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UMUC Arts Program Mission Statement

ABOUT THE UMUC COLLECTIONS

The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment

Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists a few miles from the nation’s capital, at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, and, more recently, at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo in Largo, Maryland. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists.

in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

UMUC’s Maryland Artists Collections include more than 1,500 artworks and constitute a comprehensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of more than 280 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Sung Dynasty (960–1279 a.d.) through the 19th century, a historical reach of 10 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks from the UMUC Maryland Artists Collections and Asian Collections are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center, which is open to the public seven days a week and is visited by more than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors each year. ABOUT UMUC UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degreegranting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to 90,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 27 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition Presented by University of Maryland University College

Cover artwork details, left to right: Caroline M. Thorington, Castor and Pollux Get Sirius Margaret Huddy, Sycamore, 8:30 a.m., April Maya Freelon Asante, Brilliant Children Edward Harris, Clouding Ashes Susan Goldman, RED HOT Michael Gross, Vision in Black #17

August 1–October 16, 2011 | University of Maryland University College | Arts Program Gallery


Welcome

Dear Patrons of the Arts,

The best reason to paint is that there is no reason to paint . . . I’d like to pretend that I’ve never seen anything, never read anything, never heard anything . . . and then make

Every time I make something I think about the people who are going to see it and every time I see something, I think about the person who made it . . . . Nothing is something . . .

important . . . so everything

While the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) Arts Program is known for its commitment to Maryland artists, I am proud that the university has been able to increase its support of artists from our region. Through the 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition, art patrons can continue to marvel at the creative spirit that flourishes in this area and comes alive at UMUC. I would like to congratulate the 54 accomplished artists who were selected to display their work at UMUC. This exhibition reaffirms the notion that while artistic expression is found in the traditional forms of painting, sculpture, and drawing, it also resonates throughout other types of art, including ceramic, fiber, found objects, and digital media. It is my pleasure to welcome you to this exhibition. I hope that you will be both encouraged and challenged by the range of diverse expression that originates in Maryland, Northern Virginia, and Washington, D.C. Thank you for your support.

is important.� Keith Haring

Sincerely,

Susan C. Aldridge, PhD President


Introduction Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

While the university has been showcasing art by renowned and emerging artists for 25 years, this exhibition is the first of it kind for the Arts Program at UMUC. The 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition (BMRE) highlights works of art by some of the area’s most talented artists. Some are new to the juried process while others are familiar with it, but all of the artists were excited about the possibility of exhibiting their works at UMUC, where they could be seen by art professionals from around the world. As a regional exhibit, the project was carefully designed to provide living artists in the region—Maryland; Washington, D.C.; and Northern Virginia—another professional environment to showcase their works. The university is proud to support these artists during these difficult economic times while exposing art patrons, students, faculty members, and staff members to a diverse body of works by a culturally diverse group of artists. The vision for this project began two years ago as a wish from David Maril, a member of the Art Advisory Board at UMUC. After many talks and project development meetings, the Arts Program exhibition committee approved the project. In March 2011, the call for entries was advertised on the Internet at www.artshow.com, a professional online service for artists and photographers that has an international audience of artists and collectors. The Arts Program also e-mailed the call for entries to approximately 2,200 artists and galleries in the region. The goal was to attract at least 100 artists to participate. Each artist could submit up to four images. The number of artists who participated exceeded our expectation. More than 320 4

visual artists submitted 1,010 works for consideration. The submissions consisted of works in all art media except video art, which was eliminated due to inadequate space for the medium. The electronic submission process enabled artists from as far as Fredericksburg, Virginia, to the outlying borders of Maryland to participate. Helen Frederick, Helen Jackson, and Evangeline J. Montgomery, all of whom have many years of art experience, agreed to take on the role of jurors, judging and selecting the works and shaping the exhibition. Thanks to the jurors’ professional eyes and objectivity, the exhibition provides a survey of art from the region—capturing historical themes and events, conceptual installation, iconic references, traditional and contemporary elements, and the environment. For more than 35 years, the Baltimore Museum of Art presented a juried exhibit, but the museum stopped presenting the show many years ago. Artists who participated in that exhibition included William “Bill” Taylor, Joseph Sheppard, John Sutton, Stephen Rosenthal, Elizabeth N. Swartz, Lorelle Raftery, John Blair Mitchell, Jack Perlmutter, Herman Maril, John C. Lewis, Reuben Kramer, Helen L. Jacobson, Amalie Rothschild, and Aaron Sopher. Today, our region hosts several juried exhibits, including The Reginald F. Lewis Museum High School Juried Art Show and the Juried Undergraduate Art Education Exhibition at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art). Each of these exhibitions is designed to attract a very specific audience of artist entrants. Now, UMUC has joined these institutions and will produce, develop, and present a juried art exhibit for artists, visitors, and the state of Maryland. This project is not a chronological assessment of art in our region but, rather, a broad look into the art being created in our communities. Each artistic approach is individualistic, and the inspiration and the voice of the works of art are personal yet powerful tools of communication. The Arts Program at UMUC is proud to present the 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition, a forum where this art can speak to a new audience.


Our Region’s Arts Landscape and UMUC’s Contributions Helen E. Jackson Juror

The Maryland region, including Washington, D.C., and Northern Virginia, is home to an amazing variety of art and a vibrant art community. An area once viewed as a tributary of New York and a place of hidebound conservatism in the arts, the Maryland region has emerged as a locus of innovation and experimentation where the arts live and thrive. Baltimore’s much-loved and highly touted art locales include the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum, among others. Washington, D.C., lays claim to world-class institutions, including the several art museums of the Smithsonian Institution and the often-overlooked Library of Congress, which actively collects, exhibits, and tours contemporary works on paper in addition to housing archival works dating back to the 15th century. With a fine print collection of more than 85,000 pieces, it is one of the largest such repositories in the nation. The District of Columbia is also home to the Phillips Collection, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Kreeger Museum, and the Art Museum of the Americas. Virginia features a number of venues, including the Torpedo Factory Art Center, Artisphere, ArtSpace Herndon, Columbia Pike Artist Studios, League of Reston Artists, and others. The area’s university museums provide exhibition venues as well. They range from the architecturally acclaimed Katzen Arts Center at American University to the Arts Program at UMUC.

Epicenters of Art in Our Region The area also hosts an impressive array of regional art centers that offer regular exhibition opportunities: Maryland Art Place in Baltimore, Strathmore in Montgomery County, Montpelier Arts Center and Harmony Hall Regional Center in Prince George’s County, and a quartet of Virginia-based incubator spaces—the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Arts Center, the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, and Artisphere in Rosslyn. While these institutions routinely provide opportunities for professional development for artists and visitors, they also actively engage in community education and outreach programming, audience development, and external training opportunities. Additionally, the area’s urban artscape is uniquely enriched through corporate and institutional support, including the collection policies of several major medical campuses, banks, and businesses, as well as those entities that also make alternative exhibition space available or underwrite arts programming activities. Local governments also play a critical role with respect to arts underwriting. The municipalities of Washington, D.C.; Alexandria, Arlington, and Baltimore, as well as adjacent counties, actively fund urban outdoor and public art projects that have added engaging spaces for public interaction and community use, which is evident in places like the Hyattsville, Maryland, arts district. The Art in Embassies program further contributes to the greater Maryland region’s wealth of art programs. A number of artists’ collectives, collaboratives, and incubator spaces, such as Goya Contemporary in Baltimore, Maryland; the Cultural Development Corporation’s Flashpoint in Washington, D.C.; and Pyramid Atlantic in Silver Spring, Maryland, have also been integral in the area’s continuously developing art landscape. These relatively new entities provide a broad range of services, from pub-

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lic education programming and exhibition access to opportunities for artistic collaboration. Many of these incubator sites also provide access to functional studio space, which is always a critical need for working artists.

While larger institutions provide exposure, professional validation, and opportunity for accelerated audience development, these community- and neighborhood-based sites provide opportunities for artists to collaborate, explore, and take risks.

In addition, in recent decades, this region has emerged as an epicenter of international, corporate, and institutional collecting, which has contributed significantly to the development of a thriving local art market. The region is enriched by the diplomatic community and numerous international agencies as well as its expanding number of ethnic enclaves. The public has the opportunity Juan Hernandez, La Biblia y las luces, 2010, oil on canvas, 44 x 38" to view art on a daily basis at local street markets, restaurants, coffee houses, and tea rooms. This daily interaction with art has created a vortex of public consciousness and enthusiasm. This expanding ethnic and cultural interface can been seen in this exhibition in the intensly evocative painting by Honduran-born Juan Hernandez, La Biblia y las luces, a dense and somber work with high emotional impact that draws the viewer into the experience.

UMUC’s Role and the BMRE Exhibition

The continuous growth of smaller, community-based, noncommercial, and experimental exhibition venues and a trend toward more culturally diverse collections offer broader access to the visual arts. 6

UMUC plays a unique role in this region’s broad and rich art landscape. Within this extraordinary, interactive system of artistic support, the university embraces scholarship, conservancy, and critical analysis. The Arts Program at UMUC is one of several within the wider state university system but one that performs a specific and critical advocacy role throughout the larger university structure. Situated on the lower level of the Inn and Conference Center at UMUC’s headquarters in Adelphi, Maryland, the Arts Program gallery offers an accessible space within a high-traffic environment and welcomes more than 100,000 visitors each year. The gallery hosts a regular rotation of professionally curated exhibitions and houses a permanent collection of more than 1,500 works. The 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition (BMRE), brought to fruition by UMUC and the leadership of its Arts Program director, Eric Key, was two years in the making. The resulting show confirms and celebrates the breadth of talent within the tristate area and underscores the university’s commitment to the local arts community. The BMRE features works by both established and emerging artists from throughout the region and showcases a diversity of styles from the formalism of traditional still life to contemporary abstraction. However, the exhibit maintains an active dialogue with the viewer. The show includes works in a broad spectrum of mediums and reflects the cultural and ethnic diversity of the region in both style and content. It includes a nod to contemporary political issues (in Lebanese-born painter Helen Zughaib’s Seen/Unseen) and


Right: Wesley Clark Welcome to the Tea Party 2011, wood, stain, screws, nails, Xerox transfer, and ceramic 12 x 11" Far right: Curtis Woody Reflection of a Dark Storm, 2011, mixed media 32 x 24 x 2"

reflects on America’s ongoing struggle with racial equity issues (in Curtis Woody’s Reflection of a Dark Storm and Wesley Clark’s Welcome to the Tea Party). Additionally, the exhibition includes virtuoso examples of traditional plein air landscapes, miniatures, color field explorations, portraits, mixed-media works, beautifully crafted prints, and drawings of precision draftsmanship. Rita Elsner’s Volley, a large-scale pastel, provides a whimsical commentary on contemporary suburban life whereas Jo Israelson’s Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace, winner of the President’s Best in Show award, is an arresting and subtly complex installation work that embodies an exquisitely crafted prayer for a world at peace. In reflecting on the final selections, I am struck by the cohesiveness of the assembled works. They all exemplify craft and intellect applied to visual expression.

The exhibition features 56 works, representing contemporary and traditional styles in multiple mediums, including painting, sculpture, drawings, mixed media, fine prints, monographs, textile, installation art, and photography. Taken in total, the collection provides a moving reflection on life’s moments of quietude, strife, struggle, joy, reflection, loss, and whimsy and introduces a group of creative artists to a new audience of art appreciaters, collectors, critics, and casual viewers.

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BRME Jurors Helen Jackson is a visual arts practitioner, teacher, writer, and curator. For more than 20 years, Jackson was owner and director of Capitol East Graphics, a Washington, D.C., gallery that specialized in the promotion of national and international artists of color. In addition, Jackson has curated a number of exhibitions in New York and Washington, D.C., including Two-on-Two at the Octagon Museum, Woman’s World/ Woman’s Mind at the Bronx Museum, and The South African Exhibit Project for the Telluride Festival of the Arts, and exhibitions at Duke University and the South Dallas Cultural Center. Jackson’s undergraduate studies include a visual arts minor and independent art studies at the Corcoran College of Art + Design and the Arts Students League of New York.

Evangeline J. Montgomery has worked tirelessly to support artists, promote their work, and facilitate their travel abroad. She has a bachelor’s degree in metal art from the California College of the Arts. She has curated more than 200 historical and fine art exhibitions. She is trained as a studio artist in contemporary craft. In the early 1980s and 1990s, she worked to ensure a place for women and African Americans in programs sponsored by the United States. She has received numerous awards, including the Outstanding Woman Artist Award from the Women’s Caucus for Art.

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Montgomery’s own work has been included in many public collections, such as the Paul R. Jones Collection at the University of Alabama, the Oakland Museum of California, the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, the James E. Lewis Museum of Art at Morgan State University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and others. Her work has been featured in African American Art and Artists by Samella Lewis, Collecting African American Art: Works on Paper and Canvas by Halima Taha, St. James Guide to Black Artists published by Thomas Riggs & Co., Afro-American Artists: A Bio-Bibliographical Directory by Theresa Cederholm, Gumbo Ya Ya: An Anthology of Contemporary African American Women Artists with an introduction by Leslie King-Hammond, and other publications.

Helen Frederick is a professor at George Mason University (GMU) in the Art and Visual Technology Department, and the division coordinator for printmaking. She received a BFA and an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. She is known internationally as a print media, book arts, and mixed-media installation artist. Since her 1996 teaching appointment at GMU, Frederick has developed and established graduate and undergraduate programs in the Washington, D.C., region that are also noted nationally. Frederick is recognized as the founder of Pyramid Atlantic, a center for contemporary collaborative projects in printmaking, hand papermaking, digital media, and the art of the book. She has received numerous awards, including the Governor’s Award for Excellence and Leadership in the Arts in Maryland; a Fulbright Fellowship; a National Endowment for the Arts award; a Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation award; and Arts and Humanities of Montgomery County awards. Her recent solo exhibitions include Indefinite States of Emergency at the Washington Printmakers Gallery in 2009 and Following the Scent at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2008.


1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition Awardees 1st PlAcE | President’s Best of show Award

5th PlAcE | Arts Program honorable Mention

Jo Isrealson Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace

Pat Dillon Eugene

2nd PlAcE | Jurors' choice Award

6th PlAcE | Arts Program honorable Mention

Andrei Kushnir Potomac Riverscape

Schroeder Cherry Generations

3Rd PlAcE | Award of Merit

JuRoR REcognitions

Amber Adams Rest

Larry Cook Camille

4th PlAcE | Arts Program honorable Mention

Rita Elsner Volley

Everitt Clark Roots, Trash, and Stream

Margaret Huddy Sycamore, 8:30 a.m., April

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“No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination.” Edward Hopper

Jo Israelson Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace 2009–2010 ceramics, ash, steel and sound 48 x 48 x 48"

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1st Place

President's Best of Show Award

Jo Israelson Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace It was the day before Mother’s Day. Bookended by the Capitol and the Washington Monument, we marched in silence. The only sounds were the steady rhythm of our feet, like a steady heartbeat, shush shush, shush shush, on the pebbled path. We walked—a small group of protesters—and then gathered to listen as names of the most recent casualties were read aloud. It was the day before Mother’s Day. I had seen her earlier, affixing a red, white, and blue banner to a pair of highly polished boots. Tending this tiny shrine, she was adding a personal note and a photograph. I averted my eyes because it seemed to be such a private moment, although it was occurring in the midst of a public protest. I didn’t know what to say to a stranger who had lost her child to war. What do you say to a mother who has lost her child to war? Nothing. You just listen. She told me about him. She gave me a poem she had written. It was hard to leave. Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace is a reflection of that day, our discussion, and her poem. Each handmade ceramic dove is an ocarina that sounds like a mourning dove. The pieces were pit fired, and the ashes from the fire form their nest. I interwove an Iraqi lullaby with the call of doves and her poem into the accompanying sound piece. “A Prayer to a Dying Son” was written by Lorene Davey for her son Seamus. KIA 21 October 2005.

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2nd Place

Jurors’ Choice Award

andrei Kushnir Potomac Riverscape 2009 oil on canvas 18 x 36" Every painting is a fight.

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3rd Place

Award of Merit

amber adams Rest 2011 Hydrocal 14 x 9 x 10" In addition to studying fine art, I also received a degree in architecture. I am driven by a fascination with materiality and creation. I am engaged in the portrayal of the body through sculpture.

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4th Place

Arts Program Honorable Mention

everitt clark Roots, Trash, and Stream 2009 gelatin silver contact print 5 x 4" I produce each contact print by hand in the darkroom. I apply to each print a potassium ferricyanide-based reducer, or “bleach,” which dissolves silver and can be used to add highlights, bring out soft details, and finely adjust the balance of the image. The resulting contact prints have a curious tonal intensity—difficult to describe but unmistakable once recognized—that the latest technology still cannot equal.

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5th Place

Arts Program Honorable Mention

Pat dillion Eugene July 2009 oil on canvas 34 x 46" Body language is important to me. Posture and facial expression can convey so much. When I am doing a portrait, my goal is to capture the personality of my subject, and I try to do that by focusing on their body language.

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6th Place

Arts Program Honorable Mention

Schroeder cherry Generations 2011 acrylic and mixed media on wood 27 x 23 x 2" As part of the Railroad Porter Series, this piece commemorates blacks who toiled on America’s railroads and managed to create for their families a middle-class lifestyle. All works are mixed media on wood and are open-ended narratives.

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honorable Mention

Juror Recognition

larry cook Camille fall 2010 digital print 20 x 24" In my portraits, I try to evoke admiration and respect for the subject from the viewer, but more importantly, an acknowledgment of the unappreciated.

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honorable Mention

Juror Recognition

Rita elsner Volley 2009 pastel on colored paper 27 x 39"

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Building on Carl Jung’s theories about the personal and collective unconscious, I believe that our imagination draws from a common pool of dreams and functions as a taproot to deeper meaning within our life experience. In my artwork, I attempt to follow this taproot and create a courtroom sketch from inside the dream pool, where cameras are prohibited.


honorable Mention

Juror Recognition

Margaret huddy Sycamore, 8:30 a.m., April 2009 watercolor on Arches paper 29½ x 41"

An ancient Sycamore tree has been my muse for the past 25 years. Inspired by Monet’s series paintings, I’ve painted it at all hours of the day from dawn to moonrise. Watercolor is my primary medium. I love the way it captures light.

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Ken abrams Evolution of Pan 2011 acrylic and oil on canvas 36 x 32" I was born in Guyana, a small nation on the northern coast of South America, and immigrated to the United States with my family when I was nine. My work represents influences from my teenage years from various periods and cultures, such as archaic art, comic books, the European Renaissance, the Americas, and Africa.

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James Adkins Turns and Leaves 2011 oil on canvas 28 x 34" My motivation to paint comes from my teaching.

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Maya Freelon Asante Brilliant Children 2010 tissue, ink mono/photo print 60 x 48" Plant seeds of positive knowledge and reap a brilliant harvest.

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Lila Oliver Asher Pictures at an Exhibition (detail)

I am most interested in people. All my works are still about them and the use of line.

2010 linoleum block print 27 x 69"

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Andrea Barnes Tall Woman, Tanzania 2010 charcoal pencil on Rives BFK paper 44 x 30" My current work is inspired by photographs that I took of Maasai women and children in Tanzania. I was impressed by what I perceived as their strong presence and self-possession. I became curious about what lay behind the fleeting expressions captured in the moment by my camera shutter. Through the process of translating these portraits into largescale drawings, I explore the boundaries between drawing and photography.

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Yonina Blech-Hermoni Head Over Heels 2011 wood-fired clay 31â „5 x 8 x 8"

I started my artistic career as a printmaker but have been a potter for the last 26 years. I hand-build and do wheel work and sculpture. I am especially intrigued by the alternative firing possibilities, such as raku, saggar, salt/sulfates/vapor, and, lately, high-fire reduction kilns using gas and wood coated with soda and salt solutions.

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Wesley Clark Welcome to the Tea Party 2011 wood, stain, screws, nails, Xerox transfer, and ceramic 12 x 11" My works on wood have an underlying psychological theme of associative recollection with the aesthetic of a “found object.” With these works, I am thinking about “object as memory”—having both a history of its own and evoking associative thoughts of our own past or the past of others. My goal is to walk the fine line between being too dictatorial or too vague, keeping just enough information to keep the viewers from getting lost and having to pave their own way through the work.

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Lesa Cook Rachel 2010 tricolored chalk 10 x 10" I consider myself a classical realist, focusing on natural forms and trying to capture the emotional reality of my subjects as well.

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Melchus davis One Way to the City 2011 oil on canvas 36 x 60"

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My art for the most part reveals types of diversity in content, though the technique and process is similar in most compositions. I have spent time in the past studying impressionism, but recently I have been focusing in the area of abstract expressionism, which involves an improvisational approach to experimenting with different processes, techniques, and mediums.


Beth de Loiselle Ornate Magnolias November 2010 oil on panel 36 x 24" I am a first-generation artist. Through my formal training, I learned the fundamentals to capture beauty, likeness, and emotion in my work. Inspired by my upbringing on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, I create works that inspire serenity and joy by using simple designs, exaggerated bright colors, temperatures, and values.

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Erin E. Fitzpatrick Caitlin 2010 oil on wood 24 x 18" I paint portraits to create the sensation of people watching. I work with the model to portray him or her in a natural state, with the intent to not only capture visual likeness, but also something of what the person is like. Depicting just the right squint, snarl, or serene expression in my painting helps the viewer know more about the subject than just how he or she looks.

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Fred Folsom Happy Birthday 2009 oil on linen 22 x 18" I paint solitary nudes. These mood studies move quietly past the nakedness to the soulful presence within. The figures are underpainted, glazed, stippled, scumbled, and carved. I admire smooth, flawless paint, but it gives me the creeps.

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Kathryn Freeman Girl with Two Dogs 2011 oil on panel 20 x 24"

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The human figure is a never-ending source of inspiration for me. In my paintings, I try to create harmonious order out of the confusion and randomness of everyday existence—order in which form and content merge to create a convincing world and a believable narrative.


Eric Garner Untitled 2011 2011 acrylic on canvas 12 x 101â „8" I have been a contributor, collaborator, and facilitator to the built environment, along the way observing the transformation of landscape to suit commercial, residential, and industrial needs. The geometry of our constructed world lends itself to constructivist abstract composition, our buildings and roads becoming two-dimensional building blocks. Our design conventions become visual patterns. Our expansion leaves a systematic imprint reflecting our values.

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Helen Glazer Angler Panorama 2 2010 pastel on archival pigment print 24 x 40"

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If we notice clouds at all, we’re probably just checking the weather. But I’ve been taking a closer look. Clouds are ephemeral, transforming and decaying as they move across the sky. When I stop the action with a digital camera and increase the tonal range with Adobe Photoshop, clouds reveal themselves as intricately textured three-dimensional forms arising from complex rhythms of flowing currents of air.


susan goldman RED HOT 2011 monotype with woodcut 20 x 20" In my recent body of monotypes and woodcuts, I am exploring flowers. The oversized blossom is a metaphor for the fullness of beauty, as a formal concern and as an aesthetic one. These shapes are derived from Victorian historical sources, and I am attempting to reform them into a fresh context.

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Michael gross Vision in Black #17 2010 acrylic on canvas 48 x 48 x 3" I have been painting and drawing for most of my life and, in recent years, making prints. These creative efforts are a means of grappling with the impulses and struggles that compose the way I see my place in the world. In a work of art I am pleased with, I have succeeded in wresting a sense of order from the chaos on an incomplete and unbalanced piece. I create the chaos and then I resolve it.

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Hans guerin Mother Earth April 2011 oil on linen mounted on panel 48 x 36" Being a sixth-generation artist gives me an opportunity to build on a strong legacy while injecting my own conscious connection to the observable world. Although I come from a long line of illustrators, painters, sculptors, and fine art instructors, I create my art not out of obligation, but from passion, a need to present my thoughts and skills.

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Bill Harris Female African Deity 2011 wood and canvas 40 x 50 x 4" My work is an homage to iconic figures—real and imagined.

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Edward Harris Clouding Ashes 2010 acrylic on paper 72 x 48" In creating a piece, there is often a tension caused by the difference of the marks more heavily influenced by thought and those influenced by impulse. This is not a tension that necessarily needs to be resolved. Spontaneous gestures themselves will result in rhythmic forms that, once present, can be developed or expanded upon in a multitude of ways. The question of how to make these into a final work can be answered with the broadest of solutions, which is to simply guide one’s impulse without blocking its essence.

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Juan Hernandez La Biblia y las luces 2010 oil on canvas 44 x 38" Evangelical revivals are common in the poor neighborhoods of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, where churches are numerous. The usually abstract and distant salvation preached to people offers few or no practical answers to the very palpable problems of poverty and violence that permeate these neighborhoods. In consequence and ironically, such problems just seem emphasized.

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Carrie Hill The Flood 2009 oil on masonite with gilt frame 28½ x 27" My work is a theatrical compilation of people, objects, and scenery that I have encountered in my everyday life as well as my travels. Their interaction takes one into an irrational world that, through gravity, space, and scale, feigns a seemingly physical reality.

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Sheep Jones House Hive 14 2011 oil and wax on wood 24 x 24" Courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore

My paintings begin with layers. From my past work in watercolor and wax, I’ve held onto the opportunities that mixing transparent colors offers. Layers add extra interest, leaving swatches of colors in their wake. I always am looking for the puzzle pieces to suggest a narrative. The thing is, all people have stories. Often, they will look at one of my paintings and recognize in it their own story, their own past, their own dreams.

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Eric Kalbfleisch Locust Point Trainyards II 2010 acrylic on canvas 30 x 40"

I like to paint scenes that interest me visually and where the emotional weight might not be obvious at first. I want my work to convey wonder with the painting process and the forms around us.

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Doris Kennedy Phase Space III 2011 oil on canvas 30 x 40"

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My paintings visually intuit energy dynamics. My current works are of the changing energy of spirit as expressed through portraiture. One woman’s image, painted at varying phases of space and time, will show itself to be actually defiant of time and chronology. Instead, her image will be reflective of and answerable only to the energy of her spirit as it moves through its vulnerabilities and strengths. As I capture such energies on canvas, I am continuing my journey within the construct of “Intuitive Realism.”


Viola leak Black and White Portrait 2011 silkscreened felt 24 x 17" My work is a layering process of many experiences and types of media. I work predominately on paper and fabric. Silk-screening appliquĂŠ and painting are media that I often combine or use separately. I begin with a concept and allow the work to evolve, creating its own life.

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Allen linder Man Following the Forms

Man Pushing Through

2010 marble, bronze, pewter, silver, and ivory inlay 21 x 13 x 7"

2010 marble, bronze, pewter, jade, and ivory inlay 25 x 16 x 8"

I make sculptures that tell the stories from my life. They are guideposts that indicate places I have been. I don’t need to look far to find these stories. They are the ongoing narratives so often overlooked while in heated pursuit of life itself. They lie within the stillness of my being.


Matthew J. McConville Silver Pot/Landscape 2011 oil on canvas 16 x 14" The painting is inspired by the land art movement of the mid-20th century, painted in a similar manner to the Hudson River School. The work also references the earlier painting traditions seen in Netherlandish and Spanish still lifes.

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Gregory G. McLemore Baltimore Street Art 2011 oil on canvas 30 x 40"

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The Baltimore street paintings are views of neglected, dilapidated row houses. I have always been fascinated with the beauty of decay, especially in regards to its effects on architecture. Fortunately for me, Baltimore abounds with such ruinous treasures. The contrast between the geometrically planned original structures and the organic nature of their demise is striking.


Christine Neill Persephone’s Lament 2010 watercolor and archival inkjet print on paper 23½ x 43½"

Nature has long been the subject of my large mixed-media paintings. The immediate and illusive transparency of watercolor and the contemporary digital processes I use appropriately express the unseen ephemeral states of nature. I use light and shadow, vivid and rotting color, and familiar and menacing shapes to compare tenuous natural activities similar to human events. This is a reminder that all individuals have a deep-rooted connection to the Earth and that similar biological processes bind the natural and human worlds. 49


lisa Orton Hmong Woman 2009 pastel 26½ x 18½" I really love working with pastels. Most of my subject matter so far is from my foreign travels—interesting people in different cultures and wild animals while on safari. This pastel has a different story. On one of my brother-in-law Tri’s visits back to Vietnam, he went into the hill country and met people from several tribal groups. My Hmong woman was one of them. She had such a wonderful great grandma expression, I had to paint her.

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Iris Posner Old Friend April 2011 etching 10 x 8" Remembering our old and beloved vehicles that have served us long and well.

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Preston Sampson Making Big Rocks into Little Rocks 2009 mixed media on paper 16 x 12" Color is the primary focus of my work, and it delivers the image. This is evident in the intuitive flow as its interactions with paper of canvas surface. These surfaces, in the form of raw canvas of paper void of pigment, are deliberate trails to remind the eye that what it is seeing is a creation from scratch, and that the trail exists from concept to creation.

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James singewald 515–517 Old Town Mall, East Baltimore 2009 color pigment print 40 x 30" My photography serves as a document of American cities and the changes they have seen through history. My images expose what most of our cities have become since the early 20th century and a harsh reality of how much neglect has taken place in the past 60 years. My intent is not only to show the negative effects of this environment, but also to show a glimpse of how beautiful cities like Baltimore and Philadelphia once were by exposing a raw type of beauty in their present condition. I consider my photography a portrait of a city and the history its content reveals.

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George L. Smyth Determined 2010 bromoil print 8 x 10"

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The "extras" refers to those individuals who play such roles in the movie of my life. I have no interaction with them, I do not hear their conversations, they remain in the background. However, their lack of presence would be disquieting, and I need them to help complete my story. Although they remain at a distance, each extra has their own successes and failures, worries about the future and care for loved ones, and a life as complete as my own. Just as they are extras in the movie of my life, I serve the same purpose for them.


Hillary Steel Turbulence/Peace 2009 ikat and shibori dyeing, hand weaving, and cotton 29 x 20" Employing complex woven structures and resist dye techniques that alter the cloth surface, I suggest the complexities and repetitiveness of life, nature, overlapping experiences of generations, and the struggles and resolutions that are common to us all. I have been learning for 30-plus years, and the medium of textiles and the intimacy with materials that it demands from an artist continue to be satisfying and challenging.

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Anthony E. stellaccio Domestic Article #2 (dogs) 2010 porcelain, wood, and Formica 42 x 49 x 8½" In my ceramic artwork, I have always dealt with tensions, harmonies, and metaphorical dichotomies that I express through visual and processual contrasts. Thus, the tension between the organic and the inorganic, making cadenced shifts between modulation and variation, and a search for the musicality of contrasts have always been at the core of my vocabulary as an artist.

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Caroline M. thorington Castor and Pollux Get Sirius 2009 hand-pulled color lithograph 16½ x 21½"

I am enchanted by the animate and the double entendre. I enjoy making images that are not exactly what they seem.

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Shannon M. townsend Apartment K (1) 2010 charcoal on paper 30 x 40"

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The interior of a room can also reflect the interior of a person. Each object in the room reveals information about the figure, leading the eye to many possibilities on its walk through the portrait. A stormy air flows through, leaving ghost tracks and objects out of place. The young woman’s apartment is uncertain and changing, while she keeps steady. Moments pass quickly, yet each can contain illustrious information that is regarded as ordinary. The gestural quality of charcoal on paper leaves a residue of impermanence, like the space created in Apartment K.


gwynneth Vanlaven Asphalta Angelica 2010 archival inkjet on enhanced matte 24 x 36"

Dis/appearance 2011 archival inkjet on enhanced matte 24 x 36" My camera work explores ideas of motion and stillness in photography and in life. A camera is said to capture, or freeze an action in time and space. I use photography to unfreeze, in order to create from wreckage something new. The images open an exploration of the shifts in our lives that bring everyone close to vulnerability and to each other.

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James von Minor Semaphore 2009–2010 oil on wood with objects 48 x 32" There are simple objects and mechanical processes that tend to be overlooked despite their presence in day-to-day activities. I use these as a starting point for most of my constructed works, both for the fact that they are easily ignored and for their silent quality.

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Sy Wengrovitz Shirt Off My Back 2010 basswood with steel hanger 31 x 24 x 4" Carving is an exciting activity that gives me an opportunity to be creative and make items from wood that are spiritual, peaceful, and just plain fun to look at. My recent sculptures involve carving clothing and placing them in specific settings.

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Andrew K. Wodzianski House VIII 2009 white titanium oil on tinted canvas 30 x 84"

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Paintings from the House series depict altered stills from the 1959 film House on Haunted Hill. Interior sets are treated with white velaturas on pastel grounds. The passive and tonal color schemes belie the narrative’s environmental setting of treachery and greed.


Curtis Woody Reflection of a Dark Storm 2011 mixed media 32 x 24 x 2" The beauty of mixed-media art is the flexibility it offers to start with things around you and expand from there. As a mixed-media painter, I juxtapose these visual elements into a language of moods and reactions that allow for the viewer’s own interpretations. The meaning of the attached elements often becomes clearer to me as they are assembled. The result is a continual search for balance between spontaneity and historical relevance. Because of the multi-layering, it is my expectation that the creation becomes a thoughtful, spiritual, interesting, sensitive, and ongoing experience for the viewer.

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Helen Zughaib Seen/Unseen 2011 gouache and ink on board 40 x 30" I was born in Lebanon and feel that my Middle Eastern background allows me to approach the experiences I have in America in a unique way. As an Arab American, I remain an observer of both cultures, an outsider looking in. I hope through my work to encourage dialogue and bring understanding and acceptance between the people of the Arab world and the United States.

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Exhibition Checklist Ken Abrams Evolution of Pan 2011 acrylic and oil on canvas 36 x 32" Amber Adams Rest 2011 Hydrocal 14 x 9 x 10" James Adkins Turns and Leaves 2011 oil on canvas 28 x 34" Maya Freelon Asante Brilliant Children 2010 tissue, ink mono/photo print 60 x 48" Lila Oliver Asher Pictures at an Exhibition 2010 linoleum block print 27 x 69" Andrea Barnes Tall Woman, Tanzania 2010 charcoal pencil on Rives BFK paper 44 x 30" Yonina Blech-Hermoni Head Over Heels 2011 wood-fired clay 31 â „5 x 8 x 8"

Schroeder Cherry Generations 2011 acrylic and mixed media on wood 27 x 23 x 2" Everitt Clark Roots, Trash, and Stream 2009 gelatin silver contact print 5 x 4" Wesley Clark Welcome to the Tea Party 2011 wood, stain, screws, nails, Xerox transfer, and ceramic 12 x 11" Larry Cook Camille fall 2010 digital print 20 x 24" Lesa Cook Rachel 2010 tricolored chalk 10 x 10" Melchus Davis One Way to the City 2011 oil on canvas 36 x 60" Beth de Loiselle Ornate Magnolias November 2010 oil on panel 36 x 24"

Pat Dillon Eugene July 2009 oil on canvas 34 x 46" Rita Elsner Volley 2009 pastel on colored paper 27 x 39" Erin E. Fitzpatrick Caitlin 2010 oil on wood 24 x 18" Fred Folsom Happy Birthday 2009 oil on linen 22 x 18" Kathryn Freeman Girl with Two Dogs 2011 oil on panel 20 x 24" Eric Garner Untitled 2011 2011 acrylic on canvas 12 x 101 â „8" Helen Glazer Angler Panorama 2 2010 pastel on archival pigment print 24 x 40"

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Susan Goldman RED HOT 2011 monotype with woodcut 20 x 20"

Margaret Huddy Sycamore, 8:30 a.m., April 2009 watercolor on Arches paper 29½ x 41"

Michael Gross Vision in Black #17 2010 acrylic on canvas 48 x 48 x 3"

Jo Israelson Dovecote: 365 Prayers for Peace 2009–2010 ceramics, ash, steel, and sound 48 x 48 x 48"

Hans Guerin Mother Earth April 2011 oil on linen mounted on panel 48 x 36"

Sheep Jones House Hive 14 2011 oil and wax on wood 24 x 24"

Courtesy of Steven Scott Gallery, Baltimore

Bill Harris Female African Deity 2011 wood and canvas 40 x 50 x 4"

Eric Kalbfleisch Locust Point Trainyards II 2010 acrylic on canvas 30 x 40"

Edward Harris Clouding Ashes 2010 acrylic on paper 72 x 48"

Doris Kennedy Phase Space III 2011 oil on canvas 30 x 40"

Juan Hernandez La Biblia y las luces 2010 oil on canvas 44 x 38"

Andrei Kushnir Potomac Riverscape 2009 oil on canvas 18 x 36"

Carrie Hill The Flood 2009 oil on masonite with gilt frame 28½ x 27"

Viola Leak Black and White Portrait 2011 silkscreened felt 24 x 17"

Allen Linder Man Following the Forms 2010 marble, bronze, pewter, silver, and ivory inlay 21 x 13 x 7" Allen Linder Man Pushing Through 2010 marble, bronze, pewter, jade, and ivory inlay 25 x 16 x 8" Matthew J. McConville Silver Pot/Landscape 2011 oil on canvas 16 x 14" Gregory G. McLemore Baltimore Street Art 2011 oil on canvas 30 x 40" Christine Neill Persephone’s Lament 2010 watercolor and archival inkjet print on paper 23½ x 43½" Lisa Orton Hmong Woman 2009 pastel 26½ x 18½" Iris Posner Old Friend April 2011 etching 10 x 8"


Preston Sampson Making Big Rocks into Little Rocks 2009 mixed media on paper 16 x 12"

Caroline M. Thorington Castor and Pollux Get Sirius 2009 hand-pulled color lithograph 16½ x 21½"

Sy Wengrovitz Shirt Off My Back 2010 basswood with steel hanger 31 x 24 x 4"

James Singewald 515–517 Old Town Mall, East Baltimore 2009 color pigment print 40 x 30"

Shannon M. Townsend Apartment K (1) 2010 charcoal on paper 30 x 40"

Andrew K. Wodzianski House VIII 2009 white titanium oil on tinted canvas 30 x 84"

George L. Smyth Determined 2010 bromoil print 8 x 10"

Gwynneth VanLaven Asphalta Angelica 2010 archival inkjet on enhanced matte 24 x 36"

Hillary Steel Turbulence/Peace 2009 ikat and shibori dyeing, hand weaving, and cotton 29 x 20"

Gwynneth VanLaven Dis/appearance 2011 archival inkjet on enhanced matte 24 x 36"

Anthony E. Stellaccio Domestic Article #2 (dogs) 2010 porcelain, wood, and Formica 42 x 49 x 8½"

James von Minor Semaphore 2009–2010 oil on wood with objects 48 x 32"

Curtis Woody Reflection of a Dark Storm 2011 mixed media 32 x 24 x 2" Helen Zughaib Seen/Unseen 2011 gouache and ink on board 40 x 30"

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UMUC Art Advisory BoArd Michèle E. Jacobs, Chair Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Anne V. Maher, Esq., Vice Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, PhD Art Historian I-Ling Chow, honorary member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Paula Cleggett Associate Director for Policy, The Curb Center Vanderbilt University Linda Derrick Collector and Patron of the Arts Patricia Dubroof Artist/Consultant IONA Senior Services Karen Goldstein, honorary member Art Collector Juanita Boyd Hardy Director, Millennium Arts Salon Managing Principal Tiger Management Consulting Group, LLC Sharon Smith Holston, Past Chair Artist’s Representative and Co-owner Holston Originals Pamela Holt Consultant Public Affairs Administration John K. Jacobs President Artex Fine Art Services Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Philip Koch Maryland Artist Professor, Maryland Institute College of Art

Michèle E. Jacobs Managing Director Special Events at Union Station

Thomas Li, honorary member Chairman and CEO, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

Leronia A. Josey, Esq. Attorney at Law Law Office of Leronia Josey

David Maril, honorary member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation

Donald S. Orkand, PhD, Former Chair Founding Partner DC Ventures and Associates, LLC

Harriet E. McNamee Art Historian University of Maryland University College

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense and Intelligence Systems Lockheed Martin Information Technology

Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Past Vice Chair Professor of Art History College of Southern Maryland

UMUC BoArd of visitors Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Executive Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

Sharon Pinder Founder and Chief Executive Officer The Pinder Group

Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College

Brig. Gen. Velma Richardson, Ret. Vice President, DoD IT Programs and Special Projects IS&GS Lockheed Martin Corporation

Richard F. Blewitt President and Chief Executive Officer The Blewitt Foundation

Donald Shepard Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. AEGON N.V.

Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Vice President of Administration McKissack & McKissack

Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., Ret. Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff

David W. Bower President and Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America

William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Wood Law Offices, LLC

Stephen A. Burch, JD Chairman of the Board of Directors University of Maryland Medical System John M. Derrick Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Israel Feldman President Feldman & Associates

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Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc.

CoNtriBUtors Project Manager: Donna Grove Curator: Brian Young Editor: Kate McLoughlin Designer: Jennifer Norris Production Manager: Scott Eury Fine Arts Technician: René A. Sanjines Administrative Assistant: Denise Melvin


UMUC Arts Program Mission Statement

ABOUT THE UMUC COLLECTIONS

The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment

Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists a few miles from the nation’s capital, at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, and, more recently, at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo in Largo, Maryland. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists.

in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

UMUC’s Maryland Artists Collections include more than 1,500 artworks and constitute a comprehensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of more than 280 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Sung Dynasty (960–1279 a.d.) through the 19th century, a historical reach of 10 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks from the UMUC Maryland Artists Collections and Asian Collections are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center, which is open to the public seven days a week and is visited by more than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors each year. ABOUT UMUC UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degreegranting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to 90,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 27 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

Cover artwork details, left to right: Caroline M. Thorington, Castor and Pollux Get Sirius Margaret Huddy, Sycamore, 8:30 a.m., April Maya Freelon Asante, Brilliant Children Edward Harris, Clouding Ashes Susan Goldman, RED HOT Michael Gross, Vision in Black #17

yland University College | Arts Program Gallery

UMUC 1st Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition, 2011  

Learn about the BMRE exhibition at University of Maryland University College.

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