seem personally relevant to someone else, having triggered another’s surprise memory or attachment, I will feel that the cycle is complete.

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David Marion BFA, College for Creative Studies, Detroit Defense Mechanism 2011 steel, ceramic, and marine rope 11 x 32 x 28 in.

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Art is such a powerful tool of communication, and my overall goal is to give my testimony through art in hopes that it can further inspire people or help them realize the true gifts that are within them.


Julie Maynard PhD University of California, Davis MA, University of California, Davis BA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Train Wreck: No Matter What I Do 2012 paper collage 24 x 30 in.

The works on paper are collages of advertisements and illustrations torn from magazines and catalogues. Found objects often add texture and shadow lines. Many of the three-dimensional pieces begin with a shape from nature—a bird, a leaf—cut from wood. Second and third layers of wood often include one that is painted and one that is an abstract shape.

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Mike McConnell BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art From the Summer Henri Matisse Spent with David Hockney 2012 acrylic on panel 24 x 30 in. I live and work in a log cabin and barn that I’ve renovated and restored. Many of the tools and techniques I utilized working on my house are now used in my painting process. I was a freelance illustrator for more than 30 years. Since switching to fine art, I have not started a painting with any subject in mind. I paint randomly, building layers while removing and refining areas with sandpaper and single-edge razor blades. “Eventually the painting tells you what it wants.� Thank you Grace Hartigan for so eloquently saying that. While I paint intuitively, my past as an illustrator unavoidably finds its way into my paintings. They might suggest a story, but the interpretation is left to the viewer.

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Gregory McLemore MFA, University of Arizona BFA, University of North Carolina, Asheville

I consider myself to be primarily a narrative painter, most interested in finding awkward juxtapositions of concepts that do not easily mesh. My most recent project is what I am calling Ruin Porn, an infatuation with crumbling but beautiful buildings. Baltimore, a richly historic city, is riddled with abandoned buildings. Parts of this city, sadly, are post-apocalyptic.

John Woo

Baltimore Ruins VI (Skyline) 2012 oil on canvas 24 x 30 in.

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Christine Neill MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art BS, Skidmore College Flight Lines 2012 watercolor and inkjet print on paper and Plexiglas 46 x 35½ in. Nature has long been the subject of my large, mixed-media paintings. My work explores moments where plant life intersects the human world by employing natural forms as the embodiment of myth and metaphor. Anthropomorphic, atmospheric, and emotional elements meet with the analytical for overall psychological and visual effect.

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Karen Norman MFA, University of Maryland, College Park Key in Red 2012 watercolor 29 x 21 in. My work expresses the inherent beauty of creation in color, form, and pattern. My work is a reflective medium conveying my particular interpretation of the subject matter to the viewer through the medium of watercolor.

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Barbara Nuss BFA, Syracuse University Along the Canal 2012 oil on linen 14 x 18 in.

I am a realist seeking the peace and quiet of earlier times. I am fascinated by the undulating hills, the green vistas, the soft blue mountains, and the rich historic areas around me. Through both my plein air and studio paintings, I try to give an emotional response to these ever-vanishing landscapes constantly in danger of suburban sprawl.

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Kathryn O'Grady MFA, University of Texas at Austin BFA, Michigan State University Blue 2012 crayon and watercolor on paper 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore

My work is fueled by a lifelong obsession with color and awe at the monstrous complexity of the natural world. For the last several years, I have lived in rural Maryland. I am in love with the weather, the crops, the light, the dirt, the weeds. I am especially interested in the places where people’s plans for the landscape collide with the riot of life that is there to begin with. I like the silliness, the frailty, the vanity of the human marks. I like the tornado of forces at work in nature. There is so much more going on than we can say.

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Scott Ponemone MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art BA, Amherst College Two Tiers 2012 watercolor on paper 15½ x 31¾ in.

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Over a 30-year career, I have explored people in public spaces and events (standing in line, playing at the beach, marching in parades, attending museum openings, spending time at the opera during intermission, visiting the Mall in Washington) and metamorphosed pieces of cultural heritage to create entirely new images. For the past few years I’ve concentrated on the human hand, first as the conveyor of language and ideas—for instance, sign language—then as a symbol of daily human actions and interactions.


Davide Prete MA, Fontbonne University MFA, Fontbonne University Graduate degree in architecture, Università IUAV di Venezia Undergraduate degree in architecture, Università IUAV di Venezia

I have chosen to work with three-dimensional objects and with metals, in part because of my family’s tradition in metal smiting and because of my own predilections, knowledge, and feelings. I start from rigid, rigorous, geometric compositions and I end with a soft, organic shape. The process I use involves traditional techniques such as sculptural modeling in clay and wax and metalsmithing, and new technologies such as 3D modeling, 3D printing, and laser scanning. In my latest projects, mathematical equations give me a pretext for discovering a new formal language. Using toroidal warping shapes and other mathematical forms, I try to connect figurative images with this new language. Technology helps us to discover new forms of shamanism, and my sculptures are a representation of this new practice.

John Woo

Toroidal Warp in Movement 05 2012 bronze 15 x 4 x 4 in.

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Bill Schmidt BS, Cornell University The Skipjack Kathryn Docked at Chance, MD 2010 oil on stretched linen canvas 16 x 24 in.

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I have been a professional landscape painter for more than 25 years, after careers as a nuclear engineer, consultant, and president of a training firm. I developed my distinctive style of loose realism after being inspired by the French and American impressionists and the Cape Ann marine painters, such as Emile Gruppe. Other paintings feature marines from the Chesapeake Bay area, New England, the Gulf Coast, and Bermuda.


Mike Shaffer MS, Southern Illinois University BS, University of Maryland, College Park Homage to Duchamp 2009–10 metal, wood, rubber tire, and acrylic 40 x 22 x 18 in. My work is about ideas rather than things, but I use a wide variety of materials and approaches to make clear what it is I am interested in, and from a historical perspective this has turned out to be lines and linear elements. In two dimensions, lines and grids predominate, and in three dimensions I assemble non-relational objects such as pipes, boards, sticks, and construction lumber into lattices and towers and found and common objects into freestanding and wall-hung works.

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Shahin Shikhaliyev Azerbaijan State Art College Bridge 2012 oil on canvas 48 x 48 in. My recent work explores the evolutionary development of visual perception and the science of the mind. My paintings represent reality at the earliest moments of sight, the time when our eyes are just orienting toward stimulus but before objects are perceived. I am primarily concerned with the transfer of optical energy as well as the interplay between sight and other systems of the brain through which concept and meaning are derived.

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Maxine Taylor Attended University of Maryland University College; University of Maryland, College Park; Prince Georges Community College; and Napa Valley College

John Woo

Rediscover 2012 acrylic on canvas with mixed media and collage 41 x 53 in.

I have developed a personal language of visual communication intent on capturing the essence of a particular place or space or a feeling through mixed water media, canvas, and paper. My most recent works feature abstractions that focus on lines and shapes and their relationship to movement.

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John Woo

Michael Thorpe Attended Montgomery College Mussenden Temple Beach 2013 digital photograph 20 x 24 in.

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My first camera was a Kodak Brownie. In high school I started shooting and editing video, and then in college I started developing my own blackand-white stills. I’ve been carrying a digital still camera since 2004. I still shoot black-and-white and color film, and I even shoot Polaroids from time to time. I have a collection of cameras, including my daily camera, a Canon EOS 30D DSLR. But in the end, it’s not about the tools you use, it’s how you use those tools to get the image you want.


John Woo

Michael Thorpe Summer Bay Bridge 2013 digital photograph 20 x 24 in.

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Ben Tolman MFA, American University BFA, Corcoran College of Art and Design Suburbs 2012 ink on paper 78 x 50 in. I am fascinated by the juxtapositions of the mundane patterns of everyday life and the extraordinary peculiarity of life itself. While going through the repetition of everyday tasks, it is easy to forget just how strange and complex life is. In a world that’s constantly moving faster and faster, my meticulous ink drawings allow me the space to slow down and explore my circumstances.

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Darlene Towson Attended Corcoran College of Art and Design BS, University of Maryland, College Park Canaries After Matf 2012 dye-based inks on cotton, mould made paper 22 x 27 in.

I enjoy looking through the lens of my camera to capture the initial framework. I use instinct and my sixth sense—feminine intuition—to capture my images. My challenge is to deconstruct the familiar vocabulary of photography to incorporate an idea that defines and expands the recognizable photo structure yet removes the tropes that permit us to speak about the image as a photograph.

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Patricia Weneck Attended the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Vermont Spring 2011 transparent watercolor 32½ x 40 in.

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This painting started with the concept of being encircled by trees and foliage. Using a negative painting technique enabled me to convey so many colors and rhythms of the forest.


Andrew Wodzianski MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art BS, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Self Portrait as Frankenstein's Monster 2012 oil on canvas 20 x 14 in. Visual translations and identity of literary characters are a driving interest, from melancholic performance art based on MobyDick to lowbrow illustrations of Frankenstein. Regardless of medium, I consistently implement a self-portrait form.

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Sharon Wolpoff JD, American University MFA, American University BA, American University Going Home 2012 oil on canvas 34 x 34 in. I focus my investigation by painting my surroundings when they’re lit by natural light. The interplay of light and shadow can ignite the most ordinary setting, revealing an inherent beauty. This effect of the light, rather than its source, is what I’m interested in exploring.

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Ran Zeimer PhD, Hebrew University MSc, Hebrew University BSc, Hebrew University

John Woo

Dance of the Goldfish 2013 archival print 17 x 20 in.

I use digital photography to express a fascination with the rich visual messages that are found in our mundane surroundings.

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Ran Zeimer

John Woo

The Great Salt Lake from High Above 2012 archival print 30 x 18 in.

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Tanya Ziniewicz MFA, Rhode Island School of Design BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art Land 16, 17, 18 2012 oil pastel on paper 11¼ x 70½ in. My work is about observations of the subtleties of human nature, the vague shift between emergence and disappearance, and the interdependency of positive and negative space as they explain one another’s existence.

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Exhibition Checklist Anne Bouie Earth Shield #1 2011 reclaimed wood, oxidized iron, willow branches, eucalyptus pods, wool, and yarn 49 x 12 x 4 in. Testament #3 2012 foundry molds, hemp, oxidized iron, and assorted found objects 48 x 20 x 12 in. Schroeder Cherry Janus with Schedule 2011 acrylic, glass, metal, thread, and found objects on wood 46½ x 24 x 1 in. Sara Dittrich Electric Bow 2012 cherry, music wire, contact mic, amp, and cords 20 x 120 x 2 in. Steven Dobbin When Did They Stop Drawing the Battle Lines In Crayon? 2012 tins, toy soldiers, maps, wood, metal, and infused paint 15 x 15 x 5 in. Erin Fitzpatrick Elise and Lane 2011 oil on birch panel 48 x 36 in. Sean FitzPatrick Reata 1996 2012 oil and oil paint markers on canvas 48 x 48 in. 60

Richard Franklin Tornado Alley 2011 acrylic on canvas 96 x 66 in. Peter Guttmacher Paparazzi 2011 digital photographic print on metallic paper 16 x 10 in. Nicholas Harris Attic 2012 oil on linen 44 x 52¼ in. Morning Lace Light on Door 2011 oil on linen 17¾ x 13 in. Ellen Hill Hickory 2010 acrylic, ink, and carved birch on panel 36 x 30 in. Courtesy of Stephen Scott Gallery, Baltimore

Karen Klinedinst The High Meadow 2012 pigment print on bamboo-fiber paper 15 x 30 in. Jacqueline Lee The Gift 2012 fabric, colored papers, wood veneer, pencil, and paint 36 x 36 in. Freda Lee-McCann Turbulence 2013 mixed media 36 x 36 in.

Janet Maher Perijud 12 (Sibs) 2012 collaged book pages with oil transfer, found object, and acrylic on wood 77⁄8 x 57⁄8 x 1¼ in. David Marion Defense Mechanism 2011 steel, ceramic, and marine rope 11 x 32 x 28 in. Sebastian Martorana New Construction 2012 Beaver Dam marble (salvaged Baltimore City stair step) 16 x 8 x 8 in. Julie Maynard Train Wreck: No Matter What I Do 2012 paper collage 24 x 30 in. Mike McConnell From the Summer Henri Matisse Spent with David Hockney 2012 acrylic on panel 24 x 30 in. Gregory McLemore Baltimore Ruins VI (Skyline) 2012 oil on canvas 24 x 30 in. Greg Minah The Sum Total 2013 acrylic on canvas 42 in. diameter Christine Neill Flight Lines 2012 watercolor and inkjet print on paper and Plexiglas 46 x 35½ in.


Karen Norman Key in Red 2012 watercolor 29 x 21 in.

Shahin Shikhaliyev Bridge 2012 oil on canvas 48 x 48 in.

Barbara Nuss Along the Canal 2012 oil on linen 14 x 18 in.

George Smyth Braddock Project #7 2012 bromoil 16 x 20 in.

Kathryn O’Grady Blue 2012 crayon and watercolor on paper 22 x 30 in. Courtesy of Stephen Scott Gallery, Baltimore

Maxine Taylor Rediscover 2012 acrylic on canvas with mixed media and collage 41 x 53 in.

Sharon Wolpoff Going Home 2012 oil on canvas 34 x 34 in.

Scott Ponemone Two Tiers 2012 watercolor on paper 15½ x 31¾ in.

Michael Thorpe Mussenden Temple Beach 2013 digital photograph 20 x 24 in.

Ran Zeimer Dance of the Goldfish 2013 archival print 17 x 20 in.

Davide Prete Toroidal Warp in Movement 05 2012 bronze 15 x 4 x 4 in.

Summer Bay Bridge 2013 digital photograph 20 x 24 in.

The Great Salt Lake from High Above 2012 archival print 30 x 18 in.

Ben Tolman Suburbs 2012 ink on paper 78 x 50 in.

Tanya Ziniewicz Land 16, 17, 18 2012 oil pastel on paper 11¼ x 70½ in.

Bill Schmidt The Skipjack Kathryn Docked at Chance, MD 2010 oil on stretched linen canvas 16 x 24 in.

Darlene Towson Canaries After Matf 2012 dye-based inks on cotton, mould made paper 22 x 27 in.

Helen Zughaib Circle Home Beit 2013 acrylic ink on paper 30 x 30 in.

Mike Shaffer Homage to Duchamp 2009–10 metal, wood, rubber tire, and acrylic 40 x 22 x 18 in.

Patricia Weneck Vermont Spring 2011 transparent watercolor 32½ x 40 in.

Marcia Wolfson Ray Metamorphosis 2012 marsh elder, dog fennel, and vines 75 x 25 x 25 in.

Sy Wengrovitz Soundgirl Pants 2012 basswood, steel hanger, and cardboard labels 20 x 20 x 2 in. Andrew Wodzianski Self Portrait as Frankenstein’s Monster 2012 oil on canvas 20 x 14 in.

Veiled Secrets 2013 gouache and ink on board 40 x 30 in.

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UMUC ART ADVISORY BOARD Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College Michèle E. Jacobs, Chair Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Anne V. Maher, Esq., Vice Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Myrtis Bedolla Owner and Founding Director Galerie Myrtis Joan Bevelaqua Artist, Art Faculty, University of Maryland University College I-Ling Chow, honorary member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Patricia Dubroof Artist/Consultant IONA Senior Services Nina C. Dwyer Artist, Adjunct Professor of Art, Montgomery College Jeannette Glover Artist, Program Manager, Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Karin Goldstein, honorary member Collector and patron of the arts Pamela Holt Consultant Public Affairs and Cultural Policy Administration Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College Thomas Li, honorary member Chairman and CEO, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

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David Maril, honorary member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., U.S. Army Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense/Intelligence Services Lockheed Martin Information Technology

Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Past Vice Chair, honorary member Professor of Art History, Ret. College of Southern Maryland

Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc.

Dianne A. Whitfield-Locke, DDS Collector and Patron of the Arts Owner, Dianne Whitfield-Locke Dentistry

Sharon Pinder Founder and Chief Executive Officer The Pinder Group

UMUC BOARD OF VISITORS Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Executive Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt Member Emeritus President and Chief Executive Officer The Blewitt Foundation Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Senior Vice President, Operations, and Managing Principal, Ret. McKissack & McKissack David W. Bower President and Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America John M. Derrick Jr. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Karl R. Gumtow Founder and Chief Executive Officer CyberPoint International

Brig. Gen. Velma Richardson, U.S. Army, Ret. Vice President, DoD IT Programs and Special Projects IS&GS Lockheed Martin Corporation Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., U.S. Army, Ret. Member Emeritus Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Attorney at Law Wood Law Offices, LLC Joyce M. Wright Chief Claims Officer, People’s Trust Homeowners Insurance

CONTRIBUTORS Project Manager: Nichelle Lenhardt Curator: Brian Young Editors: Kate Thornton, Barbara Reed, and Sandy Bernstein Designer: Jennifer Norris Production Manager: Scott Eury Fine Arts Technician: René A. Sanjines Administrative Assistant: Denise Melvin

Michèle E. Jacobs Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Donald S. Orkand, PhD (Former Chair) Member Emeritus Founding Partner DC Ventures and Associates, LLC

14-ARTS-006 (10/13)


ABOUT UMUC

The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it.

Serving Busy Professionals Worldwide

The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

University of Maryland University College (UMUC) specializes in high-quality academic programs that are convenient for busy professionals. Our programs are specifically tailored to fit into the busy lives of those who wish to pursue a respected degree that can advance them personally and grow their careers. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 95,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 25 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

ABOUT THE ARTS AT UMUC Since 1978, University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists and brings art to the community through its own collections, which have grown to include more than 1,900 pieces of art, and special exhibitions. UMUC’s collections focus on both art by Maryland artists and art from around the world. They include the Maryland Artist Collection, the Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, the Asian Collections, the Education Collection, and the International Collection. The university’s collection of Maryland art includes approximately 2,000 works and provides a comprehensive survey of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of nearly 420 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Tang Dynasty (618–907 ad) through the 19th century—a historical reach of 13 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists.

Cover artwork details, left to right: Sean FitzPatrick, Reata 1996 Ellen Hill, Hickory (courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore) Julie Maynard, Train Wreck: No Matter What I Do Helen Zughaib, Circle Home Beit Gregory McLemore, Baltimore Ruins VI (Skyline) Ran Zeimer, The Great Salt Lake from High Above

Artworks are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The main, lower-level gallery in Adelphi is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, and the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week. More than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors come to the Adelphi facilities each year. Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo are open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibit | University of Maryland University College

UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition Presented by University of Maryland University College November 3, 2013–January 26, 2014 | University of Maryland University College | Arts Program Gallery

UMUC 2nd Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition, 2013  

Learn about the BMRE exhibition at University of Maryland University College.

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