Page 1

EMERGING SPRING 2015 Vol. 9, No. 2


From the Dean – Thank You

Patrick O’Leary

As we begin the New Year, I wanted to let you know that after nearly two decades as a dean, I’ve decided to step down as dean of the College of Design. It has been the privilege of a lifetime to work alongside our faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends; and to see the college expand to offer a comprehensive range of design programs, foster interdisciplinary projects and research, and serve as a hub for public interest design. The stories featured in this issue serve as terrific examples of just the type of community-engaged and socially responsible design work our college undertakes. From our historic preservation students’ oral history project about the site of one of south Minneapolis’s largest racial showdowns (page 12), to our apparel students’ work with the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport to design culturally appropriate active wear for East African girls (page 4), our College’s impact is wide ranging,

of Dayton Hudson Land-Grant Chair in Urban Design and director of the University’s Metropolitan Design Center. I believe that design has an especially important role to play in imagining and implementing the cities of the future. Our metro areas are encountering dramatic changes— demographic shifts, environmental stresses, and economic disparities. We need to rethink many of the 20t- century systems that have come to the end of their useful life. This is the work I’ll be undertaking in my new role, in conjunction with metro-area partners and grant makers I’m pleased to be leaving my deanship with the College in great shape, financially strong, and with abundant opportunity and promise on the horizon. Follow the College of Design online, or look to this fall’s issue of Emerging for all of the latest on our college and the leadership transition. Thank you for everything you do to support the College of Design. With eternal gratitude, Tom Fisher Professor and Dean College of Design Learn more at z.umn.edu/emg15a.

While I’m stepping down as dean, I’m pleased to be staying at the University. This summer I will assume the positions

EMERGING FALL 2015 VOL. 9, NO. 2 EDITORS

DEPARTMENT HEADS

by researching ongoing and emerging issues, exploring new knowledge, and addressing and solving real-world problems, all while adhering to socially responsible, sustainable, and collaborative design thinking.

DESIGNER

COLLEGE OF DESIGN ADVISORY BOARD

Emerging is published fall and spring semesters by the University of Minnesota College of Design for alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of the college. This publication is available in alternative formats upon request. Please call 612-626-6385.

Anna Jursik and Trevor Miller Jenny Parker (M.F.A. Design ’12)

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kelsey Daly and Warren Bruland

COPY EDITOR

Sharon Grimes

COLLEGE LEADERSHIP

Thomas Fisher, dean; Gail Dubrow, associate dean for academic affairs; Renee Cheng, associate dean for research; Kate Maple, assistant dean for student services; Trevor Miller, director of external relations; Kathy Witherow, chief of staff

2 EMERGING SPRING 2015

Missy Bye, Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel; Kristine Miller, Department of Landscape Architecture; Marc Swackhamer, School of Architecture Stuart Ackerberg, Michael Alexin, Maurice Blanks, Roberta Bonoff, Nedret Butler, Ann Birt, Bill Chilton, Jay Cowles, Pat Cummens, Jo Davison, Kelly Gage, Mary McNellis, Tom Meyer, Sandy Morris, David Mortenson, Dave Norback, Paul Reyelts, Mark Swenson, Gary Tushie, Burt Visnick, and XiaoWei Ma

OUR MISSION

Through a unique commitment to creativity and advancing technologies, the College of Design at the University of Minnesota leads, innovates, and educates in the full range of design fields

Keep in Touch

Here are five (free) ways you can support the College of Design. You’ll expand your professional networks, enhance college visibility, and improve curent student experiences. • Share your career news and acomplishments. • Let us know when your contact info changes. • Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. • Recommend us to future design students. • Post job and internship opportunites. Lori Mollberg Director of Alumni Relations 612-625-8796 lmollber@umn.edu

Community Innovation Along the St. Louis River The Bush Foundation awarded a Community Innovation Grant to Creating a Sustainable and Equitable Future for the St. Louis River Corridor. The project team—the Design Duluth Collaborative (Landscape Architecture and Architecture), St. Louis River Alliance, and the Duluth Local Initiatives Support Corporation—aims to develop a creative, resilient, community-driven future for the diverse neighborhoods along the St. Louis River in Duluth, MN. z.umn.edu/emg15b

Zach Curtis External Relations Assistant 612-626-6385 zbcurtis@umn.edu

Support Design

Giving does many things for the College of Design. Find out how you can support • student achievement • community impact • research that makes a difference Mark Hintz Director of Development 612-624-7808 mihintz@umn.edu

facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

Christopher Scholl Major Gifts Officer 612-624-1386 scholl@umn.edu

instagram/umndesign

Table of Contents

Send address changes to design@umn.edu. Emerging is available online at design.umn.edu/emerging. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

4

On the cover: Table in Paul Reyelt’s Minneapolis home. Meet Paul and his wife Mary on page 8. design.umn.edu

7

8

10

12

14 COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 3


From the Dean – Thank You

Patrick O’Leary

As we begin the New Year, I wanted to let you know that after nearly two decades as a dean, I’ve decided to step down as dean of the College of Design. It has been the privilege of a lifetime to work alongside our faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends; and to see the college expand to offer a comprehensive range of design programs, foster interdisciplinary projects and research, and serve as a hub for public interest design. The stories featured in this issue serve as terrific examples of just the type of community-engaged and socially responsible design work our college undertakes. From our historic preservation students’ oral history project about the site of one of south Minneapolis’s largest racial showdowns (page 12), to our apparel students’ work with the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport to design culturally appropriate active wear for East African girls (page 4), our College’s impact is wide ranging,

of Dayton Hudson Land-Grant Chair in Urban Design and director of the University’s Metropolitan Design Center. I believe that design has an especially important role to play in imagining and implementing the cities of the future. Our metro areas are encountering dramatic changes— demographic shifts, environmental stresses, and economic disparities. We need to rethink many of the 20t- century systems that have come to the end of their useful life. This is the work I’ll be undertaking in my new role, in conjunction with metro-area partners and grant makers I’m pleased to be leaving my deanship with the College in great shape, financially strong, and with abundant opportunity and promise on the horizon. Follow the College of Design online, or look to this fall’s issue of Emerging for all of the latest on our college and the leadership transition. Thank you for everything you do to support the College of Design. With eternal gratitude, Tom Fisher Professor and Dean College of Design Learn more at z.umn.edu/emg15a.

While I’m stepping down as dean, I’m pleased to be staying at the University. This summer I will assume the positions

EMERGING FALL 2015 VOL. 9, NO. 2 EDITORS

DEPARTMENT HEADS

by researching ongoing and emerging issues, exploring new knowledge, and addressing and solving real-world problems, all while adhering to socially responsible, sustainable, and collaborative design thinking.

DESIGNER

COLLEGE OF DESIGN ADVISORY BOARD

Emerging is published fall and spring semesters by the University of Minnesota College of Design for alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of the college. This publication is available in alternative formats upon request. Please call 612-626-6385.

Anna Jursik and Trevor Miller Jenny Parker (M.F.A. Design ’12)

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kelsey Daly and Warren Bruland

COPY EDITOR

Sharon Grimes

COLLEGE LEADERSHIP

Thomas Fisher, dean; Gail Dubrow, associate dean for academic affairs; Renee Cheng, associate dean for research; Kate Maple, assistant dean for student services; Trevor Miller, director of external relations; Kathy Witherow, chief of staff

2 EMERGING SPRING 2015

Missy Bye, Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel; Kristine Miller, Department of Landscape Architecture; Marc Swackhamer, School of Architecture Stuart Ackerberg, Michael Alexin, Maurice Blanks, Roberta Bonoff, Nedret Butler, Ann Birt, Bill Chilton, Jay Cowles, Pat Cummens, Jo Davison, Kelly Gage, Mary McNellis, Tom Meyer, Sandy Morris, David Mortenson, Dave Norback, Paul Reyelts, Mark Swenson, Gary Tushie, Burt Visnick, and XiaoWei Ma

OUR MISSION

Through a unique commitment to creativity and advancing technologies, the College of Design at the University of Minnesota leads, innovates, and educates in the full range of design fields

Keep in Touch

Here are five (free) ways you can support the College of Design. You’ll expand your professional networks, enhance college visibility, and improve curent student experiences. • Share your career news and acomplishments. • Let us know when your contact info changes. • Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. • Recommend us to future design students. • Post job and internship opportunites. Lori Mollberg Director of Alumni Relations 612-625-8796 lmollber@umn.edu

Community Innovation Along the St. Louis River The Bush Foundation awarded a Community Innovation Grant to Creating a Sustainable and Equitable Future for the St. Louis River Corridor. The project team—the Design Duluth Collaborative (Landscape Architecture and Architecture), St. Louis River Alliance, and the Duluth Local Initiatives Support Corporation—aims to develop a creative, resilient, community-driven future for the diverse neighborhoods along the St. Louis River in Duluth, MN. z.umn.edu/emg15b

Zach Curtis External Relations Assistant 612-626-6385 zbcurtis@umn.edu

Support Design

Giving does many things for the College of Design. Find out how you can support • student achievement • community impact • research that makes a difference Mark Hintz Director of Development 612-624-7808 mihintz@umn.edu

facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

Christopher Scholl Major Gifts Officer 612-624-1386 scholl@umn.edu

instagram/umndesign

Table of Contents

Send address changes to design@umn.edu. Emerging is available online at design.umn.edu/emerging. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

4

On the cover: Table in Paul Reyelt’s Minneapolis home. Meet Paul and his wife Mary on page 8. design.umn.edu

7

8

10

12

14 COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 3


Carrot… Sushi? What do knife skills and flavor pairings have to do with design? More than you might think. Barry Kudrowitz’s (Product Design) recent study, the Chef as a Designer, interviewed locally recognized chefs and visited their kitchens to understand their creative processes. Professor Kudrowitz found that chefs and designers use a number of the same techniques— including ideation, sketching, and testing—to develop and deliver innovative products. This fall, he’s coteaching design principles through the medium of food with Professor Zata Vickers (Food Science and Nutrition) and a number of local chefs. z.umn.edu/emg15d

A community-research collaboration led by Elizabeth Bye (D.H.A. department head, Apparel, Ph.D ’90), Nicole LaVoi (Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport), Chelsey Thul (Pediatrics), and Fatimah and Salma Hussein (Girls Initiative in Recreation and Leisurely Sport) is creating

4 EMERGING FALL 2014

culturally appropriate active wear for middle school athletes. Last fall, apparel design undergraduates led small groups of East African girls in developing the design criteria–long sleeves, covered heads, torsos covered to the knees, and plenty of pink. This fall, Kira Erickson (B.S. ’14 Apparel) and Mee Jekal (Apparel) sewed the garments in wicking fabrics with high stretch and recovery. The girls modeled the first round of designs for their parents. Erickson reported positive feedback and noted that in addition to looking great, the

Taking Functional Urbanism to the Streets Streetscape Lab 2014, a pilot program fostering design engagement within an urban setting, took two courses off campus this summer to build and test prototypes in downtown Minneapolis. Students in Thomas Oliphant’s (B.Arch ’88) Furnishing the Pedestrian Streetscape and James Wheeler’s (Architecture, B.S. Arch ’03, M.Arch ’07) Architecture Design workshop developed prototypes for pop-up spaces and street furnishings.

Culturally Appropriate Active Wear Only one-third of adolescents meet the surgeon general’s exercise recommendations. And ethnic minority girls, including those in the Twin Cities East African community, are the least physically active adolescents. One design solution? Striped pink tights.

Natural Meets Modern in WAM Windows

garments provide freedom of movement. “The women keep pulling up their skirts, saying ‘‘we don’t have to do this anymore’!”

Illuminating the Connection Between Education and Industry

The Tucker Center determined the girls’ baseline activity level, and will survey them after they’ve received their outfits to see how it affects the type and frequency of their exercise. Their long-term goal is to design a uniform approved by the Minnesota State High School League, so the girls can play for their high school teams.

Students in Abimbola Asojo’s (Interior Design) Lighting Design class created lamps from reclaimed materials for the Groovystuff by Design: Connecting Education with Industry Challenge. Groovystuff showcases student entries at High Point Market and includes the best-selling designs in their catalog. z.umn.edu/emg15e Megan Ziesmer’s Tangled Table Lamp won the industry professional’s popular vote.

FOX 9 interviewed the girls and their coach. Watch the story at z.umn.edu/emg15c. facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

design.umn.edu

After refining them with feedback from the Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District and their partners, the students used the city streets as a lab to field-test their designs. Working right in the city provided the opportunity to listen, observe, propose, build, and study furnishings within the pedestrian streetscape. Both classes worked out of the Streetscape Lab, a storefront/workshop/laboratory in City Center. z.umn.edu/emg15f

This fall, retail students in Eunju Yoon’s (Retail Merchandising) Visual Merchandising class designed window displays for the Weisman Art Museum gift shop. The theme? Made in Minnesota—a nod to the University’s fall campaign and Midwestern maker culture. The winning team—Emily Lowe, Maddie Blake, and Keegan Brown—were inspired by our state’s natural beauty, the visual feel of the WAM shop, and an Anthropologie retail display of tie-dyed T-shirts. To create a similar feel with less weight and a lower cost, the team dyed and painted coffee filters, then strung them together. “Natural Meets Modern” showcases locally made crafts and products, while staying connected to the modern feel of the shop. z.umn.edu/emg15g

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 5


Carrot… Sushi? What do knife skills and flavor pairings have to do with design? More than you might think. Barry Kudrowitz’s (Product Design) recent study, the Chef as a Designer, interviewed locally recognized chefs and visited their kitchens to understand their creative processes. Professor Kudrowitz found that chefs and designers use a number of the same techniques— including ideation, sketching, and testing—to develop and deliver innovative products. This fall, he’s coteaching design principles through the medium of food with Professor Zata Vickers (Food Science and Nutrition) and a number of local chefs. z.umn.edu/emg15d

A community-research collaboration led by Elizabeth Bye (D.H.A. department head, Apparel, Ph.D ’90), Nicole LaVoi (Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport), Chelsey Thul (Pediatrics), and Fatimah and Salma Hussein (Girls Initiative in Recreation and Leisurely Sport) is creating

4 EMERGING FALL 2014

culturally appropriate active wear for middle school athletes. Last fall, apparel design undergraduates led small groups of East African girls in developing the design criteria–long sleeves, covered heads, torsos covered to the knees, and plenty of pink. This fall, Kira Erickson (B.S. ’14 Apparel) and Mee Jekal (Apparel) sewed the garments in wicking fabrics with high stretch and recovery. The girls modeled the first round of designs for their parents. Erickson reported positive feedback and noted that in addition to looking great, the

Taking Functional Urbanism to the Streets Streetscape Lab 2014, a pilot program fostering design engagement within an urban setting, took two courses off campus this summer to build and test prototypes in downtown Minneapolis. Students in Thomas Oliphant’s (B.Arch ’88) Furnishing the Pedestrian Streetscape and James Wheeler’s (Architecture, B.S. Arch ’03, M.Arch ’07) Architecture Design workshop developed prototypes for pop-up spaces and street furnishings.

Culturally Appropriate Active Wear Only one-third of adolescents meet the surgeon general’s exercise recommendations. And ethnic minority girls, including those in the Twin Cities East African community, are the least physically active adolescents. One design solution? Striped pink tights.

Natural Meets Modern in WAM Windows

garments provide freedom of movement. “The women keep pulling up their skirts, saying ‘‘we don’t have to do this anymore’!”

Illuminating the Connection Between Education and Industry

The Tucker Center determined the girls’ baseline activity level, and will survey them after they’ve received their outfits to see how it affects the type and frequency of their exercise. Their long-term goal is to design a uniform approved by the Minnesota State High School League, so the girls can play for their high school teams.

Students in Abimbola Asojo’s (Interior Design) Lighting Design class created lamps from reclaimed materials for the Groovystuff by Design: Connecting Education with Industry Challenge. Groovystuff showcases student entries at High Point Market and includes the best-selling designs in their catalog. z.umn.edu/emg15e Megan Ziesmer’s Tangled Table Lamp won the industry professional’s popular vote.

FOX 9 interviewed the girls and their coach. Watch the story at z.umn.edu/emg15c. facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

design.umn.edu

After refining them with feedback from the Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District and their partners, the students used the city streets as a lab to field-test their designs. Working right in the city provided the opportunity to listen, observe, propose, build, and study furnishings within the pedestrian streetscape. Both classes worked out of the Streetscape Lab, a storefront/workshop/laboratory in City Center. z.umn.edu/emg15f

This fall, retail students in Eunju Yoon’s (Retail Merchandising) Visual Merchandising class designed window displays for the Weisman Art Museum gift shop. The theme? Made in Minnesota—a nod to the University’s fall campaign and Midwestern maker culture. The winning team—Emily Lowe, Maddie Blake, and Keegan Brown—were inspired by our state’s natural beauty, the visual feel of the WAM shop, and an Anthropologie retail display of tie-dyed T-shirts. To create a similar feel with less weight and a lower cost, the team dyed and painted coffee filters, then strung them together. “Natural Meets Modern” showcases locally made crafts and products, while staying connected to the modern feel of the shop. z.umn.edu/emg15g

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 5


Peek into student life on Instagram @umndesign. Teach Something Different This fall, Brad Hokanson (Graphic Design, B.Arch ’76, Ph.D ’00) taught the largest class at the University of Minnesota. More than 50,000 people from 191 countries signed up for Creative Problem Solving. These weren’t typical design students: 40 percent are from emerging economies, more than two-thirds hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree; and more than half work full-time. By teaching a MOOC (massive online open course) through Coursera.org, he’s introduced the College of Design to a new audience. His assignments challenged students to eat, taste, wear, and say “something different.” A majority of students who completed the class were confident that it increased their creativity and would contribute to their professional growth. Professor Hokanson tapped into a growing demand for design MOOCs. In January 2014, Coursera had 6 million members. By December that number had jumped to 10 million. Hokanson imagines this audience would also be interested in design thinking, typography, or an in-depth look at the Goldstein’s next exhibition. Listen to Hokanson talk MOOCs with MPR’s “Daily Circuit” at z.umn.edu/emg15h.

Join the conversation @UofMDesign.

Designers and planners are focused on downtowns today as a hub of activity—and not just during the regular 9-to-5 weekday hours. Peoples’ perceptions of downtowns have changed as well. Today, they are designed as safe, clean, sustainable, and, most importantly, walkable.

Alex Heid St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Heid is working on a feasibility analysis to locate a new building on the lab’s waterfront site and helping with early research and design for a new Renewable Energy Park.

Jody Rader City of Minneapolis, Department of Long-Range Planning Rader is collecting data and making maps to create a collaborative public realm framework.

Rachel Burand Trust for Public Land Burand is researching the need for new types of public spaces and making maps to enable public engagement.

By digging deep into specific questions and collaborating with neighborhoods, the Department of Landscape Architecture’s research assistants (RAs) in practice are redefining the relationship between classrooms and communities.

Their projects range from researching policy to field-testing bike connectivity, always with an emphasis on data-driven decision-making and community engagement. For example, facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Miya Kessler Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources Kessler is developing a pollinator outreach campaign and a resilient landscape initiative. Lindsay Hawks St. Paul Riverfront Corporation Hawks is researching workshop structure, engagement tactics, and health-focused design to inform a workshop for municipal leaders on how the built environment could improve their communities’ health.

Boots on the Ground

The graduate students work directly with nonprofit organizations and government agencies with advice from faculty on research issues and methods. “The students’ landscape architecture training has equipped them with strong science, design, and communication skills that have resulted in innovative and effective technical resources that are guiding on-the-ground efforts,” said Dan Shaw, vegetation specialist/landscape ecologist at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources.

Murphy (interviewed on page 11) has advanced the University and his professions through service on six University boards since 1996 and 13 industry boards and organizations since 1973. And as an award-winning educator, mentor, and adjunct faculty member for 26 years, his efforts have supported countless emerging design and business professionals. z.umn.edu/emg15j

6 EMERGING SPRING 2015

Tallman: Northside is the chosen home for the people who are there. And the “problems” of Northside are in part the product of design. It’s not a pretty truth, but it is a truth that will have to be reconciled if we’re going to prioritize equity as the fulcrum of our city building.

Nate Gandrud City of Minneapolis, Department of Long-Range Planning Gandrud is making maps and building databases to visualize current planning and design projects.

Ted Johnson (’82), pictured above, received an Outstanding Achievement Award for his extraordinary work bringing his two passions—design and computer science— into a long-lasting and innovative partnership. A pioneering software developer and entrepreneur, he credits three years in the School of Architecture for inspiring his drive to merge aesthetics and function. z.umn.edu/emg15i

Despite living and working half a world away in Istanbul, Turkey, the Butlers are among the most enthusiastic and devoted members of our University community. They have served the University as energetic ambassadors, advisers, and hosts; and opened the doors to Istanbul for nearly 100 students and faculty. By leading and funding the Istanbul Learning Abroad Center, they’ve given the University a permanent and unique presence in Turkey.

Shannon Sawyer Mayo Clinic—Rochester Sawyer is researching design and planning models for destination medical cities.

I see mapping as a way to edit all of the inputs that we experience in the world (formal, systematic, experiential) into a simple way to identify connections, overlaps, and gaps. This RAship has further reinforced and caused me to think more critically about the audiences for the maps that we make.

Alumni Receive UMAA Honors

Nedret and Mark Butler (both B.A. Arch ’72 and B.Arch ’73) and Richard Murphy (B.L.A. ’75, B.E.D. ’75, M.B.A. ’86) received Alumni Service Awards.

Chris Tallman and Sarah Havosh Minneapolis Parks Foundation and Juxtaposition Arts Tallman and Havosh are researching, designing, mapping, and writing to better connect north Minneapolis to the Mississippi River.

design.umn.edu

they’re helping the Minneapolis Parks Foundation develop multicultural perspectives. Executive director Tom Evans explained that “as we envision the next generation of parks along the Mississippi River between north and northeast Minneapolis, the RA’s are helping us connect more deeply to the communities on either side of the river. It’s a powerful partnership that provides an understanding of the vital role design plays in shaping our communities for years to come.”

The RAs apply the skills and knowledge they gain during the program throughout their careers. Colleen O’Dell (M.L.A./M.U.R.P. ’11) explained that her assistantship at Metro Blooms gave her the chance “to practice professional writing; to network with local municipal partners and watershed management districts; and to build understanding of municipal project complexities, funding systems, and operations.”

The opportunity to gain professional experience while in school attracts talented students. Matthew Traucht (M.L.A. ’13), now a project manager at the Cultural Landscape Foundation, noted that “one of the things that drew me to the University of Minnesota was the strong focus on service learning opportunities where I would have the chance to explore practical and professional applications of landscape architecture in addition to the design, theory, and history emphases that would comprise the classroom sessions.”

Now in its third year, the program has a broad impact on the Twin Cities region and beyond. Susan Schmidt, Minnesota state director at the Trust for Public Land, said that “our RA in practice brings design skills and a different perspective, which coupled with her diligence in research and data, has been a real asset for us.”

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 7


Peek into student life on Instagram @umndesign. Teach Something Different This fall, Brad Hokanson (Graphic Design, B.Arch ’76, Ph.D ’00) taught the largest class at the University of Minnesota. More than 50,000 people from 191 countries signed up for Creative Problem Solving. These weren’t typical design students: 40 percent are from emerging economies, more than two-thirds hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree; and more than half work full-time. By teaching a MOOC (massive online open course) through Coursera.org, he’s introduced the College of Design to a new audience. His assignments challenged students to eat, taste, wear, and say “something different.” A majority of students who completed the class were confident that it increased their creativity and would contribute to their professional growth. Professor Hokanson tapped into a growing demand for design MOOCs. In January 2014, Coursera had 6 million members. By December that number had jumped to 10 million. Hokanson imagines this audience would also be interested in design thinking, typography, or an in-depth look at the Goldstein’s next exhibition. Listen to Hokanson talk MOOCs with MPR’s “Daily Circuit” at z.umn.edu/emg15h.

Join the conversation @UofMDesign.

Designers and planners are focused on downtowns today as a hub of activity—and not just during the regular 9-to-5 weekday hours. Peoples’ perceptions of downtowns have changed as well. Today, they are designed as safe, clean, sustainable, and, most importantly, walkable.

Alex Heid St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Heid is working on a feasibility analysis to locate a new building on the lab’s waterfront site and helping with early research and design for a new Renewable Energy Park.

Jody Rader City of Minneapolis, Department of Long-Range Planning Rader is collecting data and making maps to create a collaborative public realm framework.

Rachel Burand Trust for Public Land Burand is researching the need for new types of public spaces and making maps to enable public engagement.

By digging deep into specific questions and collaborating with neighborhoods, the Department of Landscape Architecture’s research assistants (RAs) in practice are redefining the relationship between classrooms and communities.

Their projects range from researching policy to field-testing bike connectivity, always with an emphasis on data-driven decision-making and community engagement. For example, facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Miya Kessler Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources Kessler is developing a pollinator outreach campaign and a resilient landscape initiative. Lindsay Hawks St. Paul Riverfront Corporation Hawks is researching workshop structure, engagement tactics, and health-focused design to inform a workshop for municipal leaders on how the built environment could improve their communities’ health.

Boots on the Ground

The graduate students work directly with nonprofit organizations and government agencies with advice from faculty on research issues and methods. “The students’ landscape architecture training has equipped them with strong science, design, and communication skills that have resulted in innovative and effective technical resources that are guiding on-the-ground efforts,” said Dan Shaw, vegetation specialist/landscape ecologist at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources.

Murphy (interviewed on page 11) has advanced the University and his professions through service on six University boards since 1996 and 13 industry boards and organizations since 1973. And as an award-winning educator, mentor, and adjunct faculty member for 26 years, his efforts have supported countless emerging design and business professionals. z.umn.edu/emg15j

6 EMERGING SPRING 2015

Tallman: Northside is the chosen home for the people who are there. And the “problems” of Northside are in part the product of design. It’s not a pretty truth, but it is a truth that will have to be reconciled if we’re going to prioritize equity as the fulcrum of our city building.

Nate Gandrud City of Minneapolis, Department of Long-Range Planning Gandrud is making maps and building databases to visualize current planning and design projects.

Ted Johnson (’82), pictured above, received an Outstanding Achievement Award for his extraordinary work bringing his two passions—design and computer science— into a long-lasting and innovative partnership. A pioneering software developer and entrepreneur, he credits three years in the School of Architecture for inspiring his drive to merge aesthetics and function. z.umn.edu/emg15i

Despite living and working half a world away in Istanbul, Turkey, the Butlers are among the most enthusiastic and devoted members of our University community. They have served the University as energetic ambassadors, advisers, and hosts; and opened the doors to Istanbul for nearly 100 students and faculty. By leading and funding the Istanbul Learning Abroad Center, they’ve given the University a permanent and unique presence in Turkey.

Shannon Sawyer Mayo Clinic—Rochester Sawyer is researching design and planning models for destination medical cities.

I see mapping as a way to edit all of the inputs that we experience in the world (formal, systematic, experiential) into a simple way to identify connections, overlaps, and gaps. This RAship has further reinforced and caused me to think more critically about the audiences for the maps that we make.

Alumni Receive UMAA Honors

Nedret and Mark Butler (both B.A. Arch ’72 and B.Arch ’73) and Richard Murphy (B.L.A. ’75, B.E.D. ’75, M.B.A. ’86) received Alumni Service Awards.

Chris Tallman and Sarah Havosh Minneapolis Parks Foundation and Juxtaposition Arts Tallman and Havosh are researching, designing, mapping, and writing to better connect north Minneapolis to the Mississippi River.

design.umn.edu

they’re helping the Minneapolis Parks Foundation develop multicultural perspectives. Executive director Tom Evans explained that “as we envision the next generation of parks along the Mississippi River between north and northeast Minneapolis, the RA’s are helping us connect more deeply to the communities on either side of the river. It’s a powerful partnership that provides an understanding of the vital role design plays in shaping our communities for years to come.”

The RAs apply the skills and knowledge they gain during the program throughout their careers. Colleen O’Dell (M.L.A./M.U.R.P. ’11) explained that her assistantship at Metro Blooms gave her the chance “to practice professional writing; to network with local municipal partners and watershed management districts; and to build understanding of municipal project complexities, funding systems, and operations.”

The opportunity to gain professional experience while in school attracts talented students. Matthew Traucht (M.L.A. ’13), now a project manager at the Cultural Landscape Foundation, noted that “one of the things that drew me to the University of Minnesota was the strong focus on service learning opportunities where I would have the chance to explore practical and professional applications of landscape architecture in addition to the design, theory, and history emphases that would comprise the classroom sessions.”

Now in its third year, the program has a broad impact on the Twin Cities region and beyond. Susan Schmidt, Minnesota state director at the Trust for Public Land, said that “our RA in practice brings design skills and a different perspective, which coupled with her diligence in research and data, has been a real asset for us.”

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 7


THE

S PAC E

BETWEEN BUILDINGS Paul and Mary Reyelts on investing in parks to build community

“What would Minneapolis be without its parks?” Mary Reyelts asked as she glanced out at Lake of the Isles. But her husband Paul is the real public space enthusiast.

starting to talk about health and the need to get outdoors and be active,” he said. “Mental health and physical health and public spaces.”

Paul sees the landscape architect as more than a park’s designer: he or she becomes the translator and problemsolver for the neighborhood supporting it. “If you’re in a foreign country, you need to speak the language. Designers know a language that helps communicate ideas. A lot of problems aren’t easy to solve. Sometimes you need to make compromises in order to move ahead. To me, that is what designers are all about.”

Mary explained a park’s emotional worth. “It changes the way you feel all day. You get drawn outside where you wouldn’t otherwise. You get life from parks.”

Paul and Mary have demonstrated their commitment to parks, design, and place-making by supporting five research-assistants-in-practice through the Department of Landscape Architecture. “This program is really boots on the ground. People are actually out in the community, getting to know that neighborhood.” It places master of landscape architecture candidates in nonprofits and government agencies. The student receives a scholarship and work experience, the community benefits from additional resources, and the department stands out in the field. “What intrigues me about the program is that everybody wins. People talk about wanting to leverage their dollars when they make donations—to me, this is about as big a leverage as you could get.” Paul, retired from a career in finance, is familiar with formulas to quantify the value of parks. “Everybody is

design.umn.edu

“IT CHANGES THE WAY YOU FEEL ALL DAY. YOU GET DRAWN OUTSIDE WHERE YOU WOULDN’T OTHERWISE. YOU GET LIFE FROM PARKS.” Paul and Mary met in Minneapolis—she was a PR intern at Piper Jaffrey for her M.B.A. from the business school (now Carlson School of Management) at the University of Minnesota. They’ve lived in the Lowry Hill neighborhood in Minneapolis for more than 25 years. They’re proud of the city’s commitment to the arts and its thriving creative sector. Mary is the president of the board of the Film Society of Minneapolis/St. Paul. “We bring directors and filmmakers from all over the world. They may come from Mexico in November, and still jump on a bike and come back raving about the city—the river and the parks.” Thanks to Paul’s early years at the School of Architecture before he headed to Harvard to study business, he

understands the benefit of bringing design thinking into the planning process. After retiring, Paul attended a summerlong career exploration studio course. With no professional design experience, he wasn’t sure how to apply his architecture background to improve his community. But he was drawn to the spaces between buildings. Today, Paul serves on the board of the Minneapolis Parks Foundation, and is involved with Gold Medal Park and the forthcoming Waterworks Park. He’s become familiar with the equity challenge common to all metro areas: small neighborhood parks aren’t as popular with donors as larger spaces like Central Park or the Chain of Lakes. But investing in them improves the health of communities. “The neighborhood parks aren’t as glamorous. But they have rec centers and swimming pools and soccer fields where kids can be active with other kids and their families. That’s where we really need the money [and the design expertise].” Paul and Mary imagine that if the program continues to grow, it could transform the city they love. Mary noted “the lack of public space is why people fled from the cities to the suburbs years ago.” And they want to attract them back, replacing parking lots with mixed-use neighborhoods and empty office parks with green space. “Whether they’re pocket parks, or spots along the river, or just places to play Frisbee, we need more green infrastructure,” Paul insisted.

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 9


THE

S PAC E

BETWEEN BUILDINGS Paul and Mary Reyelts on investing in parks to build community

“What would Minneapolis be without its parks?” Mary Reyelts asked as she glanced out at Lake of the Isles. But her husband Paul is the real public space enthusiast.

starting to talk about health and the need to get outdoors and be active,” he said. “Mental health and physical health and public spaces.”

Paul sees the landscape architect as more than a park’s designer: he or she becomes the translator and problemsolver for the neighborhood supporting it. “If you’re in a foreign country, you need to speak the language. Designers know a language that helps communicate ideas. A lot of problems aren’t easy to solve. Sometimes you need to make compromises in order to move ahead. To me, that is what designers are all about.”

Mary explained a park’s emotional worth. “It changes the way you feel all day. You get drawn outside where you wouldn’t otherwise. You get life from parks.”

Paul and Mary have demonstrated their commitment to parks, design, and place-making by supporting five research-assistants-in-practice through the Department of Landscape Architecture. “This program is really boots on the ground. People are actually out in the community, getting to know that neighborhood.” It places master of landscape architecture candidates in nonprofits and government agencies. The student receives a scholarship and work experience, the community benefits from additional resources, and the department stands out in the field. “What intrigues me about the program is that everybody wins. People talk about wanting to leverage their dollars when they make donations—to me, this is about as big a leverage as you could get.” Paul, retired from a career in finance, is familiar with formulas to quantify the value of parks. “Everybody is

design.umn.edu

“IT CHANGES THE WAY YOU FEEL ALL DAY. YOU GET DRAWN OUTSIDE WHERE YOU WOULDN’T OTHERWISE. YOU GET LIFE FROM PARKS.” Paul and Mary met in Minneapolis—she was a PR intern at Piper Jaffrey for her M.B.A. from the business school (now Carlson School of Management) at the University of Minnesota. They’ve lived in the Lowry Hill neighborhood in Minneapolis for more than 25 years. They’re proud of the city’s commitment to the arts and its thriving creative sector. Mary is the president of the board of the Film Society of Minneapolis/St. Paul. “We bring directors and filmmakers from all over the world. They may come from Mexico in November, and still jump on a bike and come back raving about the city—the river and the parks.” Thanks to Paul’s early years at the School of Architecture before he headed to Harvard to study business, he

understands the benefit of bringing design thinking into the planning process. After retiring, Paul attended a summerlong career exploration studio course. With no professional design experience, he wasn’t sure how to apply his architecture background to improve his community. But he was drawn to the spaces between buildings. Today, Paul serves on the board of the Minneapolis Parks Foundation, and is involved with Gold Medal Park and the forthcoming Waterworks Park. He’s become familiar with the equity challenge common to all metro areas: small neighborhood parks aren’t as popular with donors as larger spaces like Central Park or the Chain of Lakes. But investing in them improves the health of communities. “The neighborhood parks aren’t as glamorous. But they have rec centers and swimming pools and soccer fields where kids can be active with other kids and their families. That’s where we really need the money [and the design expertise].” Paul and Mary imagine that if the program continues to grow, it could transform the city they love. Mary noted “the lack of public space is why people fled from the cities to the suburbs years ago.” And they want to attract them back, replacing parking lots with mixed-use neighborhoods and empty office parks with green space. “Whether they’re pocket parks, or spots along the river, or just places to play Frisbee, we need more green infrastructure,” Paul insisted.

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 9


How Many Alumni Does It Take to Create a Park? Fourteen faculty and alumni contributed to the mission, vision, design, and implementation of recently opened Whitetail Woods Regional Park in Dakota County. In the early stages of planning, Steve Roos (B.E.D. ’97, M.L.A. ’99), Tracey Kinney (M.L.A. ’05, MURP ’06), and adjunct professor and Center for Rural Design director Dewey Thorbeck considered how to incorporate UMore Park into the adjacent Whitetail Woods. Mary Jackson (M.L.A. ’96) conceptualized the park, developed a program, and coordinated the development of a master plan for Dakota County Parks with help from consultants Greg Johnson (B.L.A. ’91) and Larry Wacker (B.L.A. ’72) at Sanders, Wacker, Bergley. Kevin Biehn

ALUMNI

(M.L.A. ’00) of Emmons and Olivier Resources also served as a consultant on plan development.

Richard Murphy, Jr., Values Design Education How do design skills fit into a corporate setting? What sustainability challenges could we solve with design? Richard Murphy, Jr., (B.L.A. ’75, B.E.D. ’75, M.B.A. ’86), longtime mentor and adjunct faculty member, works at the intersection of business, design, and sustainability. In celebration of his recent Alumni Service Award (page 6), we asked for his thoughts on design and corporate social responsibility.

1978

Beth Bogle’s (M.A. DHA) Fish and Bee Studio was featured in MplsStPaul Magazine.

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

design.umn.edu

1983

Peter Ozolins (M.Arch) wrote a book about sustainable building design and construction in the developing world. The book draws on more than 30 years of experience and was published in August by Routledge. More at z.umn.edu/emg15m.

2008

Eric Holland (B.S. Interior Design) was named principal of ADD Inc., based in Miami, FL.

A modern Zen-like home designed by Allison Landers (B.S. Interior Design) was a stop on the 2014 AIA Minnesota Homes by Architects Tour.

What do you think are the most pressing sustainability challenges of our time? Energy consumption drives everything we do, from food production, to transporting products, to information management. Smartphones, the Internet, and big data all run on energy. Something’s got to power those servers, but many people forget this critical aspect. Water is a scarce resource in many parts of the world, which raises the importance of storm water management practices.

1999

2009

What advice do you have to students or young design professionals interested in business? We must realize the power of our design education, which teaches us to think differently. When asked to get from A to B, the average person draws a straight line. Our education system discourages wandering paths, and most business people think inside the box. Designers are trained to think outside it, to take tangents, to refine. Designers need to consider ourselves problem solvers. Yes, we use pretty pictures. But at its heart, design is problem solving and opportunity finding.

Steve Gerten (B.E.D.) was promoted to business development manager of the San Francisco-based interior design firm Studio O+A.

Jon Buggy (B.Arch/B.E.D.) joined RSP Architects.

Adam Turman (B.S. Graphic Design) was named the 2015 Minnesota State Fair Commemorative Artist.

2004

Keith Koch (M.A. D.H.A., B.S. Retail Merchandising ’95) joined Questar Assessment as chief technology officer.

2005

Rebecca Van Amber (B.S. Apparel Design) graduated with a Ph.D in Applied Sciences (Clothing and Textile Sciences) from the University of Otago in August 2014. She also recently published two articles in the Textile Research Journal.

Cake stands designed by Jamey Berg (Interior Design) are on sale this winter at Cooks of Crocus Hill. Blake Bromme (B.S. Retail Merchandising) accepted a position as merchandise assistant for the Zappos couture site.

The College of Design won Pride of CASE V Awards for Best Student Alumni Programming (Design Student and Alumni Board) and Best Volunteer Engagement Program (School of Architecture Centennial Celebration)!

2010

James Judge (B.S. Interior Design) is flipping houses in Phoenix, AZ, and managing a blog with tips for others who want to buy, rehab, and resell properties. More at z.umn.edu/emg15n. Niki English (B.S. Apparel Design) launched a new handbag line manufactured in New York City’s Garment District. Parallel Projections, led by Kyle Beneventi (B.S. Arch), announced the winner of their redesign competition for Detroit’s Packard Auto Plant.

Matthew Traucht (M.L.A.) is documenting landscapes all over the country and working with universities in Virginia, Texas, Rhode Island, Colorado, and Toronto as project manager of the What’s Out There program at the Cultural Landscape Foundation in Washington, D.C..

Hae-Young Yun (Ph.D. Design, emphasis in Housing Studies) began her new position as postdoctoral fellow with the International Center for Design at Singapore University of Technology and Design and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Invisible Borders: The TransAfrica Project, a photographic road trip documenting African artists in Europe and Africa, featured work by Heba Amin (M.F.A.).

2011

2013

2014

Joshua Larson (B.S. Arch) and friends won a design competition with their prototype for a mobile parklet to travel around San Diego, CA, this fall.

1984

How has interest in sustainability changed over the course of your career? Students have been interested for over 15 years. Sustainability started to gain popularity with businesses five to eight years before the recession hit, but then it retreated. It’s slowly coming back.

facebook.com/uofmdesign

AIGA MN selected Jo Davison (B.S. Graphic Design) as a 2014 fellow.

2007

Beth Loraine Bowman, (Housing Studies Certificate, president of the College of Design Alumni Board) was appointed associate director of the Soap Factory.

Read the full interview at z.umn.edu/emg15l and hear him speak about business, sustainability, and design on April 20 at 6 pm. 10 EMERGING FALL 2014

1972

Craig Hess (B.Arch) began a one-year term as president of the Minneapolis–St. Paul chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute.

Josh Kinney (M.L.A. ’01), project designer and manager at Dakota County Parks, managed design consultants HGA, whose project team included adjunct professor Ross Altimer, Erica Christensen (M.L.A. ’07), and Trygve Hansen (B.E.D. ’04, M.L.A. ’12). Kinney also managed design consultant Tory Christensen (M.L.A. ’06) and was heavily involved in implementing the design. Bruce Blair (B.L.A. ’79) is the park manager. z.umn.edu/emg15k

2006

Megan Wannarka (B.S. Apparel Design) completed a three-year term of service with the Peace Corps, stationed in Senegal. She’ll spend 2015 in Grenada working with honeybees through the Peace Corps Response.

Listed according to their most recent College of Design degree or class year.

Architecture Networking and Portfolio event (held annually each March) won the Program Extraordinaire Award from the U of M Alumni Association.

IN MEMORIUM

Marion Ryan (B.S. Home Economics ’46) Tom Hodne (B.Arch ’55) Richard Faricy (B.Arch ’59) Mary Kay Owens Tuohy, M.D. (B.S. Interior Design ’74) Robert Cooke (B.Arch ’60)

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 11


How Many Alumni Does It Take to Create a Park? Fourteen faculty and alumni contributed to the mission, vision, design, and implementation of recently opened Whitetail Woods Regional Park in Dakota County. In the early stages of planning, Steve Roos (B.E.D. ’97, M.L.A. ’99), Tracey Kinney (M.L.A. ’05, MURP ’06), and adjunct professor and Center for Rural Design director Dewey Thorbeck considered how to incorporate UMore Park into the adjacent Whitetail Woods. Mary Jackson (M.L.A. ’96) conceptualized the park, developed a program, and coordinated the development of a master plan for Dakota County Parks with help from consultants Greg Johnson (B.L.A. ’91) and Larry Wacker (B.L.A. ’72) at Sanders, Wacker, Bergley. Kevin Biehn

ALUMNI

(M.L.A. ’00) of Emmons and Olivier Resources also served as a consultant on plan development.

Richard Murphy, Jr., Values Design Education How do design skills fit into a corporate setting? What sustainability challenges could we solve with design? Richard Murphy, Jr., (B.L.A. ’75, B.E.D. ’75, M.B.A. ’86), longtime mentor and adjunct faculty member, works at the intersection of business, design, and sustainability. In celebration of his recent Alumni Service Award (page 6), we asked for his thoughts on design and corporate social responsibility.

1978

Beth Bogle’s (M.A. DHA) Fish and Bee Studio was featured in MplsStPaul Magazine.

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

design.umn.edu

1983

Peter Ozolins (M.Arch) wrote a book about sustainable building design and construction in the developing world. The book draws on more than 30 years of experience and was published in August by Routledge. More at z.umn.edu/emg15m.

2008

Eric Holland (B.S. Interior Design) was named principal of ADD Inc., based in Miami, FL.

A modern Zen-like home designed by Allison Landers (B.S. Interior Design) was a stop on the 2014 AIA Minnesota Homes by Architects Tour.

What do you think are the most pressing sustainability challenges of our time? Energy consumption drives everything we do, from food production, to transporting products, to information management. Smartphones, the Internet, and big data all run on energy. Something’s got to power those servers, but many people forget this critical aspect. Water is a scarce resource in many parts of the world, which raises the importance of storm water management practices.

1999

2009

What advice do you have to students or young design professionals interested in business? We must realize the power of our design education, which teaches us to think differently. When asked to get from A to B, the average person draws a straight line. Our education system discourages wandering paths, and most business people think inside the box. Designers are trained to think outside it, to take tangents, to refine. Designers need to consider ourselves problem solvers. Yes, we use pretty pictures. But at its heart, design is problem solving and opportunity finding.

Steve Gerten (B.E.D.) was promoted to business development manager of the San Francisco-based interior design firm Studio O+A.

Jon Buggy (B.Arch/B.E.D.) joined RSP Architects.

Adam Turman (B.S. Graphic Design) was named the 2015 Minnesota State Fair Commemorative Artist.

2004

Keith Koch (M.A. D.H.A., B.S. Retail Merchandising ’95) joined Questar Assessment as chief technology officer.

2005

Rebecca Van Amber (B.S. Apparel Design) graduated with a Ph.D in Applied Sciences (Clothing and Textile Sciences) from the University of Otago in August 2014. She also recently published two articles in the Textile Research Journal.

Cake stands designed by Jamey Berg (Interior Design) are on sale this winter at Cooks of Crocus Hill. Blake Bromme (B.S. Retail Merchandising) accepted a position as merchandise assistant for the Zappos couture site.

The College of Design won Pride of CASE V Awards for Best Student Alumni Programming (Design Student and Alumni Board) and Best Volunteer Engagement Program (School of Architecture Centennial Celebration)!

2010

James Judge (B.S. Interior Design) is flipping houses in Phoenix, AZ, and managing a blog with tips for others who want to buy, rehab, and resell properties. More at z.umn.edu/emg15n. Niki English (B.S. Apparel Design) launched a new handbag line manufactured in New York City’s Garment District. Parallel Projections, led by Kyle Beneventi (B.S. Arch), announced the winner of their redesign competition for Detroit’s Packard Auto Plant.

Matthew Traucht (M.L.A.) is documenting landscapes all over the country and working with universities in Virginia, Texas, Rhode Island, Colorado, and Toronto as project manager of the What’s Out There program at the Cultural Landscape Foundation in Washington, D.C..

Hae-Young Yun (Ph.D. Design, emphasis in Housing Studies) began her new position as postdoctoral fellow with the International Center for Design at Singapore University of Technology and Design and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Invisible Borders: The TransAfrica Project, a photographic road trip documenting African artists in Europe and Africa, featured work by Heba Amin (M.F.A.).

2011

2013

2014

Joshua Larson (B.S. Arch) and friends won a design competition with their prototype for a mobile parklet to travel around San Diego, CA, this fall.

1984

How has interest in sustainability changed over the course of your career? Students have been interested for over 15 years. Sustainability started to gain popularity with businesses five to eight years before the recession hit, but then it retreated. It’s slowly coming back.

facebook.com/uofmdesign

AIGA MN selected Jo Davison (B.S. Graphic Design) as a 2014 fellow.

2007

Beth Loraine Bowman, (Housing Studies Certificate, president of the College of Design Alumni Board) was appointed associate director of the Soap Factory.

Read the full interview at z.umn.edu/emg15l and hear him speak about business, sustainability, and design on April 20 at 6 pm. 10 EMERGING FALL 2014

1972

Craig Hess (B.Arch) began a one-year term as president of the Minneapolis–St. Paul chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute.

Josh Kinney (M.L.A. ’01), project designer and manager at Dakota County Parks, managed design consultants HGA, whose project team included adjunct professor Ross Altimer, Erica Christensen (M.L.A. ’07), and Trygve Hansen (B.E.D. ’04, M.L.A. ’12). Kinney also managed design consultant Tory Christensen (M.L.A. ’06) and was heavily involved in implementing the design. Bruce Blair (B.L.A. ’79) is the park manager. z.umn.edu/emg15k

2006

Megan Wannarka (B.S. Apparel Design) completed a three-year term of service with the Peace Corps, stationed in Senegal. She’ll spend 2015 in Grenada working with honeybees through the Peace Corps Response.

Listed according to their most recent College of Design degree or class year.

Architecture Networking and Portfolio event (held annually each March) won the Program Extraordinaire Award from the U of M Alumni Association.

IN MEMORIUM

Marion Ryan (B.S. Home Economics ’46) Tom Hodne (B.Arch ’55) Richard Faricy (B.Arch ’59) Mary Kay Owens Tuohy, M.D. (B.S. Interior Design ’74) Robert Cooke (B.Arch ’60)

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 11


STUDENTS

Texting in Zero Gravity

Megan Ziesmer (Interior Design) won the popular vote in the Groovystuff by Design competition for her Tangled Table Lamp.

Anna Peshock and Julia Duvall (Apparel Design) designed a glove that lets astronauts type text messages and emails on their fingers, without any handheld device. The Argot Glove has conductive patches on its thumb and fingers, connected to

Curt Lund (Graphic Design and Museum Studies) received a Steven J. Schochet Endowment Academic Award for Excellence in GLBT Studies.

a microprocessor with conductive threads. Its wearer taps the thumb to the patches on different fingers to type different letters. The glove got its start during a studio taught by Lucy Dunne in partnership with NASA, and Peshock and Duvail presented it this fall at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers. z.umn.edu/emg15p

Hanna DeGroot, Megan Blanchette, Elizabeth Maki, Bethany DeLine, Mary Kennedy, Amanda Lindberg, Darien Ruschy, Ashley Ochiagha, and Marie Hastings (all Interior Design) placed in the USGBC-MN Natural Talent Competition with redesigns for Jackson Elementary in St. Paul. Students for Design Activism planned and hosted temporary public spaces with Women in Landscape Architecture and the FAIR School Minneapolis on Park(ing) Day event. Sarah Kendzior (Retail) is a finalist for the National Retail Federation’s 2015 Next Generation Scholarship.

Community Engaged Preservation In fall 2012, Professor Greg Donofrio (Architecture) challenged his Introduction to Historic Preservation class to consider “why is the site of an event that happened 80 years ago of interest to a neighborhood today? Why should we commemorate this history?” At first glance, 4600 Columbus Avenue South doesn’t look too special. But in 1931, the house was the site of one of south Minneapolis’s largest racial showdowns. When Arthur and Edith Lee, an AfricanAmerican couple, bought the house in what was then considered a white neighborhood, their neighbors mobbed the house to intimidate them out. A number of groups 12 EMERGING SPRING 2015

and individuals stepped up to defend them, including postal service workers, WWI veterans, the NAACP, and attorney Lena Olive Smith.

but complementary sets of skills and knowledge, his class collaborated with the neighborhood to develop the exhibition “A Right to Establish a Home.”

Preservationists traditionally work with communities that have identified an issue, such as a specific type of conservation district, to produce a final report of their findings. Donofrio envisioned a different type of public engagement. He wanted to understand why, in addition to reasons outlined in the archives, the neighborhood considered the site historically significant. Recognizing that the students and the community possessed different

The class conducted oral history studies to record experiences with race and housing, race and public life, and race and owning a business. They attended community meetings. And they kept in touch. “When you have authentic community engagement, you can no longer make lateral decisions about how the exhibition’s going to look,” Donofrio explained. “You have an obligation to stay in touch and consult them about how the material

reads, and whether you’ve quoted them accurately. It takes more time but the results are so much richer.” The class collected enough raw material for Donofrio to partner with the neighborhood organization on a legacy grant to support Laurel Fritz (M.S. Heritage Conservation and Preservation candidate) to write and edit a National Register nomination. The Lee house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in July, 2014. z.umn.edu/emg15o

facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Josh Ong and Rosaura Ramos (B.D.A. ’14) received the Wigington Minority Scholarship. Dealer Expo awarded Sarah Kendzior, MinJung Park, Dooyoung Choi, and Eunju Yoon (all Retail) scholarships for their Model Stores for Millennials designs.

Maroon and Gold Taxis At the homecoming parade, Boynton Health Services introduced an upgraded Gopher Chauffeur that passengers can identify more easily, designed by Jake Thibedeau (Graphic Design). “Initially I was inspired by taxis, more specifically older NYC taxis from the ’60s and ’70s,” he explained. “I wanted to give it the iconic look of a taxi, but modernize it and give it the University’s color scheme.” He plans to pursue graphic design and use his talent to combat unoriginality. “There is far too much copy and paste going on in the world today and not enough individualism.” In this case, his creativity will help students find a safe ride home. z.umn.edu/emg15q

design.umn.edu

AIAS Chapter Honor Award The American Institute of Architecture Students recognized the University of Minnesota Chapter as winners of the 2014 AIAS Chapter Honor Award. With 130 student members, ours is the largest chapter in the Midwest, and quite plugged into the Twin Cities professional architecture community. z.umn.edu/emg15r COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 13


STUDENTS

Texting in Zero Gravity

Megan Ziesmer (Interior Design) won the popular vote in the Groovystuff by Design competition for her Tangled Table Lamp.

Anna Peshock and Julia Duvall (Apparel Design) designed a glove that lets astronauts type text messages and emails on their fingers, without any handheld device. The Argot Glove has conductive patches on its thumb and fingers, connected to

Curt Lund (Graphic Design and Museum Studies) received a Steven J. Schochet Endowment Academic Award for Excellence in GLBT Studies.

a microprocessor with conductive threads. Its wearer taps the thumb to the patches on different fingers to type different letters. The glove got its start during a studio taught by Lucy Dunne in partnership with NASA, and Peshock and Duvail presented it this fall at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers. z.umn.edu/emg15p

Hanna DeGroot, Megan Blanchette, Elizabeth Maki, Bethany DeLine, Mary Kennedy, Amanda Lindberg, Darien Ruschy, Ashley Ochiagha, and Marie Hastings (all Interior Design) placed in the USGBC-MN Natural Talent Competition with redesigns for Jackson Elementary in St. Paul. Students for Design Activism planned and hosted temporary public spaces with Women in Landscape Architecture and the FAIR School Minneapolis on Park(ing) Day event. Sarah Kendzior (Retail) is a finalist for the National Retail Federation’s 2015 Next Generation Scholarship.

Community Engaged Preservation In fall 2012, Professor Greg Donofrio (Architecture) challenged his Introduction to Historic Preservation class to consider “why is the site of an event that happened 80 years ago of interest to a neighborhood today? Why should we commemorate this history?” At first glance, 4600 Columbus Avenue South doesn’t look too special. But in 1931, the house was the site of one of south Minneapolis’s largest racial showdowns. When Arthur and Edith Lee, an AfricanAmerican couple, bought the house in what was then considered a white neighborhood, their neighbors mobbed the house to intimidate them out. A number of groups 12 EMERGING SPRING 2015

and individuals stepped up to defend them, including postal service workers, WWI veterans, the NAACP, and attorney Lena Olive Smith.

but complementary sets of skills and knowledge, his class collaborated with the neighborhood to develop the exhibition “A Right to Establish a Home.”

Preservationists traditionally work with communities that have identified an issue, such as a specific type of conservation district, to produce a final report of their findings. Donofrio envisioned a different type of public engagement. He wanted to understand why, in addition to reasons outlined in the archives, the neighborhood considered the site historically significant. Recognizing that the students and the community possessed different

The class conducted oral history studies to record experiences with race and housing, race and public life, and race and owning a business. They attended community meetings. And they kept in touch. “When you have authentic community engagement, you can no longer make lateral decisions about how the exhibition’s going to look,” Donofrio explained. “You have an obligation to stay in touch and consult them about how the material

reads, and whether you’ve quoted them accurately. It takes more time but the results are so much richer.” The class collected enough raw material for Donofrio to partner with the neighborhood organization on a legacy grant to support Laurel Fritz (M.S. Heritage Conservation and Preservation candidate) to write and edit a National Register nomination. The Lee house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in July, 2014. z.umn.edu/emg15o

facebook.com/uofmdesign

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Josh Ong and Rosaura Ramos (B.D.A. ’14) received the Wigington Minority Scholarship. Dealer Expo awarded Sarah Kendzior, MinJung Park, Dooyoung Choi, and Eunju Yoon (all Retail) scholarships for their Model Stores for Millennials designs.

Maroon and Gold Taxis At the homecoming parade, Boynton Health Services introduced an upgraded Gopher Chauffeur that passengers can identify more easily, designed by Jake Thibedeau (Graphic Design). “Initially I was inspired by taxis, more specifically older NYC taxis from the ’60s and ’70s,” he explained. “I wanted to give it the iconic look of a taxi, but modernize it and give it the University’s color scheme.” He plans to pursue graphic design and use his talent to combat unoriginality. “There is far too much copy and paste going on in the world today and not enough individualism.” In this case, his creativity will help students find a safe ride home. z.umn.edu/emg15q

design.umn.edu

AIAS Chapter Honor Award The American Institute of Architecture Students recognized the University of Minnesota Chapter as winners of the 2014 AIAS Chapter Honor Award. With 130 student members, ours is the largest chapter in the Midwest, and quite plugged into the Twin Cities professional architecture community. z.umn.edu/emg15r COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 13


Design is Part of the Solution

FACULTY + STAFF

University of Minnesota’s Made in Minnesota campaign features Dan Handeen (M.Arch ’07) and a net-zero energy home by researchers and students at the Center for Sustainable Building Research. Watch the ad at z.umn.edu/emg15s.

Senior fellow John Carmody (Architecture, B.Arch ’70, M.Arch ’95) and professor emeritus Gunter Dittmar (Architecture) received AIA Minnesota Special Awards. Daniel Jasper and Ange Wang (Graphic Design, B.S. Graphic ’04, M.F.A. ’90) helped K12 educators integrate design into existing art curricula at Design High. The Institute for Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy presented faculty IDEA Multicultural Research Awards to Abimbola Asojo (Interior Design), Sauman Chu (Graphic Design, B.S. Applied Design ’91, M.A. ’94, Ph.D. ’96), and Hyunjoo Im (Retail Merchandising). Marc Swackhamer (Architecture) was selected to speak about reigniting a passion for experiential learning and materials literacy at Minne College in Naples, FL. Bill Angell (Housing Studies) received the Jack Bartholomew Award from the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists for dedication to presenting outstanding radon professional education. R. T. Rybak, James Wheeler, and Ozayr Saloojee (Architecture) coordinated a symposium in Duluth for students and community members. Breakout sessions explored concepts including equity, infrastructure, economics, energy, and urban systems in the St. Louis River Corridor. Barry Kudrowitz (Product Design) and John Comazzi (Architecture) led a serious play workshop for K12 architecture and design educators this summer in Bloomfield Hills, MI, as part of the Association of Architecture Organizations

14 EMERGING SPRING 2015

facebook.com/uofmdesign

Upcoming Events inaugural Architecture and Design Education Network (A+DEN) Symposium.

For a full listing of College of Design events this spring, visit design.umn.edu/calendar.

“Visible and Invisible Infrastructures: Alternative Futures in Resiliency, Failure, and Design Pedagogy” by Vince deBritto and Ozayr Saloogee (Architecture) was awarded Best Research Paper at the Architectural Research Centers Consortium Conference.

Design Intersections 2015 A Legacy of Play April 30, 7:30–9:30 AM McNamara Alumni Center intersections.design.umn.edu

Steven McCarthy (Graphic Design) was invited to serve on the board of the Minnesota Center for Book Arts.

Steve King, cofounder of Landscape Structures, will be our featured speaker this spring. Design Intersections brings design professionals together twice a year for networking and conversation. Breakfast is provided.

Remi Douah (Center for Design in Health, Ph.D. ’06) recently returned from Lagos, Nigeria, where he engaged in a qualitative research consultancy, examined how microfinance could improve health care access for hard-to-reach populations, and discussed community emergency preparedness and sustainable public health infrastructure with health officials. Hye-Young Kim (Retail Merchandising) and Richard Graves (Center for Sustainable Building Research) received Extension Block Grants to improve community vitality programs among ethnic minority entrepreneurs (Kim) and to develop prototypes for deep winter greenhouses (Graves). The Department of Landscape Architecture cosponsored “Thinking Making Living,” a new exhibition at the Katherine E. Nash Gallery. Lin Nelson-Mayson (Goldstein Museum of Design) gave a presentation about the value of state museum associations at the National Museum and Library Services Board meeting in Washington, D.C.

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Design in 7 April 1, 6:30 PM doors open, 7 PM program Coffman Memorial Union Theater design.umn.edu/designin7

Tickets: $30 early-bird (by April 9), $40 regular (by April 28, midnight), $15 students (first 25 students free), $45 walk-in registration (day of event).

May 13, 7:30 AM–5 PM Coffman Memorial Union Theater seechangeconference.org

What can be shared in just seven minutes? Listen in as seven professionals from the fields of architecture, apparel, graphic and interior design, housing, landscape architecture, and retail share thoughtprovoking, inspiring, and sometimes curious tales from the trenches.

Design Cycles: A Bike Show, January 24 – May 10 Goldstein Museum of Design Design Cycles explores the history of cycling in Minnesota with frames by regional builders; vintage bikes and cycling maps; and retro and contemporary bicycle accessories.

design.umn.edu

Tickets: $5 students, $15 UMAA members, $20 general; Free to 2014–15 design mentors and mentees.

See Change: The Power of Visual Communication

See Change cross-pollinates the disciplines of visual communication, bringing together field leaders to share insights, projects, working philosophies, and survival techniques for inciting and navigating change.

PLAYsentations

Tickets: $129 UofM / AIGA / WAM members, $169 general, $25 students.

May 6, 6 PM Coffman Memorial Union Theater z.umn.edu/playsentations2015 PLAYsentations is a theatrical show where product design students present their original toy prototypes to the community. Children and families are welcome to attend.

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 15


Design is Part of the Solution

FACULTY + STAFF

University of Minnesota’s Made in Minnesota campaign features Dan Handeen (M.Arch ’07) and a net-zero energy home by researchers and students at the Center for Sustainable Building Research. Watch the ad at z.umn.edu/emg15s.

Senior fellow John Carmody (Architecture, B.Arch ’70, M.Arch ’95) and professor emeritus Gunter Dittmar (Architecture) received AIA Minnesota Special Awards. Daniel Jasper and Ange Wang (Graphic Design, B.S. Graphic ’04, M.F.A. ’90) helped K12 educators integrate design into existing art curricula at Design High. The Institute for Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy presented faculty IDEA Multicultural Research Awards to Abimbola Asojo (Interior Design), Sauman Chu (Graphic Design, B.S. Applied Design ’91, M.A. ’94, Ph.D. ’96), and Hyunjoo Im (Retail Merchandising). Marc Swackhamer (Architecture) was selected to speak about reigniting a passion for experiential learning and materials literacy at Minne College in Naples, FL. Bill Angell (Housing Studies) received the Jack Bartholomew Award from the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists for dedication to presenting outstanding radon professional education. R. T. Rybak, James Wheeler, and Ozayr Saloojee (Architecture) coordinated a symposium in Duluth for students and community members. Breakout sessions explored concepts including equity, infrastructure, economics, energy, and urban systems in the St. Louis River Corridor. Barry Kudrowitz (Product Design) and John Comazzi (Architecture) led a serious play workshop for K12 architecture and design educators this summer in Bloomfield Hills, MI, as part of the Association of Architecture Organizations

14 EMERGING SPRING 2015

facebook.com/uofmdesign

Upcoming Events inaugural Architecture and Design Education Network (A+DEN) Symposium.

For a full listing of College of Design events this spring, visit design.umn.edu/calendar.

“Visible and Invisible Infrastructures: Alternative Futures in Resiliency, Failure, and Design Pedagogy” by Vince deBritto and Ozayr Saloogee (Architecture) was awarded Best Research Paper at the Architectural Research Centers Consortium Conference.

Design Intersections 2015 A Legacy of Play April 30, 7:30–9:30 AM McNamara Alumni Center intersections.design.umn.edu

Steven McCarthy (Graphic Design) was invited to serve on the board of the Minnesota Center for Book Arts.

Steve King, cofounder of Landscape Structures, will be our featured speaker this spring. Design Intersections brings design professionals together twice a year for networking and conversation. Breakfast is provided.

Remi Douah (Center for Design in Health, Ph.D. ’06) recently returned from Lagos, Nigeria, where he engaged in a qualitative research consultancy, examined how microfinance could improve health care access for hard-to-reach populations, and discussed community emergency preparedness and sustainable public health infrastructure with health officials. Hye-Young Kim (Retail Merchandising) and Richard Graves (Center for Sustainable Building Research) received Extension Block Grants to improve community vitality programs among ethnic minority entrepreneurs (Kim) and to develop prototypes for deep winter greenhouses (Graves). The Department of Landscape Architecture cosponsored “Thinking Making Living,” a new exhibition at the Katherine E. Nash Gallery. Lin Nelson-Mayson (Goldstein Museum of Design) gave a presentation about the value of state museum associations at the National Museum and Library Services Board meeting in Washington, D.C.

@uofmdesign

instagram/umndesign

Design in 7 April 1, 6:30 PM doors open, 7 PM program Coffman Memorial Union Theater design.umn.edu/designin7

Tickets: $30 early-bird (by April 9), $40 regular (by April 28, midnight), $15 students (first 25 students free), $45 walk-in registration (day of event).

May 13, 7:30 AM–5 PM Coffman Memorial Union Theater seechangeconference.org

What can be shared in just seven minutes? Listen in as seven professionals from the fields of architecture, apparel, graphic and interior design, housing, landscape architecture, and retail share thoughtprovoking, inspiring, and sometimes curious tales from the trenches.

Design Cycles: A Bike Show, January 24 – May 10 Goldstein Museum of Design Design Cycles explores the history of cycling in Minnesota with frames by regional builders; vintage bikes and cycling maps; and retro and contemporary bicycle accessories.

design.umn.edu

Tickets: $5 students, $15 UMAA members, $20 general; Free to 2014–15 design mentors and mentees.

See Change: The Power of Visual Communication

See Change cross-pollinates the disciplines of visual communication, bringing together field leaders to share insights, projects, working philosophies, and survival techniques for inciting and navigating change.

PLAYsentations

Tickets: $129 UofM / AIGA / WAM members, $169 general, $25 students.

May 6, 6 PM Coffman Memorial Union Theater z.umn.edu/playsentations2015 PLAYsentations is a theatrical show where product design students present their original toy prototypes to the community. Children and families are welcome to attend.

COLLEGE OF DESIGN SPRING 2015 15


Happy 100th, Ralph! We celebrated Ralph Rapson’s 100th birthday with his signature mustache. Alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends posed for a panoramic group photo. Our alumni and friends on the East Coast sported their ’staches at events at Visnick & Caulfield Associates, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, and Pickard Chilton. See more #rapsonstaches at z.umn.edu/emg15t.

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Emerging Magazine - Spring 2015  

Stories about alumni, students, and faculty at the University of Minnesota College of Design.

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