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FEATURES

THE

University's outstanding teacher is from College PAGE 3

College's top teachers named PAGE 4

Interest peaks for forensic chemistry program PAGE 5

Truman Scholar hopes to enrich lives of others PAGE 7

Book examines Native American mysteries PAGE 8

English department offers MFA PAGE 9

New department chairs announced PAGE 10

Alum named executive editor of Clarion-Ledger P A G E 11

Award-winning writer takes up residence PAG E 12

Professor shows smart sports teams integrated first PAG E 13

DEPARTMENTS

The Dean’s Column The Ventress Order

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LIBERAL ARTS 18 4 8

VOL. 3 NO. 1

FALL 2002

First fellowship recipients represent psychology, chemistry, English he College of Liberal Arts has appointed creation of a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry, three outstanding faculty members as the a program that now has more than 90 majors,” initial recipients of the three-year Liberal Hopkins said. Arts Distinguished Faculty Fellowships. Gross is a prolific researcher with more than They are Dr. David Graves in chemistry 150 journal articles and book chapters. and biochemistry, Dr. Alan Gross in psycholo“His teaching, both at the undergraduate gy, and Barry Hannah in English. Each faculty and graduate levels, is exemplary, and he has member will receive $10,000 a year for each of recently taken on the important position of the three years he holds the fellowship. director of clinical training in the Department “These faculty members represent the best of Psychology,” Hopkins said. of the college, in teachHannah received ing, in research and the Robert Penn creative accomplishWarren Lifetime ment, and in serving Achievement Award the community,” said in fiction three years Dr. Glenn Hopkins, ago. He has enjoyed a dean of liberal arts. national reputation The fellowships since 1972, and his are intended to creative writing class reward and support is one of the most popfaculty members who Liberal Arts Dean Glenn Hopkins (left) presents Alan Gross (second ular classes on campus. left), Barry Hannah, and David Graves with plaques declaring have developed distin- from “In the 20 years he their status as Distinguished Faculty Fellows. guished records and has served as writerwho hold the rank of in-residence, he has full professor or have held the title of writer- or helped many students establish their own artist-in-residence for at least 10 years. The careers in fiction,” Hopkins said. “We are most annual stipends may be used by the recipients fortunate to have Barry Hannah on this camto enhance their salaries, for travel, or in any pus.” other way they choose. A selection committee appointed by Dean Graves has a strong research record, pubHopkins reviewed nominations from each lishing frequently in the most prestigious jourdepartment and made recommendations. The nals, Hopkins said. During Graves’ 18 years Distinguished Faculty Fellowships are funded on the faculty, he has attracted more than $2 through the University Foundation with supmillion in research funding. port provided by alumni and friends, and the “He recently was a driving force behind the Hardin Foundation.

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THE DEAN’S COLUMN his Fall, The University of Mississippi is welcoming a record enrollment of 12,287 students, including the largest freshman class in history. Of the increased enrollments in the last years, Chancellor Khayat has said, “We have sown the seeds to many excellent new programs, and the harvest has come.” Strong academic programs in the College and faculty who excel in teaching and research are, indeed, the attraction for students in the College of Liberal Arts. Strong academic programs such as the new MFA program in creative writing in the Department of English, which welcomed its first students this semester; the rapidly expanding biochemistry program in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; and the popular psychology program with more than 350 majors. Extraordinary faculty are necessary for strong programs, and I highlight these three programs because they are homes to the first three Distinguished Faculty Fellows in the College of Liberal Arts. Dr. David Graves, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Dr. Alan Gross, Department of Psychology, and Barry Hannah, Department of English, were chosen by a committee of faculty as the first Distinguished Faculty Fellows. Many worthy faculty were nominated, and the decision was difficult. These three faculty members have had remarkable careers and truly deserve this honor. They represent the best that the College has to offer in research and creative accomplishment, service, and teaching. While celebrating the accomplishments of our senior faculty, we welcome this year 22 new tenure-track faculty members to the College. These talented faculty members hold degrees from such places as Duke, The University of London, UCLA, and Harvard. We also welcome new leadership in four important departments this year. Dr. Michael Allen joined the University in August as chair of the Department of Psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast. Dr. Nancy Wicker, now at Minnesota State-Mankato, will join us in January as chair of the Department of Art. On campus, two established faculty members have stepped into roles as chairs: Dr. Tristan Denley in the Department of Mathematics and Dr. Scott McCoy in the Department of Theatre Arts. We are fortunate to have found capable leaders for these programs. The College—comprising 17 departments, 25 degree programs, and 250 faculty—is large and diverse, and this newsletter can bring only a glimpse of all that is happening. Regardless of our different areas of interest and responsibility in the College, we are all committed to providing excellent undergraduate education for our students and graduate programs of distinction in selected areas. We are fortunate to have the dedicated support of our friends and alumni, and I thank all of you for your support. Whether through the Ventress Order, the Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter, gifts to scholarship funds, volunteering to speak to classes, or in some other way, your support has been generous and constant. We are in your debt. I hope you enjoy this issue of the newsletter. We have discussed the possibility of a more frequent online newsletter. Let us know what you think. And when you are next on campus, I hope you will stop by Ventress Hall to say hello.

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The College of Liberal Arts Founded in 1848 with only four professors, the College of Liberal Arts is the oldest and largest division of The University of Mississippi. The College offers a broad and comprehensive course of study including most areas of knowledge in the humanities, the fine arts, and the biological, physical, and social sciences.

Glenn Hopkins, dean Dr. Ron Vernon, associate dean Dr. Holly Reynolds, assistant dean C. Perry Moulds, assistant to the dean, advancement Brandi A. Tolbert, advancement associate afro-american studies Dr. James Payne, Chair aerospace studies LTC Maurice Kilpatrick, Jr., Chair art Professor Jan Murray, Acting Chair Dr. Nancy Wicker, Chair (as of January 2003) biology Dr. Clifford Ochs, Chair chemistry Dr. Charles Hussey, Chair classics Dr. Aileen Ajootian, Chair Economics Dr. Mark VanBoening, Chair english Dr. Joe Urgo, Chair history Dr. Robert Haws, Chair journalism Dr. Stuart Bullion, Chair mathematics Dr. Tristan Denley, Chair Military Science LTC Joseph Blackburn, Chair modern languages Dr. Peggy Sharpe, Chair music Dr. Steve Brown, Chair naval science Capt. Ronald Zaperach, Chair philosophy & religion Dr. Michael Harrington, Chair physics Dr. Thomas Marshall, Chair political science Dr. Robert Albritton, Chair psychology Dr. Michael Allen, Chair sociology & anthropology Dr. Robert Thorne, Chair theatre arts Dr. Scott McCoy, Chair center for the study of southern culture Dr. Charles Wilson, Director sarah isom center Dr. Deborah Barker, Director croft institute for international studies Dr. Michael Metcalf, Director

This publication is gratefully funded by The Ventress Order, an organization established by The University of Mississippi Alumni Association in cooperation with The University of Mississippi Foundation to enhance the total offerings of the College of Liberal Arts. Active membership in The University of Mississippi Alumni Association helps make Liberal Arts possible. Active members have **** on their mailing labels. Please contact the Dean’s Office, College of Liberal Arts, if you have any questions or comments. The University complies with all applicable laws regarding affirmative action and equal opportunity in all its activities and programs and does not discriminate against anyone protected by law because of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex, or status as a veteran or disabled veteran. 10/02-2143-A


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Art professor is University’s teacher of the year rt professor Ron Dale is the University’s 2002 Elsie M. Hood Outstanding Teacher of the Year. His recognition came during the 59th campus Honors Convocation. “In every student’s life, there is at least one teacher who redefines what it means to learn—a teacher who makes us work longer and think more deeply—a teacher who stands firm in his beliefs, whose own excitement about his vocation reinforces the very material he presents to his students,” said Chancellor Robert C. Khayat as he introduced the winner. Dale, who has taught in the Department of Art since 1980, was selected from among the University’s 505 full-time faculty for the prestigious teaching award, which includes a $5,000 stipend. “I’m completely shocked by it,” said Dale, who specializes in painted wood and ceramic sculpture. “This is probably the most significant recognition for what I do, and to get the students’ endorsement is truly a joy. I love to teach, and to be honored in this way is something very special.” In the many endorsement letters sent to the selection committee, students and colleagues described Dale as “an attentive listener and an effective problem solver who recognizes directions and possibilities open to the student ... an exceptional mentor ... a living example of what emerging artists in the art department are striving to be ... a conscientious observer, armed with a keen wit ... honorable and hilarious, exacting and generous, judicious and kind.” A native of Asheville, North

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Teacher of the Year Ron Dale (right)

Carolina, Dale summed up his career goals as “being equally professional as an artist as well as a teacher. I try to instill in my students that they can be good artists, teachers, or both. My goals are to continue making my own art and working with students because I enjoy them.” Dale received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Goddard College and his Master of Fine Arts from Louisiana State University. He was recognized in 1985 by the National Endowment for the Arts as the Southern Arts Federation Emerging Visual Artist and was awarded the 1992 Visual Arts Award of the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters. His ceramic and wood installa-

tion sculptures have been exhibited nationally and internationally, and his artwork has been featured in numerous publications. Several pieces of his work are on permanent displays in galleries throughout the South. “The ability to motivate artistic talent is a rare trait, and the term ‘art teacher’ denotes a very special category of teaching,” Khayat said. “Art is the oldest form of symbolic communication in the history of the human race. “Art transcends language barriers and cultural differences and connects us with the past and with future generations. Art inspires us to think, to question, to admire, and has always been the vanguard for social and intellectual change.”

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Top Teachers

Magazine guru, marine biologist receive college’s top teaching awards wo professors in the College of Liberal Arts received awards for outstanding performance in the classroom. Journalism professor Samir Husni—widely known as “Mr. Magazine”—received the Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award; Gary Gaston, professor of biology, received the Cora Lee Graham Award for Outstanding Teaching of Freshmen. A campus committee chose the two honorees from among nominations by the college’s faculty, staff, students, and alumni. Glenn Hopkins, dean of liberal arts, lauded the professors. “Dr. Husni brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to his classes with his national reputation in magazine journalism,” Hopkins said. “Couple that with his genuine concern for students and their learning, and it’s easy to understand why his classes are so highly regarded by students year after year. “Science education for freshmen is a delicate matter, requiring a special blend of rigor and an understanding of the problems faced by those attempting college-level work for the first time. Dr. Gaston has met this high standard for many years.” Upon learning he had been chosen from among some 250 liberal arts faculty members, Husni said, “Students should come first, not just as a slogan for an institution but as a matter of reality. Our job is not limited to enhancing the students’ intellectual levels of knowledge but also ensuring that our teaching prepares them for the workforce.”

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College of Liberal Arts Dean Glenn Hopkins (center) presents Outstanding Teacher awards to Drs. Samir Husni (left) and Gary Gaston.

Gaston said, “I enjoy teaching freshmen. This award is incentive for me to dedicate myself to improved teaching at all levels. I am honored to be recognized.” Husni joined the UM journalism faculty in 1984. He received a bachelor’s degree in information and documentation from Lebanese University, followed by a master’s at the University of North Texas and doctorate at the University of MissouriColumbia, both in journalism. He publishes the annual Samir Husni’s Guide to New Consumer Magazines. The publication and Husni’s international renown as a magazine authority grew from his hobby of collecting first editions, which began in 1978. Gaston joined the UM faculty in 1990, after teaching biological and

environmental sciences for seven years at McNeese State University. His doctorate is from the College of William and Mary, and his bachelor’s and master’s degrees are from the University of Alabama. A marine biologist, Gaston studies animals dwelling in communities on ocean bottoms. His research is supported by grants from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium. He has served on the board of the international research journal Estuaries. Husni and Gaston received individual engraved plaques for their awards, and their names have been added to permanent plaques that hang in Ventress Hall, home of the College of Liberal Arts.


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Nationally recognized forensic chemistry program rides ‘CSI’-inspired surge of interest he fictional sleuths of the smash CBS drama “CSI” hold degrees from such notable schools as University of California-Berkeley, Harvard University, and Seton Hall, but producers might want to consider adding a character with a degree from The University of Mississippi. The UM degree program in forensic chemistry is ranked among the nation’s top five by the American Academy of Forensic Scientists, said Dr. David Graves, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, who directs the program. “They look at our curriculum, our student GPAs, and student honors, and they say we’re right up there with Michigan State and Cornell,” Graves said. “We’re turning out some really sharp people in this field, and they’re in demand all over the country. A lot of our graduates are people who will be running crime labs in the near future.” About 150 universities offer forensic science degrees, but UM is one of only a handful to offer it through the chemistry department. Many schools base their forensic science programs in political science or criminal justice, but the Ole Miss program focuses on analytical chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology, with doses of physics, genetics, and criminalistics thrown in. “In the crime laboratory, we use people from varying backgrounds— chemistry, biology, criminal justice, depending on what area they’re going to be working in,” said Ken Winter, director of the Mississippi Crime Laboratory in Jackson. “The good thing about taking people from a

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Accomplished faculty and bright students aid in the success of the forensic chemistry program at Ole Miss

chemistry background is that you can plug them into just about any area.” Since its launch in the early 1970s, the forensic chemistry program has enjoyed healthy growth both in students and national prestige. More than 70 students from 27 states are enrolled in the program, and the average ACT score for incoming freshmen is 28, Graves said. Between their junior and senior years, students must complete a 10week internship. Over the past five years, UM interns have worked in state crime labs in Mississippi, Tennessee, Illinois, Colorado, California, Delaware, New Jersey, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, Wisconsin, and Arizona and at the FBI Forensic Science Research and Training Center in Quantico, Virginia. “It allows the students to apply

some of the chemistry we’ve been teaching them in real-world situations,” Graves said. “It also helps them to see the gaps in their knowledge, so they can come back and get what they need to fill those gaps.” Many students end their internships with promises of a job offer when they graduate, he said. About a third of the program’s graduates go directly to work in a crime lab, and the remainder generally enter medical school or graduate school. Graves hopes to add a graduate program in forensic chemistry soon and is working with officials at the Mississippi Crime Lab to develop a curriculum that includes a final year of job training. He’s also preparing for even more rapid growth as CBS debuts its spinoff series “CSI: Miami” this fall. “If that one does well, I look for enrollment to double over the next five years,” he said. FALL 2002

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Areas of need within the College of Liberal Arts

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Home Sweet Home

Gift of furniture enhances beauty of writer’s residence

In addition to the generous gift you read about, the College of Liberal Arts depends on private support for many of its operations. Providing a quality education is a costly venture. Here are some other opportunities for support and involvement. Giving Opportunities Unrestricted and Endowment Funds: Unrestricted and endowment funds allow the office of the dean to support the greatest needs of the College as they arise. Unrestricted gifts can be given at any level through the Ventress Order. Scholarships: With many of our students relying on some form of financial aid, it is imperative that the College sustain a high level of private support for scholarships. Named Chairs: An example is the L. Stacy Davidson Chair in Liberal Arts held by Dr. Ken McGraw, professor of psychology. Named chairs can be established with a gift of $2 million. Named Lectureships: Endowed lectureships give the College of Liberal Arts the funds necessary to bring these outstanding scholars to Ole Miss. Named lectureships can be established with a gift of $1 million. Laboratories and Equipment: Donors whose funds are designated for laboratory renovation and upkeep, or for the purchase of new equipment, are honored through naming opportunities. Faculty Development: Learning is a lifelong process. Providing faculty with development funding directly impacts the level of teaching that our students receive. Support can also be provided in the form of planned and deferred giving. If you are interested in making a gift through your estate, or if you have an interest in any of the areas discussed above, please contact Perry Moulds, major gifts officer, at (662) 915-5961 or pmoulds@alumni.olemiss.edu, or Brandi Tolbert, advancement associate, at (662) 915-1586 or btolbert@alumni.olemiss.edu. PA G E 6

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Shay Youngblood enjoys Curtis Gwin’s furniture gift.

le Miss’ writer-in-residence residence just got even nicer, thanks to a gift from UM alumnus and Florida developer Curtis Hart Gwin. About three years ago, Gwin (’76 BSCE) and his partner bought 4.5 acres near campus for an upscale condominium development. They built a show model and furnished it beautifully. This past summer when the model sold, Gwin was faced with a decision about what to do with the furniture. His realtor friend Tommy Guest of Oxford suggested he ask if the University could use it. “Curtis’ gift has made an already nice home even more attractive for all our writers-in-residence,” said Perry Moulds, assistant to the dean for advancement in liberal arts. “This is a terrific gift that goes for a very good use.” A Tchula native, Gwin has a soft place in his heart for Ole Miss, where he met his wife, then Rita Cobb of Clarksdale. They are life members of the Alumni Association and lived in Oxford several years after graduation.

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Between entering The University of Mississippi in 1967 to study civil engineering and his graduation in 1976, Gwin worked for Oxford engineers E.J. Miller and Tommy Elliott. In 1983, the Gwins moved to Destin, where he began his career as a commercial developer. Today, they are proud parents of a daughter, Jane Hart, a 21-year-old senior at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama; and a son, Curt, who is a community college freshman. Benefiting from the gift this fall is Shay Youngblood, who has settled into the home near campus. She’s also enjoying the generosity of another UM alumnus, writer John Grisham, who gave the University the residence and, along with his wife, Renee, funded the writer-inresidence fellowship Youngblood holds. “Wonderful and generous” is Youngblood’s description of Gwin’s gift. This new furniture really enhances the beauty of this house,” she said.


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Truman Scholarship

Liberal arts alumna hopes to enrich lives of others wo childhood friends shared a dream of providing their community with health care. One now has three children, and the other vows to assist other women trapped like her friend. Keyana Mitchell, 21, of Southaven, Mississippi, received a prestigious Truman Scholarship in spring 2001. Now attending medical school, she was one of only 75 Truman Scholars nationwide and the third University of Mississippi student in three years to receive the $30,000 award for graduate study—a prize she intends to use to fulfill her dream. Mitchell, a native of Clarksdale, hopes to one day own her own medical practice and work with public officials to change statewide health care guidelines. “Since becoming a Truman Scholar, I realize the kinds of changes I want to make will require me to be in government,” she said. “To truly make a difference in the way health care is delivered in this state will require a major change in policy.” As Mitchell recalls the trials her friend has faced as a young mother, she reflected on her own mother’s struggle to raise her. “Her life made me realize how hard it is for young, black mothers to make it,” Mitchell said. “I desperately want to help enrich the lives of young women like her and make it easier, because I could be one of them.”

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Keyana Mitchell

‘Keyana’s mental energy, commitment to scholarship, and desire to help others will enhance and change health care in the United States.’

! Dr. Ethel Young-Minor English and Afro-American Studies Assistant Professor

Mitchell hopes to work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and eventually become state secretary of health. Her interest developed as a high school student and was nurtured at

Ole Miss, where her outstanding record helped her land an internship at the Yale University Medical School. A 2002 Phi Beta Kappa graduate with a 3.9 GPA and numerous other honors, Mitchell now attends Emory University’s School of Medicine and hopes to return to the Delta to provide essential services to those who are least able to help themselves. “Building upon my background in medicine and public health, I would like to evaluate the difference between the health care provided to poor, minority mothers and infants and that provided to white mothers and infants,” she said. “I want to understand the relationship between the economic stability and ethnic background of the mother and child and the health care they receive.” With her experience, Mitchell’s professors believe she can make a difference. “Keyana’s mental energy, commitment to scholarship, and desire to help others will enhance and change health care in the United States,” said Dr. Ethel YoungMinor, assistant professor of English and Afro-American studies. The Harry Truman Scholarship Foundation was established by Congress in 1975 as the official federal memorial to honor the nation’s 33rd president. Scholars are selected on the basis of leadership potential, intellectual ability, and the likelihood of making a difference.

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History’s Mysteries Professor’s book examines mysteries of South’s Native Americans new volume of 12 essays by historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists aims to decipher some perplexing historical mysteries: how and why did Indians of the 17th- and 18th-century South change after the European invasion? The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760, co-edited by Dr. Robbie Ethridge, the University’s McMullan Assistant Professor of Southern Studies and assistant professor of anthropology, examines and details two centuries for which very little is known about Southeastern Indians. “These 200 or so years are practically unknown for the Southeast, yet this is a time in which dramatic changes happened to the Southeastern Indians,” said Ethridge, who has published and presented several papers on Southeastern Indians of the 18th century. “This book contributes enormously not only to our understanding of Southeastern Indian history, but also to our understanding of early American history.” Ethridge co-edited the book with Charles Hudson, Franklin Professor of Anthropology at the University of Georgia and a leading expert on the anthropology and history of Southeastern Indians. The volume contains lectures presented at The University of Mississippi’s 1998 Porter L. Fortune Jr. History Symposium. “Dr. Ethridge’s book is a remarkable example of scholarship,” said

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Dr. Robbie Ethridge

Dr. Jay Johnson, associate director of UM’s Archaeology Research Center and professor of anthropology. “It will stand as a landmark in the anthropology and ethnohistory of the region for many years to come.” Ethridge said the book examines some of the historical forces at work when the Indians of the Southeast came into contact with the modern world system and how the native societies responded to these forces. “From these works, we now understand that the first 200 years of the historical era was a time when fundamental—even catastrophic— changes occurred in native societies of the South,” she said. Ethridge is set to publish another book, The Creek Indians and Their World, 1796-1816, next year.

Three professors receive Fulbrights A trio of faculty members are recipients of prestigious Fulbright Awards and yearlong teaching appointments. Dr. Ann FisherWirth and Dr. Jay Watson, professors of English, and Dr. Susan Dr. Ann Fisher-Wirth Major, visiting assistant professor of linguistics, are among some 2,000 other U.S. Fulbright recipients traveling and working overseas this year. “For the Department of English to have received two Fulbright Awards in one year is further evidence of the high quality of our literary faculty,” said department chair Dr. Joseph Urgo. Fisher-Wirth is in Sweden, teaching American and Southern literature as well as environmental and creative writing. In Finland, Watson is teaching American studies for the English and Dr. Jay Watson Comparative Literature departments at the University of Turku and Abo Akademi University. Major is conducting research and teaching language acquisition to graduate students at The Prince of Songkla University in Pattani, Thailand. “Over the past several years, Susan has pro- Dr. Susan Major vided us with the highest quality of instruction, as well as a strong professional and research presence on campus,” said Dr. Donald L. Dyer, professor and director of linguistics. Fisher-Wirth has been at Ole Miss 14 years, Watson has been here 13 years, and Major came to the Oxford campus in 1998.


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English department offers Mississippi’s only MFA in creative writing he University of Mississippi’s literary-rich Oxford campus, where Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner drafted As I Lay Dying and the late novelist Willie Morris spent more than a decade as writer-in-residence, offers the state’s only Master of Fine Arts in creative writing program. Capitalizing on Oxford’s literary aura, University administrators and Department of English faculty agree the new program will flourish. “Housed in a city and state known for producing nationally acclaimed writers, and blessed with excellent faculty, the English department here is a natural home for an MFA in creative writing,” said Dr. Glenn Hopkins, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. The English department, already renowned regionally, nationally, and internationally for its work in Southern literature and creative writing, is being strengthened by the new academic program, said Dr. Joseph Urgo, the department’s chair. “It’s really calling attention to the literary gold mine that we have here,” Urgo said. “I think the program’s immediate strength is in being located in a center of literary activity, where the quality of writers who pass through Oxford every year is comparable to those you’d see in New York or other metropolitan centers. “We have a very strong faculty here with a tradition of writing,” he said. “Many are scholars and writers with an established commitment to teaching at all levels, graduate and undergraduate.” The MFA program, which takes an

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average of two to three years to complete, enables teachers to respond to the increasing demand for a terminal degree in creative writing, Urgo said. “This program has been immensely successful, as we have had more applicants than we can accommodate,” he said. “We want to be selective and invite the most promising students.” The number of applications is expected to rise even more with announcement of the availability of the new Grisham fellowships, which provide students with a $14,000 annual stipend for up to three years. The fellowships are accompanied by full remission of tuition, Urgo said, providing students “a full ride for three years.” Five English faculty members, who themselves are widely published creative writers, teach the required courses. Among them is Dr. David Galef, professor of English

and 12-year faculty member who coordinates the program. “This is a program with bones in it; one that is rigorous and carefully designed to equip students for the workplace,” Galef said. Students with demonstrated writing talent and a bachelor’s degree must complete 36 hours of course work, as well as 6 additional hours of thesis credit. Students also are expected to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language before defending their thesis, a book-length manuscript of either poetry or prose. About a dozen students are enrolled in the program. Other faculty teaching courses in the program are Beth Ann Fennelly, visiting assistant professor of English; Dr. Ann Fisher-Wirth, professor of English; Barry Hannah, writer-in-residence; and Shay Youngblood, the 2002-03 Grisham Writer-in-Residence. FALL 2002

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New Faces in New Places

The College welcomes new department chairs and assistant dean ART. Nancy Wicker joins the Ole Miss faculty in January as chair of the Department of Art. She earned her Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Minnesota and her B.A. from Eastern Illinois University. As professor and director of the Scandinavian Studies Program at Minnesota State University, she has been working in the field of Scandinavian art history. BIOLOGY. Interim Chair Clifford Ochs joined the biology faculty in 1992. He earned a Ph.D. from Cornell University and B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbara. His research interests include the ecology of aquatic microbial communities in lakes and streams, and he is working on a project determining how nutrients and sunlight affect organisms in plankton communities. ECONOMICS. An Ole Miss faculty member since 1990, Mark VanBoening is acting chair of economics for 200203. The associate professor also is director of the Mississippi Experimental Research Laboratory, where his research interests include human behavior as it pertains to economic theory and policy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona, and his M.A. and B.A. from Wichita State University. MATHEMATICS. Mathematics chair Tristan Denley joined the Ole Miss faculty in 1997, after completing his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge (England) and filling several postdoctoral posts at the University of Umea (Sweden and Waterloo University

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Michael Allen (left), psychology; Mark VanBoening, economics; Cliff Ochs, biology; Tristan Denley, mathematics; Robert Thorne, sociology; Ronald Zaparach, naval science; Scott McCoy, theatre arts; Nancy Wicker, art; Holly Reynolds, assistant dean.

(Canada). His research focuses on graph theory and combinatorics. A native of England, his B.A. is from the University of Exeter. NAVAL SCIENCE. Capt. Ronald Zaperach, a 1979 graduate of Ole Miss, received basic training at the Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Illinois. He was commissioned upon earning his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. He completed Basic Surface Warfare Officer School in 1980 and was designated a surface warfare officer in May 1982. The new department chair wears numerous medals. PSYCHOLOGY. Michael T. Allen comes to Ole Miss from the University of Southern Mississippi. He received his Ph.D. in experimental psychology

from the University of Tennessee, M.A. from Appalachian State University, and B.A. from the University of North Carolina. The new chair’s research focuses on psychological stress as a risk factor for high blood pressure and coronary heart disease. SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY. Archaeologist Robert Thorne joined the Ole Miss faculty in 1970. He founded and for 30 years directed the University’s Center for Archaeological Research, which provided major survey and site excavation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and TVA. The interim chair received his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri, and his M.A. and B.A. from Ole Miss.

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Liberal arts alum named executive editor of Mississippi’s largest newspaper onnie Agnew, UM journalism alum and a member of the Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter Board of Directors, is the new executive editor of Mississippi’s largest newspaper, The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson. Agnew, 39, is the paper’s first black executive editor. He joined The Clarion-Ledger as managing editor in February 2001. A Tupelo native, he earned his bachelor of arts degree from UM in 1984. “I can’t tell you how elated I am to have such an honor. This paper and the impact it has in this state every day are just incredible,” he said. “I look forward to being in this role for a very long time.” Clarion-Ledger Publisher Bill Hunsberger, who named Agnew to the top editing post, said, “Ronnie Agnew is an experienced journalist

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Ronnie Agnew

and manager, and a Mississippi native son. He has shown he has the skills to lead the state’s largest news-

paper organization. He has the talent and determination to make The Clarion-Ledger an even better newspaper than it is today.” After his UM graduation, Agnew joined the staff of the Commonwealth in Greenwood as a reporter and worked at The Sun Herald in Biloxi. He was a reporter at the Cincinnati Enquirer, where he was promoted to assistant city editor in 1988. In 1993, he left Cincinnati to become managing editor of the Hattiesburg American. Agnew was editor of the Dothan Eagle in Alabama from 1997 until he joined The Clarion-Ledger. He and his wife, Cynthia, have three children, Christopher, Victoria, and Rachel.

Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter selects first leaders Ten University of Mississippi College of Liberal Arts alumni have volunteered their time and guidance as leaders for the first Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter (LAAC). The LAAC strives to recruit bright students and unite the College with its 25,000 plus graduates. The group will coordinate small events in different regions

across the Southeast, seek professionals to lecture on campus, identify Ventress Order prospects, and recruit high school students. For more information on the LAAC, please contact Brandi Tolbert at (662) 915-1586 or btolbert@alumni. olemiss.edu.

2002 LAAC Board of Directors Wesla Leech, president

Wesla Leech, president Vernon King, vice president Brandi Tolbert, executive secretary Ronnie Agnew Bob Black

Emilie Coakley Molly McFarland Al Povall Amy Sorenson Miriam Weems

Vernon King, vice president

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Department gets ‘Blood’ transfusion

Poet, playwright, novelist is new Grisham Writer-in-Residence hay Youngblood finds magic in the written word. As a toddler and avid reader, she even dreamed of living in a library. As the University’s 2002-03 John and Renée Grisham Writer-inResidence, Youngblood is sharing her literary fascination, teaching fiction this fall and a multigenre workshop next spring. An award-winning poet, playwright, and fiction writer, Youngblood is the newest recruit for the 10-year-old Grisham program, which embraces emerging Southern writers. After a stint as a visiting professor for New York University’s graduate creative writing program, relocating to Oxford is “like coming home,” Youngblood said, “Being from Georgia and having spent many summers in southern Alabama, the music, the food, the poetry in a turn of a Southern phrase, the thick smell of pine trees and a heavy rain coming are all familiar to me,” she said. “I appreciate being part of new writers’ growth by offering my experiences as a writer and teacher.” The Oxford community “has a rich literary history, and I expect to be inspired to create new work,” said Youngblood, whose short story, “Born With Religion,” won a Pushcart Prize. Youngblood’s other work includes Black Girl in Paris, Soul Kiss, and The Big Mama Stories. Her play, “Talking Bones,” received the

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Shay Youngblood

Kennedy Center’s Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award in 1993, and “Shakin’ The Mess Outta Misery” received Best Playwright and other awards from the Hollywood NAACP Theater Awards in 1991. “The Grisham fellows are accomplished writers, and I’m honored to be part of such a distinguished

group,” said Youngblood, who has degrees from Brown University and Clark-Atlanta University. The annual appointments are funded by novelist Grisham and his wife, who were Oxford residents. Recipients teach writing workshops and participate in English department activities.


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Economics professor shows smart sports teams integrated first—and won more t was no fluke Jackie Robinson played for the Dodgers instead of the hapless Cubs, according to a study conducted by Ole Miss Hearin Professor of Economics Robert D. Tollison. Published in the March 2002 issue of the American Economic Review, the profession’s top journal, the study shows that the era of integration of major league baseball, which played out between the 1940s and 1960s, was led by the sport’s winning teams. Princeton University’s Dr. Orley Ashenfelter, editor of the American Economic Review, said the paper was destined to become a classic. “Racial Integration as an Innovation: Empirical Evidence from Sports Leagues” also analyzes integration records of Atlantic Coast Conference basketball teams. It was co-authored by economics professors Brian L. Goff of Western Kentucky University and Robert E.

I

‘Previously successful entrepreneurs figured out how to obtain black athletic talent and use it to their teams’ advantage.’

! Authors of “Racial Integration as an Innovation: Empirical Evidence from Sports Leagues”

McCormick of Clemson University. While one might think losing teams had the most to gain from utilizing the skills of talented black ath-

letes, the authors found the “firstmovers” were the better-managed, competitively dominant baseball and college basketball franchises. “Previously successful entrepreneurs figured out how to obtain black athletic talent and use it to their teams’ advantage,” the authors said. The keys to managerial success were not limited to the field of play. “In addition to evaluating black player skills,” the authors said, “entrepreneurship in bringing blacks to the majors also involved political skills ....” “Managers of successful firms are pioneers in adopting new ideas, which are then copied by their less innovative rivals,” said Ole Miss Hearin Professor William Shughart. “Professor Tollison’s paper launches an important research agenda, asking whether the same pattern characterizes the lowering of racial barriers in more ordinary industries.”

New department chairs Continued from Page 10 THEATRE ARTS. Scott McCoy has taught acting and directing at Ole Miss for 17 years, headed the department’s directing and graduate studies programs for 10 years, and co-founded the Festival of Southern Theater. The new chair received his M.F.A. from the University of Minnesota, and his B.A. and J.D. from the University of New Mexico. He returned to teaching after a career as a professional actor and direc-

tor in Minnesota, where he founded the Chimera theater group in St. Paul. COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION. Upon Michael Dean’s retirement, Holly Reynolds became assistant dean of liberal arts. On the political science faculty since 1997, she has worked with the Croft Institute for International Studies, enhancing its Latin American studies program. Her

research interests include Latin America’s political parties and legislatures, especially Mexico’s. She also works with the University of Miami’s North-South Center and several government agencies on issues related to our country’s drug-control policy and relations with Colombia and Mexico. She received her B.A. from LSU, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Rice University.

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The Ventress Order

VENTRESS ORDER OFFICERS BUZZY HUSSEY, CHAIR Buzzy Hederman Hussey of Memphis, a longtime supporter of Ole Miss, is chair of the Ventress Order. In addition to her contributions to the University, the 1962 graduate has been involved in community and civic work for many years. She serves as an elder at Idlewild Presbyterian Church and president of the Crippled Children’s Foundation, and participates in the Grantmakers Forum. Hussey serves on several boards, including those for the Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Thomas W. Briggs Foundation, Memphis Botanic Garden, The Little Garden Club of Memphis, MOST, and LeMoyne Owen College. Previous board service includes the Children’s Museum of Memphis, Memphis Symphony League, and Junior League of Memphis. Her chosen career was a partnership with her late husband, Richard. In 1972 the couple purchased Babcock Gifts, an operation still in existence today on Poplar Avenue in Memphis.

KAREN MORI BONNER, VICE CHAIR Karen Mori Bonner of Madison received her B.B.A. from Ole Miss in 1979, and she notes that her favorite teacher was Dr. Jimmy Davis. She is currently working on her graduate degree in counseling psychology at Mississippi College. Bonner has spent 25 years in the family retail business, Mori Luggage & Gifts, Inc. She is an active member of St. James Episcopal Church in Jackson. Bonner also serves as an advisory board member for Habitat for Humanity in Jackson. She and her husband, Jeff, have one child, Zach, who is currently a freshman at Ole Miss.

BRANDI A. TOLBERT, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Brandi Tolbert comes to The University of Mississippi Foundation as advancement associate for the College of Liberal Arts, where she coordinates development activities and fund-raising efforts. Tolbert also works to increase Ventress Order membership and established the first Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter. After graduating from Ole Miss in 2000 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, she was selected for the BursonMarsteller summer internship program in New York. A Brandon, Mississippi, native, Tolbert previously worked at Ketchum Public Relations in Washington.

In memoriam Dorothy J. Atkinson G.B. Delashment James Otis Dukes Margaret J. Gorove

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Dorothy T. Keady Arthur B. Lewis Marcus E. Morrison

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The Ventress Order is an organization established by The University of Mississippi Alumni Association in cooperation with The University of Mississippi Foundation. Named in honor of James Alexander Ventress, a founding father of the University, the Order administers substantial gifts for the benefit of the College of Liberal Arts to encourage its recognition as one of the outstanding education centers in the United States. As professions in today’s society assume more diverse and complex roles, so must The University of Mississippi College of Liberal Arts modify and expand its educational programs. Members of the Ventress Order will help to broaden the scope and content of these programs and to enhance the total offerings of the College of Liberal Arts. For more information on the Ventress Order, please contact Brandi Tolbert, executive secretary of the Ventress Order, P.O. Box 249, University, MS 39677, or call (662) 915-1586.

MEMBERSHIP (June 1, 2002) FULL MEMBERS The full membership is made up of members of the Ventress Order who, upon satisfaction of their membership commitment, or in addition to such commitment, make a minimum monetary contribution of $500 to the Order in a given year. Dale Abadie James Deloach Abbott Marian and Frederick Anklam, Jr. Barbara D. Arnold James Arthur Autry E. Murray Avent Thomas W. Avent, Jr. Carole Sanders and Frank H. Bailey Michael Leo Baker Dan Ballard Sheri Parker Bankston Bryan Barksdale George S. Barnes Brett R. Bartlett Fred E. Beemon, Jr. Johnny M. Belenchia Vasser Bishop Thomas A. Blanton E. Josh Bogen, Jr. Karen M. Bonner Louis K. Brandt David E. Brevard Gregory Brock Adam H. Broome Steven F. Brown Patricia R. Brumfield Gwynne T. Brunt, Jr. Stewart West Bryson Maralyn H. Bullion Hanh and Stuart J. Bullion Harold Burson Timothy R. Cantrell Natie P. Caraway John Hubbard Cheatham III Neal Garver Clement Gerald B. Cole Robert F. Cooper III John Gordon Corlew Frank J. Criddle III Sandra Gail Crosthwait Faye Lanham Daniel Fay S. Davidson Stacy Davidson, Jr. Allison and D. Pete Davis Wanda and Michael P. Dean Rex M. Deloach and Ruthann Ray Cole Delong III Jo Ann and S. Gale Denley Dixie and Herbert Dewees, Jr.

David Isamu Doorenbos W. W. Drinkwater, Jr. Leslie Dukes Charles Martin Dunagin Allan Percy Durfey, Jr. Maurice Eftink James H. Eley Robert Smith Ellis Esther Lewis Ethridge Robert S. Fabris Joseph B. Fenley Calvin Albert Fleming III Ann S. Fox Mary Ann H. Fruge' Dwight Terry Gentry Jean and Kees Gispen C. Daniel Goodgame Hardy Moore Graham Hardy P. Graham William W. Gresham, Jr. Betty Jo and J. K. Gresham Walter D. Gurley, Jr. Marguerite and Curtis H. Gwin Glen Wesley Hall Glinda and Mike Hall Jimmy L. Hamilton Katherine and Jordan H. Hankins William Kirk Hannon David Scott Hargrove Robert Harris Harper Ethelwyn Stevens Hart Samuel B. Haskell III Marian and Julian B. Hill, Jr. Jere R. Hoar Luanne Buchanan and Michael H. Hoffheimer Glenn W. Hopkins Briggs Hopson, Jr. William Stone Howard Julie, Lynn and Norris Howell, Jr. Mary-Hartwell and Beckett Howorth, Jr. Fraser Berkley Hudson David Andrew Huey Judith W. and William R. Hurt Samir Husni Bernice Hederman Hussey Charles L. Hussey

Carter Hutchins, Jr. Wiley C. Hutchins William O. Jacobs Gregory Scott Kent Robert C. Khayat Joseph C. Kiger Michael Lewis King Fred H. Krutz III Lillian N. Landrum Leila and Samuel M. Lane Lilla S. Lauderdale Beverly and Tim Lawrence Alma G. Lewis Ronald M. Lewis, Jr. William Lewis, Jr. Hung Wei Lin John Fair Lucas III Freddie S. McEwan Sharrel and Frank A. McGrew III Keith Dockery McLean Carlette McMullan William Holt McMullan Becky and Edwin E. Meek Michael F. Metcalf Joseph Edwards Miler Georgia Nix Miller and Gary L. Miller Sidna B. Mitchell Karen and Robert S. Montjoy Paul H. Moore, Sr. Dennis E. Moore Anita and Thomas E. Murphy Celia C. Muths James Elmer Nix, Sr. Charles E. Noyes Nancy Jane Otto Rose L. Paris Crymes G. Pittman Allie Stuart Povall, Jr. Scott Morris Prewitt M. Bernard Puckett, Jr. Keil and Kirk Purdom J. Steve Purdon Margaret and James Hugh Ray John Eugene Ray Willard P. Rose, Jr. Joe R. Ross, Jr. David G. Sansing Diane and Richard F. Scruggs Kelly Scott Segars, Jr. Robert Seibels III

Norman Edward Shaw Hazel and John Howard Shows Irene S. Simon Thomas R. Singley LeAnn Smith J. George Smith, Jr. Rose and Hubert E. Spears Sarah A. Spencer Esther Sparks Sprague Carolyn Ellis and William A. Staton III Patricia L. and Phineas Stevens Ygondine W. Sturdivant Crystal Lane Tate Dorothy Lee Tatum Julien R. Tatum, Jr. Stephens D. Taylor Mary Sue and Robert L. Tettleton John Buckingham Thomas Sanford C. Thomas Pamela C. Tims Ancel Cramer Tipton, Jr. Ann F. Tolbert J. Michael Tonos, Jr. James Thomas Trapp Rodney Faser Triplett, Sr. William C. Trotter III James Martin Tucker Thomas C. Turner Lesley and Joseph R. Urgo Ronald F. Vernon Meredith M. Walker, Jr. Juliet H. Walton Mary Ellen and Robert L. Warner, Jr. Lara and George White Curtis C. Wilkie, Jr. Polly F. Williams Norman Mott Williamson Creighton Wilson, Jr. Joseph Kenneth Wong Ralf P. Zapata

Continued on Page 15


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Calendar November 2 Meeting: Liberal Arts Alumni Chapter Board of Directors. Brandt Memory House, 9 a.m. Call (662) 915-1586. 7 Concert: Piano Series at Ole Miss. Meek Hall auditorium, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-7268. 11 Poetry Reading: By J.D. McClatchy, author, editor, and chancellor of Academy of American Poets. Sponsored by John and Renee Grisham Visiting Writers Series. Bondurant Hall auditorium, 7 p.m. Call (662) 915-7687. 12 Silver Em Day: Journalism presents its highest honor. Features previous Silver Em recipients, awards dinner, and more. Details TBA. Call (662) 915-7146. 15 Artist Series: Chanticleer performs “Our American Journey.” Fulton Chapel, 8 p.m. Call (662) 9157411 for tickets, prices.

The Ventress Order [

20-23 Theater Performance: “The House of Blue Leaves,” John Guare’s deliciously satiric look at America in the mid-20th century. Location TBA, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-5816.

December 4

Concert: Mississippi Early Music Ensemble. Paris-Yates Chapel, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-7268.

the abyss between faith and reason, science and religious mystery. Location TBA, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-5816. 31-February 1 Student Hall of Fame Reunion: Includes reception and dinner, tour of campus, dedication of Hall of Fame Gallery, and more. Call (662) 915-7375.

February

5-7 Theater Performance: “Mississippi: The Dance Company,” another great evening of inventive and original dance. Fulton Chapel, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-5816.

16 Artist Series: “Crazy for You,” new Gershwin musical comedy. Location TBA, 2 p.m. Call (662) 915-7411 for tickets, prices.

January 2003

6

22 Artist Series: Parsons Dance Company. Location TBA, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-7411 for tickets, prices. 29-February 1 Theater Performance: “Agnes of God,” a compelling and highly theatrical examination of

Poetry Reading: U.S. Poet Laureate (2001-02) Billy Collins reads and comments. Sponsored by John and Renee Grisham Visiting Writers Series. Bondurant Hall auditorium, 8 p.m. Call (662) 915-7687.

For more events, visit us at w w w. o l e m i s s . e d u / c a l e n d a r / o r www.alumni.olemiss.edu.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14]

AFFILIATE MEMBERS The affiliate membership classification encourages alumni who are recent graduates to provide financial support for the College. The membership requires a minimum gift of $1,000 payable over four years. John Julian Abadie Louis E. Abbott Camille S. Anders Douglas William Atkinson Elizabeth and John Bergin Michael Joseph Boland Gayle Smith Bourland Virginia F. Brooks Cecil C. Brown Mary Terrell Cargill Michael H. Carter Mary Carroll Chiles John Benton Clark Melonie M. Counce

Sidney C. Crews Ralph D. Davison Anna Katherine Dendy Vance Paul Derryberry Jean Cobb Douglas Sarah Kendall Dunn David C. Edrington Roy Cecil Fox William K. Griffin III Dorothy A. Halliday W. Gordon Hamlin, Jr. William H. Keener, Jr. Catherine S. Kidd Thomas W. Kimbrough

Robert Phillip Koontz Kenneth Forst Lange Claudia Martino Molly E. McFarland Johnny P. McRight Willis Roy Minton Marie Austin Moore Samuel K. Morgan, Jr. Deanne Marie Mosley William R. Mott Clifton Perry Moulds Margaret Allen Moyse Allan Linn Murphree Chris Noone

Thomas A. Peterson Jane Ramsey T. Whitman Smith John David Stanford Wayne S. Stuart Samuel C. Thigpen Kari Marie Thompson J.T. Tisdale Brandi A. Tolbert Michael C. Torjusen Todd Alan Vinyard Dabney Dykes Weems Deborah C. West Mitzi J. and Lynn K. Whittington

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Support The Ventress Order The College of Liberal Arts

The Ventress Order

. . .

Please support the work of The Ventress Order and The University of Mississippi by sending your tax-deductible contribution to: The University of Mississippi Foundation, The Ventress Order, P.O. Box 249, University, MS 38677, or go to http://www.umf.olemiss.edu/ and make your gift online. Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone:________________________Work Phone:___________________________E-mail:_______________________ ! This is a joint gift for husband and wife YES, I want to join other alumni and friends of The University of Mississippi College of Liberal Arts in support of academic excellence by making a contribution. . Enclosed is my check for You may charge my ! Visa ! MasterCard or ! Discover Card #____________________ Exp._________ Signature ___________________________________________________________________________________ . I pledge $ Payments will be made: ! monthly (bank draft) ! quarterly ! semi-annually ! annually ! other . Payment to begin on ! I wish to JOIN THE VENTRESS ORDER ($5,000, payable within 10 years). ! I would like to JOIN THE VENTRESS ORDER AS AN AFFILIATE MEMBER* ($1,000, payable within four years). (*for alumni who have graduated within the last 10 years)

! I would like more information about The Ventress Order. Please send me a brochure. ! $150 annual contribution. Other (specify)

.

! I do not wish my name to be publicized in connection with this gift.

Answer the Call!

Support Ole Miss and the College of Liberal Arts. An Ole Miss student caller will be in touch soon for the College of Liberal Arts spring phonathon.

College of Liberal Arts Ventress Hall P.O. Box 249 University, MS 38677-0249

Non-Profit Org. U. S. Postage

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Permit No. 6 University, MS


University of Mississippi College of Liberal Arts 2002 Newsletter  
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