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UMHBLIFE U N IVE R S ITY

OF

MARY

H A R D I N - B AY L O R

SPRING 2014

75 YEARS EASTER PAGEANT

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PLUS: Ninth Avenue renamed in honor of MLK | Peer tutoring helps improve student retention


B I G P I C T U R E | During the semi-annual Reaching Out service event this past March, students delivered wooden playhouses to military families on Fort Hood. In the week leading up to the event, students, faculty, and staff built the playhouses. All 12 houses were given to current UMHB students who are also tied to the military, whether as army spouses, retired veterans, or active duty soldiers.

UMHBLIFE S P R I N G 2 014 | V O L U M E 33, N U M B ER 3

PRESIDENT Randy O’Rear, Ed.D. EDITOR-IN- CHIEF Paula Price Tanner, Ed.D. EDITOR Jennifer Meers Jones ’08 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tyler Agnew Jessa Grassi McClure ’08 Jasmine Simmons PHOTOGR APHERS Jennifer Meers Jones ’08 Randy Yandell ’99

UMHB LIFE IS PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A YEAR BY THE DIVISION OF COMMUNICATIONS AND SPECIAL PROJECTS. UMHB Box 8431 900 College Street Belton, Texas 76513 1-800-727-UMHB life.umhb.edu

Letters and comments can be sent to: umhblife@umhb.edu

ALUMNI LIFE IS COMPILED BY THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS. Please send any information for publishing or change of personal information to: Alumni Relations UMHB Box 8427 900 College Street Belton, Texas 76513

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UMHB LIFE

Or update online: alumni.umhb.edu alumni@umhb.edu


UMHBLIFE S P R I N G 2 0 1 4 | VOLUME 33, NUMBER 3

D E P A R T M E N T S

5| C A M P US L I F E Street on campus renamed in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., 7-Eleven CEO Joe DePinto delivers 2014 McLane Lecture, and more 10| AT H L E T I C L I F E Coach Pete Fredenburg named D-III Coach of the Year, plus women’s basketball advances to ASC championship

F E A T U R E S C E L E B R AT I N G 75 Y E A R S |12 A look back into how the Easter Pageant began and evolved over time, featuring first-hand accounts from alumni who portrayed Jesus or served as directors S TAY I N G T H E CO U R S E |20 The Center for Academic Excellence improves student retention with peer tutoring, focusing not only on academics but also on relationships

11| P H I L A N T H R O P Y Terry Reeves Ferry ’52 sells coin collection to fund endowed scholarship 24| A LU M N I L I F E Check out what’s happening in the lives of alumni and their families— plus profiles on Evan ‘12 and Brittany Montgomery Duncan ’12, Thomas Umstattd ’08, and Edwin CB ’36-’38 and Helen Dreibelbis Holt ’37-’39

JAMES STAFFORD

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O N T H E COV E R | Portraying Jesus in the 75th Annual Easter Pageant, senior Karl Baker shows the crowd the holes in his hands as he exits the tomb following the resurrection. This year’s pageant was held on Wednesday, April 16, 2014. P H O T O BY J E N N I F E R M E E R S JON E S ’0 8

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RANDY YANDELL

Ceremony marks the renaming of Ninth Avenue for MLK On Tuesday, Feb. 18, the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor joined with the City of Belton and the Belton African American Churches United to celebrate the renaming of West Ninth Avenue in Belton in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The change was the result of more than two years of collaboration between city officials, area churches, and UMHB. The ceremony, which took place on campus at the corner of College Street and MLK Avenue, drew a crowd of over 300 attendees. Assisting with the unveiling was Dr. Alveda Celeste King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The daughter of Dr. King’s younger brother, Rev. A.D. William King, Alveda King has held many leadership roles as a minister, lecturer, author, Georgia state legislator, and presidential appointee. She currently serves as director of African American Outreach for the Roman Catholic pro-life group, Priests for Life. Also taking part in the celebration were Elder Charlie L. Berry from Greater Belton Church of God in Christ; Rev. William Hill, representing the Belton African American Churches United; Belton Mayor Jim Covington; and Rev. Andy Davis, UMHB Trustee and pastor of First Baptist Church of Belton. UMHB president Dr. Randy O’Rear and Alexa Stewart from the UMHB Association of Black Students represented the university at the event. During the ceremony, King told a series of stories about her family, specifically her uncle, Martin Luther King Jr. She recalled how, after an angry group of men tried to strangle her uncle, he later told his wife, ”The harder they tried to kill me, the harder I was going to love them.” “My uncle stated, ’Faith is taking the first step, even when you can’t see the whole staircase,’” she said. “Today, this street is merely a step on his staircase. MLK will run right through this campus. While a diversity of students cross back and forth across this street, we are overcoming racial boundaries Dr. King fought to see banished.” Alveda King spoke at greater length the following day as the featured speaker for chapel in a lecture titled, “Faith of Our Fathers: King Family Legacy.”

(Left) Dr. Alveda Celeste King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., speaks during the dedication ceremony; (below) students and guests visit with one another following the unveiling of the new street sign.

“It means a lot for the university to honor this great man and Baptist preacher. Dr. King did not do all that he did just for the AfricanAmerican race; he did it for the human race. We are proud to have the opportunity to honor his life’s work through the renaming of Ninth Avenue.” — D R . S T E V E T H EO D O R E Senior Vice President for Administration and COO

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Julia Amason Walker ’60 will retire at the end of May after 24 years of service to the university. Julia has served as Resident Director in both Johnson Hall and Independence Village. Chris Green will be stepping into the role of Resident Director at Independence Village in June. Rebeka Retta ’90, who has served as RD of Burt Hall since 1989, will be the Resident Director for College View next fall. Julie Barr ’08, who has served as RD of Johnson Hall since 2012, will be the Resident Director for Burt Hall next fall. Steven Haney was named Assistant Director of Development Services in March. Steven is a graduate of West Texas A&M University with two Bachelor of Business Administration degrees, one in accounting and one in finance. Steven has worked as a credit analyst, accountant, trust officer, and most recently as an auditor. Steven and his wife, Lauren, live in Salado and are expecting their first child in July.

Joe DePinto, president and CEO of 7-Eleven, speaks at McLane Lecture On Wednesday, March 26, Joe DePinto, President and CEO of 7-Eleven, Inc., delivered the 2014 McLane Lecture in the Frank and Sue Mayborn Campus Center. The focus of DePinto’s presentation was the model of servant leadership that he has made a cornerstone of the 7-Eleven corporate culture. DePinto said that as he and his staff surveyed the organization, they found that their actions had come to convey an attitude that the individual stores and store operators existed to support the corporate headquarters. “At that point, we flipped the pyramid,” DePinto said. “We renamed the headquarters the Store Support Center. We defined the culture as putting the customers first and supporting the people who worked in our stores.” To weave this new mentality into the corporate culture, DePinto initiated a robust training and feedback program. This focus on individual service and leadership was front and center during an episode of Undercover Boss, in which DePinto appeared in 2010. During his lecture, DePinto featured a moment from that episode where a 7-Eleven employee named Delores exemplified the servant leadership model. “When I was with her, she was tough on me, but I always knew she cared about me,” DePinto said. “She knew every customer’s name, and they all knew her name. She is respected by her community because she loves what she does, and she treats everyone like family.” DePinto and his wife, Ingrid, and their four sons reside in Southlake, Texas. Ingrid is a 1990 graduate of UMHB, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. The McLane Lecture brings nationally recognized speakers to UMHB each year through the generosity of Temple residents Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr.

JENNIFER JONES

A ROU N D CAMPUS

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Social Work Pinning, Lord Conference Center, 7:30 p.m. Education Pinning, Manning Chapel, 7 p.m. Nurses Pinning, Mayborn Campus Center Arena, 7 p.m. Spring Commencement, Crusader Stadium, 7:30 p.m. Minimester registration & classes begin Memorial Day (campus closed)

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june

may

EVENTS CALENDAR 9 9 9-19 23-7/3 23-27 24-27

Summer I & II advising and registration Summer I classes begin (day and evening) Swim Camp – Session I (Mon.–Thurs.) Swim Camp – Session II (Mon.–Thurs.) Color Guard/Drum Major Camp, 9th–12th grades All State Choir Camp, 9th –12th grades, Presser Hall


Madge Meyer (far left) shares insight she has gained as a woman in business. (Left) Students Lucia Hood, Stella Canul, and Askar Jama laugh as Meyer describes how she used humor to diffuse a difficult confrontation. B Y

JENNIFER JONES

student tuition

INCRE A SE IN THE AVER AGE COST OF AT TENDANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL STUDENT IN 2014 -2015

Forum features award-winning author Madge Meyer ’61

This is the lowest increase

in 17 years.

4 7 7 7-17 14-18

Kindermusik, newborn to age 7, days and times vary, Presser Hall July 4th holiday (campus closed) Summer II additional registration Summer II classes begin (day and evening) Swim Camp – Session III (Monday–Thursday) Art Camp, ages 7-12, times vary, Baugh Center for the Visual Arts

august

july

On Thursday, April 3, the McLane College of Business hosted a Women in Business Forum, featuring alumna Madge M. Meyer. She discussed her book, The Innovator’s Path: How Individuals, Teams, and Organizations Can Make Innovation Business as Usual, and outlined the eight principles to which she attributes her success in business and life. “Today we have no choice; we must be innovative,” Meyer said. “To initiate meaningful change, we have to listen deeply to our customers— not just hearing what they are saying but also listening to the ideas behind what they are saying.” Meyer is a renowned public speaker, award-winning author, and the founder of Madge Meyer Consulting, LLC. She was the Executive Vice President, Chief Innovation Officer, and Technology Fellow at State Street Corporation. During the past year, she represented State Street as a consultant assisting MIT Collaborative Initiatives in bringing innovative solutions to problems ranging from global sustainability to health, education, and veterans’ reintegration. Meyer is a 1961 UMHB graduate with a degree in mathematics and chemistry. In 2010 she was recognized as an honoree on the McLane College of Business Wall of Fame.

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T H E N U M B E R S : 2 0 1 4 - 2 0 1 5

TUITION WILL INCRE A SE BY

$15

PER CR EDIT HOUR

FOR THE Y E AR IN A ROW, THERE WILL BE

no increase IN STUDENT FEES

INCRE A SE IN PRICE FOR ROOM AND BOARD THIS REFLEC TS THE INCRE A SES IN THE COSTS FOR C A MPUS DINING SERVICES A ND UTILITIES

4-8 4-8 8 20-24 21-22 25

Art Camp, ages 7-12, times vary, Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Jr. Summer Musical Camp, W. W. Walton Chapel, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. Jr. Summer Musical Camp Performance, W. W. Walton Chapel, 6:30 p.m. Welcome Week Fall advising & registration Fall classes begin CAMPUS L I F E

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COURTESY PHOTO

In December, Dr. Chrisann Merriman’s Mission-based Marketing class (pictured below) donated $500 to the nonprofit Hope for the Hungry. It all began with a few paper clips and ended as a lesson on how to raise money for an organization. Each student started with a paper clip and traded up for something of more value. After multiple trades, they sold their assets and donated the proceeds to Hope for the Hungry, a local ministry whose mission is “assisting children worldwide and serving missionaries who have responded to God’s call to ‘Share the Bread of Life with a Starving World.’”

1st Vice Commander Oscar Houser, Chaplain Rodney Simonds, and Post Commander Jesse Wilson ’81

JENNIFER JONES

Class raises funds for Hope for the Hungry

BY B R I T TA N Y P UM P H R E Y

ROTC scholarship established by local veteran’s organization BY JASMINE SIMMONS Founded in 1919 on the principles of God and country, American Legion is a veteran’s organization that focuses on assisting veteran families and the community as a whole. The Belton chapter recently established a scholarship for students who are active in the university’s ROTC program. The Walton H. Walker Post 55 American Legion Endowed Scholarship is awarded to graduating high school seniors who participate in the Reserve Officer Training Corps program. “The primary reason we chose UMHB for the endowed scholarship is because of their ROTC program,” Post Commander Jesse Wilson ’81 said. “ROTC is an outstanding program for young people who want to go into the military.” Wilson’s affiliation with the school traces back to 1957 when he was a young drill sergeant stationed at Fort Hood. Upon visiting the then all-girls college, he met his wife, Shari Wilson ’60, in Stribling Hall. After a 21-year military career, Wilson returned to the university where both he and his oldest daughter studied and received education degrees at the same time. “We were the first father and daughter to ever attend UMHB at the same time,” Wilson said. “We were both disciples in the Easter Pageant. I lit her candle during Midnight March and passed my robe down to her.”

A spring book drive organized by the UMHB chapter of Kappa Delta Pi netted 202 children’s books for Aware Central Texas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention of child abuse and family violence. The goal of the drive was to provide children’s books for distribution through Aware’s parenting classes, which emphasize the importance of reading in the home. Kappa Delta Pi is an international honor society founded in 1909 to promote excellence, scholarship, leadership, and service in the field of education. The UMHB chapter was granted its charter in November 2013, and the book drive was the first service project organized by the new group. “We are a new organization, so we were very pleased the book drive generated such great results,” said Sarah Coy, chapter president (pictured center with Dr. Christie Bledsoe and DeeAnne Lumley). 8

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COURTESY PHOTO

Kappa Delta Pi’s first service project collects over 200 books


University forms partnership with Threads of Hope ministry On Friday, March 21, the nonprofit organization Threads of Hope celebrated the opening of its new warehouse on the UMHB campus with an open house for students, faculty, and staff of the university. Threads of Hope opened the doors of the order fulfillment center, located in the university’s J.W. Williams Service Center, so visitors could learn about their organization, which helps impoverished women in South America support the needs of their families through the creation and sale of embroidered textiles. The alliance between Threads of Hope and UMHB can be traced back to the fall of 2011. Each year UMHB students plan and stage Missions Emphasis Week, which brings dozens of representatives from missions programs around the globe to campus to talk to students about their work. Dr. David Bonner, who teaches in the McLane College of Business, had become acquainted with the work done by Threads of Hope and recommended that representatives from the nonprofit be invited to participate. That initial campus visit led to trips to Peru by business students in 2012 and 2013, to help the organization evaluate its business processes and outcomes. Realizing that the university’s relationship with Threads of Hope could open the door to international service and learning opportunities for students in other disciplines as well, UMHB recently offered the nonprofit a space in the J.W. Williams Service Center to set up a satellite warehouse and order fulfillment center. “The mission of our university is to prepare students for leadership, service, and faith-informed discernment in a global society,” said Dr. Steve Oldham, UMHB provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. “We are excited that Threads of Hope has accepted our offer of space for their order fulfillment center here on the campus; it will provide opportunities for our students to take part in meaningful volunteer activities within walking distance of where they live. We are also looking forward to exploring how this collaboration could open the door for students from a variety of disciplines to take part in service trips abroad, taking the knowledge and skills they’ve acquired in the classroom and using them to help others less fortunate than themselves. Students who have participated in such trips tell us it is a life-changing experience, and that is something we would love to offer to all of our students.”

Quoted “We were overwhelmed by the university community’s response to support Kids Against Hunger. Nearly 60 faculty, staff, students, and family members packaged food to ship to hungry children across the globe. For some, the service project was family time or a date night, and others volunteered with colleagues or students— all to serve others. In three hours, 15,552 meals were packaged.” — D R . C H R I S T I E B L E DS O E , who headed up the Christian Planning Committee’s campus-wide fundraising effort for Kids Against Hunger. Faculty and staff raised $4,500 for the charity, which helps feed malnourished children around the world. The funds paid for the meals that members of the university community helped package on Tuesday, Feb. 18.

To learn more about Threads of Hope, please visit: http://www.threadsofhopetextiles.org

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ANDREW ZAVOINA | D3PHOTOGRAPHY

Women’s basketball advances to ASC championship game Coming into the season, the Lady Crusader basketball team was picked to finish ninth in the league’s Preseason Coaches’ and Media Poll. The team exceeded expectations, making it into the American Southwest Conference Tournament championship game. The Cru had a rough start to their season going 2-6, but turned a corner and finished the year on a 16-4 run, with the last loss coming in the ASC championship game against U.T.-Tyler. This was UMHB’s third appearance in the ASC title game and its first since 2006. The first half was back-and-forth before UMHB opened up a 31-24 lead with 1:53 remaining in the first half. The Patriots cut it to 31-27 at halftime, then opened the second half with an 11-0 run to take a 38-31 lead. UMHB answered to retake the lead at 42-40, but Madison Wilson converted a three-point play to give the Patriots a 43-42 lead, and the Cru never led again. U.T.-Tyler pulled away late as UMHB’s comeback bid fell short. The loss ended the Cru’s season at 18-10 overall.

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ATHLETIC L I F E

COURTESY PHOTO

Fredenburg named Liberty Mutual Division III Coach of the Year After a season complete with a fourth consecutive undefeated regular season record, a ninth outright American Southwest Conference title, and a twelfth NCAA playoff berth, Head Football Coach Pete Fredenburg received the ultimate reward for his positive influence on his players, school, and community. Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with the National Football Foundation and the College Football Hall of Fame, announced Coach Fredenburg as the 2013 Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award winner for Division III. The Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award is the leading college football honor recognizing coaches for their responsibility, integrity, sportsmanship, and excellence, on and off the field. Liberty Mutual awarded Coach Fredenburg $50,000 to support his favorite charities and $20,000 in scholarships to the Alumni Association. Coach Fredenburg selected the Ronald McDonald House, McLane Children’s Hospital, Helping Hands Ministry, and the Wounded Warrior Project as his award beneficiaries. The UMHB Alumni Association chose to use its funds to establish the Pete Fredenburg Endowed Scholarship. “This is truly an honor,” Fredenburg said. “We stress to our players to make a difference on campus and in their community and we encourage them to be involved. To be able to support these local charities and our students through the generosity of Liberty Mutual just means so much to me.” Coach Fredenburg’s superior season and commitment to his players and community elevated him above a group of five Division III coach finalists through fan votes cast Dec. 10-22 at coachoftheyear.com and ballots from elite selection committees of national media and College Football Hall of Fame players and coaches. Fan votes contributed 20 percent to each coach’s final score, and the media and College Football Hall of Fame accounted for 25 percent and 55 percent, respectively. This year’s 13-win campaign saw the Cru advance to the national semi-finals, where the team lost by one point to eventual champion Wisconsin-Whitewater. The Cru finished the season ranked second in the D3football.com national poll.


Paying it forward Terry Reeves Ferry ’52 sells coin collection to fund endowed scholarship B Y J E S S A G R A S S I M c C L U R E ’ 0 8 In 1950, Terry Reeves Ferry ‘52, stepped onto campus to become a part of the rich traditions she had heard so much about, and to reach her goal of becoming an elementary school teacher. Thanks to a scholarship she received from an anonymous donor, Ferry was able to accomplish her dreams and go on to have a successful career and full life. “I never knew the name of the person who helped me attend Mary Hardin-Baylor. It was some wonderful person,” Ferry said. “So, now that I’m 82, I wanted to pay it forward in some way.” Ferry treasured her time at Mary Hardin-Baylor and said she felt as though her scholarship not only afforded her the chance to reach her career goal, but also gave her a new family. She has fond memories of eating meals in the formal dining room with tables covered in linen, hiking to the city pool for early morning swimming lessons, and getting to witness the life-changing Easter Pageant. After graduating from Mary Hardin-Baylor in 1952, Ferry met and married World War II veteran and mining engineer Neil Ferry. The two married in New Mexico and made a life for themselves in California, becoming successful in their chosen careers. The couple retired in Georgia and eventually made their way back to the Lone Star State where Terry grew up. During their years in California, the couple picked up a hobby that would one day make it possible for Ferry to give back to the university that meant so much to her. “They were always having these coin auctions out there in California,” Ferry said. “We became interested in it, and we began to collect a small collection.” After years of collecting these rare and precious coins, the Ferrys decided it was time to sell them. The collection sold for more than $50,000, which they decided to donate to UMHB to create an endowed scholarship. Ferry wanted to help another Mary Hardin-Baylor student, just like that anonymous donor helped her so many years ago. “I just hope that it goes to some deserving students who apply themselves and make good use of it and then go on to become successful in life so that they can pass it on,” she said. Development officer Michael Ball said that this scholarship couldn’t have come at a better time. “Upwards of 90 percent of our students are receiving some type of financial aid,” Ball said. “As we continue to see an expansion in our enrollment, scholarships are critical for us in helping meet the financial needs of our students.”

Neil and Terry Reeves Ferry

“I have such fond memories of my years at Mary Hardin-Baylor. It not only provided me with a good education that I used throughout my teaching career, but it also taught me moral leadership and gave me a new sense of closeness—the university community came to feel like family to me. My greatest desire is for this scholarship to give another student the chance to experience these same things at the university I love so dearly.” — T E R R Y R E E V ES F E R R Y ’ 52

P H I L A N T H R O P Y

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Celeb Beginning A N U N L I K E LY

1929

• 7 5

Y

JA N UA RY 2 6 , 1 9 2 9

tragedy struck when fire destroyed

In the early morning hours,

the first building built on the Belton campus, Luther Hall (pictured inset). The building, named for president Dr. John Hill Luther, who brought Baylor Female College from Independence to Belton in 1886, housed the entire college until 1907, when Wilson Administration Building was built. After that, it served primarily as dormitory space and housed the dining hall. The night of the fire was so cold that the water used by the Belton volunteer firemen to extinguish the blaze froze. Thankfully, not one of the over 200 girls in the building were injured.

Autumn

The ruins from that fire sat untouched for over two decades. 12

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brating This spring marks the Easter Pageant’s 75th anniversary. Take a look back at how this beloved tradition began and evolved over time.

Jessa Grassi McClure ’08, Jennifer Meers Jones ’08, and Jasmine Simmons contributed to this story

E A R S •

n 1939 Shortly after taking the office of president, Dr. Gordon G. Singleton suggested the idea of an Easter Pageant. He had a direct view of the Luther Ruins from his office window in Wilson Administration Dr. Gordon G. Singleton Building and thought the ancientlooking Roman arches and warm colored stones would be

Dr. Singleton called Miss Cynthia Sory, a 1932 graduate who was now working as the drama teacher. He asked her if she could produce the pageant. She agreed.

Miss Sory was given a $25 budget,

the perfect setting for such an event.

which she spent on dye for the robes, wood from which students fashioned swords, straw hats that were turned into helmets by advanced art students, and aluminum paint to give the swords and helmets a metal appearance. Drama classes studied the New Testament to fashion the costume designs.

Cynthia Sory Broom

F E A T U R E S

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a

“ W H E N I TH I N K OF EASTER PAG EANT I J E S U S TH E F I RST Y EAR . ELOI SE WAS I WAS I N SCH OOL . SH E WAS A L EADE R AND RO L E OF CH R I ST TO ME AF TE R ALL

1940s SPRING 1940

The inaugural production had a cast of 50 students.

Miss Sory wrote the first script, which consisted of five tableaux scenes portraying the week before the crucifixion through music and speeches taken directly from the New Testament. The orchestra played a Stainer cantata and selections from Gounod’s “The Redemption.” The college chorus sang Handel’s “The Messiah.”

Several weeks before Easter, a committee of faculty members and student leaders determined who would play each role, selecting students they believed most closely lived the roles to which they were to be cast. Roles such as Judas and Pontius Pilate were given to students with strong acting skills. No tryouts were held. The same procedure for casting has been followed throughout pageant history.

In the weeks leading up to the performance, President Singleton was met with some objection DID YOU KNOW?

by community members who sent letters suggesting that it would be sacrilegious for a female to portray Christ. He responded that it was no different than the millions of ministers who interpret Christ through word pictures every Sunday.

Eloise Moss Stewart (Jesus, 1940)

Senior Eloise Moss was selected to portray Christ. The elementary education major also served as Student Government Association President and vice-president of the statewide Baptist Student Union.

A handful of people attended the first performance, held at 5:30 p.m. on Easter Sunday. 14

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mentor to me

STILL T H I N K O F THE GI R L WH O P L AY ED AL L OF TH E DAYS D A N E X A MP L E , A N D SH E STI L L DEF I N ES THE TH ESE Y EA RS. SH E DEF I N I TELY WAS

- Elizabeth Underwood McAnelly ’42 (Portrayed Jesus in 1941)

“We glued the beards on our faces. My hair was blonde, so I dyed it for the production to go along with the darker beard. That was an experience for me, seeing myself as a brunette. It was quite fun for us girls to learn how to act like men. We put on long robes and took all of the curl out of our hair and learned to walk like a man. But even with all the fun, it truly was a time of rededication. I think all of us who participated made the resolution to be more dedicated to Jesus and grateful for what he did for us. It was quite a humbling experience to think that I was portraying Christ Jesus. It has influenced the rest of my life, reminding me that we as Christians are supposed to portray Christ all of the time.” Elizabeth Underwood McAnelly (Jesus, 1941)

- Elizabeth Underwood McAnelly ’42

1942

The first performances were done exclusively in pantomime with a music background, until dialogue was added in 1942. A new opening scene was added portraying the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem through the college iron gates while the chorus sang “Fling Wide the Gates.” The performance time was changed to sunrise, and the shows remained at this time until the early 1960s.

F E A T U R E S

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“ OU R D IR EC TO R , MR. A RT H U R PRO S PE R , I N H E RI T ED T H E NEW SP E EC H TEAC HE R. V I V I A N M O O N A RT H U R ’ 5 3 PLAY ED

Mr. Prosper said to her, I am a

S O OUR D IR EC TO R FO U N D T H E LO R D O U R S EN I OR Y EAR T E STIMO NY. W E A LWAYS PR AY E D E S PECI ALLY FOR T H E Y W E R E DI FFI C ULT AUDIENCE AT T E N D A N C E

from just a handful O F AUD I E NCE MEMB ER S AT TH E FI R S T P E RFOR MAN CE I N 1 9 40, AT T E N D AN CE G R EW TO

700 in 1946, THEN

2,500 in 1949. B Y

1 9 5 0 ,

a cast of 200 actresses PE R FO RMED I N FR ON T OF A N E S TI MATED CR OWD OF

5,000.

T H E PAG EA N T G R EW FR O M THE OR I G I N A L

5 scenes in 1940, TO

15 scenes by 1950. 16

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“Being chosen to play Jesus was really a surprise to me. That a human could attempt to portray what the Lord is like—I felt very unqualified. It was a powerful experience. I really tried to give it my best effort at feeling what Christ might have been feeling. The pageant was a lot different then. The whole performance took place on the steps of the Ruins. We didn’t have more than one performance each year, and it was first thing Easter morning. Over the years, I have kept a picture of the pageant, with me in a white robe with a cross on my shoulder. Whenever my four daughters saw that picture, they would ask about it. It was an opportunity to make a witness to my own children.”

- Glenella Grant Scarborough ’50


JO B D I R EC TING PAG EA NT W H E N H E WAS H I R E D AS T H E J U DAS THAT Y EA R A ND A F T E R T H E PAG EA N T WAS OVER

Christian today because of you.

R . TH ROUGH O UT HE R LIFE , V I V I A N T R EAS U R E D H I S

T HO S E WH O PLAY E D JUDAS A N D BA R A B BAS BECAU S E RO LE S TO PL AY. “ - Pat Lockridge Shannon ’53 (Portrayed Jesus in 1953)

1960

Shari Cunningham Wilson ’60 was named the first student director. Prior to this, a faculty member served as director. The pageant continues to be directed by students to this day.

“President Tyson asked me to play Jesus and also direct the pageant, and I told him I couldn’t do both. I chose to direct because I am not an actor and didn’t feel I’d do justice to the role of Christ. They picked a junior to be Christ that year. I got to help select the cast, and many of the decisions about the performance were left up to me. The girls responded very well. I was so thankful and honored to play a part in it. It went very well. It was beautiful weather, and we didn’t have any rain. I consider myself blessed to have had the opportunity to direct the pageant.”

1955

After more than two decades of the Luther Ruins sitting untouched, Luther Memorial was constructed in 1955. The original archways, which were left standing after the fire, were preserved in the memorial. While the memorial was being built, the pageants of 195456 were performed on the east side of Alma Reeves Chapel. Shari Cunningham Wilson (Director, 1960)

- Shari Cunningham Wilson ’60 F E A T U R E S

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It has never rained during pageant. DID YOU KNOW?

“We had one year where the weather was horrible,” Helen Wilson Harris ’75 recalls. “There were thunderstorms for several days before. The newspapers in Temple and Killeen started calling me and asking what we were going to do if it rained on the pageant. I told them, ‘It never rains on the pageant, so it won’t rain.’ The day of the performance it rained all day. We had the pageant at 5:30, and at about 4 p.m. it stopped raining, but was still really overcast and rumbly looking. We got through the whole pageant without rain and in the last scene, the person who played Christ came out from behind one of the pillars and raised his arms and gave the commission to the disciples. Then, as he stepped out, right behind him the clouds broke and a stream of light shone down on him. The whole crowd gasped. It gave me shivers. That moment has always stood out to me.”

“The Dean of Students sent out a memo that said due to lack of interest, the pageant has been cancelled. So five of us went to see Dr. Parker and said, ‘We’re interested, please don’t cancel our pageant.’ He told us, ‘It takes more than five students to make a pageant. It’s Friday afternoon. If you can get 100 signatures of students who will be involved in the pageant by Monday, then you can have your pageant.’ We had meetings in the dorms, and we got way more than 100 signatures.

Helen Wilson Harris (Director, 1974 and 1975)

I served as assistant director as a freshman and sophomore, and director my junior and senior years. One year, during one of the rehearsals, we had a large crowd there. They were waving palm leaves and laying down garments and worshipping the Lord. The next part of the rehearsal was the trial scene with Pilate. Those same crowd members were yelling ‘crucify him.’ That particular evening, several people just began to weep, realizing they were just part of the crowd shouting ‘Hosanna’ and now were saying ‘crucify him.’ So we stopped rehearsal, and a number of people actually prayed to accept the Lord that night. That was a real highlight.”

-Helen Wilson Harris ’75

The pageant was nearly cancelled in the early 1970s. 18

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1974

Bobby Johnson ’76 was selected as the first male student to portray Christ. Both women and men continued to be cast in the role of Christ over the next two decades. Krista McNary Baty ’92 was the last female to play Christ. In 1982, Layne Caraway ’83 became the first male student to direct. Both males and females continue to be named directors today.


E A S T E R PA G E A N T T O DAY E ASTE R PAGE ANT RE M AIN S

student-led & directed. TH E P RE SIDE NT CH OOSE S TH E DIRE C T O R AND TH E ROLE S OF JE SU S AND MARY.

“The university had only been coed for three years when I played Jesus in 1974. Later on, President Bobby Parker told me, ‘When I picked you for your role in the Easter Pageant, I got all sorts of mail from alumnae who didn’t want Jesus to be played by a male.’ He told me he wrote back and said, ‘If you look in your Bible, you’ll find that Jesus was a man.’ Stepping into a role that had been held by so many wonderful ladies throughout the years was an honor and a great responsibility. I played the role of Christ, but in real life I was probably all of the characters at one time or another. Sometimes I was in a state of denial, and sometimes I was too much like Judas.”

- Bo b by J ohnson ’7 6 (Played Jesus in 1974)

AP P ROXIM ATE LY

6,000

AT TE ND TH E TH RE E P E RFORM AN C E S , H E LD AT 12:30, 3:00, AND 5:30 O N THE W E DNE SDAY BE FORE E ASTER.

300 students

PARTICIPATE IN TH E PAGE AN T. IT H AS BE COM E A NE W TRADITIO N TH AT TH E P E RSON P ORTRAYING C HRIS T

selects the twelve disciples

.

IN TH E M ONTH S LE ADING U P TO PAGE AN T, TH E SE STU DE NTS M E E T TOGE TH E R F OR W E E KLY DE VOTIONALS. “As Christians, people see our actions and character first and hopefully that points them to Christ. But it’s the complete opposite for me this year. Thanks to my appearance, people often see Jesus first, and then they look at my character and my actions. It’s an interesting time in life when you’re known more as Jesus than Karl Baker Karl Baker. Overall, Easter Pageant is (Played Jesus in 2014) something bigger than this university; God cares about this. This is the heart of the campus—to present the gospel. We do this because we realize this story has eternal significance in people’s lives.” F E A T U R E S

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Staying th The Center for Academic Excellence improves student retention with peer tutoring, which focuses not only on academics but also on relationships

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he Course S TO R Y B Y PAU L A P R I C E TA N N ER • P R O F I L ES & P H OTOS B Y J EN N I F ER M EER S J O N ES ’0 8

It is common knowledge that the number of students seeking college degrees has risen to an unprecedented level: in 2013 more than 14.4 million students were enrolled in a college or university, working toward a bachelor’s degree. What is less well known is that, across the U.S., roughly half of the students who begin a bachelor’s degree never finish it. Katie Bonner wants students at UMHB to beat those odds, and as the director of the university’s Center for Academic Excellence (CAE), she devises programs to help students succeed in their studies and complete their degrees. “There is a big gap between high school and college-level work, and there are many students who

struggle with that transition,” Bonner explains. “Our goal is not to do the work for them, but to encourage them and help them develop the skills they need to do well on the college level.” UMHB’s Strategic Plan of 2010 called for the university to ramp up efforts to improve student retention, and the CAE has been working handin-hand with the Office of the Provost to do just that. The center sought and obtained International Tutoring Training Program certification from the College Reading and Learning Association in 2011 and implemented a new training program for tutors soon thereafter. Coupled with efforts to increase student awareness of tutoring opportunities, the changes have generated impressive results. In the fall of 2012, the CAE held 950 tutor-

ing sessions, an 83 percent increase over the fall of 2011. In the fall of 2013, the center logged 1,442 tutoring appointments, which was a 52 percent increase over the previous fall. Bonner attributes this growth to several factors. “We have really excellent students working as peer tutors,” Bonner says. “We train them to make their tutoring sessions more than just subject focused; we encourage them to build relationships with the students, so they will feel comfortable coming back for help when they need it. And our tutors often end up recruiting other students to come to the study sessions. We provided the tutors with hoodies that say “CAE Tutor” on the back; when they wear them around campus, they serve as human billboards!”

F E A T U R E S

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“We have also worked through the Freshman Seminar classes, which all freshmen must take, to emphasize where the CAE is and that it is not just for remedial students. We tell them that we can provide individual or small group tutoring for any of their core classes. As a result, we have had more and more freshmen coming in, and there seems to be less stigma associated with seeing a tutor than there was in the past.” Another program contributing to the tutoring program’s growth is the “Grades First” early warning system which was instituted at UMHB three years ago. The system asks the professors in each of a student’s classes to report every two weeks whether the student is “at risk to fail” or “not at risk to fail” the class. The summary of each student’s reports is sent to his or her advisor and coach (if the student is an athlete), and students who are reported “at risk” are quickly issued an invitation to come in for tutoring at the CAE. The system provides a “wake up call,” giving students a chance to seek help and turn their grades around before it is too late. “All of these efforts are helping us reach more students with our tutoring program,” says Bonner. “It’s all in keeping with our mission as a university; we want our students to succeed in their studies, and we want to maintain our emphasis on academic excellence. The more we can help our students help themselves, the better job we’ll be doing on both of those counts.”

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MEET THE HOMETOWN: El Paso CLASSIFICATION: Junior MAJOR: Engineering

JOSE OSTOS

FAITH & FOOTBALL: “I was recruited to play right tackle for the football team. I love being at UMHB because it has really helped me grow in my faith. During football season, we do devotionals during the week and after practice you can choose to stay to pray. Even things as simple as attending chapel once a week and getting involved in a local

Jerah Stanford HOMETOWN: Alvarado CLASSIFICATION: Senior MAJOR: Nursing HOW SHE GOT INVOLVED: “When I first started college, I didn’t really transition well. I was introduced to [CAE director] Mrs. Bonner, and she hired me as a tutor, which typically doesn’t happen to freshmen. I did well in high school and I had already taken a lot of AP courses in high school, which made it possible for me to tutor those subjects. I tutor all prerequisite courses to nursing and then actual nursing classes, too. The CAE allowed me to work and sharpen my study skills.” FORGING BONDS: I am really close with the other tutors. When I started I was the youngest one there, so the older ones served as mentors to me. They helped me adapt to college life, and now I feel fortunate to be able to do the same thing for our younger tutors.” MOST GRATIFYING TUTORING EXPERIENCE: “As a tutor, I get many questions about what my experience has been like as a nursing major. It is so rewarding to help someone begin the nursing program because I wish I would’ve had someone to do that for me. I definitely can relate to the students, and I love that I have the opportunity to provide them with not only educational help, but also advice on the paths to follow to be a successful nursing major.”


E TUTORS church are things that I didn’t really have back home.” WHY HE TUTORS: “As a a tutor you aren’t just helping your peers academically; you are also building a relationship which hopefully makes them feel comfortable enough to keep coming back. With so many of the people I work with I am not just their tutor, but I am also now their friend. Not only does it benefit them, but it is also beneficial to me as well.” FUTURE PLANS: “I am a part of the shared engineering program between UMHB and Baylor, which means I am taking the lower-level engineering courses here and, once I’ve completed those, I will transfer to Baylor for the upper-level classes. A great perk to this program is that, once you graduate, you qualify for automatic acceptance into Baylor’s master’s program, so in just a couple more years I will leave with a master’s degree. After that, I hope to go into civil engineering.“

NIA WILLIAMS HOMETOWN: Arlington CLASSIFICATION: Junior MAJOR: Accounting LIGHT BULB MOMENTS: “I love sitting down one-on-one with students and watching the light bulb click. I’m always trying different things and figuring out new ways of teaching when I can tell they are not getting it. For example, when I am tutoring someone for New or Old Testament class, sometimes they have trouble understanding the stories just from reading them in the Bible. So I tell it to them in a different way, and you can just see it click. I love working with people until they get it and can turn it around to make the grade they need. I want to work as an accounting professor one day, so tutoring is great experience and also confirmation that this is the career path I should take.” SUCCESS STORY: “I worked with a football player who was an opportunity student and was on academic probation. I told him, ‘We are going to change that.’ Even though I couldn’t tutor him in all of his classes, I made sure he was also working with other tutors and was on top of his work. He would check in with me. He ended up getting his grades up, off of probation, and back on the football team. Now a lot of people look up to him as an example and a mentor. Stories like that make the work worthwhile. ”

Which courses generate the most requests for tutoring?

Accounting

Algebra Anatomy and Physiology

English Composition Pre-Calculus

Statistics

F E A T U R E S

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Dr. Jerry Bawcom and his wife, Vicky, watch as the signage is installed on Bawcom Student Union building. Dr. Bawcom served as the 21st president of UMHB from 1991 to 2009.

A LUM N I LIFE ’38 ’74

April Swilling Spring ex ’74 recently published her first book, Fear Not. April is married and has three adult children and five grandchildren. She and her husband live on 10 acres in a little farming community in Michigan. She works part time as an RN and a piano instructor. The book may be purchased from West Bow Press or amazon.com. April may be reached at 19165 Armada Center Rd., Armada, MI or MA52spring@gmail.com.

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’75

’88

’78

’91 ’94

Gloria Mattson Huerta was awarded the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) on Sept. 17. She serves as campus Dean of Nursing of West Coast University in Ontario, Calif.

Mildred Hudson Stowe celebrated her 100th birthday on Nov. 23.

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Andrea Brooks Tucker is the Chief Nurse Executive at East Central Regional Hospital in Georgia. She was also named director of mental health partnerships at Georgia Regents University College of Nursing. She was formerly the Nurse Executive at Southwestern State Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. Andrea had previously worked as a behavioral health consultant for Lockheed Martin and the Department of Defense in San Antonio; director of nursing at the Apalachee Center in Tallahassee, Fla.; and as executive director for the Texas Impaired Nursing Program.

Helen Costa Coronel graduated from Vanderbilt University with her Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) in August 2013. She currently works as a Family Nurse Practitioner for the Army at Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Ala. Alan Simmons is head boys basketball coach for Rockwall High School.

Fran Dunlap Clark has written a book, The Meeting On The Moon. Fran, a child advocate, said she wrote the book to expose the elements that allow for school bullying situations to start and flourish, and to explore the power of spiritual and human relationships. For excerpts visit franclark. com or contact her at fran@franclark.com.


Got news? Alumni Life reports news received Oct. 15, 2013, through Feb. 15, 2014. If you have news to share, submit online at life.umhb.edu or send it to: Alumni Relations, UMHB Box 8427, 900 College Street, Belton, Texas 76513 or alumni@umhb.edu. To make a memorial gift, please contact: Development, UMHB Box 8433, 900 College Street, Belton, Texas 76513.

WEDDINGS

JENNIFER JONES

Adrienne Akins ’04 to Bradley Warfield, June 9. Adrienne is an assistant professor of English at Mars Hill University in Mars Hill, NC. She received her PhD in English from Baylor University in 2011.

’94

Chris Nagel was honored with a VITAS BEST (Building Excellence, Satisfaction and Teamwork) Award for 2013. He has served as a Cooperative Baptist Fellowship endorsed chaplain with VITAS Innovative Hospice Care in Houston since 2008.

’06

Connie Carver Guzman earned a master’s in Human Behavior from National University and is now working as the Campus Center Director for Park University in Oceanside, Calif.

’07

Robert Copeland is the small groups pastor at Friendswood Community

Church in Friendswood, Texas.

Sara Hillis ’04 to Peter Ousby, Oct. 12. Sara is the associate director of student activities at Pennsylvania College of Technology and is pursuing a doctorate of education at Drexel University. Lauren Marie Sanders ’04 to John Dustin Marx, Oct. 12, in Temple. Lauren is the head girls golf coach and a special education teacher for Belton ISD, and John is employed with Space-X as a contractor. Mandi Bundrick ’06 to Matthew Riley, Feb. 8. They are now serving at Central Penninsula Church near San Francisco, Calif.

Kathryn Nicole Spain ’10 to Dominique Winston, Nov. 30, in North Richland Hills. Kathryn is employed with Killeen ISD while pursuing her master’s degree in Human Resource Management from Texas A&M University-Central Texas in Killeen. Dominique is a tactical networking specialist in the U.S. Army, stationed at Fort Hood. He is pursuing his associate’s degree in aviation science.

Miranda Moon ’12 and Coley Taylor ’12, July 6. Coley is working for Truthcasting, a video streaming company in Temple, and Miranda teaches second grade in Belton ISD. Sara Downing ’13 to Joshua Beyer, Dec. 20, in Georgetown. Lauren Nicole Knight ’13 to Jake Edward Stewart, Nov. 24, in Jonestown. Lauren graduated with a bachelor’s degree in visual communication, and Jake is employed by the U.S. Army as a captain.

BIRTHS Laura Myers Bowers ’98 and her husband, Chase, announce the adoption of Samuel McCully “Mac,” born Jan. 14. He joins big sister Maddie Grace and big brothers Nate and Jeb.

He joins big brother Josiah.

Jeremy ’99 and Merritt McKinnon Johnston ’00 announce the birth of their son, Silas Samuel, July 8.

Jeffrey Hunt ’05 and his wife, Nikki, announce the adoption of Brenner Xavier, on Aug. 1, 2013. The adoption was finalized Feb. 27. ALUMNI L I F E

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Anthony ’06 and Lindsey Harkrider Deringer ’08 announce the birth of their daughter, Ruthie Ann, Nov. 16.

Daniel ’07 and Elizabeth Vein Webb ’07, MBA ’10, announce the adoption of their daughter Alice Corinne, born May 30, 2013.

Brittney Dickey Melton ’06 and her husband, Derik, announce the birth of their son, Logan Wesley, Oct. 6.

Paul ’09 and Whitney Picklo Dorton ’09 announce the birth of their daughter, Evelyn, in February 2013.

Kevin ’07 and Holly Hughes Davis ‘09 announce the birth of their daughter, Blair Debra, Dec. 18. They live in Gober.

Josh ’10 and Hope Strickland Saenz ’09 announce the birth of their daughter, Mila Ann, Nov. 6.

Sarah-Jane Sanders Menefee ’07 and her husband, Matt, announce the birth of their daughter Norah Jubilee, Nov. 19. She joins big sister Evelyn. Sarah-Jane is the communications/web officer for Education Service Center Region 12 in Waco. Shelly McMullen Neuwirth ’07 announces the birth of her daughter, Elsa, Feb. 15, in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Jeff ’06 and Charis Himmel Olchesky ’07 announce the birth of their son, Jeffrey Robert III “Trip,” April 8. He joins big sister Amerson Rose. Esther Buchanan Houghtaling ’07 and her husband, Spencer, announce the birth of their daughter, Avery Elise, Aug. 6. She joins two-year-old big sister Hannah.

Diego, Calif.

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Steven Schwarz ’07 and his wife, Katie, announce the birth of their daughter, Riley Elle, Dec. 4. Steven serves the U.S. Navy as a chaplain and is currently stationed in San

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Sarah Sultemeier Everett ’11 and her husband, Nick, announce the birth of their son, Landon Bradley, July 16. Sarah is a nurse at McLane’s Children’s Hospital PICU.

D E AT H S Roma Clift Montgomery ’21-’24, Nov. 28, in Lawton, Okla. She worked for two years as a journalist for the Norman Transcript, then enrolled in the University of Chicago where she received her master’s degree in psychology in 1929. She married Jacob Randolph Montgomery on Feb. 6, 1930, then moved to Lawton. Roma was active in many civic activities which included the Lawton Garden Club, the Lawton Community Theater, Lawton Junior Service League, USO, Comanche County Red Cross, Community Concert Association, Campfire Girls, Adult Institute of Discussion, Shakespeare Club, and Carnegie Library, and was a decades-long supporter of Centenary United Methodist Church. Ruth Beachum ’35, Jan. 29, in Raymonville. Alta Bowers Cates ’36, Dec. 9, in Lubbock. She taught elementary school until the birth of her oldest daughter. She was active in the First Baptist Church, PEO, the Lubbock Women’s Club, and various support groups for Texas Tech University.

Charline Hickerson ’38-’39, Nov. 8, in Belton. She was a dental assistant at Fort Hood for one year then transferred to the V.A. Hospital in Temple for the rest of her 33-year professional career. She was a member of Elm Grove Baptist Church. She was the sister of Mac Hickerson, Honorary Alumnus. Manuela “Meme” Garza Longoria ’39, Nov. 15, in Weslaco. Her first teaching position was at the King Ranch in Kingsville. She taught Spanish at Mission High School, while her husband was overseas in Europe during World War II. After his return, she was involved in the management of their business complex. She continued to teach for Monte Alto, Edinburg, and La Sara ISDs; she also served on the Monte Alto school board. After her husband’s death, she stayed active as a reading consultant for the Migrant Program at the Region One Service Center in Edinburg. Meme also taught in the Alternative Program at Pan American College. Mary Cage Hagar ’45, Oct. 24, in Waco. She served as a home economics teacher, a high school counselor, Women’s Missionary Union member and director, a Bible study teacher, a conference facilitator, a Mission Service Corps volunteer, and a longtime member of Columbus Avenue Baptist Church. Eugene Drake, Dec. 13, in Houston. He was the husband of Jeanne Bruce Drake ’48, who preceded him in death. Retta O’Bannon Hanie ’48, Dec. 22, in Dallas. For over 30 years she was associated with the White Rock News, first as the editor and then as the owner of the paper. Martha Perry Stickley ’48, Jan. 9, in Houston. Carolyn Mangham Norlie ’50, Nov. 26, in Tyler. She taught school for nine years in San Antonio, Garland, Plano, and Chicago. She then worked for a number of years as office manager for her husband’s medical practice. She was a member of the Hideaway Community Church where she was a part of the choir for over 23 years, and was active in several area ladies’ Bible studies. She led music at Colonial Nursing Center in Lindale for many years.

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Writing their own love story A shared love of journalism turns into something more for Evan ‘12 and Brittany Montgomery Duncan ’12 BY T YLER On May 25, 2013, Evan ‘12 and Brittany Montgomery Duncan ’12 exchanged vows and committed to work together—in the good times and in the bad. But that’s nothing new for them. Evan, a journalism and theology/ philosophy dual major, and Brittany, a journalism and church history dual major, began working together for The Bells student newspaper in 2009, on the day Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan killed 13 people at Fort Hood. Evan went to Fort Hood as a photographer, and Brittany helped gather information in the journalism lab as the chaos unraveled. “We found ourselves together often, as we both are passionate about telling stories, trying to understand faith and life, and working hard,” Evan said. Since both studied in the journalism and Christian Studies departments, they were frequently in classes together. They quickly became competitive. Brittany remembers telling Evan, “‘I’m going to beat you on this test,’ but he always got two points better than me on everything in class.”

“Everything,” Evan emphasized with a laugh. Evan and Brittany both worked as editors for The Bells, with Evan serving as editor-in-chief and Brittany as assistant editor one year, and then reversing roles the following year. The year Evan was in charge, “was probably the year of the least romantic feelings. I was a tough editor,” Evan said. As reporters, they were passionate about expanding their work beyond what was happening on campus. “When you cover a national story that’s bigger than just your school, that’s when you get really excited about what you’re doing,” Brittany said. Under their leadership, the newspaper won The Society of Professional Journalists’ award for first place as the best all-around non-daily student newspaper for four-year schools in Texas and Oklahoma. SPJ awarded Evan, Brittany, and journalism major J.C. Jones ’13 second place among all college and university newspapers in Texas and Oklahoma in the general news reporting category for their coverage of the Texas

AGNEW

wildfires in 2011. The fires hit home for Brittany especially, because they burned areas of her hometown in Magnolia. Driving from town to town covering the fires, Brittany noticed Evan’s kindness, and “that’s when I decided I liked him,” she said. They started dating shortly after working on the fire stories together, and seven months after they graduated from UMHB, Evan proposed at the same park they often walked to as students. Today, Evan is the Communications and Media Director at First Baptist Temple and attends Truett Seminary in Waco. Brittany works as a coordinator at Livesure, an insurance marketing company in Temple where she does “a little bit of everything” including communications and social media. Prior to that, Brittany worked in the news department at the local TV station KCEN. During that time, she covered events such as the Hasan trials and the fertilizer plant explosion in West. “Working for The Bells definitely prepared us for the future—not only in our careers, but also for our life together,” she said.

COURTESY PHOTOS

First comes reporting, then comes marriage...

Left to right: Just friends at the time, Evan and Brittany share lunch together with other Bells staffers at adviser Vicky Kendig’s annual end-of-the-year party in May 2010; the two pose for a picture during a trip to New Orleans for a newspaper conference in October 2011; the couple graduates together in May 2012, then marries the following year on May 25, 2013.

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Ramona Caldwell Barlow ’57, Dec. 6, in Rockdale. She taught school for 25 years in Rockdale. She taught physical education for three years, Title 1 for one year, and sixth-grade social studies for 20 years. Ramona was active in First Baptist Church, holding various offices in Sunday School, Woman’s Missionary Union, and Senior Adult Ministry. She was a member of Rockdale Historical Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, and Delta Kappa Gamma. She was a historian for First Baptist Church, Rockdale Historical Society, Lucy Hill Patterson Library, and Rockdale Homecoming Association. Jackie Campbell Way ’58, Jan. 31, in Dallas. She was active in the community and her church, First Presbyterian Church of Richardson, where she served as an elder and member of the choir. Her community activities included the Bluebonnet Club of Richardson, PEO, and Elle’s Belles. Jackie was an accomplished pianist and singer. She taught piano for a number of years and enjoyed performing with the Piano Civic Chorus. The highlight of her career was a trip to Carnegie Hall to sing. She was co-owner of a T-Shirts Plus franchise in Plano. Bettye Cowan Pruett ’59, Nov. 19, in Burleson. She was a music teacher for 35 years, teaching in Greenfield, Ind.; Brushton, N.Y.; Lampasas; and Copperas Cove. Bettye was a member of the Texas Music Education Association and Southern Hills Baptist Church. She played organ and piano, was a musician and singer, and often led Bible studies for women. Her son, William Pruett, may be reached at 509 Plantation Court, Burleson, TX 76028. Ilene Johnson ’63, Dec. 27, in Dalton, Ga. She taught school for 38 years in Aldine ISD and was a member of Delta Kappa Gamma International. While living in Texas, she was a member of White Oak Baptist Church and taught Sunday School for many years. After moving to Dalton, she was a member of Dalton First Baptist Church. Herbert E. Polgue, Nov. 19, in Kerrville. He was the husband of Betsy Dabbs Polgue ’64. Kloma Brown Rucker ’66, Dec. 1, in Temple. She taught for 21 years at Thornton, Meridith-Dunbar, and Jefferson Elementary Schools. She was a curriculum facilitator for four Temple elementary

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schools and one Waco School. She was a member of the Texas School Book Adoption Committee, TCTA, National Education Association, the Retired Teachers Association of Bell County, and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She served as chairwoman of the March of Dimes and was a past president of the Business and Professional Women’s Club of Temple and the Temple Council of Parents and Teachers Association. She was co-founder of the Temple Junior Cotillion Club and was a member of the Cotillion. She was active with Heart Drive, the Bell County Unit of the American Cancer Society, Avolonte Study Club, and the Girl Scouts. She was named Outstanding Woman Citizen of the Year in 1962 by the Temple Chamber of Commerce. She also taught Sunday School and sponsored youth fellowship groups at Seventh Street Methodist Church, and she was a member of First United Methodist Church, where she served as church secretary. Marilyn Edward Woodruff ’69, Oct. 30, in Milwaukie, Ore. Marilyn taught for 40 years in Texas, Missouri, and Oregon. Before retiring in 2009, her final 11 years were devoted to Kraxberger Middle School in Gladstone, Ore., where she taught math, health, vocal music, and leadership classes. Marilyn was trained as a lifeguard and spent years coaching soccer, basketball, track, cross-country, swimming, and tennis. She also taught classes at Drury College and Portland State University. Cheryl Pullin Simcik ’70, Jan. 26, in Woodway. She worked for many years as a bus driver for Round Rock ISD. She and her husband recently retired to the Waco community to be near their children. Paula Hewitt Townsend ’72, Nov. 24, in Temple. She worked for Central Texas Center for MHMR Services and the Bell County Sheriff Department; and she retired at Bell County Juvenile Probation Department after 25 years. She later taught sixth, seventh, and eighth grade at Temple Education Center, and she taught criminal justice and early childhood education at Temple High School. She was a Golden Life member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she served as secretary for the Temple Alumnae Chapter. She also served as correspondence secretary for the Dunbar-Meridith homecoming organization, and was a member of the TISD Superintendent Advisory Committee

for the recent school bond issue election. She was a life member of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, where she was a member of the Women’s Ministry, Naomi Circle, and president of the Temple Area Sub-District Senior Women’s Ministry I of the St. John Regular Baptist District Association in Austin. Druane Holton McLoud ’75, Dec. 8, in Temple. She worked at Scott & White Hospital, holding positions as nephrologist clinician, dialysis supervisor, and oncology nurse clinician. She retired in 2004 after 26 years of service. Julie Young Lawson ’76, Sept. 17, in Gatesville. She was listed in the premier edition of Who’s Who in American Nursing. During her long nursing career, she was employed at Scott & White neonatal ICU nursery, the Hillcrest emergency room, and as an instructor at McLennan Community College. She joined the Department of Veterans Affairs in Marlin in 1978 and transferred to the Fort Lyon, Colo., VA Medical Center in 1985, where she was chief of nursing. While in Colorado, she was also an adjunct faculty member at Otero Junior College. She retired from the VA in 1990. She was a member of Central Christian Church, Hamilton House, and Daughters of the Nile; past president of University High PTA; president of the United Methodist Women; past queen of Marek Temple; and member of the Hillbilly Clan of Karem Shrine and the Kokopelli Club. Viola Longoria Couling ’90, Jan. 3, in San Antonio. She retired after more than 23 years of teaching in Killeen ISD and NISD in San Antonio. Dorothy T. Arnold ex, Sept. 27, in Victoria. Her teaching career began in 1940 at Liberty School in Victoria County, and continued for 38 years, of which 30 years were spent at Flour Bluff in Nueces County as a classroom teacher and business manager. She participated in many professional and civic organizations on local, district, state, and national levels. She received numerous awards, honors, certificates, and recognitions related to educational pursuits. After her retirement in 1978, she enjoyed living in the Mission Valley Community doing volunteer work, church work, and continuing participation in professional and civic pursuits, which included the Pilot Club of Cuero and Heirloom Stitchers Guild.

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Rising to the top

BY T YLER AGNEW

At just 28 years old, Thomas Umstattd ’08 is founder and CEO of a highly regarded web marketing company for Christian authors Going into college, Thomas Umstattd ’08 had plans to start a business one day. But even he couldn’t have predicted that it would happen before he graduated. Umstattd built his first website at the age of 13 and taught his first web design class at just 16 years old. He graduated cum laude from UMHB with a degree in business management. While in college, Umstattd attended a writer’s conference with a brochure featuring websites he had designed. “At that conference, a couple of authors wrote checks for new websites right there on the spot,” he said. “That was when I knew I had stumbled upon an under-served niche.” This led to the birth of Umstattd Media, his first web design and media company, which he founded in 2007, while still in college. In 2009, he developed AuthorTechTips.com, a website that helps authors use the web to promote their books. The site was

twice featured in Writer’s Digest as one of the 101 most helpful websites for authors. AuthorTechTips.com is now AuthorMedia.com, a resource for authors that need assistance building their websites and strengthening their brand. Now 28 years old, Umstattd serves as the CEO of the web marketing company Castle Media Group LLC, which he founded in 2011. He now has five full-time employees and works with several part-time contractors. Castle Media Group is an umbrella web marketing company comprised of three separate divisions that aid small businesses and individuals by designing websites and developing social marketing strategies. “We specifically focus on Christian authors. We strive to help the church use technology to advance God’s Kingdom,” Umstattd said. “‘Christian’ often means second rate in the eyes of many business people. We want to flip that reputation on its head.” And Umstattd has done so. “We are now one of the biggest developers of Christian author websites in the country,” he said. “We picked a small pond and became

one of the biggest fish in that pond.” For Umstattd, one of his favorite parts of the job is helping authors to, as he calls it, “level up.” “We help them go from unpublished to published, or from published to bestselling,” he said. Also an award-winning speaker, Thomas teaches audiences all over the world. His friendly speaking style blends multimedia and audience participation. He offers audiences a unique perspective that helps them use the web in a whole new way. Looking back, Umstattd can pinpoint specific college experiences that charted the course and led him to the path he is on today. “It all began while I was studying international business in Ecuador through the UMHB Spring Break study abroad program. This was the trip that really revealed to me that I could use my marketing skills to advance God’s kingdom.” Returning from the trip, his business courses further confirmed his passion for the industry. Success for Umstattd is derivative of his time as a Crusader. “UMHB gave me a lot of access to my professors. They became mentors to me and helped me become the person I am today.”

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In memory: Dr. A.A. Hyden Dr. A.A. Hyden, Honorary Alumnus ’89, passed away Jan. 19 in Waco. He served as academic dean and faculty member at UMHB from 1956 to 1970. His late wife, Marjorie Hyden, HA ’89, served as BSU (now BSM) director and in other capacities at UMHB. Hyden was born on Dec. 11, 1919, in Groesbeck, Texas. He attended the University of Texas, where he also played on the basketball team. After two years, he was drafted into the Army and was a part of the Signal Corps. He worked in the Pentagon when it first opened and was then transferred to London to continue his work with the Signal Corps. He was in London when some of the most severe bombing occurred and was in Paris the night it was liberated from the German army. Honorably discharged on his birthday in 1945, A.A. returned to pursue his call to ministry at Baylor University. He transferred to Wayland Baptist University to pastor a church in west Texas while he earned his bachelor’s degree in speech and religion in 1949. He went on to Southwestern Theological Seminary and received his B.D. in Theology, master’s in Christian Education, and his E.D. During that time, he met the love of his life, Marjorie Lee Barnett, and the two married in 1947, beginning their 59 years of love and life together. A.A. worked for Buckner Children’s Home, the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, and Baylor University from 1968 until his retirement in 1990, primarily in the role of Dean of Students. The Hydens spent their life blessing, loving, feeding, and pouring their lives into all of the children and students around them. A devoted member of Seventh & James Baptist Church since 1968, A.A. served in numerous capacities in the church and in 2011 was honored as the first Deacon Emeritus of the congregation.

Center Point. She retired in 2007. Verna Coleen Lipman ex, Jan. 30, in Plano. Mary Josephine Williams ex, Jan. 17, in Galveston. She loved traveling and did so extensively. Two highlights were visits to Croatia and Germany, the birth lands of her parents. She was a member of Sacred Heart Church and served as a volunteer with the Grand Opera House in the 1990s. Maurine Burks, Jan. 11, in Montague, Calif. She was a former faculty member in the UMHB art department. After graduating from Phillips University and Texas Woman’s University, she began teaching at Mary Hardin-Baylor in September 1966. She retired May 31, 1989. Maurine and her students provided art work for The Baylorian. Her most memorable art project was the 1979 painting of the mural on the Belton Dam, depicting scenes from Bell County’s colorful history. This mural was only the second of its kind in the country; the other one was in California. Along with UMHB art students, many volunteers in the county painted portions of the mural. The first portion on the east side of the dam was 800 feet long and 15 feet high. Within two years, she completed a mural on the west side of the dam that was 500 feet long and from 3 to 15 feet high. Reed Harris, Oct. 17, in Lawton, Okla. He was former Director of International Student Services at UMHB from 1987 to 1999. Henry Adrion III, Nov. 25, in Hilltop Lakes. He served as a UMHB Trustee for 16 years.

Evangeline San Miguel Garcia ex, Oct. 19, in Temple. She was a member of Immanuel Baptist Church, the King’s Daughters Hospital Auxiliary, and the Garden Plotters. She also was a translator for Parkdale Professional Development School in Waco. She was a published author of poetry and received several awards at the City of Temple Senior Games for her writings. Florence “Rusty” Keeton Garrison ex, Nov. 21, in Houston. She was a gifted soprano and performed in concerts, as well as in Community Playhouse and University of Houston productions. She appeared on local television and hosted her own music program on a Houston radio station. She sang lead in the

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Summertime Light Opera Company and performed with the Houston Symphony Chorus. Rusty belonged to the Tuesday Music Club and was a soloist and a member of various church choirs for decades. Margie Lee Kelley ex, Dec. 3, in Kerrville. She was a licensed social worker and a licensed chemical dependency counselor. She worked many years for Child Protective Services and Kerrville State Hospital. She was assistant director in the Texas Department of Corrections Substance Abuse Felony Punishment Facility system, the director of The Serenity House in Fredericksburg, and the Family Program Director at the Starlite Village Hospital in

Johnnie Floyd “Brother Franks” Franks, Feb. 9, in Killeen. He served as a UMHB Trustee.

ME MO R IALS Dr. Henry Adrion III Joe Adams Family Amy Bawcom Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Robert & Lynda Beams Nina Connelley Brenda Hopkins & Family Pam & Walt Manly Dr. & Mrs. Randy O’Rear

(continued on page 32)


Helen and Ed Holt (pictured far left, and on their wedding day in 1940) celebrated their 73rd wedding anniversary on Christmas Day 2013. During their time as Mary HardinBaylor students, Helen lived in Ely Pepper dorm, and Ed lived in “the shack.”

Lifelong love After meeting on campus in the 1930s, couple celebrates 73rd wedding anniversary BY PAT RICK B E ACH RODOLFO GONZALEZ | AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Strictly speaking, America wasn’t yet in the war in late December 1940. In the months to come, conflicts at sea would become increasingly common, with German U-boats and destroyers sinking American vessels. And in less than a year, Pearl Harbor would end the United States’ official posture of neutrality. Against that backdrop of unfolding history, Edwin Holt CB ’36-’38 and Helen Dreibelbis ’37-’39 made a little history of their own. Standing in front of a Christmas tree in a small ceremony in the Dreibelbis’ family home in San Juan, Texas, they pledged to spend their lives together. It was Christmas Day, 1940. The time, dryly notes the woman known for the past 73 years as Helen Holt, was high noon. The joke, running close to three-quarters of a century now, is Edwin Holt agreed to the date so he’d never forget his anniversary. So began a marriage in which the month Christmas falls in is made a bit of a big deal. “December is always kind of a special time,” Helen Holt, 93, said in the living room of the house the pair of longtime educators has lived in since 1989. “We’re not so commercial.

We like good smells from the kitchen, candy and cookies and such.” On a morning when those very smells were coming from that very kitchen, they looked back on remarkable lives. Of growing up with almost nothing and earning advanced degrees, of moving from town to town for the next teaching job, of working for many years in Austin schools, of how hard things began and how grateful they are to still be around, in their own home. Even their Pekingese, Lulu, is getting up there in age, 16 and blind, but alive. Edwin, to start, was born in Elkhart, in east Texas. His father died in a cotton gin accident when he was very young, and his mother died when he was 10, leaving seven children, four of whom—including him—were sent to a Methodist orphanage in Waco. He eventually enrolled at Mary HardinBaylor College, which by the 1920s had begun to allow a number of “campus boys” to study on campus. They worked jobs deemed unsuitable for the young ladies enrolled, in exchange for room, board, books, and tuition. Edwin’s job was to milk the cows twice a day. Helen waited tables. “I thought he was the cutest

redhead I ever saw, and so witty,” she said. “When he was younger with red hair he looked like Mickey Rooney.” Courtship and college proceeded. Ed proposed, and Helen accepted; then he got busy with work. Feeling rejected, or at least neglected, after not hearing from him for months, Helen returned the engagement ring. “I didn’t even get a postcard for half a year,” she said. “I really, dearly loved him. It hurt so bad. Worst thing I ever did.” The following Thanksgiving, Ed returned to the Valley and requested a date, which Helen granted. He again proposed, and she again accepted. They decided to make it official on Christmas, a day easy to remember. Ed was always busy with holiday concerts back when he was teaching, when he was “engulfed in music,” as he put it. Now they relax and remember. They smell the cookies and admire their tree. And neither is going anywhere. “We’re both planning to live to over 100,” said Ed, 97. This story first appeared in the Austin American-Statesman on Dec. 25, 2013. Reprinted with permission.

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Joyce M. Ponder Dyke Shipp J. D. & Sandra Shipp Betty Ann Sweitzer J. T. & Donna Tackett

Marjorie & Joe Weldon Bailey Julia Alexander Lou Beth Birdwell Diane Bruce Debbie Burns Sue L. Dance Suzanne Graham Joy Hensarling Donna Wright Christel Baker Beatrice Ivey Kent Owens Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens B. J. & Nell Ray Barclay Joe Lee Todd Sylvera Cole Barton Marietta Parker Evelyn Hampton Beaird Jean Madeley McDonald Nancy Salisbury Sullivan Albert & Dolores Boehnlein Robert D. Boehnlein Olive Chaffee Boggs Franklin I. Boggs Marvin Roger Boyd Cathy Blurton Shawna Cassell Curtis Evans Breaux Linda Breaux Sarah Brennan Carilane Newman Vieregg Conrad Buckley Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Lynwood C. Burkhalter Mildred Dicus Walker Maurine Burks Mark & Betty O’Hair Anderson Marietta Parker Hershall Seals Terry Taggart Ray Burns Marietta Parker

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Kathleen Byrne Carilane Newman Vieregg

Beth Childress Minnie Abrego Sanchez

James Carrell Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens

Mary Frances Clark Mary Grant Kominowski

Alta Bowers Cates Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Jayne & Mike Field David Holt Virginia & Choc Hutcheson John & Cindy Owens Katsuko Iwaya Sato Frank & Windy Sitton David R. Tripplehorn Clinta B. Williams Lucille Cearley Mary Cearley Hatsell

L.R. & L.B. Cook Nelda Cook Perry Johnnie Lee Cooksey Beatrice Ivey Kent Owens Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Loyd Dickerson Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens


Tommy Dixon Teresa Buck Kay Daugherty Kathy Harden Denise Karimkhani Dorothy Planas Rev. Eugene Drake Malcolm & Becky Morris Lou Ann Ysaquirre Rev. Eugene & Jeanne Marie Bruce Drake Karl & Linda Fuchs Jeanne Marie Bruce Drake The Bruce Family Deborah Linfield Jean Madeley McDonald Dorothy Minten Ernestine Morgan Key Evans Dennis & Paula Key Martha White Farris Tom & Karen Farris Elizabeth F. Figari Mrs. Doc Swalwell Roy Finney Janie Minten William F. “Bill” Fisher Jerry & Diane Gillentine B. S. Fitzgerald Hugh “Buddy” & Barbara Menking Dr. Ruth LaVerne Gallman Rebecca Pettit Adams Anita McCoy Aguirre Paula Gansky Amsler Glenda Whitney Bell Becky S. Bunn Glenda Barton Bush Gladys Boyd Cobb Ann Taylor Cooney Lillian Kay Cowan Jennifer Caldwell Dulgher Shirley Roberts Holleman Charla Adcock Hunt Martha McCollum Janca Tammy Mosemann Krueger Dr. Grace Labaj Karen Timm Lingafelter Kathryn Fagan Long Amy Turner Mersiovsky Nancy Cortese Miller Elizabeth Kramer Mitchell Priscilla Kresge Nicholson

Dr. & Mrs. Randy O’Rear Susanna Osterman Marietta Parker Dr. Linda Hood Pehl Carolyn Price Prasise Ellen Colley Rechenthin Dr. Aida Smith Sapp May Schmill Barbara Newberry Smith Sara Sprecher Blair Stevens Lorraine Taylor Barbara Newquist Terry Delores Chupik Williams Diane Sulak Wilson Joella Carroll Wininger

Jonathan & Scott Gibson Texas State Daycare Burt Glazov Carilane Newman Vieregg Lillian A. Guenzel Polly Parnell Carolyn Hallbauer Amy Bawcom Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Carolyn Allison Owens Michael Hammett Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Louise Josephine Olive Hewlett Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens UMHB Faculty Assembly

Julie A. Keener Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr. Larry Lairmore Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr. Jerami Christyl Lamons Chris Lamons Maxine Lockhart Dorothy Minten Esther Minten Meriworth McMillan Mabry Dorothy Minten Esther Minten Marietta Parker Mary Alice Cowley Marshall Amy Bawcom Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Dr. & Mrs. Randy O’Rear Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Marietta Parker Shirley Cowan Sommer Christopher L. McMeens Naomi K. Keeney Lee Holcomb Means Jean Madeley McDonald John & Alice Minten Dorothy Minten Esther Minten Wyn Moore Carilane Newman Vieregg

Truman Howard Carilane Newman Vieregg

Caleb Morgan Julia Alexander Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Lou Beth Birdwell Diane Bruce Debbie Burns Sue L. Dance Suzanne Graham Joy Hensarling Donna Wright

Dr. William F. Hutmacher Marian Christy Nolan

Minnie Lane Murphy Helen Holmes Ruchti

Dr. A. A. Hyden Kay Anderson Mark & Betty O’Hair Anderson Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Kathleen E. Kruse Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Kenneth & Velva Schrader Riddle

Stephanie Barth Nash Laura Nash Collins

Barbara Hill Belle Johnson Edward Ellis Hogwood Jr. The Taylors & The Hutchesons Pam H. Wilson

Mary Ailese Parten Philip Davidson III Shirley Paysse Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr.

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Ron Pearson Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr.

David Whyburn Kim Whyburn

Class of 1964 Velva Schrader Riddle

Herb Polgue Mark & Betty O’Hair Anderson Ken & Velva Schrader Riddle

Jim & Eunice Hamilton Winn Mary H. Winn

Gloria Eakin Combs Eula Woodyard McKown

Doris Watters Wood Jane Wood

Martha Smirl Cooper Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Marietta Parker

Dr. Delma Posey Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr.

Wesley Woodall Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens

Stacey Price Preston Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Glenna Roscoe Pearce Owen Putnam Leslie Putnam Johnston John Reynolds Dr. & Mrs. J. A. Reynolds Charles M. Rimmel Pam & Walt Manly R. D. Sanderford Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Marietta Parker Dr. & Mrs. J. A. Reynolds

Marilyn Edwards Woodruff Dr. William F. and Kathryn Long

Teresa Crothers Bill & Jan Muske

Fredda Shipp Young Mark & Betty O’Hair Anderson Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens Marietta Parker

Donna Stapp Curb Janice Andrews

Becky Buie Zerbe Janice Andrews

Rev. & Mrs. Andy Davis Marietta Parker

HONORARIA

Colonel Otto P. Scharth Marietta Parker

Peggy Bass Albin Johnette Shaffer Fisher

Jay & Justin Schultz Frank & Diane Schultz Bill & Carole Swickard

Kay Anderson Ruby Fowler Peterson

Alice Bagby Smith Dr. & Mrs. Jimmye Hillman

Amy Bawcom Marietta Parker

Ted Spiegel Carilane Newman Vieregg Jerry Storms Kent Owens Dr. Kerry & Kathy Owens Riley & Carolyn Allison Owens

Glen & Glenda Dennis Cosper Betsy Cantu Rodriguez

Dr. & Mrs. Jerry G. Bawcom Marietta Parker Mary H. Winn

Timothy Lawrence Daniel Debbie Stapp Daniel

Reina I. Davison Loren & Connally Vandiver Dwane Drake Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Bawcom Nadine Clark Erekson Johnette Shaffer Fisher Marjorie Frank Ferrill Dr. Kay Schwertner Psencik Johnette Shaffer Fisher Nadine Clark Erekson Pete Fredenburg Drs. Bob & Sara Stone Barkley

Mary Sandlin Billeck Eula Woodyard McKown

Linda Fuessel Bill & Jan Muske

Janie Lee Butler Strader Julia Woodyard Nation

Dr. Edna Penny Bridges Carolyn Owens Pruitt

Charles “Mac” Hickerson Don Owens

Billy Vaughan Martha & Jerry Tyroch Jr.

Hayden Cardy Donnetta Baggett Byrd

Jackie Campbell Way Lawton & Peggy Bass Albin Randi Carter Johnette Shaffer Fisher Wanda McKinney Smith Adolphus White Sr. Janel White Seals

Maizey Cardy Donnetta Baggett Byrd

Dorothy Jean Reinhard Hogwood The Taylors & The Hutchesons Pam & Keith Wilson & Family

Peter C. Chen Giorgiana Chivescu Chen Class of 1954 Joan E. Green

Dr. Anita L. White Dr. Michael A. White

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Jennifer Wallin Jones Jimmy & Katherine Wallin Dr. Mickey Little Darlene Klausmeyer Harrison Luke Wesley Lufburrow Bobby J. & Donna Bolick Johnson


Sue Allison May Lisa May Bennett

Dr. Claire Phelan UMHB Faculty Assembly

Jon Wallin Jimmy & Katherine Wallin

Dr. Dan McLallen Julia Woodyard Nation

Jerri Lynn Bass Schooley Mr. & Mrs. Jim Lewis

Olive Fuller Wilson Margaret L. Shaw

Dr. Randy O’Rear Bill & Jan Muske Jeff W. Smith

Pat Lockridge Shannon Diana Marino Bassett

Dr. Larry Woodward Karl McNair Jr.

Shirley Cowan Sommer Carolyn Owens Pruitt

Dr. Marlene Mixon Zipperlen Dr. Helen Wilson Harris Dr. Elton E. & Peggy Stuckly Jr.

Carolyn Allison Owens Lisa May Bennett Dr. Bernice Hill Dr. Dorleen Billman Hooten

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Julia Amason Walker Bill & Jan Muske


900 College Street • Belton, Texas 76513

Electronic Service Requested


UMHB Life | Spring 2014