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ANNE McLAUGHLIN

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

FACULTY ART INVITATIONAL

2016

Breaking Away, no date, mezzotint-style etching, 14 x 14 inches

ALL THAT’S ART MAY 8–JULY 31, 2016

ARTS PROGRAM | UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


2016 ALL THAT’S ART MAY 8–JULY 31, 2016


Š 2016 University of Maryland University College. All rights reserved. Copyright credits and attribution for certain illustrations are cited internally proximate to the illustrations. ISBN 13:978-0-9842265-0-4 ISBN-10: 0-98442265-0-8


Katherine Lambert

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear Patrons of the Arts, Every year, University of Maryland University College (UMUC), through its Arts Program, is

privileged to showcase the work of some of Maryland’s most distinguished artists. Now, it is a

special honor to highlight the talents of some of our own—artists who teach at UMUC or other institutions within the University System of Maryland—in the Faculty Arts Invitational 2016.

These faculty members embody the creative fire within our institutions, and they share their passion by working to equip the next generation of visual artists, designers, and graphic designers with the tools they need to achieve professional and personal success.

The Faculty Arts Invitational 2016 offers these artists—and their invited guests—a showcase for their fine art. It also serves to remind us of the importance of art in our communities.

No matter what subject they teach, these faculty members share information, perspective, appreciation, history, and criticism with their students. These students share their insights in return, and the resulting exchange shapes the future—of the arts and of our nation.

The Faculty Arts Invitational 2016 is curated by Joan Bevelaqua—a UMUC adjunct faculty

member who deserves special recognition for her service to our students, her deep involve-

ment in the arts community, and her efforts on behalf of the artists represented here. Through this exhibition, the remarkable talents on display are shared with a broader community— wholly consistent with UMUC’s mission of extending educational opportunities across Maryland and around the world.

Many thanks to Ms. Bevelaqua, to the staff and board members of the UMUC Arts Program,

to all of the educators whose work is on display—and special thanks to you for your interest in and support of the arts. Sincerely,

Javier Miyares President

University of Maryland University College 3


Steven Halperson

DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT

Faculty members who engage students from year to year are the backbone of every

educational institution. Faculty members who teach art within the USM are as important as

those who provide instruction in any other academic field. These artists are training the next generation of artists. They impart their knowledge of a certain aspect of the art discipline

to students. Whether they are teaching literary art, dance, visual art, or performing art, art

professors give their students the tools and abilities to produce works that push the creative envelope or detail a narrative of daily life. In the visual arts, these narratives are portrayed in paintings, drawings, mixed media, photography, videography, and sculpture.

An artist once said to me that art is nothing but a creative process to express one’s state

of mind and that those who have the ability to create such works broaden viewers’ minds.

After further discussion, we concluded that art is an essential part of the cultural fiber of the world and has been part of the development of every society since early humans provided a glimpse into their lives through the drawings they left on cave walls. Today, we celebrate

art and artists as tools of societal well-being. Communities with arts programs and students engaged in art are generally healthier communities in which to live. Universities and col-

leges with arts programs produce creative thinkers and problem solvers as a result of their students’ exposure to some aspect of art.

The Faculty Art Invitational 2016 at UMUC is a product of the Arts Program and presents the creative expressions of artists who are faculty members within the USM along with invited guest artists from the community and surrounding colleges. It is a broad representation encompassing diverse styles, mediums, and theatrical approaches. Each work by each

artist presents a unique dialogue for the viewer. More importantly, this exhibition provides a venue for artists in our community to showcase their works. It also recognizes them as

professional artists who deserve respect and the attention of a larger audience. Many thanks to Joan Bevelaqua, an adjunct professor of art at UMUC, an artist, and a devoted participant

in the field, who knows many of the artists in this exhibition and who served as guest curator for this project. Eric Key

Director, Arts Program

University of Maryland University College

4


Tracey Brown

CURATOR’S STATEMENT

This year’s Faculty Art Invitational celebrates the recent achievements of artist/faculty members from Maryland’s public universities and community colleges by exhibiting their latest works in the UMUC Arts Program Gallery.

Today’s teaching artists serve as the first point of contact for many students who are major-

ing in art or graphic communication or who simply wish to explore their creative talents. As

teachers, these artists give students the guidance they need to become art practitioners, no matter what the students’ artistic ambitions may be. As artists, they devote time and energy

to their own body of work. There is often a struggle between becoming an excellent instructor and developing an artistic body of work, not only because of the time needed for both but also because the demands and challenges are so different.

A favorite author of mine, Joyce Carol Oates, who teaches writing at Princeton University, wrote about teaching and being a writer in A Widow’s Story: A Memoir. Much of what

she wrote can also be applied to teaching art and being an artist. To paraphrase Oates, “Teaching art is an act of communication.”

Henry Adams wrote, “A teacher attains a kind of immortality because one never knows

where a teacher’s influence ends.” There are tangible rewards with teaching students to think, evolve, and stretch their imaginations. I have received e-mails and been thanked

by students for providing fundamentals, assigning creative work, and giving constructive feedback. The rewards as an artist, however, can be elusive. And while teaching is by nature a communal activity, working alone in a studio is the opposite.

To recognize Maryland’s teaching artists’ commitment to art, their students, and their profession, UMUC is proud to exhibit their most recent artworks at this year’s Faculty Art Invitational.

Joan Bevelaqua

Guest Curator, Adjunct Faculty Member

University of Maryland University College

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Clayton Lang, Bowie State University, Tale of All Tails (detail)


FEATURED ARTISTS

JAMES ADKINS

MATT KLOS

JOAN BEVELAQUA

DAVID LABROZZI

ED BROWN

CLAYTON LANG

JOSEPH P. CASSAR

LINDSAY McCULLOCH

MATT SMITH CHAVEZ

ANNE McLAUGHLIN

DUSTIN DAVIS

TRACE MILLER

JESSICA C. DAVIS

NARE RATNAPALA

MICHEL S. DEMANCHE

DING REN

SUSAN DODGE

DANIEL RIESMEYER

NINA CHUNG DWYER

BROOKE ROGERS

COLLEEN FITZGERALD

JOHN RUPPERT

JAMES FITZSIMMONS

STUART STEIN

CHRISTOPHER HARRINGTON

NORA STURGES

PETER HERZFELD

FAHIMEH VAHDAT

BRADLEY HUDSON

SARAH WEGNER

THEODORE JOHNSON


JAMES ADKINS GUEST ARTIST

Passages

2014, oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches

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I paint the nude figure, which has long been a traditional

subject, but I consider myself a contemporary artist. The nude has symbolized the human condition; been used as allegory; and portrayed gods, heroines, victims, or objects of desire. I like to reference this past and other artists.


My paintings are based on observation. I have always

JOAN BEVELAQUA

I also employ images that explore the psychological and

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

enjoyed challenging myself to create an illusion of the real. subconscious nature of reality to express what cannot be seen. Through my work I attempt to search for personal themes that have universal and archetypal meanings.

Myth of Possession #4 2015, oil on canvas 41½ x 35¾ inches

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ED BROWN SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Wave II

2014, charcoal

27½ x 39½ inches

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My interests in beginning a drawing or painting are formal,

but I hope the end results are expressive of an emotional or spiritual state. My drawings begin as an exploration of line, value, and space. I am drawn to line. When I first look at a work of art, I look more at the lines on the surface than at the overall form.


I am interested in the language of color, forms, shapes, and textures.

JOSEPH P. CASSAR UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Balancing Act I

2015, acrylic on canvas 32 x 32 inches

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Symbol and referent 3 (detail)

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MATT SMITH CHAVEZ

For this series, I photographed studio materials on which I’ve

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

used processes that are decidedly nonarchival—in this case,

silk-screened fabric that will eventually disintegrate because

Symbol and referent 3

it has been soaked in bleach. As these materials become

print mounted on Sintra

once abstract fetishized art objects that are inherently

no date, archival inkjet

archival inkjet prints, they take on hybrid properties: at

11 x 12 inches

nonreferential and photographs that are indexical archives of something destined for the waste bin.


My goal is to create artwork by using found objects and arranging the objects so they visually relate to

one another in a simple and direct way. I integrate a conceptual attitude in each piece and use the title to influence the viewer’s perception.

DUSTIN DAVIS FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

Games We Play

2014, mixed media 18 x 8 x 6 inches

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JESSICA C. DAVIS SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

After Cartona

2016, etching with alcohol, ink overlay, 14 x 11 inches

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This new series of anatomical screen prints on layered glass and vellum, along with a series of etchings with

translucent alcohol ink overlays, are a modern take on

medical references of the High Renaissance period, with prints being the most common visual.


UP2 is a response to another print (UP1) that evokes

MICHEL S. DEMANCHE

or falling?

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

memories for me of 9/11. It is ambiguous. Is he jumping

UP2

2015, edition 1 of 5, silver gelatin print 18 x 18 inches

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SUSAN DODGE FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

Quadrants.Untitled

no date, oil on paper

and pastel, 18 x 20 inches

As my work evolves, so do the sources that inspire my

work. Some influences, however, remain constant. Images and readings relating to Native American cultures and

mythologies inspire me. Initial ideas about spiritual rituals

and the structure of the night sky used as both an allusion to protection and as a visual framework surface time and again in subtle ways. Other influences are formal and process-related or relate to the landscape of family

structures, mothers and daughters, and growth. It is

important for me to challenge myself and to have my work continually move forward.

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These works are part of a series of prints inspired by

formations of wooden sticks used for erosion control in a

wildlife refuge. The works seek to create a visual musicality from the rhythm of the lines, the geometry of their forms,

the tension between natural and man-made elements, and the echo of the images by their reflections.

NINA CHUNG DWYER MONTGOMERY COLLEGE

Passacaglia

2015, silkscreen print on Arches 88

17 x 23 inches

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COLLEEN FITZGERALD

Becoming reflects the notion that the self is not a fixed

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

entity but rather one that exists in a perpetual state of flux. The series echoes the paradoxical notion that creation

Becoming (Detail C)

often arises from destruction.

2015, pigment print 10 x 8 inches

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I have a desire to understand my place in a tradition that was

JAMES FITZSIMMONS

for nature and the mystery of life. However, I also want to

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

born in the Renaissance, which includes a holistic reverence speak to my time as a modern artist steeped in the tradition

of painting, with the ability to create the world as it might be; to understand the underlying need for doing so; and to be sympathetic to the desire to express this need with paint in

Coffee Maker #1

2015–16, oil on board 60 x 48 inches

the twenty-first century.

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CHRISTOPHER HARRINGTON

My objects blur the line between painting and sculpture.

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

By using iridescent pigments, pumice, acrylic polymers,

and resins, I attempt to create works that are dynamic from

Echoes

a distance but that also have many secrets that are revealed

no date, mixed media (resin and pigment) 30 x 24 inches

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only on close inspection.


These images represent my journey toward minimalism.

The added process of laser etching accentuates my desire to break boundaries within art and myself.

PETER HERZFELD FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

Mom Cop Mom (triptych) 2016, laser-engraved

shina plywood, 3 pieces 18 x 12 inches each

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BRADLEY HUDSON

As an artist, printmaker, and illustrator, I like to make works

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

that tell a story. I am currently creating Star Wars illustrations for Topps, and each one depicts a little portion of the Star

Dita Von Doom

Wars universe.

2014, acrylic on canvas 36 x 24 inches

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For me, painting is a mechanism to process and meditate

THEODORE JOHNSON

surroundings. It is also a way to imagine, construct,

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

on systems and to respond to immediate and far-flung and recollect.

Clippings

2015, oil on canvas 21½ x 21½ inches

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MATT KLOS

My Fort Howard painting project depicts abandoned Veterans

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administration structures located on federal land in Sparrows Point, Maryland. The paintings objectively combine formal

Fort Howard #15

aspects of drawing and color while subjectively asking

48 x 48 inches

protections afforded historic homes on the national registry.

2014, oil on panel

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questions about federally owned property and the care and


The primary focus of my work for the past nine years has

DAVID LABROZZI

of perceived motion on the static picture plane. On an

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

been centered around understanding the phenomena

abstract level, my paintings are designed to manipulate the physiological state of the viewer.

San Francisco Cyclist #2 2015, oil on linen 34 x 38 inches

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Tale of All Tails (detail)

CLAYTON LANG BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY

Tale of All Tails

2014, leather and mixed media, 58 x 64 inches

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I work in leather because it allows me to pursue my dual

interests in painting (color) and sculpture (form). In addition, the organic nature of leather seems appropriate in my

quest to describe the spirit or life force embodied in all living things.


The paintings and prints in my Interference series are created

LINDSAY McCULLOCH

specific places and events. Layers of digitized interference

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

through a complex interweaving of images sourced from are then superimposed over the images to simulate the

gradual distortion of memory through the passage of time.

Degeneration/Regeneration 2014, oil on panel 24 x 42½ inches

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ANNE McLAUGHLIN

My goal is to look for designs, colors, and patterns in nature

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

and interpret them beyond realism to the two-dimensional world of a print—finding the essence of a familiar object

Protecting the Nest

through intimacy. Printmaking to me is a challenge that

14 x 14 inches

with limitless avenues of experimentation.

no date, reduction woodcut

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forces a freedom in style by its lack of control combined


The black-and-white line abstractions here are intended to capture the fractal nature of the forest as a playful underlying grid for storing nature’s bountiful source of energy.

TRACE MILLER TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Entanglement

2014, oil on vellum on panel 42 x 36 inches

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NARE RATNAPALA UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Corresponding Quantity 22 no date, acrylic on canvas 48 x 38 inches

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Evolving thoughts and a sequence of expressions are

documented in visuals to capture a moment in the process.


inverted world (detail)

DING REN UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE EUROPE

inverted world

2015–16, series of 15 digital C-prints

from 35mm analog film, plastic sleeve 64 x 6 inches

I use a field-driven approach to examine cross-cultural

patterns at the junction between the foreign and the familiar. Instead of exploring obvious patterns, I am interested in the ones that are subtle and nuanced—traces in the topography and geography. My photographs are meant to show a

connectedness with the immediate environment as well

as express an interest in emotions and the human condition.

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DANIEL RIESMEYER

As a painter, fidelity to perception (to both my outer and

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

inner worlds) is my chief concern. I think this is one of the most beautiful aspects of artistic expression—a painting

Night Logic

can come from a very personal interior space while saying

2015, oil on canvas 24½ x 20½ inches

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something that transcends our limited scope.


I trace my painting roots to two important movements at the tail end of late modernism: pop art and minimalism. My minimalist bent comes from the flat Atlantic horizon, while the pop influences were the characteristic look of

the surfing industry in the 1980s and the sparkling imagery of the boardwalk amusements in Ocean City, Maryland,

BROOKE ROGERS SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Overhead

2015, acrylic on canvas 36 x 36

where I grew up.

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JOHN RUPPERT

I am inspired by the pull of gravity, the fiery origins of rock, the

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

persistence of erosion, the splintering power of lightning, and the slow roll of the earth as we travel through space. A stone

Fissure with Yellow Sky

presents a story of geological time, dating back billions of years

photograph, 92 x 32 inches

Similarly, the subjects in my work invariably show traces of their

2015, composite

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preceding human history and will endure well beyond our time. own making, whether formed by nature or by me.


My process is based on the development of a specific

representational context for a period of painterly study.

The representational structure is a reference that enables the artist to evaluate all aspects of process in relation to something concrete and understood, at least to some degree. I often use historical imagery because of the

cultural context it occurs in and the potential for a painting

STUART STEIN TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Win Man Win

2015, oil and charcoal on canvas

34 x 30 inches

to create an arena that is open for the viewer on a number of levels. The imagery provides a mixture of historical, cultural, textural, and even photographic density that

hopefully provides the viewer with a basis for rich interaction.

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NORA STURGES TOWSON UNIVERSITY

of paintings of the least architecturally adventurous areas

Mattress

of the building I work in. At first glance generic, the

fiberboard, 8 x 10 inches

human construction and use.

2015, oil on medium-density

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Mattress is one of the paintings in The Building, a series

off-white, cinder block hallways are enlivened by their


Like many Iranian artists living in exile, I speak through

FAHIMEH VAHDAT

language. Symbolism shows up in my work not only as imagery

HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

symbolism embedded in the rich tapestry of the Persian

but as an inherent part of the installation, in the materials I use

in the traditional and nontraditional processes of printmaking,

painting, and drawing. I usually incorporate interactive artwork and performance pieces within exhibition spaces. My work confronts female oppression and human rights abuses,

especially in Iran, as well as throughout the Middle East and

Adelabad Prison, Shiraz, Iran Freedom Series, 2015–16 oil, print, ink, fabric, and collage on wood panel 90 x 48 x 3 inches

the United States. As an Iranian-American Baha’i artist in exile,

my work also addresses the experience of “in-between-ness” as Eastern and Western ideals merge and separate.

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SARAH WEGNER

My sculpture gives physical form to psychological states,

PRINCE GEORGE’S COMMUNITY COLLEGE

choices and treatment of materials.

Pain

circa 2012, steel, found objects, and ram skull 64 x 24 x 24 inches

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which are revealed through the poses and through the


FEATURED INSTITUTIONS

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SALISBURY UNIVERSITY TOWSON UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

MONTGOMERY COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

PRINCE GEORGE’S COMMUNITY COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE EUROPE


EXHIBITION LIST James Adkins Guest Artist Passages 2014, oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches Vanitas 2015, oil on canvas 36 x 36 inches Joan Bevelaqua University of Maryland University College Myth of Possession #1 2015, oil on canvas 32 x 36 inches Myth of Possession #4 2015, oil on canvas 41½ x 35¾ inches Ed Brown Salisbury University Wave II 2014, charcoal 27½ x 39½ inches Wave III 2014, charcoal 27½ x 39½ inches Joseph P. Cassar University of Maryland University College Balancing Act I 2015, acrylic on canvas 32 x 32 inches Balancing Act II 2015, acrylic on canvas 32 x 32 inches

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Matt Smith Chavez University of Maryland University College

Michel S. Demanche University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Symbol and referent 3 no date, archival inkjet print mounted on Sintra 11 x 12 inches

UP1 2015, edition 1 of 5, silver gelatin print 18½ x 18½ inches

Symbol and referent 4 no date, archival inkjet print mounted on Sintra 13 x 12 inches

UP2 2015, edition 1 of 5, silver gelatin print 18 x 18 inches

Symbol and referent 5 no date, archival inkjet print mounted on Sintra 11 x 12 inches

Susan Dodge Frostburg State University

Dustin Davis Frostburg State University

Postcards: Alternative Latitudes no date, monoprint, collage, and pastel 20 x 36 inches

Games We Play 2014, mixed media 18 x 8 x 6 inches Value Added 2016, mixed media 24 x 5 x 3 inches Jessica C. Davis Salisbury University After Cartona 2016, etching with alcohol, ink overlay 14 x 11 inches The Resulting Portrait 2016, screen priston on vellum with light pad 14 x 11 inches

Quadrants.Untitled no date, oil on paper and pastel 18 x 20 inches Nina Chung Dwyer Montgomery College Crescendo 2015, silkscreen print on Arches 88 23 x 17 inches Passacaglia 2015, silkscreen print on Arches 88 17 x 23 inches Rondo I 2015, silkscreen print on Arches 88 17 x 23 inches


Colleen Fitzgerald University of Maryland University College

Bradley Hudson University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Becoming (Detail C) 2015, pigment print 10 x 8 inches

Dita Von Doom 2014, acrylic on canvas 36 x 24 inches

James Fitzsimmons Anne Arundel Community College

Murray 2015, watercolor on paper 14 x 11 inches

Clayton Lang Bowie State University Tale of All Tails 2014, leather and mixed media 58 x 64 inches Lindsay McCulloch Anne Arundel Community College

Coffee Maker #1 2015–16, oil on board 60 x 48 inches

Theodore Johnson Anne Arundel Community College

Degeneration/Regeneration 2014, oil on panel 24 x 42½ inches

Pumpkin Stack 2014–15, oil on board 48 x 32 inches

Clippings 2015, oil on canvas 21½ x 21½ inches

Interference IV 2014, screen print on Arches 88 9 x 16 inches

Christopher Harrington University of Maryland Eastern Shore Echoes no date, mixed media (resin and pigment) 30 x 24 inches Radioactive Toy 2014, mixed media (resin and pigment) 24 x 24 inches Peter Herzfeld Frostburg State University Mom Cop Mom (triptych) 2016, laser-engraved shina plywood, 3 pieces, 18 x 12 inches each

Receipt 2015, oil on canvas 40 x 50 inches Matt Klos Anne Arundel Community College Fort Howard #11 2014, oil on panel 24 x 24 inches Fort Howard #15 2014, oil on panel 48 x 48 inches

Anne McLaughlin University of Maryland University College Breaking Away no date, mezzotint-style etching, 14 x 14 inches Protecting the Nest no date, reduction woodcut 14 x 14 inches Trace Miller Towson University

David Labrozzi University of Maryland University College

Entanglement 2014, oil on vellum on panel 42 x 36 inches

Las Vegas #1 circa 2015, oil on linen 30 x 44 inches

Mandelbrot’s Premise (diptych) 2014, oil on canvas, 2 pieces, 30 x 40 inches each

San Francisco Cyclist #2 2015, oil on linen 34 x 38 inches

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Nare Ratnapala University of Maryland University College

John Ruppert University of Maryland, College Park

Sarah Wegner Prince George’s Community College

Corresponding Quantity 22 no date, acrylic on canvas 48 x 38 inches

Column 2016, basalt and cast iron 7½ x 4 x 3 inches

The Things I Did For You circa 2015, steel, found objects, and bronze 65 x 30 x 20 inches

Ding Ren University of Maryland University College Europe Lungs 2015, series of 15 digital C-prints from 35mm analog film, plastic sleeve 64 x 6 inches inverted world 2015–2016, series of 15 digital C-prints from 35mm analog film, plastic sleeve 64 x 6 inches Daniel Riesmeyer Anne Arundel Community College Night Logic 2015, oil on canvas 24½ x 20½ inches View of Dinan from Lehon 2015, oil on canvas 21 x 19 inches Brooke Rogers Salisbury University Hometown 2015, acrylic on canvas 36 x 36 Overhead 2015, acrylic on canvas 36 x 36

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Fissure with Yellow Sky 2015, composite photograph 92 x 32 inches Stuart Stein Towson University Win Man Win 2015, oil and charcoal on canvas 34 x 30 inches Nora Sturges Towson University Mattress 2015, oil on mediumdensity fiberboard 8 x 10 inches Table with Gloves 2015, oil on mediumdensity fiberboard 7 x 8¾ inches Fahimeh Vahdat Howard Community College Adelabad Prison, Shiraz, Iran Freedom Series, 2015–16 oil, print, ink, fabric, and collage on wood panel 90 x 48 x 3 inches Aylan Kurdi, the Drowned Syrian Refugee Boy 2016, oil, print, ink, and collage on wood panel 7½ x 4 x 3 inches

Pain circa 2012, steel, found objects, and ram skull 64 x 24 x 24 inches


UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, includ-

ing members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it.

The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational

opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in

academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedi-

cated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

CONTRIBUTORS DIRECTOR, ARTS PROGRAM: Eric Key

CURATORS: Eric Key, Jon West-Bey, Joan Bevelaqua EDITORS: Sandy Bernstein, Barbara Reed

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL PROJECTS: Cynthia Friedman DESIGNER: Jennifer Norris

PROJECT MANAGER: Laurie Bushkoff PRODUCTION MANAGER: Scott Eury

FINE ARTS TECHNICIAN: René A. Sanjines

ARTWORK PHOTOGRAPHY: pages 12, 15, 16, 18–19,

21, 25, 27, 31–33, 34, and 36–38 supplied by the artist; all others by John Woo

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UMUC ART ADVISORY BOARD Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College Anne V. Maher, Esq., Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, Honorary Member Art Historian Myrtis Bedolla, Vice Chair Owner and Founding Director Galerie Myrtis Joan Bevelaqua Artist, Art Faculty University of Maryland University College Schroeder Cherry, EdD Artist, Adjunct Professor of Museum Studies Morgan State University I-Ling Chow, Honorary Member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Nina C. Dwyer Artist, Adjunct Professor of Art Montgomery College Karin Goldstein, Honorary Member Collector and Patron of the Arts Juanita Boyd Hardy, Honorary Member Executive Director CulturalDC Sharon Smith Holston, Honorary Member Artist’s Representative and Co-Owner, Holston Originals Pamela G. Holt Consultant Public Affairs and Cultural Policy Administration Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

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Thomas Li, Honorary Member Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

David W. Bower Sr. Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America

David Maril, Honorary Member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation

Karl R. Gumtow Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer CyberPoint International, LLC

Terrie S. Rouse Executive Director, Georgetown Heritage, and President, Rouse Consulting

Anne V. Maher, Esq. Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP

Christopher Shields Director, NASDAQ.com Business Operations Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Honorary Member Professor Emerita of Art History College of Southern Maryland Dianne A. Whitfield-Locke, DDS Collector and Patron of the Arts Owner, Dianne Whitfield-Locke Dentistry

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., U.S. Army, Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense/ Intelligence Services Lockheed Martin Information Technology Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc.

Sharon Wolpoff Artist and Owner Wolpoff Studios

Sharon R. Pinder President and Chief Executive Officer Capital Region Minority Supplier Development Council

Elizabeth Zoltan, PhD Senior Director, School Support, Connections Education

Brig. Gen. Velma L. Richardson, U.S. Army, Ret. President, VLR Consulting

UMUC BOARD OF VISITORS Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Chairman of the Board CyberSpa, LLC Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt, Member Emeritus Managing Partner, R&B Associates, and President, The Blewitt Foundation Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Senior Vice President, Operations, and Managing Principal, Ret. McKissack & McKissack

Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., U.S. Army, Ret., Member Emeritus Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Founder Wood Law Offices, LLC Joyce M. Wright Senior Consultant Fitzgerald Consulting

Cover artwork: Theodore Johnson Anne Arundel Community College Receipt, 2015, oil on canvas 40 x 50 inches

16-ARTS-010


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programs that are convenient for busy professionals. Our programs are specifically tailored to fit into the demanding lives of those who wish to pursue a respected degree that can

advance them personally and grow their careers. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of class-

room and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 80,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student

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ABOUT THE ARTS PROGRAM AT UMUC Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and

Maryland artists at its headquarters in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for

emerging and established artists and brings art to the community through special exhibitions and its own collections, which have grown to include more than 2,800 pieces of art.

UMUC’s collections focus on both art by Maryland artists and art from around the world.

They include the Maryland Artist Collection, the Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, the Asian Collections, the Education Collection, and the International Collection. The university’s

collection of Maryland art includes approximately 2,000 works and provides a comprehensive survey of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of

nearly 420 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Tang

dynasty (618–907 AD) through the 19th century—a historical reach of 13 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists.

Artworks are on display throughout the College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center at

UMUC and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The main, lower-level gallery in Adelphi is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, and the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard is open to

the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week. More than 75,000 students, scholars, and

visitors come to the Adelphi facilities each year. Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo are open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


ANNE McLAUGHLIN

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

FACULTY ART INVITATIONAL

2016

Breaking Away, no date, mezzotint-style etching, 14 x 14 inches

ALL THAT’S ART MAY 8–JULY 31, 2016

ARTS PROGRAM | UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

UMUC Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition, 2016  

Learn about the exhibition "All That's Art" at University of Maryland University College.

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