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Spring 2008

A magazine for alumni & friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

New look for New Bedford UMass Dartmouth arts community fuels an economic resurgence


MESSAGE FROM

J e a n F . M a c Co r m ac k Dear friends:

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write this letter as the promise of spring is in the air and our 108th Commencement nears. On May 24 and 25, more than 1,500 undergraduate and graduate students will receive their hard-earned degrees, proud of their accomplishment and excited about what their future will bring. These graduates and the 40,000 who came before them are the products of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. They are our reason for existing. They are the greatest contribution that we make to the Commonwealth and the nation because each of them will leave this campus with the ability to have a positive impact on society. While here, they have had wonderful role models in the faculty and staff and valuable experiences both in and out of the classroom. They have been witness to and participants in the university’s full engagement in the community, and it is our expectation that each of them will use the intellectual muscles that they have exercised to build stronger communities in the years and decades ahead. This issue of UMass Dartmouth highlights some of the very tangible impacts that the university has had on individuals and the community beyond Ring Road: Our cover story, written by 2004 alumnus Jarrad Nunes, sketches the economic and social impact that our Star Store arts campus has had on downtown New Bedford since it opened in 2001. “Soldier On,� written by former Standard-Times reporter Natalie White, discusses the work of two alumni, each from a different generation, coming together to make life better for veterans returning from war. Our Around the Campanile section begins with a focus on our College Now program, which is celebrating its 40th year of creating hope and unleashing potential in human beings where others were either unable or unwilling. Finally, this issue includes the annual report of our Foundation, which reminds us that thousands of alumni and friends have joined us in our mission. The good works highlighted throughout this magazine simply would not be possible without such support. I hope you enjoy this issue. Please write to me at chancellor @umassd.edu to let me know what you think.

Sincerely,

Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor


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From the sidewalks to galleries: art in various forms brings people to downtown New Bedford on AHA! nights.

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n this issue of UMass Dartmouth, you can read about the thriving creative economy that has been inspired by the College of Visual and Performing Arts’ move into what was a deteriorating downtown New Bedford building. You’ll also read about the compelling work that two graduates are doing on behalf of homeless veterans, with an accompanying article about the university’s efforts to steer veterans, among others, to teaching careers. This issue also includes the annual report showcasing UMass Dartmouth’s supporters and fund-raising initiatives. We welcome letters from our readers, and encourage your feedback. You can email comments to publicaffairs@ umassd.edu or mail them to Public Affairs-Rm 331A, Foster Administration 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth ma 02747-2300.

Around the campanile College Now turns 40 years old

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Gloria Steinem helps launch women’s studies

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Professor developing new underwater research vehicle 4

Track star sets university record

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Feature stories A new look for New Bedford

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Soldier On Managing Editor

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant to the Chancellor/Public Affairs

Annual Report of the Foundation

Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement

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Alumni news

Jeffrey A. Wolfman Director of Alumni Relations

Class notes

Mary Ellen DeFrias ’94

Designer

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Claire T. Carney Library update

Rachel Cocroft

inside back cover

Writer/Editor

Diane H. Hartnett

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #0015-139) Volume 12, Number 2, May 2008

Contributing Writers

Susan Gonsalves ’86, Jarrad Nunes ’04, Jim Mullins ’81 (Amherst) John Regan ’07, Natalie White Photographers

Elizabeth Bender, Kindra Clineff, D. Confar, G. Paz-y-Miño C., Nancy Palmieri, Jennifer White ’07 Alumni Class Notes

Nancy J. Tooley ’99

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University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once in March, once in May, twice in June, once in July, once in August, and twice in November by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300 Periodicals postage paid at New Bedford, ma 02740 postmaster: Send address corrections to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300

Cover: Sculptor Erik Durant ‘94, who teaches and lives in the area, works in his Hatch Street loft. Studios like his play a key part in New Bedford’s blossoming creative economy. For more information, see www. newbedfordopenstudios.org. Photo by Jennifer White ‘07, photography.

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Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack congratulates recent College Now students at the annual dinner.

College Now celebrates 40 years “I absolutely had a great time at the university. You have such easy access to people who can help you go further in life. The university empowered me to grow.”

— Crystal Howard ’95

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he door into College Now has been swinging open for 40 years, helping people attain what they might have otherwise foregone: a UMass Dartmouth education. Launched in the fall of 1968, this alternative admissions program is one of the university’s most successful, enduring initiatives. Roughly 1,000 people have gone through College Now, graduated from the university, and enjoy rewarding, productive careers—people such as Nanette Vega, assistant dean of students at the University of Miami; Joseph Latimer, the University of Rochester’s director of diversity enhancement; and Crystal Howard, communications director for ESPN’s Enterprises division. Howard, who graduated in ’95 with an English degree and earned a master’s from Columbia University’s Journalism School, has built an impressive career in media relations; before joining ESPN last year, she handled high-level communications and publicity for the likes of New Era Cap Co. and Bad Boy Entertainment, the business venture of Sean “Diddy” Combs. College Now and UMass Dartmouth can take some credit for her success, Howard said when visiting campus last fall. “I knew I’d always go to college when I was a student (at

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Middleboro High School), but I never focused on the process of applying. So I came in through College Now and (counselors) Carol Spencer and Wayne Ramos were my mainstays.” Howard was a vocal, visible activist. She helped found United Brothers and Sisters, acted in Theater Company plays, sat on the Student Senate and a chancellor search committee, and worked part-time. Howard became an English major because “I wanted to be Bryant Gumbel. He was the only black man on television and was well thought of. I decided I would write and be on the air…to have black girls and boys see someone like me in that kind of position. “I absolutely had a great time at the university. You have such easy access to people who can help you go further in life. “The university empowered me to grow” into someone quite different from the junior high student who fumed when “my teacher singled me out in front of everyone in the class for getting an A on a paper.” Such transformation of attitudes and expectations is the core goal of College Now. While the program’s students have varied academic and personal backgrounds, they are alike in one respect: they need a non-traditional route to enroll. They are students with the desire and ability for college,


New s of N ote but certain obstacles have kept them from the normal admissions route, says College Now Director Carol Spencer. They may think college is impossible financially, or they’ve been told they aren’t college material. College Now helps students overcome the obstacles and strengthen the skills and self-confidence they need to earn their degree. “In its mission statement, the university pledges access and equality. College Now addresses that,” says Spencer, who began as a program counselor 16 years ago. The program has accepted approximately 100 students annually in recent years. Applications are cut off after they reach 300, says Spencer. Applicants must meet a number of requirements, including a minimum 2.0 grade point average and Massachusetts residency. Tests and interviews are a key part of the application process. “We want to see the student personally,” Spencer says. “We look at motivation and desire. We’re looking for students who will be able to build their skills within a semester.” That’s because the students are “College Now majors” for their first semester, with a specially-tailored curriculum, weekly meetings with a counselor, and a required class on study skills and similar topics. “They work really hard in that class. The deans come to a class and they are always welcoming and encouraging with the students,” says Spencer. Professors who are teaching College Now students maintain close contact with program counselors, frequently reporting on students’ performance. College Now students who pass the first semester with at least a C grade continue on as a traditional student; many need an extra semester or two before graduating. No matter how it is measured, the program’s success rate is impressive. More than 90 percent of College Now students pass their first semester and matriculate into the university. And the data on graduation rates show virtually no difference between the so-called traditional students and those who came to UMass Dartmouth through College Now. Diane Hartnett is the Publications Office staff writer

Professor Jen Riley, Women’s Studies director (left) and Juli Parker, Women’s Resource Center director, introduce Gloria Steinem.

Feminist icon Gloria Steinem launches Women’s Studies scholarship with campus visit Feminist activist Gloria Steinem, visiting UMass Dartmouth in February, believes that what is generally taught about the history of women reflects only part of the story. The best-selling author who cofounded Ms. magazine spoke at a daylong event that served to launch the Women’s Studies endowment scholarship for students and demonstrate support for the Women’s Resource Center. Steinem lauded the recent establishment of the Women’s Studies major as a “goodspirited, inclusive kind of study,” adding that there was a “kind of world consciousness” on campus that she wished the rest of the world would embrace. Women’s self-esteem is vulnerable, she said, partially because of ignorance of women’s accomplishments. Mozart’s sister, for example, may have written some of his compositions. A dozen females passed the rigorous tests in the first class of astronauts but were denied space travel. And Native American women who controlled their own fertility, sat on councils, and made decisions about peace and war inspired the suffragettes. “No one ever told me that. History looks at women with one eye closed. If you open the other eye, it shifts and you can see real depth,” Steinem said. She encouraged her audience to document their own, and their ancestors’, histories for future generations, “so that

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we’ll begin to know what real human history actually is.” Joining Steinem at the panel discussion were three alumnae: > Washawn (Thomas) Jones ’00, humanities/social sciences, an account executive for Boston Globe Media who is completing her master’s degree in management; > Diane Hitchcock ’01, sociology with a minor in women’s studies, now a master’s degree candidate at the University of Colorado Denver, where she will receive a certificate in domestic violence studies; and > Nicole Di Fabio ’06, women’s studies/anthropology, a research assistant at the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology. The event was sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Women’s Studies Program, and the Women’s Resource Center with support from various departments. Dr. Jen Riley, women’s studies program director, said, “The rights we have today, especially as women, are due in part to the work of Gloria Steinem and other feminist activists in our history. “We brought her to UMass Dartmouth to share with our students and the community a sense of the history that stands behind us and that we must not forget and to remind all of us that there is still work to be done.”

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Donzaleigh Abernathy signs a copy of her book, Partners in History, for Keith Wilder, director of the Frederick Douglass Unity House.

Donzaleigh Abernathy stirs crowd during the sixth annual Martin Luther King Drum Major Award ceremony The sacrifices of civil rights crusaders must not be in vain, said Donzaleigh Abernathy, during her stirring keynote address at this year’s sixth Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast and Drum Major Awards event. The youngest daughter of civil rights leader Ralph Abernathy recalled his work with close friend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the turbulent ‘50s and ‘60s. Today’s youth, said Donzaleigh Abernathy, must take heed of the past, embrace education, and commit to lives of non-violence. “I want to inspire young people to do more than shoot each other and kill each other in random acts of senseless violence. We have to teach them black history so they know their responsibilities and on whose shoulders they stand.” Drum Major Awards went to: Dana Mohler-Faria, Governor Deval Patrick’s special advisor on education and Bridgewater State College president; Susan Costa ‘95, former vice chancellor for student affairs at UMass Dartmouth; and the New Bedford Historical Society, represented by Lee Blake ‘83. The recipients, by their actions and deeds, demonstrate a commitment to the ideals set forth by Dr. King. The awards’ name recalls his famous speech in which he called on citizens to be “drum majors for justice.” Recalling the verbal abuse and intimidation she and her siblings endured as they were integrated into a Georgia elementary school, Abernathy said, “I was setting a precedent for others to follow...

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We didn’t make those sacrifices for segregation to become the way it is today. I studied hard. It was not so people could become complacent.” Ralph Abernathy organized the Montgomery bus boycott with Dr. King. He was secretary-treasurer of the Southern Christian Leadership and became its president following Dr. King’s death. An accomplished actress, Abernathy wrote Partners in History, in which she documents the courage and endurance of her father and “Uncle Martin.” She is a founding member of New Road Schools, which promote cultural, racial and economic diversity.

UMass Dartmouth and Brooke Ocean Technology USA partner on underwater research vehicle “Small, smart and powerful,” are a few of the adjectives UMass Dartmouth Marine Science Professor Louis Goodman uses to describe the new device he is building to gather data from the ocean. Goodman, recipient of a $40,000 Massachusetts Technology Transfer Center grant, is collaborating with Brooke

Ocean Technology USA on the one-year project. The partners are designing a prototype of the H-Hybrid Programmable Underwater Profiler—H-PUP—with an eye towards its commercialization. “We view the H-PUP as a revolutionary new and relatively low cost way of conducting marine measurements,” says Goodman, director of SMAST’s Marine Turbulence Laboratory. The tool combines the capabilities of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, a torpedo-like robot, with a vertical profiler, a more conventional means of gathering underwater measurements. Unlike other profilers, the H-PUP can operate both horizontally and vertically while carrying acoustic, video, and environmental sensors. The vehicle also eliminates the need for a line or tether to be dropped to collect data. Roger Race, general manager of Brooke Ocean Technology USA, located at the Quest Center business incubator in New Bedford, cites a DouglassWestwood study showing possible market growth into the billion dollar range. “We fully intend to build and market this new hybrid vehicle to the global market. As our company grows, we hope to be able to continue to create more new jobs in New Bedford,” he says. Likely customers include U.S. and foreign military and civilian agencies, homeland security, energy and environmental industries, and research institutes. “It’s a wonderful combination of superb engineers and a `can do’ company like Brooke Ocean Technology. We each bring our strengths in science and engineering to make a marriage of different organizations that works,” says Goodman.

Miss Massachusetts, Valerie Amaral ’08, wins scholarships Forming friendships she expects will last a lifetime was the best part of her participation in the Miss America contest, says Valerie Amaral ’08, the reigning Miss Massachusetts. Winning scholarship money wasn’t bad either. The 22-year-old Acushnet native won the $2,000 preliminary talent award


New s of N ote and a $5,000 scholarship for raising the most money for the Children’s Miracle Network, the national platform of the Miss America Organization, in addition to other money for making it to the national competition. She was one of nine Quality of Life finalists for founding Youth Sharing Time and Talent, which encourages young people to do volunteer work in their communities. “I went into the competition with the goal of keeping a positive attitude and making friends throughout the weeks there.” Planning to begin law school in fall 2009, Amaral is speaking in schools and at community events to promote her platform of volunteerism.

New team to bolster support for university mission Three new professionals have been hired to build alumni, foundation, and corporate support for student aid, teaching, and research: Alumni Director Mary Ellen DeFrias ‘94; Assistant Vice Chancellor Michael Eatough; and Assistant Vice Chancellor Louise Mitchell. DeFrias, who majored in political science at UMass Dartmouth, has been senior outreach coordinator at the university since 2005, a key organizer for major university events, and a longtime Alumni Association member. As alumni director, she will play a leadership role in

in marine affairs from the University of Rhode Island. Mitchell joins UMass Dartmouth from SouthCoast Health System where she served as a Capital Campaign Officer. She has worked in the southeastern Massachusetts/Rhode Island broadcasting industry as an advertising sales and business development specialist. The British-style political humor of John Oliver came to campus this past February. Oliver, best-known for his work on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” was enthusiastically received by the large audience.

engaging the university’s 40,000 alumni in the life of the campus. Eatough and Mitchell will focus on major gift development, working with the colleges and the School of Marine Science and Technology to build private support for scholarships and academic programs. Eatough most recently was assistant director of leadership and planned gifts at the Rhode Island School of Design. He has held development and fund-raising posts at several institutions, among them Roger Williams University and Morton Hospital and Medical Center in Taunton. He earned his bachelor’s degree

Alumni Relations Director Mary Ellen DeFrias ‘94 at left with Assistant Vice Chancellors Michael Eatough and Louise Mitchell.

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From campus to Wall Street: students learn to manage a $25,000 investment fund A new, $25,000 student-run investment fund on campus is giving its participants firsthand marketplace experience in creating and managing an investment portfolio. The project gives students money management lessons and reflects the increased interest in socially responsible investing, says Vice Chancellor for Advancement Jeffrey Wolfman. “Basically, it’s like a boot camp to teach real-life money management to students,” Wolfman says. UMass Dartmouth students, as well as those at the Boston, Lowell, and Amherst campuses, will all gain practical skills and knowledge as they compete against one another, trying to achieve the highest rate of return. The winner will be recognized at an end-of-year banquet. Alumna Maria Furman, who graduated in ’76 with a political science major, is a member of the oversight board mentoring the students. A portfolio manager for 26 years, Furman anticipates that participants will research investments, make asset allocation decisions, and buy any stocks they consider good investments. Both domestic and international markets are open to them. “It will be real investing, not a paper portfolio. They have $25,000 to invest as they see fit. This will encourage them to read and follow current market events, form an opinion on the economy and possible market behavior, and invest accordingly.” Advising the students is Michael H. Anderson, associate accounting and finance professor. He says that the student-run fund not only “reinforces investment lessons, but also makes them less

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5pm VIP reception & book signing $75 / person

Join us for an evening with Boston Celtics legend Bill Russell

6pm Dinner, speech, & book signing $75 / person $750 / table of 10

March 27, 2008

Basketball great Bill Russell, Venus de Milo, Swansea

8 now a director of the National For tickets contact Ava Lescault: 508.910.6435 alescault@umassd.edu

th Annual Center for Marketing Research Celebrity/Scholarship Dinner

Mentoring Partnership, urged his audience to “do everything within

economics and international business. “My ultimate goal is to be involved with international finance. I love the global economy and the idea of doing business all over the world. From this experience, I want to gain a foothold in the business of finance, making valuable connections, and learning the necessary things to put me ahead of the competition in the workforce.” “The students are going to learn a lot,” says Furman, noting that the project was launched during a bear market. “I expect the students are a little surprised and nervous to be part of this volatile stock market. It is not usually this bad in this short a timeframe, but it is the real world of investing—bull and bear markets in the same year.”

Business professors organize global innovation and development conference in Brazil Three Charlton College of Business professors say it took teamwork, focus, and tenacity to direct an international business conference in Rio de Janeiro this past January. Establishing ties with co-host Fundacao Getulio Vargas of Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and enhancing UMass Dartmouth’s global reputation were among the positive results of the event, according to Drs. Steven White, Angappa Gunasekaran, and Godwin Ariguzo. The Global Business Innovation and Development Conference attracted approximately 90 educators, students,

your power to make the place you live the best you can make it” when he spoke at this spring’s eighth annual scholarship dinner of the university’s Center for Marketing Research. The cornerstone of the Boston Celtics during the team’s 1960s dynasty has become a staunch proponent of education. abstract since we’re working with real money. Further, the fund’s returns will ultimately be turned into scholarships for UMass Dartmouth students.” Students are also interacting with university leaders and business professionals, thus developing possible future job opportunities. The fund is regarded as UMass Dartmouth Foundation assets and is traded in a segregated account set up by that office with JP Morgan. Students will call Boston to place trades and will be able to see their account online. Senior finance major Liza Lennox hopes “to take away knowledge from those with whom I’m closely working, a great team experience, time management skills, and a better understanding of analyzing the market.” Sarah Killingbeck, a junior finance major from Norton, has minors in

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Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack and Congressman Barney Frank (seated with her) recently visited the Azores as part of a regional group seeking stronger links with that area.

UMass Dartmouth, government and community leaders forge links with the Azores Business leaders, educators, and elected officials met with their counterparts in the Azores during a February trade mission to discuss ways to strengthen education and economic ties. Among the 56-member delegation were: Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack, U.S. Representative Barney Frank, Senator Marc Pacheco of Taunton, Representatives Michael Rodrigues of Westport and Antonio Cabral of New Bedford, Bristol Community College President Jack Sbrega, and Fall River business leader Fernando Garcia. UMass Dartmouth and University of the Azores representatives signed agreements to work together on faculty/student exchanges and research initiatives in the marine sciences, business, nursing, and Portuguese Studies, and to explore the sharing of library and archival resources.


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and professionals from numerous countries. Planning the conference began a year ago with a call for research papers that attracted responses from around the world. White explained that an international scientific committee comprising international experts made recommendations on those papers; a database was developed and papers’ authors were invited to the conference. Organizers also secured support from Fundacao Getulio Vargas, a public policy and business school in Rio de Janeiro, and the American Marketing Association Global Marketing Special Interest Group. Organizing an event of this magnitude presented several challenges, said Ariguzo. “The interaction with our Brazilian collaborators was a positive challenge as we learned about the differences in how we value time and about their local customs. Their young people are very motivated and we dealt with a nice combination of youth and maturity.” When participants from Algeria, Colombia, Ghana, and Iran experienced problems, “it was significant to see how access to an international conference was such a meaningful thing for them. Working as a team, we were able to overcome obstacles and bring a lot of talented people together,” Ariguzo said. “We’ve set the path for future collaborations,” said Gunasekaran.

Ice hockey and men’s basketball teams have impressive seasons; field hockey squad distinguishes itself academically

“The two Brazilian universities have a keen interest in maintaining ties to UMass Dartmouth,” and several Brazilian students have expressed an interest in student exchange opportunities. Among those attending was Paul Constantine, who graduated in ’04 with a marketing degree and earned his MBA a year later. A field service representative in risk management at GE Commercial Distribution Finance, he said the conference “motivated me to reach a new level in creativity and diversity.” One outgrowth of the event was publication by the university professors of the book, Development for Economic Growth in the Global Environment.

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UMass Dartmouth’s student-athletes turned in impressive performances over the past several months, on and off the playing field: > The men’s basketball team, nationally ranked throughout the season, earned an at-large bid to the NCAA Division III championships with its 25-3 record. The Corsairs, however, fell to the Coast Guard in the play off game, 50-47. Senior center Dan Holbrook, a Lexington native, was named a second team State Farm Division III All-American. > The ice hockey squad, after another outstanding season, made it to the NCAA Division III play-offs, bringing with it an 18-8-1 record. The men, however, were beaten by Trinity College, 7-3, in the first round. > The field hockey team and nine of its members were cited by the National Field Hockey Coaches Association for outstanding academic records. The team was one of 83 across the country to have a cumu lative grade point average of 3.0 or better, with nine of the players individually achieving that average during the fall semester.

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UMass Dartmouth students listen to a naturalist from the island of Santa Cruz.

January expedition takes students to “enchanted” Galápagos It’s not unusual for students to travel during a school break. But it is rare to mingle among blue-footed boobies, giant tortoises, marine iguanas, and other exotic creatures while earning biology course credits. For nine UMass Dartmouth undergraduates, a 10-day, January expedition to Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands proved to be the experience of a lifetime. “I had a great group of UMass Dartmouth students fully committed to experiencing naturalism and evolution in the greatest natural laboratory our planet has,” says Biology Professor Guillermo Paz-y-Miño C., who organized the trip in partnership with the Office of International and Exchange Study Programs. Recipient of a Commonwealth of Massachusetts award for his contribution to innovation in science education, he has run similar expeditions in the past. The Galápagos, 600 miles west of continental Ecuador in the Pacific Island, comprise 13 large islands, 6 small islands, and 40 islets. Paz-y-Miño C. says that their unique natural history makes the Galápagos ideal for studying biology, biogeography, environmental sciences, human ecology, and the history of evolutionary biology. Charles Darwin’s visit to the Galápagos in 1835 was crucial to the development of the theory of evolution. The UMass Dartmouth group, which included Susan Atkins, International and Exchange Study Program director, visited Quito, the capital of Ecuador. They explored the colonial downtown, churches including San Agustín, La UMass

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Compañía de Jesús, and San Francisco, the main plaza of Independence, and Ciudad Mitad del Mundo, or the “middle of the world city,” before navigating around Santa Cruz, Española, Isabela, Fernandina, and Baltra Islands. There, the students completed 70 hours of intense academic work, including independent projects that culminated in oral presentations and papers. Participants also attended environmental interpretations by scholars from the Charles Darwin Field Station, the Galápagos National Park, the Galápagos Foundation, and the Ecuadorian National Observatory, and wrote journals documenting their reflections. “My outlook on biology has totally been transformed,” says Larissa Basque, a freshman marine biology major from Plainville. “There is an abundance of… animals so exotic and unique to the islands, it has opened my eyes to new understandings and realization of how diverse this world is.” “All of the books you may read and all of the pictures you may see are nothing compared to the actual experience of visiting the islands. You will never see anything more beautiful in your life,” says Kayla Braunston, a freshman biology major from Gloucester. Atkins found it rewarding to watch the students, whose science backgrounds varied, learn and embrace their new surroundings. “There was a sense of adventure and now their perceptions of culture and views of this amazing part of the world have changed. The experience

was valuable for students because, for those pursuing environmental sciences or marine biology, this was an opportunity to see firsthand what being a naturalist is like. This (trip) was a path to explore their future careers, a way to translate their academic focus into reality.” For non-biology majors, the trip was equally worthwhile. Bartholomew Walsh, a junior philosophy major from Charlton, says it allowed him “to study a unique and beautiful place firsthand, gave me a newfound appreciation for science as methodological naturalism, and also, more importantly, left me with a better understanding of evolutionary theory. In the Galápagos, evolution occurs right before your eyes, giving you a rare glimpse into the underlying process of the cosmos at work.” “It’s a place unlike any other on this planet with unique and fascinating creatures,” says Kaitlin Switzer, a freshman fine arts major from North Kingstown, RI. “You witness firsthand natural phenomena in their most raw form. As this life-changing journey unfolds, nature’s processes reveal themselves, opening your eyes to profound truths.”

Student is grandson of Korean War Memorial model UMass Dartmouth student Dan McSweeny was only nine years old at the time, but he vividly recalls a special ceremony he attended in the nation’s capital. It was the ceremony honoring his grandfather William McSweeny, who received numerous honors for his combat infantry service during the Korean War , including his selection as one of the models for the Korean War Memorial in Washington D.C. and his appointment in 1995 as a Kennedy Center trustee. He also held several positions in the nation’s capitol, was a foreign correspondent, and authored several books. “I was excited about going to the White House. It was one of the best moments in my life,” says Dan, adding that his grandfather’s influence was a factor in his choice of political science as a major.


New s of N ote Champion hurdler Jon Garcia: “It’s Division III and I love it”

and all I needed to do was finish

By Jim Mullins

safely to win the race.” And that’s just what he did.

As he entered the starting blocks of his final collegiate race,

His winning time was three-

Jon Garcia did not have a lot on

hundredths of a second in front

his mind. As hundreds of other

of second place, enough to firmly

athletes, coaches, and fans swirled

establish Garcia’s place in the

around him inside the Ohio

UMass Dartmouth record book.

Northern University Sports Center

The national championship was his

in Ada, Ohio, on the afternoon of

third: two indoors in the 55-meter

March 15, the UMass Dartmouth senior was very relaxed.

hurdles, one outdoors in the 110-meter hurdles.

“This was my seventh national championship race, so

With the national title in hand, and a sixth Division III

I am not nervous. Actually, I’m enjoying it,” said Garcia.

All-America award to his credit, Garcia has distinguished

“I’m thinking that I’ve grown to love this. I was able to

himself as the most successful student athlete in the

fall in love with my sport. I’m doing this because it's

more than 40 years of athletics at UMass Dartmouth.

Division III and I love it.”

Distance runner Jim White won six All-America awards

He was 55 meters and 5 hurdles away from capping an outstanding collegiate career, filled with the kind of accomplishments which will certainly land him in the

with two national titles in the mid-1980s, and diver Tom Egan did the same in the early 1990s. With his collegiate competition career over, Garcia

Corsair Hall of Fame when they call the roll for the

is a student volunteer with the track team this spring.

Class of 2013.

He will graduate with a degree in graphic design and a

Working his way into the starting block, which he has done since he started running track at Stoneham

lifetime of memories. “The part I love the best in track is that moment

High School, Garcia went through the same pre-race

when they call out your name the way they do at

habits he has always used. He moved out and touched

national championship races,” Garcia said. “They call

the first hurdle, jumped up and down a few times to

your name and say things about you like being a two-

prepare his muscles, slapped his hamstrings a couple of

time national champion, and your best time, and then

times, and began to settle into the blocks.

they say you’re from UMass Dartmouth. At that point,

By the time the starter called “set,” followed three seconds later by the starting gun, Garcia was ready to explode. It was over in 7.46 seconds. “At the start, you can hear the people and the officials, but once you start in the race, it’s quiet,” Garcia

you feel a lot of eyes on you. All that adds to the hype before the race.” Then, in just a few seconds, it is all over. A race. A career. A third national championship. Jim Mullins is administrative assistant for sports information in the Athletics Department.

said. “Once I hit the third hurdle, I knew I was ahead

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A new look for New Bedford UMass Dartmouth’s Star Store arts campus is at the core of a growing creative economy and the revitalization of downtown New Bedford

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By Jarrad Nunes ’04

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n a recent Thursday AHA! Night in downtown New Bedford, one instantly feels the energy and vitality of a living, breathing urban community. Galleries buzz with excitement, as new works are

unveiled to appreciative art lovers. Across the street, a former industrial garage recently revamped as an independent concert venue hosts a fledgling jazz-rock ensemble and their enthusiastic audience. An improv troupe resembling a trio of Greek statues delights passersby while in the distance diners enjoy a meal. At the center of the excitement, UMass Dartmouth’s satellite arts campus—known as the Star Store from its previous life as a downtown retail fixture—stands at the epicenter of a city renewed and reborn. The electric atmosphere at the corner of Purchase and Union streets is even more astounding when one considers New Bedford’s not-so-distant past. Just 15 years ago, the Star Store was emblematic of what had become a depressed and desolate city center. Once the hub of New Bedford’s bustling business district, the long-dormant building carried the raw wounds of a stagnant economy and a

The transformation of the old Star Store in downtown New Bedford has been the foundation for a thriving “creative economy.” The university art gallery in the revitalized building (picture at left) regularly draws numerous visitors. Pictured below: a high school student works with an artist in the teen internship project, one of Artworks’ many programs, while the Green Bean cafe grows in popularity thanks in part to the influx of students and others to downtown.

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changing community. Its terra cotta façade with the establishment of the National Park had begun to crumble after years of neglect; in the downtown historic district, are the thieves had stripped the building of the bookends of New Bedford’s resurgence as a copper flashing that once lined the perimcenter for art, history, culture, and educaeter of the roof. This staggering vacancy set tion. It is in this ‘creative economy,’ stimuin motion a downward spiral that threatlated in large part by the university’s presened the existence of the entire downtown. ence in the downtown corridor, that we’ve In this void, some saw an opportunity to found the greatest growth and the greatest draw on art and education as a catalyst for potential for future development.” New Bedford’s renaissance. Over a period of A 2008 study commissioned by the three years, State Senator Mark Montigny Economic Development Council sought to ’84 advocated for a state investment that further define and examine the components would not only restore the Star Store’s grand of New Bedford’s creative economy. The exterior, but would also refashion the interesearch confirmed definitively that the city’s rior into a state-of-the-art satellite facility “creative economy is not an incidental confor the university’s College of Visual and tributor to the city, but a significant generaPerforming Arts. tor for economic growth.” UMass Dartmouth had long been a fixThe raw numbers tell the story even more ture in New Bedford, dating back to one convincingly. Nearly three percent of New of its predecessor institutions, the Swain Bedford’s workforce is actively contributing School of Design, which had occupied sevto the creative economy, a robust number eral buildings in the city’s west end since when compared to the Massachusetts (2.5%) the late 1800s. This new project, however, and national (1.6%) percentages. These indiwould bring hundreds of students directly viduals earn an average of $38,000 annually, —Mark Hess, into the depressed city center to study and well above New Bedford’s median income. senior project manager, to create, drawing on a successful model This sustained growth has fueled a conin Portland, Maine, where the transforma- HallKeen Real Estate siderable increase in redevelopment projects tion of a defunct department store into the Investment and Management in the city center. Since the reopening of the flagship facility of the Maine College of Art Star Store in 2001, more than a half-million sparked the turnaround of an entire downtown area. square feet of commercial space — nearly one-third of the The local media touted the project as a “savior” and “the key total—have been renovated for new businesses or converted to to downtown revitalization,” and hundreds were on hand when residential use. Including current construction projects, the total Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack was joined by city and state value of renovations in downtown New Bedford amounts to a leaders to cut the ribbon in September 2001. staggering $80 million. For many developers, such significant “The university’s presence in downtown New Bedford has investment became more attractive once the Star Store project been absolutely critical,” said Matthew Morrissey ’96, executive proved itself a risk worth taking. director of the New Bedford Economic Development Council. “The UMass Dartmouth project eliminated a huge source “What you have in the success of the Star Store project, along of blight, and had a very positive ripple effect throughout the

“Almost instantly,

the presence of UMass Dartmouth students and faculty in New

Bedford’s downtown

had a positive impact on the life of an entire area.”

Artworks! gallery and office manager Jen Carland helps organize the program’s numerous offerings, including tours of the organization’s galleries by various groups, such as this gathering of New Bedford teachers enrolled in a class given by the university’s continuing education division.

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(l-r) CVPA Dean Adrian Tió visits Professor Marc St. Pierre in St. Pierre’s New Bedford studio. Angelica Vanasse hangs her art in a storefront gallery, near Cork, wine and tapas bar whose logo was created by design professor, Jan Fairbairn.

area,” said Mark Hess, senior project manager for HallKeen Real Estate Investment and Management, a major contributor to the redevelopment boom. “Almost instantly, the presence of UMass Dartmouth students and faculty in New Bedford’s downtown had a positive impact on the life of an entire area. This influx of a creative, well-educated population to downtown New Bedford made it a significantly more attractive, and certainly a more marketable, place to live and work.” Specifically, Hess and HallKeen have been instrumental in encouraging participants in the creative economy to become downtown residents. A massive redevelopment project, The Union Street Lofts, saw the complete restoration of five separate turn-of-the-century buildings in downtown New Bedford. “The true potential of this area lies in its capacity as a residential center,’’ Hess said. “We’ve made significant strides in just five years. As more artists and UMass Dartmouth students and faculty occupy space in the city center, it has become clear that it must become a more consumable place , with enough to do throughout the week and throughout the year to be a viable home base for professionals and families.” One of downtown New Bedford’s newest residents is also a recent addition to the university. College of Visual and Performing Arts Dean Adrian Tió relocated to the area in August 2007 from Illinois, and opted for a residence within walking distance of the Star Store campus. Said Tió, “the ‘walkability’ of downtown New Bedford was what sold me initially. On my first visit, I was struck by how accessible everything was. It was easy to connect the dots. I could see myself at the coffee shop and the Mexican restaurant, at the Star Store and the Zeiterion. I saw a number of venues that I could take guests

to—the New Bedford Art Museum, ArtWorks! and Gallery X. It was all there, within walking distance. That’s why I chose to live in downtown New Bedford.” Another encouraging sign of the creative economy’s strength in New Bedford are the increasing numbers of UMass Dartmouth alumni who remain in the area after graduation. Jennifer Carland, a Pittsburgh native who received her Master of Fine Arts in Jewelry/Metals in 2007, began her post-collegiate career in New Bedford, a move that would have seemed unlikely when she first came to the area in 2002. “I have to be honest that my first impressions of the area, specifically downtown, were not overwhelmingly positive,’’ she said. “I was drawn to the MFA program at UMass Dartmouth because of the accomplished faculty and the incredible studio spaces and artists’ facilities at the Star Store, but the downtown area really was a depressing place when I first arrived. I didn’t know the area other than what I knew from researching the graduate programs at UMass Dartmouth, so I was surprised to find an urban center with so many vacant spaces.” As her studies progressed, Carland began to notice changes downtown that transcended mere aesthetic improvements. “In my experience, the people of New Bedford have always been real, approachable, and very friendly. When things started happening throughout the area, you could sense that people, both the longtime residents and the students living here, finally began to realize what New Bedford had to offer. There’s history here, and you couldn’t ask for a better location with Boston, Providence, and Cape Cod so close.” Carland herself is an active participant in the region’s creative economy, working since late last year as the ArtWorks! gallery and office manager. ArtWorks! is a non-profit arts incubator serv-

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Nicole St. Pierre ‘99 works in her Hatch Street studio overlooking the Acushnet River.

ing the entire city, from working artists seeking studio space to at-risk area youth needing safe, structured after-school activities. Carland finds the youth outreach “the most difficult, but most rewarding” aspect of her efforts at the 15-year-old organization. “Overall, my experience at ArtWorks! has been very exciting, and an excellent learning experience leading out of my graduate studies at UMass Dartmouth. It’s been a great fit.” I rene Buck, the organization’s executive director, agreed. “Jennifer has become such an important member of our organization. More and more, ArtWorks! has been a wonderful place for student artists to develop their skills beyond the classroom. They’re getting real-world experience here.” ArtWorks! workshop leaders and program coordinators include a number of UMass Dartmouth students and alumni. “The Star Store project was an investment that has provided an invaluable return to the entire downtown community,” Buck said. “That arts campus is a threshold for a student artist to experience the area. The art students at UMass Dartmouth are part of a smaller ‘Star Store community.’ What’s encouraging to me are the students who are actively engaging themselves in the larger New Bedford community, beyond the university. “The recent conversations about New Bedford’s creative economy have been especially exciting, because it’s essentially a recognition by our leaders that the arts have a relevant place in our communities. The creative energy being expended finds its way throughout the entire regional economy. Many folks are learning that you can run just about any business creatively!” Evidence of this statement can be seen at Cork Wine and Tapas, a recent addition to the downtown dining scene. With a distinct look and contemporary menu that wouldn’t be out of place in a much larger city, owner Richard Cardoza relished the opportunity to tap into a new energy that he saw building in downtown New Bedford. “An establishment like Cork is a necessity in any place where professionals and artists live and work,’’ Cardoza said. “I’ve seen the arts and culture drive economies to success time and time again. New Bedford is no different. The Star Store project, and the young, energetic population it has reintroduced to the downtown area, have provided fuel to a fire that’s been burning for a long time. It’s definitely a critical piece. The potential is slowly being realized.” UMass

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New Bedford’s potential as an economic and cultural hub was evident to Karie Vincent, executive director of New Bedford Art Museum, during her first visit to the city in 1998. “Right away, I observed an unusual spirit of cooperation and collaboration. Community leaders were resisting the common tendency to think in competitive terms. Organizations were working together, pooling their resources, feeding each other’s creativity, and celebrating each other's successes. I knew I wanted to be a part of a community that was moving forward with such determination and unity. I could feel it—something very special was happening in downtown New Bedford! “The creative economy has always been here. This movement was defined only recently, but it existed a thousand years ago. What is happening today is that we are expanding our understanding of that part of our economy and the importance of it to all of us.” While the achievements thus far have been many, community leaders are acutely aware of the challenges that lie ahead. “It’s so important that the players in the downtown revival continue to improve the way they communicate,’’ Hess said. “There are lots of great ideas being talked about, but they require a more cohesive, unified vision than what currently exists.” Irene Buck of ArtWorks! concurred. “The future success of New Bedford’s creative economy requires a type of synergy that is built upon the cornerstones of communication, organization, and the recognition of what has been successful already." Dean Adrian Tió sees continued residential development as essential to the health of the downtown area. “You’ve got to get more people living here. Once you get that critical mass of residents, you’ll start to see real growth in the anchor businesses that one would expect to find in a city center —a grocery store, laundromat, and more restaurants. It’s hard to sustain a true residential community without them.” The university has been working to understand better the creative economy and maintain the impressive growth of the last several years. The Business Innovation Research Center, part of the Charlton College of Business, recently received a grant to identify benchmarks for the future of the regional creative economy. This project will provide hard data to guide sustainable economic development. Steps are also being taken to further encourage students to be active participants in the arts and culture of downtown New Bedford. The university and city recently partnered to launch The Loop, a daily shuttle bus service that links the main campus in Dartmouth with different downtown locations, including the Star Store and the Professional and Continuing Education Center. “The Loop is a direct conduit to move students seamlessly between campuses —bridging a perceived gap between the two areas,” said Dean Tió. He hopes that students take the opportunity as passengers to “really see New Bedford. “Hopefully, the visual cues are positive enough that students will come back on their own to take part in everything that’s going on downtown.” Jarrad Nunes is graduate and events coordinator for the College of Visual and Performing Arts.


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Soldiering On Jim Canavan ’75 and Gainer O’Brien ’04 bring two generations together to honor and serve veterans By Natalie White

D

arryl Benson did most of his duty time in Germany, just after the Vietnam War. In 1980, after four years of working in Army communications, he headed home to Springfield — a young man, raring to take on the civilian world. But Benson had a hard time fitting back in. No one seemed interested in hiring him and he couldn’t find a decent paying job.

Gradually, drugs, alcohol, and anger layered him in homelessness and hopelessness. Along the way, he lost his fiancée, a series of jobs, and his ability to cope. Benson lost his place. “I went into a tailspin. It all just spiraled out of control,” said Benson, now 49. “Rage, resentment, grief. I had no direction in my life. No one was interested in what I had trained to do. I didn’t even know how to put together a resume. I went from my parents taking care of me, to the military taking care of me, to nothing. I didn’t know what to do. I was used to being around

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Darryl Benson, once homeless after serving in the Vietnam War, is now a caseworker at Soldier On.

the guys, used to having a mission. Then I had nothing.” For the next 25 years Benson struggled, shuttling through the revolving doors of addiction, detox, and treatment, unable to snag a steady foothold. From the ranks of the military, Benson skidded into the ranks of the nation’s homeless to become yet another homeless veteran. “I slept in abandoned houses, I slept on the streets, in alleyways, in hallways, sometimes on someone else’s floor,” Benson said. Three years ago, Benson found his place again, at “Soldier On.” He found a new home with the Massachusetts group, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping homeless veterans— first as a man in need, and later as a man needed. Thanks in large part to the efforts of two UMass Dartmouth alums, Soldier On too has discovered a new lease on life. Recently revitalized with a new mission, a new name, and a new awareness campaign spearheaded by Jim Canavan ’75 and Gainer O’Brien ’04, the group is poised to make a significant contribution in the war against homelessness. Canavan, a veteran of not only the Vietnam War but also the non-profit sector, served as executive director at Community Teamwork Inc. in Lowell. He graduated from UMass Dartmouth with distinction, with an English degree, then earned his master’s in public policy from UMass Boston’s John W. McCormack Graduate School of Public Policy. Originally from Cambridge, he served in the U.S. Coast Guard. Despite being a generation apart, the two UMass alumni today find themselves pursuing this common cause, playing star roles in poising the once marginalized group — formerly the United Veterans of America — to attract funding and attention for its innovative plans to create permanent, veteran-owned housing.

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Soldier On plans to break ground in Pittsfield this summer for one of the nation’s only permanent, veteran-owned housing complexes for homeless vets. Canavan’s job has been to jump-start the movement. As creative director at Darby O’Brien Advertising, O’Brien has been working to get the Soldier On story out. Canavan, Soldier On’s vice president for housing development until March 31, recently took the post of executive director of the Northern Berkshire United Way in North Adams, but plans to stay closely involved in the veteran-owned housing initiative. Veterans such as Benson make up nearly one third of the homeless population in America, according to the National Coalition of Homeless Veterans. Finding a way to address the homelessness problem for the veterans could go a long way to reducing the overall numbers, Soldier On believes. “I was truly desperate,” said Benson, who is no longer homeless and is now a case worker at Soldier On, living in staff housing and finishing up his college degree nights at Westfield State College. “They gave me hope. They took me in, told me, ‘you can make good choices and you can change your life, and we’re here to help.’” Now he’s there to help. The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans reports that the Veterans Administration estimates 200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night in the U.S., and nearly 400,000 are homeless during the course of the year. While women represent a growing percentage (currently about four percent), most are men. Nearly half of all homeless veterans grapple with mental illness and about half struggle with substance abuse. About one third of the nation’s homeless vets served in war zones and some suffer from post traumatic stress syndrome. Others may not have seen combat, but still have difficulty finding jobs with liveable incomes and affordable housing when they return to the U.S. The Department of Veterans Affairs manages to reach about 25 percent of homeless veterans with some assistance. The help isn’t nearly enough, said Soldier On’s President, John F. Downing, and it doesn’t go far enough. Soldier On hopes to revolutionize the way the nation deals with homeless veterans. Rather than offer only temporary and transitional shelter, Soldier On wants to provide a program that will lead to permanent, veteran-owned and veteran-run housing. The group plans to break ground in Pittsfield on a first-of-its-kind “limited equity” apartment complex for formerly homeless veterans, representing an innovative and progressive program that was crafted by Canavan. “We want to change the end of the story,” said Downing. Veterans often end up homeless again after first doing well after leaving the shelters, because many lack the financial, medical, and social support systems needed for long-term recovery, employment, and permanent housing. Soldier On runs a 135-bed homeless shelter in the Leeds neighborhood of Northampton, and a 60-unit studio apartment transitional housing program in Pittsfield, all with continuous support programs to help veterans resolve health, emotional, and financial issues.


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The staff understands the depth of displacement and loss the veterans are experiencing. Many, like Canavan, are veterans themselves; as was the case with Benson, some are both veterans and formerly homeless. When Downing joined Soldier On in 2001, it was called the United Veterans of America. He wanted to introduce permanent housing for formerly homeless veterans, but the idea kept falling flat. Frustrated, he turned to Canavan and O’Brien whose creative approaches are turning Downing’s idea into a reality. Both subsequently realized that they had graduated from UMass Dartmouth, as had Downing’s son Peter (’01), who is helping to revamp Soldier On’s website. “Jim Canavan and Gainer O’Brien — they’re a big part of why this is happening,” said Downing. He said Canavan turned a pie-in-the-sky dream into a financial viable reality. Downing

initially wanted to build condominiums for formerly homeless veterans, but investors were wary about what they considered a risky population: the formerly homeless, many with substance abuse in their backgrounds, perhaps mental health and physical problems, a history of joblessness, and bad credit. During his time at UMass Dartmouth in the early ’70s, Canavan threw himself into political activism, joining with other Vietnam vets to stop the Vietnam War. He was drawn to the school (then known as Southeastern Massachusetts University) in part because of its large population of veterans. He also liked the Southcoast region, with which he became familiar as a Coast Guardsman on the cutter Yakutat, whose home port was New Bedford. He planned to study marine biology, but discovered he had talent in and enjoyed writing, so switched to English. This also

University’s TEACH! program makes it easier to transition from a military career to the classroom Stationed in Baghdad, and considering the imminent end of his 20-year military career, Navy Lt. John Bozeman happened upon an Internet notice for Fall River’s annual teachers’ job fair — and realized he’d found his second career. He secured a leave to attend the fair, where “I went around to the middle school administrators and said, ‘This is what I want to do and I mean it.’” Today, he’s doing just that, teaching math on a provisional basis at Fall River’s Talbot Middle School. At the same time, thanks to a partnership between the national Troops to Teachers program and the TEACH! initiative run under university auspices, Bozeman is also a student, pursuing his Massachusetts teaching license. Sponsored through the Center of University, School, and Community Partnerships, TEACH! prepares individuals— many of them older career-changers—for math and science teaching posts in middle and high schools in New Bedford, Fall River, Brockton, Taunton, and Wareham. The two arms of the federally-funded TEACH! initiative offer an accelerated, innovative route for initial teacher licensing, while also giving participants intensive classroom experience as they take the education courses offered through CUSP. Bozeman, a member of the TEACH! SouthCoast cohort which began last fall, is the first retired military person in the program, although a second is due to enroll and increased recruiting is in the works. Kenneth McCann, New England coordinator for Troops to Teaching, is collaborating with TEACH! SouthCoast Director Carol Radford to bring more newly-retired military persons to teaching careers. A self-described “broker,” Broker notes, “I’m aware of who has the grants for transition to teaching (programs). I can contact them about sources of candidates, and I can let the candidates themselves know of the opportunities.” Troops to Teaching requires participants to teach in desig-

nated high-need schools or districts, and provides stipends to the prospective teachers in exchange for a three-year commitment to teaching. “These are individuals who like to teach and who like kids,” McCann says. “They have done a lot of teaching in the military, and for most of their career, they have been involved in some form of training and instruction. “They bring a lot to the classroom— their background, maturity, motivation, and discipline.” Nationwide, the program’s success is notable: After five years, more than 75 percent of Troops to Teaching participants are still in the classroom, compared to roughly 50 percent of those who begin teaching soon after college graduation. Bozeman calls TEACH! “the best post-graduate education I’ve ever received and I’ve been in a number of programs. It really is very efficient in its structure and Carol (Radford) brings us varied experiences while we get the support we need in the classroom.” Bozeman, who has an undergraduate degree in psychology from Western New England College, is one of 17 persons in this first TEACH! SouthCoast cohort. As student and as teacher, Bozeman is going through a learning process, most notably in realizing how much afterschool preparation teachers must do for the following day. “The other teachers have been outstanding, in mentoring me. And students and teachers have given me an enormous degree of respect for my military service.” For more information, visit www.umassd.edu/cusp/ and Kenneth McCann at Kenneth.mccann@maine.edu

—Diane Hartnett

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gave him more flexibility to work on the anti-war movement. America. O’Brien said he and his father liked the group’s misHe remained involved in the political world, and the experience sion and the challenge that Canavan and Downing presented. showed him how to navigate that world to effect change among The father and son team agreed to adjust their fees, and started policy makers and politicians. planning an aggressive awareness campaign to bring more atten“My four years at SMU changed my life in very positive tion to the plight of homeless veterans. and dramatic ways. It was the best thing I could have ever The first item on the agenda was a name change, followed by done, except to marry my wife,” said Canavan, who is married initiatives highlighting the group’s mission. While O’Brien was to Mary K. Grant, president of the Massachusetts College of describing to a friend the challenge of renaming the group, “all Liberal Arts in North Adams. of a sudden it just popped into my head. And I thought, well, Canavan took Downing’s idea and drafted a business plan let’s throw that out there. We did, and they ended up loving it. that could attract financial backers, including “Soldier on. It’s got the tough built in. the federal government, which has earmarked It’s almost a fight song,” O’Brien said. nearly $2 million for the project. The state has Tough, yes, but the phrase also suggests agreed to pitch in about $3 million. that they’re up against it, and must keep In part, the plan grants formerly homefighting against the odds. The advertising less veterans limited equity in the apartment and public relations firm came up with complex, basically giving them an owner“Soldier On: The Fight Doesn’t End When ship share in the project that will allow They Get Home” to lead off the awareness them to be part of the cooperative that will campaign, complete with advertising feaset the rules for residents. Soldier On will turing formerly homeless vets. manage the complex, which Canavan has “You know, for these guys, every day is designed with many innovative features, a struggle, against addiction, or ailments, including an onsite green energy plant that or other fights. There is not an easy day for will run the complex and a transgenerathem,” O’Brien said. —Jim Canavan ‘75 tional design allowing residents to grow old “Inside the military, when a soldier is in their homes. For instance, all apartments doing really well in a mission, they say, that will accommodate wheelchairs. soldier is really on. It means he’s at the top of his game. But it’s To qualify, residents must go through the Soldier On proa common business expression now too, for doing well.” grams on substance abuse, employment, and health issues, and O’Brien said his time at UMass Dartmouth, particularly must adhere to strict guidelines. classes in film and writing, helped him hone the skills he now In another creative feat, Canavan has designed the project uses in advertising and public relations. He recalls too the many so that half of each resident’s monthly payment will go into an good friendships he forged at UMass, and the wiffle ball tournainvestment/savings account that residents can access after sevments on the university lawns. “We had some great wiffle ball eral years. The ownership (which is returned upon death) and extravaganzas that went on for hours." He wrote for the student savings (which become part of each veteran’s estate) give each newspaper The Torch and also for Temper, the literary review. resident a significant stake in the complex. As soon as Soldier On rolled out the name and the aware“This kind of veteran housing has never been done before. ness campaign at the end of last year, the group and its permaIt’s a model for the country,” said Canavan. “What we want nent housing proposal received unprecedented attention, said to do is end homelessness. That’s why we’re trying to do it this Downing. Soldier On and the permanent housing initiative have way. We want veterans to have their own homes —more than been featured on television and national newspapers; governjust a room with a hot plate with them going down the hall to ment officials and groups want to talk to organizers about partuse the bathroom.” nering on similar projects in other states. But even the greatest plan, Downing and Canavan knew, “Since we changed our name, our national attention has would flop without financial backers. As soon as people heard increased by 500 percent,” Downing said. United Veterans of America, they closed down, assuming the The veteran-owned housing prototype will house 39 apartgroup was part of the Veterans Administration. Downing could ments and offer formerly homeless veterans like Benson a stake not get them to understand that the group was not funded by the in their own homes, their own communities, their own lives. VA, that they were not responsible for government policy and “Soldier on has in essence turned my life around,” Benson problems, and that they needed significant community support said. “I had basically given up hope of ever living normally to continue helping homeless veterans. again. I thought that I would always do the things that kept me And that’s where O’Brien came in. down, abusing alcohol and drugs. I never thought that my life He had joined his father’s firm, Darby O’Brien Advertising would ever matter, that I would ever make a difference. ” in South Hadley, after graduating from UMass Dartmouth four Natalie White is a freelance writer living in Middleboro. years ago with an English degree. He is now creative director. Last year, the company met with the United Veterans of

“What we want to

do is end homelessness.

That’s why we’re trying to do it this way. We

want veterans to have

their own homes.”

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A message from Jeffrey Wolfman Executive Director, UMass Dartmouth Foundation; Vice Chancellor for Advancement

Dear alumni, friends, and UMass Dartmouth community, On behalf of Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack and the UMass Dartmouth campus, I am delighted to send you our fiscal year 2007 Annual Report, which lists contributions to the university from July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007. Philanthropy or private support is crucial to the university’s ability to fulfill its mission of teaching, research, and service. It enables us to offer a level of academic excellence and student access that state funds alone cannot provide. As you can see from the list of donors, we have had another successful year, raising $6.8 million for a variety of commendable programs. Despite a volatile stock market, our endowment has reached the $30 million mark, generating funds to support scholarships and various campus priorities. We are incredibly optimistic as our alumni, friends, businesses, and foundations support the campus and its mission. This is an extraordinary time as we are growing in every aspect: students, facilities, faculty, and most importantly, the number of new contributors. Research indicates we are on the cusp of a “golden age” of philanthropy. In the next 50 years, approximately $1.25 trillion (yes, trillion) is expected to pass from one generation to the next. Of that amount, $172 billion will be donated to charity, with another $187 billion expected as charitable gifts during this generation’s lifetime. That unprecedented scale of giving will transform philanthropy in our region. This transfer of wealth represents the resources we need to address critical issues and shape our region well into the future. For UMass Dartmouth, the Claire T. Carney Library and the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives campaigns highlighted the year’s fund-raising efforts. Having raised $4.9 million of our $6 million goal, we are confident that we will transform the library into an enhanced intellectual and scholarly hub for the campus and the region.

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A number of new scholarship endowments were established: n Chancellor Professor Emeritus Richard J. Ward and his family created the Cecilia B. Ward Scholarship for students with literary and performing arts talent. n Chancellor Professor Emeritus Walter E.A. Mierzejewski established the Jennie Syzmanski Mierzejewski Scholarship for mathematics majors. n Chancellor Professor Emeritus Mel Yoken and his wife Cindy established an endowment for a Reading Room in the Claire T. Carney Library and donated a portion of their rare book collection. n Retired Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Lou Esposito created a fellowship for Italian-American Culture and History. We are partnering with international communities in our fund-raising endeavors. Chancellor MacCormack led a trade mission to San Miguel in the Azores, and the Government of the Azores donated $100,000 for improvements to the Portuguese-American Archives. Portugal’s President, Anibal Cavaco Silva, visited UMass Dartmouth in June, receiving a remarkable outpouring of support from the community. Through our Center for Portuguese Studies, we have formed an ever-strengthening bond with Portuguese-language countries. Next year, we will increase outreach to our 40,000 alumni, to retired faculty and staff, to businesses and foundations, and to our more than 1,100 faculty and staff members. We will make every effort to increase private fundraising revenues to complement our many excellent, diverse programs. Your continued support is critical in fulfilling our goals. We are extremely grateful to you, our faithful supporters, and look forward to your continued generosity in this “golden age” of philanthropy.

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The following list includes donors to the Annual Campaign alphabetically according to their giving levels. This listing represents donations received between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. A special thank you to those who have joined the Chancellor’s Circle by contributing $1,000 or more in a single year. Benefactor $100,000 - $499,999 Anonymous Mr. Edmund Dinis The Honorable and Mrs. William Q. MacLean, Jr. ‘80 Alvida Quill Charitable Gift Trust Distinguished Patron Dr. Louis Esposito Mrs. Joann F. Melendes Estate of Ms. Gratia R. Montgomery

$50,000 - $99,999

Major Patron $25,000 - $49,999 Joseph Baptista Trust Mr. and Mrs. Earle P. Charlton II ‘96 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken Ms. Otilia S. Ferreira ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ‘00 Chancellor Professor Emeritus Richard J. Ward Patron Anonymous Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Downey Mr. and Mrs. Roy Enoksen Mr. and Mrs. Manuel B. Garcia ‘65 Mr. Gilbert A. Goulet Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Gross Mr. Charles J. Hoff The Jarabek Family Ms. Diane Laflamme Mr. Thomas F. Lyons Mr. and Mrs. Ira H. Schlezinger Mr. Eric Slifka Gold Mentor Anonymous Mr. Harold R. Bannister ‘35 Ms. H. I. Chang Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Ferris Mrs. Maria D. Furman ‘76 Mr. Fernando J. Garcia ‘69 Professor Howard T. Glasser Joseph W. Houth Charitable Trust Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 Dr. Thomas Lawton ‘53 Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski Mr. Kevin C. Santos ‘81 Ms. Koreen A. Santos Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Ward UMass

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$10,000 - $24,999

$5,000 - $9,999

Blue Mentor Mr. Alan Ades ‘96 and Mrs. Ruth Ades Mr. Michael S. Aizenstadt ‘79 Dr. Cynthia M. Alves ‘84 Attorney Alan A. Amaral ‘69 Anonymous Professor Naseer H. Aruri Mrs. Charlotte G. Babbitt Mr. John I. Babbitt, Jr. Dr. Clyde W. Barrow Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Berard Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Bernier ‘80 Chancellor Professor Donald Boerth Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Bogan ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. John Borowicz Jeanne T. Bourassa Trust Ms. Katherine C. Buckley Mr. Mike Bulman Mr. Louis A. Cabral Crystal and Edwin Campbell Mr. Richard Cardoza Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 Ms. LaVerne Cawthorne Paul and Elaine Chervinsky Mr. Nicholas Christ Chancellor Professor Lester W. Cory ‘63 Dr. Susan T. Costa ‘72 Mrs. Gloria T. Craven ‘77 Dr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Curry ‘64 Mr. Tom Gidwitz and Dr. Gail Davidson Mr. Peter M. DeWalt Mr. and Mrs. Allan W. Ditchfield Ms. Jean Doyle Mr. Michael P. Duarte ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. John R. Egan Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Feitelberg ‘03 Mr. Bruce E. Fernandes ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. John P. Ferreira Mr. John J. Galiher, Jr. ‘84 Mr. John H. Gallant Professor Geraldine Gamburd Dr. and Mrs. Frederick V. Gifun ‘86 Dr. Robert W. Green Dr. Susan J. Leclair ‘77 and Chancellor Professor James T. Griffith ‘70 Mr. Lawrence C. Hall Mr. and Mrs. John G. Hawes ‘66 Dean William Hogan ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Holmes Professor Madhu H. Jhaveri Mr. James J. Karam ‘71, ‘01

$1,000 - $4,999 Mr. William T. Kennedy ‘03 Dr. and Mrs. Roger R. Lacoste Dr. Susan C. Lane Attorney George J. Leontire Dr. and Mrs. Amine B. Maalouf Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Maguire ‘70, ‘74 Mr. Joseph A. Marshall Mr. Gerald J. Mauretti ‘65 Mr. Norman S. Medeiros ‘93 Mr. John D. Moore ‘96 and Mrs. Elizabeth Isherwood-Moore ‘80 Mr. Timothy J. Moran Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Nauman Mr. Manuel F. Neto Mr. James F. O’Leary Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Oliveira Dr. Doreen C. Parkhurst Mr. Manuel R. Pavao Dean Eileen Peacock Mr. John M. Pereira ‘78 Mrs. Geraldine A. Perry-Lopes ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Petitti ‘71 Ms. Kim Pineau The Honorable John F. Quinn ‘85 Mr. Donald H. Ramsbottom Ms. Gail F. Ray Mr. Jeffrey L. Raymon Mrs. Janice H. Reynolds ‘82 Ms. Janet L. Robinson ‘06 Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Evan J. Rosser Mr. John T. Saunders Mr. and Mrs. Gerald H. Silvia Ms. Nancy Sincero Dr. George S. Smith Mrs. Diane D. Souza ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. David M. Teixeira ‘78 Mr. Paul L. Vigeant ‘74 Mr. Carlton M. Viveiros ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Sumner J. Waring, Jr. Mr. Sumner James Waring III ‘01 Mrs. Susan A. Watson Mr. and Mrs. William N. Whelan Ms. Patricia A. White ‘77 Mr. Myron Wilner Mr. Jeffrey A. Wolfman Mr. Donald G. Wood ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Xavier ‘72 Dr. Donald L. Zekan


Mentor $500 - $999 Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Alpert Anonymous (2) Mr. and Mrs. Michael Baldwin Mr. and Mrs. Douglas C. Bencks Mr. John S. Berg ‘85 Ms. Jane K. Booth ‘65 Mr. Donald J. Brody ‘71 Dr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Brown ‘72, ‘74 Mr. Wendell S. Brown Mr. Paul M. Camara ‘69 Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Cappadona ‘78, ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. L. Dean Cassell Mr. Lawrence R. Chartier ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Chin Chancellor Professor John A. Chopoorian Mr. Scott W. Costa ‘78 Mr. Thomas G. Davis Mr. Ronald J. Dias ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan S. Duhamel ‘83 Mrs. Annette L. Dwyer Mr. Terry R. Farias ‘68 Mr. Jack Fyock Dr. and Mrs. Charles J. Gormley II Mr. Bernard H. Gould Mr. John C. Gregson ‘68 Mr. John E. Grenier, Jr. ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Warren Hathaway Mr. and Mrs. Norman G. Hildreth, Jr. ‘85 Mr. John T. Hoey Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. James ‘71, ‘70 Mr. Michael Johnson ‘92 Ms. Sarah Kaput Mr. Rodney T. King ‘50 The Honorable and Mrs. Manuel Kyriakakis ‘87 Ms. Joyce M. LeBlanc ‘89 Mr. Robert F. Leduc ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Lenhardt Attorney Robert J. Marchand ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Martin Brian and Cindy McGreevy ‘79, ‘78 Mr. George W. Noyes Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Pickette, Jr. Mr. James R. Pratt, Jr. ‘89 Ms. Aiyun Qi ‘00 Mr. David Rapoza ‘60 Mr. Songlin Ren ‘86 and Mrs. Sijia Wu ‘86 Mr. Joaquim Santos ‘72 Mr. Paul T. Silva Mr. and Mrs. William Sullivan Mr. Karl Svendsen ‘63

Scholarship fund honoring EMC Corp. executive benefits engineering majors

Professor Doris Thibault Mr. Joseph M. Tucci Mr. J. Charles West ‘78 Ms. Elizabeth Winiarz Mr. Ying Zhang Mr. Lin Zhou ‘91 and Mrs. Jianliu Li

Campanile Society $250 - $499 Mr. Christopher Adey ‘90 Anonymous Mrs. Roberta G. Arostegui ‘73 Mr. Richard H. Aubut ‘75 Mrs. Carol A. Bardwell ‘76 Mr. Bruce E. Barnes ‘73 Mrs. Ann Ley Benoit Mr. Ralph A. Boardman ‘63 Mr. Jason W. Bordun ‘01 Mr. John A. Botelho ‘77 Mr. Jonathan J. Boyce ‘76 Mr. Edmund J. Brennan Peter and Tia Bullard Mr. Paul H. Burkett ‘64 Mr. James L. Canavan, Jr. ‘75 Mr. Jeffrey D. Casale ‘04 Mr. Jianrong Chen ‘99 Ms. Lan Cheng ‘00 Mr. Daniel J. Correia ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Cottrell, Jr. ‘72 Mr. Jethro Craig ‘88 Mr. Walter J. Czerny Mr. Joe F. DeMedeiros ‘99 Mr. Glenn I. Deming ‘82 Mr. Rui M. Dos Santos ‘05 Mr. John V. Dufresne ‘99 Mrs. Linda K. Egan ‘80 Mr. Angel Enrique Fernandez ‘05 Mr. Scott M. Ferson ‘87 Mr. Harold E. Flight ‘72 Mr. James C. Freeman ‘87 Mr. John A. Freeman ‘58 Attorney Sheldon Friedland Ms. Marilyn L. Fritzemeier ‘04 Mr. Donald A. Gagnon ‘81 Mr. Edwin B. Gentle III ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Graham ‘79 Mrs. Kathy L. Grandmaison ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. John D. Grieci Mr. Henry A. Guay ‘65 Dr. Qiushuang Guo ‘97 and Ms. Congfeng Yang ‘98 Mrs. Kate Randall Haley Mr. Daniel Hanafin Mr. James F. Kelley Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Wolfhard E. Kern Ms. Kelly L. Kochis ‘90

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Membership on the College of Engineering’s Advisory Board gave Don Watson both an appreciation for UMass Dartmouth and a desire to assist its students. So when Mr. Watson, executive vice president of EMC Corp., died at age 48 of cancer, his widow and colleagues agreed that a UMass Dartmouth scholarship would best honor him and his belief in education’s life-changing power. The first Donald Watson Golf Tournament, held in September 2007, drew close to 300 participants and raised nearly $40,000 for the scholarship for engineering students. “Don absolutely believed in education,” said Brian Schofield, who worked with Mr. Watson at the Hopkinton-based company. Schofield helped coordinate the 2007 golf tournament, held roughly a year after Mr. Watson’s death, and is overseeing this year’s benefit, slated for October. “This will definitely be an annual event, one small way to show our appreciation of him.” “Don’s strength as a leader was his ability to build partnerships,” said his widow Sue. “His memory is truly honored by EMC’s participation. In this way, Don’s legacy of building partnerships continues through this scholarship.”

Giving future students the education opportunities she had For virtually every year since her 1982 graduation, Janice Houde Reynolds has supported her alma mater with a $1,500 contribution—her way of helping others benefit from the education opportunity she had. The Fall River native, now living in Richmond, VA, typifies many of UMass Dartmouth’s supporters, who give consistently because they recognize the impact a college education can have on an individual. “I had great professors and the school was the right fit,” said Reynolds, an accounting major. “I started to make a contribution to the university not long after I graduated (knowing) that a lot of people in the area would not be able to get a college education without the university.” Her comments take on greater significance when you learn that Reynolds and her father actually graduated on the same day; thanks to the university, he was able to pick up the education he had deferred years earlier and earn a sociology degree. “UMass Dartmouth,” said Reynolds, “gives people in Fall River and New Bedford lots of opportunities they would not otherwise have.”

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Charles J. Hoff scholarships benefit students throughout UMass system The generosity of Charles J. and Josephine Hoff has had an immense impact: scholarship assistance for more than a thousand University of Massachusetts students, including 23 attending UMass Dartmouth this year. The Hoffs have contributed a total of $5.5 million to UMass since they launched their scholarship initiative in 1991. With matching funds from the state, that translates into a $10 million scholarship program, which, said Pres. Jack Wilson, constitutes “a dramatic statement about Charles’ and Josephine’s commitment to and confidence in the University of Massachusetts.” “We want this program to benefit students on all five campuses because the promise of the University of Massachusetts is a promise that transcends individual campuses and particular regions of the state,” said Hoff in announcing his gift. “The University of Massachusetts is an institution where the whole truly exceeds the sum of its parts. As UMass goes, so too goes the future of the Commonwealth and the future of the nation.” Hoff, a 1966 graduate of UMass Lowell and successful entrepreneur, has held executive positions with several companies, including Bausch & Lomb and Gillette. He was the owner and president of ARL Analytical Instruments Co., and owner and CEO of Universal/Univis Inc., a group of designer eyewear companies. As a venture capitalist, Hoff has turned several faltering businesses into profitable enterprises that provide jobs for thousands of workers. In 1992, he received UMass Lowell’s Distinguished Alumnus Award and two years later an honorary doctor of humane letters degree. In further service to education and UMass, he was a member of the university board of trustees from 1993 to 2002.

Foundation gift recognizes that “education is power” “Education is power,” said Robert F. Stoico, founder of The Robert F. Stoico/FIRSTFED Charitable Foundation, in announcing his $1 million gift to UMass Dartmouth. The university was an appropriate recipient, said the longtime chief executive of the former Fall River-based institution: numerous FIRSTFED employees have graduated from UMass Dartmouth and, like the bank, the university has had a significant, enduring impact within the community. UMass Dartmouth will use $750,000 of the gift to Continued on page 25

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Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Gerard M. Koot Mr. Richard P. Lake ‘52 Mr. David E. Lambert ‘91 Mr. Frederic J. Lamoureux ‘51 Mr. Bruce W. Lawton ‘65 Ms. Dina A. Lindquist ‘79 Mr. James C. Lok ‘72 Mr. Edmond M. McGrath Mr. and Mrs. Michael Macy Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Medeiros ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Medeiros ‘88 Mr. Nicholas Mendes Mr. Mark J. Minichiello ‘90 Mr. Robert N. Mullen ‘82 Mr. John M. Murphy ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Vincent John Murphy ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Nickerson ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Roland M. Ouellette ‘79 Drs. Richard and Carolyn Panofsky Ms. Mary Ann Partridge ‘80 Dr. Joyce Y. Passos Mrs. Susan L. Payne ‘78 Mr. Curtis E. Pollitt ‘77 Mr. Milton Rhodes ‘41 Mrs. Claire Robinson ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Murray P. Rosofsky Ms. Gerda A. Sano ‘81 Dr. and Mrs. George P. Santos Mr. Anthony R. Sapienza Drs. James R. Sears ‘06 and Donna Huse Mrs. Kathleen Shannon ‘83 Mr. Walter O. Shepard, Jr. ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Smith ‘80 Mr. Paul Smola ‘79 Mr. Robert J. Souza ‘76 Ms. Pearl R. Szatek ‘78 Ms. Barbara Tausey ‘74 Mr. Durval M. Tavares ‘81 Attorney and Mrs. Raymond Veary ‘69 Mr. Steve W. Wainio ‘73 Mr. Richard C. Walker ‘74 Mr. Andrew T. Ware ‘88 Mr. Donald F. Wilbur ‘54 Mr. Mitchell M. Winkler ‘80 Mr. David F. Wood ‘72 Mr. Yaode Xu ‘95 and Ms. Jia Ping Chen Mr. Baosen Zhou ‘97 Century Club $100 - $249 Ms. Marilyn N. Abraham ‘82 Ms. Elizabeth Acheson Ms. Joan R. Adaskin Ms. Michele E. Agostinho ‘99

Mr. Dennis R. Aikman ‘95 Mr. Alvin P. Almeida ‘70 Dr. Alexander Altschuller Dr. Charles M. Alty ‘61 Mr. Brian Alves ‘85 Mr. Leonard G. Alves ‘59 Mr. Michael J. Ambrosini ‘70 Mr. William S. Anderson ‘80 Mr. Ernest S. Angstadt ‘88 Mr. Donald C. Betts ‘77 and Mrs. Martha L. Antaya ‘76 Mr. Elisha Atkins Mrs. Elizabeth Atkins Mrs. Barbara J. Audino ‘79 Mr. David A. Augustinho ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Augustyn ‘69, ‘73 Mr. John L. Aumann ‘75 Mr. Edward J. Bajakian ‘71 Mr. Thomas S. Bancroft ‘60 Mr. James D. Barber ‘68 Mr. George Barboza ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. James M. Barca Mr. Beryl Barkman Mr. and Mrs. Joaquim C. Barros ‘85, ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry Mr. Keith W. Bartholomew ‘93 Attorney Paul M. Bartkiewicz ‘72 Ms. Kathleen L. Bassett ‘77 Mrs. Priscilla M. Bayreuther ‘54 Ms. Kathleen M. Beals ‘06 Sister Barbara Beauchamp Mrs. Sheila Beckeman ‘80 Mrs. Barbara E. Belanger ‘77 Mr. John J. Belli ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Bencks Mr. Joseph M. Benevides, Jr. ‘77 Mr. Thomas A. Benoit ‘81 Mr. Keith A. Berger Ms. Damaris Berner ‘81 Mr. Paul A. Bessette ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. David M. Biggs Ms. Kathleen Billings Mr. Raymond J. Biron ‘62 Mr. Eugene A. Bisaillon ‘59 Mr. George A. Bishop III ‘60 Ms. Anne C. Bisson ‘81 Mr. Carl C. Bjornson ‘80 Mr. David J. Blackburn ‘93 Ms. Loretta D. Blake ‘83 Mr. Scott W. Blevins ‘80 Mrs. Anne E. Bode ‘79 Mrs. Anne B. Boisvert ‘74 Ms. Peggy Bolduc ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. William J. Boles, Jr. ‘74, ‘73 Mr. Bruce P. Boni ‘60 Ms. Marietta E. Booth ‘73 Mr. James A. Borges ‘87 Mr. Jeffrey P. Bosworth ‘88


Mr. John P. Botelho, Jr. ‘93 and Mrs. Christine A. Botelho ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Steven D. Botelho Mr. James A. Botellio ‘59 Ms. Geraldine L. Boucher Dr. and Mrs. Robert C.M. Bourne Mrs. Susan C. Bouthillette ‘88 Mrs. Elizabeth L. Bowen ‘82 Mrs. Jayne Brady Prescott ‘79 Mrs. Sandra B. Bravo ‘78 Mr. Nathan C. Brinker ‘98 Ms. Nancy M. Briss ‘77 Mr. Leonard V. Brophy, Jr. ‘78 Ms. Leonora V. Brown ‘97 Mr. Terrance P. Brown ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Brownell Dr. John Buck Mr. Bruce H. Buckley ‘60 Mr. and Mrs. James F. Buckley ‘81 Dr. Richard T. Burke Mr. and Mrs. Chris Byron Mr. David A. Cabral ‘85 Mrs. Karen M. Caddell ‘85 Mr. Cornelius Cahill ‘61 Mr. and Mrs. Guy A. Calabrese Mrs. Peg Caldwell Condon ‘74 Mr. Stephen M. Camara ‘77 Dr. and Mrs. Wayne J. Camara ‘78 Mrs. Mary E. Canning ‘83 Mr. Scott Caplain Mr. Richard J. Capobianchi ‘81 Mr. Richard Carbonaro ‘51 Mr. George S. Cardoza ‘63 Mr. Wayne M. Cardoza ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. James A. Cariani Mr. and Mrs. John G. Carlson Mr. David W. Carreau ‘55 Mrs. Mary Anne Cary ‘76 Mr. Carlos A. Casanova ‘90 Ms. Mary C. Cassidy ‘77 Mr. William G. Catlow ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Cerand Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan D. Chace ‘81, ‘88 Mr. James F. Charrette ‘97 Mr. Everett Charves ‘52 Ms. Karin M. Chilstedt ‘03 Mr. Thomas J. Chmura Mr. and Mrs. Randall Christensen ‘86, ‘85 Ms. Patricia M. Ciavola ‘82 Ms. Jean C. Ciminello ‘86 Ms. Susan A. Clarke ‘01 Ms. Noreen Cleffi Mr. Maurice G. Coderre ‘66 Ms. Dyanne F. Cooney ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Antone Correia ‘67, ‘83 Mr. Manuel C. Correia-Branco ‘92 Dr. Antonio H. Costa ‘83 Professor Alden W. Counsell ‘42 Mrs. Angela S. Couture ‘93

Professor David J. Creamer ‘58 Ms. Maria F. Crivello ‘80 Mr. Robert C. Crowley ‘79 Mrs. Victoria R. Cunningham Mr. Edward M. Cusson ‘61 Mrs. Dorothy M. Czyzewski ‘81 Chancellor Professor Letitia Dace Ms. Florence A. DaCosta ‘73 Mr. Kurt R. Dahlberg ‘73 Mr. Charles F. Daly ‘73 Mr. Patrick A. Davis ‘80 Ms. Maria De Sa ‘82 Mr. Joseph C. Deangelo ‘93 Mr. Robert F. Deans ‘70 Ms. Tracy DeEscobar ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Delano ‘57 Mr. Joao-Luis DeMedeiros ‘97 Ms. Carolyn J. DeMoranville Dr. Lincoln A. DeMoura Ms. Debora J. DePaola ‘74 Mr. Parris F. Kellermann ‘91 and Ms. Monica A. DeSalvo ‘87 Mr. Ronald R. Desruisseaux ‘76 Mr. Daniel A. DiCesare Professor Mary Ann Dillon Chancellor Professor Ronald DiPippo Mr. Michael E. Donaghy ‘77 Reverend and Mrs. John Douhan Ms. Joann M. Downs ‘86 Professor Daryll C. Dowty ‘78 Mr. Robert P. Duarte Ms. Susan F. Duarte ‘83 Mr. Richard J. Dube ‘59 Mrs. Laura C. Duffy ‘74 Attorney Roger J. Dugal ‘70 Mr. James A. Dulude ‘78 Ms. Janice Dumont ‘85 Mr. Roland J. Duphily ‘66 Mrs. Christal T. Dupuis-Broadbent ‘86 Mr. Theodore J. Dziedzic ‘76 Mr. Thomas B. Eastwood ‘86 Mr. James R. Eggert ‘75 Mr. Stuart M. Elsberg Mr. Selwyn Epstein Mr. Antonio F. Esteves ‘80 Mr. Marc D. Etchells ‘77 Mrs. Debra A. Evans ‘73 Mrs. Gayle Exworthy ‘81 Mr. Xiaolong Fang ‘96 Mr. Charles L. Faria ‘69 Mrs. Eileen T. Farley ‘93 Dr. John W. Farrington ‘66 Mr. Laurier A. Fauteux ‘69 Mr. Christopher L. Fava ‘96 Ms. Debra A. Fazekas ‘76 Mr. Kevin J. Feeney ‘89 Mr. Robert B. Feingold Mr. Karl J. Feitelberg Mr. Jason I. Feldman ‘06 U M a s s

Mr. Alan H. Ferguson ‘74 Mr. Michael A. Ferragamo ‘06 Mrs. Christine Ferreira ‘74 Mr. Barry S. Fineberg ‘76 Dr. John Finnie Mr. David T. Fisher ‘83 Professor Edward J. Fitzpatrick, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Fleckles Mr. Richard W. Flood ‘65 Mr. Thomas J. Folan Ms. Barbara M. Fontaine Mr. Robert G. Fortes ‘77 Ms. Catherine A. Fortier-Barnes Mr. John E. Foster, Jr. ‘57 Ms. Viki A. Fowler Dr. and Mrs. Irving A. Fradkin Mr. Robert W. Frank ‘80 Mr. Michael D. Freitas ‘69 Mr. James E. French ‘78 Ms. Christine Frizzell Mr. Kristopher G. Furtney ‘80 Mr. Richard L. Fyans ‘65 Mr. Pierre J. Gabriel ‘75 Mr. John C. Gagnon ‘74 Mr. Roger J. Gagnon ‘61 Mrs. Amy B. Gaines ‘77 Mr. Donald M. Gale ‘79 Mrs. Mary A. Galipeau ‘91 Mrs. Eugene Galkowski Mr. Robert R. Gamache ‘73 Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay Mr. Robert J. Ganson ‘81 Ms. Cynthia A. Garcia ‘85 Ms. Deborah E. Gardiner ‘79 Mr. Stephen F. Gardiner ‘74 Reverend F. Richard Garland ‘85 Mr. Peter D. Garvey ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Gauvin ‘85 Mr. Douglas K. Gentile ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. William M. George Mr. David Gibbs ‘81 Ms. Paige M. Gibbs Mr. Thomas M. Gibney ‘86 Mrs. Susan E. Gibson ‘76 Ms. Priscilla Gay Gillespie ‘06 Professor and Mrs. Harold L. Gilmore Mr. Steven D. Gioiosa ‘76 Mrs. Peggy-Lynn Giunta ‘83 Ms. Barbara H. Glicksman ‘81 Ms. Michaelene Glowacz Mr. William J. Gobush ‘97 Mr. George J. Godfrey ‘91 Dr. James A. Golen ‘65 Ms. Roberta J. Gomes Mr. Jose C. Gonsalves ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Gorda ‘77, ‘79 Ms. Leslye Gordon Mr. and Mrs. Wilber L. Gosbee Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Gould ‘84, ‘86

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Mrs. Linda R. Gouveia ‘77 Mrs. Rose M. Grant ‘71 Dr. Lawrence W. Gray ‘77 Mr. David C. Greim ‘79 Mr. Zheng-Yu Gu ‘92 Mr. Joseph A. Guglietta ‘80 Mr. Matthew P. Gurney ‘95 Mr. Jeffrey P. Gworek ‘76 Mr. Mark J. Hahn ‘75 Mrs. Anne M. Hall ‘71 Mr. David L. Hall ‘69 Mr. Stephen T. Hall ‘93 Mr. Kenneth J. Hamel ‘89 Mrs. Claire M. Hanify Mr. and Mrs. Montagu Hankin, Jr. Mr. James D. Hardell ‘03 Mr. Jeremy L. Harrington ‘96 Mr. John Hartford Mr. David G. Hauver ‘82 Ms. Lorraine Roy Hawkes ‘71 Mr. Raymond F. Haworth ‘51 Mrs. Ethel C. Hayes Mr. Steven D. Hegarty ‘90 Mr. William D. Hennessy Mr. Wildred S. Herrup Mr. and Karl D. Hetzler ‘82 Mr. Jonathan E. Hird Dr. Alan W. Hirshfeld Ms. Judith A. Hodge ‘77 Mr. Timothy L. Hoffman ‘77 Mrs. Carol A. Hokans ‘82 Ms. Melinda M. Holland ‘90 Professor Elliott P. Horch Mr. and Mrs. Richard Howe Mr. William T. Howell, Jr. ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Branden J. Humphrey Mr. Edward F. Iacaponi ‘69 Mr. Warren L. Ide ‘75 Professor Raymond Jackson Mr. Charles W. Janda ‘69 Mr. Paul F. Jarosik ‘88 Mr. David A. Jennings ‘76 Mr. John R. Johnson ‘73 Ms. Judith D. Johnson Mr. Stephen C. Johnson ‘68 Mr. Kenneth N. Josephson ‘72 Mr. Stephen Paul Jutras ‘97 Mr. Gary H. Juvinall ‘84 Mrs. Yen M. Kadish ‘00 Mr. Bruce V. Kane ‘81 Mr. Walter O. Kangas ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Peter T. Kavanaugh Mr. Chester J. Kawa, Jr. ‘65 Mrs. Erin Keaney-Moynihan ‘89 Mr. William F. Keating, Jr. ‘62 Attorney David Keighley ‘90 Mr. Mark W. Keighley ‘88 Mr. John D. Kelleher Mrs. Kerry J. Kelleher ‘96 Mr. Michael T. Kellish ‘82

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Mr. Craig S. Kennedy ‘80 Ms. Barbara M. Kiarsis Mr. Alexander J. King, Jr. ‘61 Ms. Doris M. Kingman ‘76 Mr. Shawn D. Kinney ‘82 Mr. Craig Klinedinst ‘01 Mr. Olukayode James Komolafe ‘77 Mr. Paul J. Kostek ‘79 Mr. Cesar R. Kothe ‘86 Mrs. Sheila Krekorian-Tully ‘87 Mrs. Suzanne M. Kresser ‘79 Ms. Katherine Krikorian ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Russell R. Kroszner ‘77 Mr. Christopher T. Kuehn ‘93 Mrs. Sylvia L. Kulpa ‘90 Mr. Zheng-Jie Kuo ‘99 Mrs. Evelyne M. LaFlamme ‘82 Ms. Deborah A. Lambert-Huber ‘79 Mr. George H. Lamontagne ‘70 Mr. Paul A. Lamoureux ‘53 Mr. Matthew J. Landoch ‘69 Mr. Joseph A. Lane ‘60 Mr. Jeffrey P. Larivee ‘77 Mr. Lawrence R. Lassoff Mr. James R. Laurila ‘85 Mr. Mark A. Lavallee ‘84 Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘61 Mr. Brian A. Lawton ‘78 Mr. Joseph R. Leal ‘40 Mr. Raymond J. LeBeau ‘60 Mr. Robert E. Lebeau ‘70 Mr. Wayne LeBlanc ‘92 Mr. Michael J. LeDonne ‘97 Mr. William F. Leger ‘61 Mr. Norman A. Lehoullier, Jr. ‘70 Dr. and Mrs. Michael Lemelin Mr. Thomas H. Lemieux ‘51 Chancellor Professor Steven J. Leon Mr. Donald W. Lepore ‘61 Mr. Robert H. LeRoyer ‘86 Ms. Monica A. Lesniak ‘86 Mr. Richard C. Letendre ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Melvin H. Levine Mr. Christopher Limerick, Jr. ‘50 Mr. Martin E. Linkiewicz ‘76 Mr. Jens F. Lisinski ‘88 Ms. Mary Ann Lomba ‘64 Ms. Nanette Defeo Longley ‘76 Mr. Alan W. Loomis ‘76 Mr. Dennis J. Lopes ‘74 Ms. Cynthia J. Lord ‘78 Mr. Paul A. Lovett, Jr. ‘78 Mr. Michael P. Lucas ‘80 Ms. Katherine M. Lukas ‘00 Mrs. Judith A. MacDonald ‘87 Mr. Sumner MacDonald ‘58 Mr. Humberto F. Macedo ‘82 Mr. John G. Machado ‘91 Mr. Gregory B. MacKilligan ‘83 Mr. Glenn S. MacNaught ‘83 Mr. Dana W. Madden ‘85 UMass

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Mr. William D. Magan ‘88 Mr. Gary R. Magoon ‘77 Mr. Thomas A. Maguire ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy P. Mahan Mrs. Christine A. Mahoney ‘84 Mr. Christopher Makepeace Mr. Donald M. Makie ‘74 Mrs. Kerry A. Manchester ‘92 Dr. Charles H. Manley ‘64 Mrs. Anne E. Manzi ‘42 Mr. John R. Maples ‘74 Mr. David F. Marcille ‘84 Mr. Edwin J. Margarida ‘82 Ms. Anne P. Marks ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Vincent Marron Mr. William H. Marsden ‘54 Ms. Janet N. Marshall Mr. Richard T. Marsland ‘73 Mr. Wayne L. Martin ‘75 Mr. Anthony J. Martins Mr. and Mrs. Manuel J. Martins Mr. Paul G. Martins ‘78 Mr. Christopher G. Mascio ‘96 Mr. Abel R. Massa ‘78 Ms. Donna R. Massano Chancellor Professor Giulio Massano Mrs. Torin A. Mathieu ‘97 Ms. Carolee S. Matsumoto Mr. Michael C. May ‘97 Mr. James J. McCarthy ‘77 Ms. Marion E. McCarthy Mr. Hugh R. McCartney III ‘77 Ms. Donna L. McClung ‘79 Mrs. Sherilyn D. McCoy ‘80 Mr. Frederick B. McDonald ‘55 Ms. Janice R. McDonough ‘93 Mr. Jerry B. McGinnis ‘68 Mr. Kenison A. McIntosh ‘59 Mr. John P. McKenna ‘67 Professor Donald G. McKinley Mrs. Kathleen G. McNeil ‘81 Mr. John Medeiros ‘70 Mr. John E. Medeiros ‘83 Mrs. Patricia M. Medeiros ‘83 Mrs. Judith A. Melanson Mr. James D. Mello ‘83 Mr. Andrew M. Mendes Mr. Edward J. Mendes ‘65 Ms. Natalie Mendes Mr. Alan B. Mercer, Sr. ‘48 Ms. Elaine R. Meredith ‘81 Mr. Ralph C. Merullo ‘83 Mr. Robert Messier ‘76 Mr. James C. Miczek ‘76 Ms. Regina M. Milan ‘83 Mrs. Beth Paul Milham ‘92 Ms. Elizabeth A. Miller ‘55 Ms. Julia M. Miller ‘89 Mr. David Milstone

Dr. Arlene B. Mollo Mr. Neal P. Monagle Mr. and Mrs. David G. Moore Ms. Joanne E. Morrison ‘78 Mr. Cornelius J. Murphy, Jr. ‘52 Ms. Kelly A. Murphy ‘94 Mr. Donald E. Napert ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Narbonne ‘77 Mr. Roy M. Nascimento ‘94 Ms. F. Lee Nason Mr. Kenneth L. Nichols ‘64 Mr. Walter D. Nichols ‘75 Ms. Elsa N. Nicolovius ‘71 Mr. Phillip W. Nimeskern, Jr. ‘77 Ms. Andrea L. Nixon ‘77 Ms. Ivone Lopes Nogueira ‘96 Mr. Paul A. Nolin ‘70 Ms. Christine Nounou ‘74 Ms. Mary Louise Nunes ‘83 Ms. Donna M. O’Connor ‘78 Dr. Nancy J. O’Connor ‘80 Mr. Gary F. O’Grady ‘78 Ms. Sheila K. Oliva ‘91 Mr. David E. Olsen ‘96 Mr. Dennis P. Olson ‘77 Mr. Henry A. Openshaw ‘02 Mr. Lewis C. Palmer II ‘63 Mr. James S. Panos Mrs. June Paoline ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Parola Ms. Catherine A. Partridge ‘79 Mr. Tobias M. Paulo ‘86 Ms. Alice Pearse Mr. Thomas M. Pease ‘77 Mr. George A. Peck ‘80 Ms. Valerie M. Pederson ‘77 Ms. Susan Peloquin ‘81 Reverend John J. Pennington, Jr. ‘65 Mr. Kenneth G. Pentheny ‘81 Mr. Richard L. Pepin ‘83 Mr. Manuel F. Pereira Mr. Bruce B. Perry ‘73 Mr. Joe Perry ‘72 Mrs. Rose A. Perry ‘76 Mrs. Anne Marie Petit ‘77 Mrs. Diane C. Phillips ‘84 Ms. Charlene Picard Mr. Russell Pichette, Jr. ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Pickett Mr. Gerald F. Pietruska ‘67 Ms. June M. Pina ‘72 Mrs. Sheila Martines Pina ‘77 Mr. Steven G. Pinheiro ‘75 Mr. Clinton E. Pires ‘75 Mr. Donald H. Plant ‘61 Mr. William J. Porter, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Mary Alice Post ‘77 Mr. James P. Ragan ‘83 Mrs. Ozma F. Rahman ‘95 Dr. Ismael Ramirez Soto Mr. Joseph D. Rando ‘85

Mrs. Anne J. Rantuccio ‘77 Mr. David J. Raposa Mr. Luis M. Raposo ‘83 Dr. Paul A. Rapoza ‘76 Ms. Pamela J. Ras ‘88 Ms. Jennifer L. Raxter ‘98 Mrs. Rita T. Raymond Ms. Lorianne L. Reeves ‘77 Ms. Patricia E. Regan ‘84 Mr. Robert A. Reimels ‘69 Ms. Danielle K. Renaud ‘99 Mrs. Kelly A. Reynolds ‘01 Mr. Timothy J. Rezendes ‘84 Mr. Michael D. Rhines ‘84 Mr. Kevin R. Ribeiro ‘00 Mr. James J. Ricci ‘74 Mrs. Jean M. Rieser ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Riley ‘87, ‘92 Ms. Lynne A. Robitaille ‘81 Mrs. Ida Roderick ‘56 Dr. Wendy A. Rogers ‘85 Ms. Anne-Marie J. Rosa ‘01 Mr. Alan D. Roscoe ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Rose ‘95, ‘94 Mr. Kevin M. Rowles ‘77 Mrs. Debra A. Ruegg ‘80 Ms. Joan C. Ruel ‘98 Professor Gail E. Russell Mr. Howard W. Salden ‘84 Ms. Carol D. Santos Mr. and Mrs. David G. Sarles Ms. Melinda J. Sauro ‘97 Ms. Michelle Sauve ‘04 Ms. Lea A. Schneider ‘83 Dr. Ronald Schneider Mr. Andrew G. Schofield, Jr. ‘70 Mr. William S. Schofield ‘74 Mr. Randy Schwartz Ms. Kathleen Scieszka ‘97 Ms. Lorelei A. Scionti ‘82 Mr. Bruce C. Scofield ‘71 Ms. Joanne M. Seymour Mr. Patrick J. Sherman ‘04 Ms. Susan Shubitowski ‘86 Mrs. Colleen Mahan Sifferlen ‘83 Mr. Edmund Silva ‘65 Dr. Augustine Silveira, Jr. ‘57 Mrs. Theresa A. Silveira ‘92 Mr. Victor M. Simas ‘84 Mr. Michael Sitarz ‘72 Mr. Thomas Skibinski ‘76 Mrs. Edith R. Skinner ‘83 Mr. David A. Sluter ‘75 Dr. Walter Smietana ‘64 Mrs. Deborah C. Smith ‘95 Mrs. Louise E. Snyder ‘69 Mr. James J. Soares ‘66 Mr. Scott J. Soares ‘93 Mr. Victor C. Soares ‘84 Ms. Denise M. Soucy ‘86


Mr. George M. Sousa ‘05 Dr. Sharon A. Sousa Mr. John S. Souza ‘50 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. Spratt ‘89 Mr. Raymond H. St. Pierre ‘52 Mrs. Eveline E. Stavropulos ‘75 Mr. Peter Stavropulos Lt. Col. Audrey Stebenne, USAF (Ret.) ‘70 Mr. Charles A. Stefanini ‘91 Mr. Alexander J. Stevenson ‘78 Mrs. Dawn Stopka ‘77 Mr. Steven M. Strandberg ‘88 Ms. Christina K. Styan ‘00 Ms. Heather Egan Sussman ‘96 Mr. William A. Swan ‘77 Mrs. Christine F. Swann ‘78 Mr. Raymond C. Swenton ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Thadeuz F. Swiszcz Mrs. Doreen M. Sylvia Hutchinson ‘88 Mr. Paul E. Sylvia ‘74 Ms. Diane M. Tavares ‘74 Mr. Charles G. Taylor ‘65 Mr. Donald F. Taylor ‘54 Mr. Antonio A. Teixeira ‘78 Mr. Jeremy T. Theerman ‘98 Ms. Amelia H. Thomas ‘03 Mr. Manuel A. Thomas ‘56 Mr. Gordon R. Thomas ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Toomey Dr. Linus Travers Mr. Stephen S. Trond ‘55 Ms. Kathleen F. Trumbull ‘86 Professor Ann E. Tschirch Mr. Eugene L. Tucker Mrs. Filomena Turnblom ‘75 Dr. Kenneth E. Udas ‘86 Mrs. Diana Ukleja ‘96 UMass Dartmouth Financial Aid Office Staff Ms. Mary Van Vactor Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Vanderburg Mr. Robert A. Vanstone ‘56 Ms. Ellen Ventura Mr. Thomas A. Viana ‘73 Mr. Gerald Victorino ‘04 Mr. Alfred R. Vieira ‘70 Dr. Antone C. Vieira, Jr. ‘68 Mr. Bart Vonzastro Mrs. Leona B. Walder Mr. and Mrs. Eyal Waldman Ms. Claire S. Walecka ‘99 Mr. Joseph P. Walker II ‘79 Mr. Richard D. Walsh ‘76 Mr. Timothy P. Walsh ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Steven F. Ward Ms. Susan Warren ‘76 Mr. Eric S. Watson ‘73 Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler Professor Barbara Weatherford

Mr. David A. Webster ‘71 Mr. Jeffrey Weissman ‘72 Ms. Dawn H. Wheeler ‘97 Ms. Deanne M. Wherry Mr. John S. Whitaker ‘82 Ms. Patricia J. Whitaker ‘73 Mrs. Judith G. White Mr. Paul M. White ‘80 Mr. John W. Whitehead ‘64 Mr. Robert M. Whitehead ‘66 Mr. John F. Whiteside ‘52 Mrs. Virginia F. Wilkens ‘82 Ms. Jeannette Wilkinson ‘82 Mr. Allen D. Williams ‘82 Mrs. Jean E. Williams ‘90 Mr. Alton R. Wilson ‘65 Mr. Francis P. Wilson ‘62 Mrs. Theresa A. Winsor ‘73 Mr. Malcolm D. Woodward III ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. Chang Ning Wu Mrs. Elise S. Wylde ‘72 Mr. Joseph Xavier, Jr. ‘75 Mr. Xiong Xiaoxiong ‘86 Ms. Jenny Xifaras ‘60 Mr. Jun Xu ‘96 Mr. Yaode Xu ‘95 and Ms. Jia Ping Chen Mrs. Joyce L. Youngberg ‘68 Ms. Karen A. Zahorsky ‘78 Mr. Philip J. Zasadny ‘82 Mr. Jinyuan Zhou ‘91 Dr. Rosemary A. Zurawel ‘73 Dr. and Mrs. Max Zurflueh Mr. Dirk A. Zwart ‘77 Contributor $50 - $99 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Aducci ‘81 Ms. Michelle A. Albernaz ‘91 Mr. David Allen, Jr. ‘91 Mr. Michael J. Almeida ‘76 Ms. Toni M. Almeida Mrs. Jane Alonzi ‘74 Ms. Maria N. Alves ‘83 Mr. Richard H. Amundson ‘03 Ms. Mary I. Andrade ‘81 Mr. Peter G. Annunziato ‘90 Mr. John V. Anselmo ‘69 Mr. Stephen C. Antaya ‘80 Mr. John K. Arico ‘97 Mr. Michael P. Armstrong ‘80 Ms. Ana P. Arraial ‘03 Mr. Robert Arruda ‘68 Mr. Gary Ashworth ‘81 Mrs. Jennifer L. Ashworth ‘93 Mr. Normand G. Audette ‘72 Mr. Jeffrey M. August ‘89 Ms. Debbie S. Avelar ‘97 Mr. David Z. Bailey Mrs. Joanne Banys ‘80 U M a s s

“Education is Power” Continued from page 22

establish the Robert F. Stoico/FIRSTFED Grand Reading Room within the Claire T. Carney Library. The remainder will fund scholarships for students with financial need and a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Stoico also gave $1 million donations to Roger Williams University and Bristol Community College. “In this country, a person who is driven to achieve can reach his or her goals because of equality in our system of higher education,” said Stoico. “We wanted to honor the colleges in our area, while paving the way to a brighter future for our communities’ young people through scholarship support. “We especially wanted to give back to the local schools that trained so many successful FIRSTFED employees. We hope this grant will help shape the future of our region. I can think of no better investment than in a young person with dreams.”

Annual Fund keeps alumni informed about UMass Dartmouth’s growth Tamara Endich, a senior majoring in graphic design, has spent more than a hundred hours on the phone, calling UMass Dartmouth’s alumni, friends, and supporters. She’s one of the platoon of students who comprise a key part of the Annual Fund as they seek contributions for major projects, new programs, scholarships, and the like. Endich’s work with the Annual Fund was a logical extension of her activism on campus. A student trustee, Endich felt she “could bring to the phone-a-thon information for the people whom we were calling. I can tell people about what’s happening here, about new buildings such as the residence halls, and the plans for the library. “I also explain that the state doesn’t fund everything that the university needs, and that their donations go for many projects and causes. It’s been very interesting in that I’ve learned the different ways in which people view the university.” While students who participate in the Annual Fund phone-a-thon are paid, they are motivated primarily by their positive feelings about UMass Dartmouth. The experience enables them to connect with previous generations of students, while those who have been called are learning about the university’s present and future. Said Endich, “Through doing this, I think that when I get that phone call, I’ll want to give.”

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1967 alumnus recognizes university’s importance to the individual and the region Were it not for UMass Dartmouth, he likely would not be heading up one of the area’s most highly regarded institutions, says 1967 grad John Ledwidge. So the president and CEO of St. Anne’s Credit Union personally donates close to $400 annually to the university, and has done so for the last two decades. And the credit union has made a $50,000 gift to the Claire T. Carney Library campaign. “I feel I’m where I am because of the opportunity to go to that school,” said Ledwidge, a business administration major and first-generation student who had little money while at UMass Dartmouth. “The college was very good to me. I feel a very strong tie to the university. If enough of us give even a little bit, we will keep it strong. It’s a great institution.” Ledwidge’s two children are UMass Dartmouth grads, as are a number of St. Anne’s employees and their offspring. The credit union’s contribution to the library reflects both St. Anne’s sense of community and its recognition of the university’s impact within the region. “It is very important to us that the school continue its identity and remain strong. The university is so important in southeastern Massachusetts, and the library is the cornerstone of the university. So we felt it important to get onboard, and our board was unanimous in voting for the contribution.”

Giving to UMass Dartmouth via estate planning Designating UMass Dartmouth as an estate beneficiary has become an increasingly popular vehicle for individuals who want to show their support for the university with a financial contribution. In recent years, the university has benefitted from: a $1 million-plus gift from the late Mary Morley Crapo Hyde Eccles, resulting in an annual $50,000 scholarship program for New Bedford students; a sizeable gift from the late Augustus Silva, a former English Department chairperson at Southeastern Massachusetts Technical Institute, that provides for three $3,000 scholarships each year to English students; and a bequest from the late Wilfred Michaud ’72, a noted art collector who lived in Provincetown. This form of long-term planned giving can be especially appealing from a financial or taxation standpoint. Prospective donors can learn more about various gift instruments, such as annuities and bequests, by contacting the UMass Dartmouth Foundation Office at 508.999.8200.

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Mr. Michael J. Barber ‘62 Mr. Mario J. Barbosa ‘77 Mr. Kenneth W. Barclay ‘65 Ms. Linda A. Barcomb ‘85 Mr. Wayne Barker ‘68 Mr. James H. Barnett Ms. Phyllis J. Barney ‘76 Mr. John K. Bassett ‘79 Dr. Wayne E. Bates ‘87 Mr. Jak Beardsworth ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Beaudoin ‘72 Mrs. Carolyn M. Beaulieu ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Beaulieu Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Bednarz ‘75 Ms. Sharlene D. Begley ‘75 Ms. Sandra A. Belanger ‘72 Ms. Beverly A. Belli ‘85 Mr. Carlos O. Benavides Mr. Manuel Benevides ‘81 Mrs. Elizabeth Benoit ‘81 Mr. Richard H. Bergman ‘71 Mr. Mark J. Bernardo ‘92 Mr. Donald R. Bertrand ‘79 Ms. Muriel F. Berube ‘73 Ms. Myra R. Besen ‘75 Mr. Maurice L. Bessette ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bettencourt ‘78, ‘76 Mrs. Jacqueline M. Bjorkman ‘90 Mr. Paul J. Bollea ‘75 Ms. Roberta A. Bonifacio ‘83 Mr. Thomas Booth ‘71 Mr. Stephen Borden ‘74 Mr. Daniel S. Botelho ‘04 Mr. Paul A. Bouchard, Jr. ‘04 Mr. Hormidas R. Boucher ‘38 Mrs. Marie A. Bourassa ‘91 Mr. James G. Bourgoin ‘86 Mrs. Lynne T. Bowler ‘81 Mr. Bruce P. Branchaud ‘76 Mr. William Branco ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brandon ‘85 Mr. Scott A. Brigante ‘05 Mr. Steven T. Briggs Mr. Kenneth H. Brink Mrs. Mary M. Brogan Mr. Patrick M. Brogan ‘77 Attorney Clement Brown ‘72 Ms. Sharon D. Brown ‘77 Mr. Robert N. Brunelle ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bryant Z. M. Bryant Mr. and Mrs. Todd M. Bryda ‘89 Mr. Jeffrey H. Bunce ‘76 Mr. David J. Burke ‘83 Mrs. Patricia A. Burns ‘80 Ms. Cheryl Bushnell ‘00 Mrs. Pamela M. Butler ‘87 Mrs. Geraldine Butz ‘57 Ms. Amy A. Byalick ‘05 Mr. Brian J. Cabral ‘01

Mrs. Deborah S. Cabral ‘92 Mrs. Melissa Cabral ‘01 Ms. Anne M. Cabucio ‘83 Mr. John E. Cadorette ‘86 Ms. Donna Caisse ‘83 Mr. Joseph T. Callaghan, Jr. ‘62 Mr. Dennis M. Canulla ‘81 Mr. Joseph Carando ‘53 Mr. Augusto R. Cardoso ‘81 Mr. Paul A. Cardullo ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. George Carey Mr. Gregory K. Carignan ‘80 Mr. Jeffrey K. Carignan ‘81 Ms. Pamela J. Carignan ‘83 Mr. Ralph L. Carlson ‘97 Mrs. Shirley Carreiro Ochipa ‘73 Mr. William Carter, Jr. ‘54 Mr. Michael A. Carvalho ‘80 Mrs. Andrea M. Casey ‘86 Mr. Alan H. Cass ‘98 Mr. Samuel G. Chapin ‘87 Mr. David B. Charette ‘76 Mr. Ashok Ruman Charry ‘00 Mr. Patrick E. Chasse ‘95 Ms. Pamela J. Cherry ‘95 Mr. Mark V. Chester ‘92 Mr. David J. Chiulli ‘78 Ms. Mary M. Clarke ‘83 Mrs. Christine M. Clower ‘87 Ms. Helen H. Cole Ms. Kim M. Coleman ‘88 Mr. Brian P. Comeau ‘97 Mr. Gregg M. Comeau ‘94 Mrs. Monica B. Connolly ‘87 Mrs. Colleen C. Considine ‘75 Mr. Michael F. Conway ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Cook Mr. Christopher Brendon Cooney ‘90 Ms. Susan Correia ‘98 Ms. Augusta M. Costa ‘92 Mr. Carlos A. Costa ‘78 Mr. Eric J. Costa ‘99 Mr. John M. Costa ‘95 Mr. Mike Costa ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Costa ‘78, ‘80 Mr. Thomas F. Costa ‘85 Ms. Christine M. Coughlin ‘82 Mr. Keith D. Coughlin ‘82 Mr. Christopher W. Covert, Jr. ‘85 Mr. Kevin R. Coyne ‘74 Mr. William C. Cray ‘77 Attorney Peter Daigle ‘95 Mr. Thomas J. Daigle ‘81 Mr. Edward V. Dailey ‘54 Ms. Maria J. DeSousa D’Alu ‘71 Mr. George DaPonte ‘92 Ms. Susan E. Darbyshire ‘81 Ms. Maria V. DaSilva Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davis ‘80, ‘73 Mr. Howard L. Debeck ‘71 Ms. Michelle F. DeBest ‘97


Mr. Stephen Decesare ‘78 Mr. Agostino H. Defreitas ‘82 Mrs. Mary Ellen A. DeFrias ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Frank DeMello, Jr. Mr. Stephan DeMicco Ms. Patricia A. Dennehy ‘78 Mr. Rodney P. DeRego ‘67 Mr. Paul R. Desforges ‘62 Mr. Anarolino Desousa ‘77 Ms. Constance A. Deterra ‘79 Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Dinmore Ms. Kathleen M. Dolan-Hemingway Ms. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ‘03 Mr. Lee S. Donohue ‘89 Mrs. Karen M. Dorgan ‘75 Mr. Thomas M. Dowd ‘79 Mrs. Amy L. Dowe ‘95 Ms. Serena M. Doyle ‘86 Mr. Peter A. Draymore ‘79 Ms. Eudora Dronge ‘42 Mr. Ansu O. Dualu ‘04 Ms. Paula M. Duarte ‘90 Mr. Virgulino L. Duarte ‘73 Dr. Barbara Dubin Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dubrawski, Jr. Ms. Susan L. Duffy ‘78 Mr. Joseph C. Duggan ‘69 Mr. Bradley K. Dunkelberger ‘91 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Eddleston ‘82 Mr. Robert P. Eichelroth ‘88 Mr. Michael W. Ellen ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Glenn A. Ellis ‘84, ‘86 Mr. Joseph P. Ellis ‘85 Ms. Linda Enos ‘78 Mr. David L. Erickson ‘86 Mrs. Susan M. Ernsting ‘83 Chancellor Professor Lee E. Estes ‘65 Mr. William R. Etchells ‘55 Mrs. Robyn A. Eusebio ‘86 Mrs. Janet D. Evans ‘82 Ms. Linda A. Farrell ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Fater Dr. Richard Faulkenberry Mr. William J. Fawcett ‘60 Ms. Angela A. Fell Mr. Robert E. Felton ‘77 Mr. Raymond E. Ferland ‘76 Mr. Daniel E. Ferreira ‘79 Mr. Jeffrey D. Field ‘82 Mr. Richard S. Fine ‘76 Mrs. Maria P. Fitzgerald ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Fitzgibbons ‘63 Ms. Kathleen Flanagan ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Foley Mrs. Kathleen R. Foley-Peres ‘87 Mr. Edmund T. Folger ‘75 Mrs. Rose A. Follett ‘97 Mr. James P. Forance ‘84 Ms. Shirley A. Fortes Mr. David W. Fowle ‘73

Ms. Jeanne M. Fox Mr. Donald W. France ‘79 Mrs. Loris S. Frazer ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin F. Frey Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Friar ‘75, ‘74 Mr. John E. Furtado ‘68 Mr. Stephen P. Gabel ‘75 Ms. Ann Marie Gallagher ‘87 Mr. Kevin F. Galligan ‘77 Ms. Marianne A. Ganzenmuller ‘78 Mrs. Rita M. Gardner ‘83 Mr. Peter Gargas Mr. Michael J. Garrity ‘77 Mr. David D. Gavin ‘84 Mrs. Lisa A. Gay ‘84 Ms. Jie Ge ‘95 Mr. Stephen M. Geary ‘82 Mrs. Patricia M. Gelina ‘95 Mr. Stephan R. Gelinas ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Gemme ‘84, ‘83 Mr. Kurt Gent ‘74 Mr. Bernard W. George ‘76 Mr. Frank J. Germano, Jr. ‘74 Ms. Patricia A. Gibbs ‘93 Mr. Jay N. Gillis ‘84 Ms. Judith A. Giusti ‘99 Mr. Gordon E. Goldberg ‘93 Mr. Bento A. Gomes ‘70 Mr. Fred L. Gomes ‘86 Mr. Richard C. Gonneville ‘79 Ms. Janice R. Gonzaga ‘87 Ms. Shannon Ashley Goode ‘02 Mr. Edmond Goulart, Jr. ‘70 Mr. Fernando M. Goulart ‘75 Mr. Christopher M. Gouveia ‘96 Mr. Arthur Goyette, Jr. ‘82 Mrs. Joanne E. Greaves Mr. Daniel I. Greer ‘92 Mr. Paul A. Gregg ‘99 Mr. Mark D. Gregory ‘76 Mr. Roy F. Grieder, Jr. ‘73 Mr. Cory S. Griffis ‘05 Mr. Mark A. Grigalunas ‘78 Mrs. Jill A. Guthrie ‘90 Mrs. Katherine H. Gutman ‘86 Ms. Eileen M. Hall ‘79 Mr. John F. Halloran ‘79 Mr. Joseph J. Hanlon ‘89 Mr. Joseph P. Hannon ‘90 Mr. Robert J. Harpham ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Harris ‘85, ‘88 Ms. Marie E.B. Hartley ‘05 Mr. Barry E. Haskell ‘71 Ms. Judith A. Haskell ‘90 Ms. Melissa E. Haskell Mr. William R. Hathaway ‘77 Professor Eugene Herman Mrs. Catherine M. Hickey ‘90 Mr. James M. Hickox ‘77 Mr. Brian P. Hodson ‘72 U M a s s

The Estelle Woolfe Robinson and Ruth Soloman Smith Memorial Scholarship The passion for learning demonstrated by her late mother and her mother’s closest friend has inspired Professor Robin Robinson to create a scholarship to assist women intent on pursuing higher education. The Estelle Woolfe Robinson and Ruth Soloman Smith Memorial Scholarship will support nontraditional women students, for study in any discipline, who have deferred or interrupted their university studies, whatever the reason. Preference will be given to women from Cape Cod, where Robinson resides. Robinson, associate professor of sociology and crime and justice studies, launched the scholarship with $15,000 as a tribute to the two women, whose creativity and persistence supported their love of learning. Robinson said her mother, Estelle Robinson, an immigrant from England, had a lifelong fascination with archaeology, literature, and art history, which she transformed into a commitment to create public sources of books and programs for children and adults. Her mother taught Prof. Robinson that “learning is connected to your sense of social responsibility.” Ruth Smith, a modern ballet dancer, deferred her dream of a university education in order to support her young family. She persisted, however, earning an English degree over seven years as she worked full-time as a secretary, and then directed Temple University’s Office of Human Subjects Research for many years. “Over 30 years,” said Robinson, “my mother and Ruth shared the gifts of their minds and gave generously of their energy and talent to build community as they shared their love of literature and art, dance and music.”

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Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Hoffman Mr. Michael J. Hogan ‘89 Mr. Richard B. Hollis ‘04 Mr. Ernest P. Holt, Jr. ‘56 Mrs. Marilyn E. Hopkins ‘86 Mrs. Lois R. Horowitz Ms. Claudia A. Horsley ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Gill Houghton Ms. Maureen Hoye ‘91 Mrs. Megan G. Hoye ‘97 Ms. Colleen Hughes Ms. Stephanie A. Hulbig ‘93 Ms. E. Jacqueline Hunt ‘76 Ms. Virginia M. Huntzinger Ms. Jennifer J. Hurley ‘99 Mrs. Susan J. Husk ‘88 Mr. S. M. Sazzad Hussain ‘97 Dr. Richard M. Ibara Ms. Sharon B. Inglis ‘83 Mr. Eric Jermyn ‘92 Ms. Beverly A. Johnson ‘93 Mr. Kyle Thomas Kabala ‘06 Mrs. Edith A. Kameron Mr. Donald R. Kamienski ‘60 Mr. and Mrs. William Kannan Mr. and Mrs. Neil I. Kaplan ‘73, ‘74 Mr. Boris Katan ‘84 Mrs. Nancy C. Keane ‘65 Mr. Kenneth E. Keay ‘81 Mrs. Ann E. Keener ‘72 Mr. James V. Kelly ‘84 Professor Lori Keough Mr. John D. Kerr ‘76 Mrs. Deborah A. Kirk ‘77 Mr. Jonathan P. Klaren ‘94 Mr. Robert J. Koning ‘86 Mr. Ronald M. Koontz ‘93 Mr. Richard Koury ‘87 Mr. Chris A. Kreidermacher ‘80 Mrs. Cecilia M. Krisnosky ‘84 Ms. Janet D. Krobot ‘80 Ms. Donna M. Krone ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery P. Kurth Ms. Frances Kut ‘75 Mr. John J. Lacasse ‘84 Mr. Jeffrey B. Lafleur Mr. Joseph P. Lala ‘88 Mrs. Marianne B. Lally ‘77 Mr. John D. Lamb ‘91 Mr. Henry C. Lamontagne ‘68 Dr. Nancy Lamontagne ‘65 Mrs. Mary Ann Lamontagne, Jr. ‘01 Ms. Dawn M. Landreville ‘81 Mr. John W. Langer ‘72 Mr. Jonathan Langfield ‘86 Mr. Robert J. Larochelle ‘78 Mr. Philippe Lauture ‘86 Mr. Marc G. Laverdiere ‘80 Mr. Robert M. Lavery ‘70 Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘75 Ms. Sara-Jane Lawrence ‘75 UMass

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Ms. Chrisann Leal ‘90 Ms. Jeannette Leal Ms. Heidi L. Leavitt ‘92 Mr. Robert N. LeBoeuf ‘61 Mr. Kenneth A. Leconte ‘77 Ms. Amy L. Leduc ‘78 Mr. Donald R. Lee II ‘00 Ms. Mary Leger ‘06 Ms. Ethel M. Leidhold ‘97 Mr. Paul G. Leite ‘03 Mrs. Stephanie Leong ‘93 Mrs. Carol A. LePage ‘79 Mr. Daniel R. LePage ‘76 Mr. Paul LePage ‘67 Mr. Paul E. Levasseur ‘59 Mr. Edward F. Levell ‘52 Mrs. Suzanne D. Levesque ‘89 Mrs. Claire Levovsky ‘96 Mr. Anthony J. Lewandowski ‘85 Mr. John W. Lewis ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. David L. Limauro Mr. William G. Lisk ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. David H. Lithway Mr. Stephen Liuzzi ‘84 Mr. Jorge M. Lopes ‘96 Ms. Renee Lopes-Pocknett Mr. Gennaro R. Lopriore ‘56 Mrs. Barbara J. Loranger ‘82 Mr. Joseph M. Love ‘75 Mr. Steven Lowe ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. Kent H. Lundberg Mr. Patrick T. Lynch ‘79 Ms. Marilyn M. Lynds ‘78 Mr. Edwin L. Maclean ‘79 Mr. Anthony M. Mahan ‘97 Mr. Paul D. Malcolm ‘57 Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Malkoski ‘81, ‘82 Mr. Michael S. Manchester ‘67 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy A. Mancour ‘89 ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis W. Manna Ms. Paulette L. Manssuer ‘78 Mr. Michael R. Marandola ‘06 Mr. Joseph M. Marella Ms. Risha H. Margolis ‘69 Ms. Catherine M. Marques Messier ‘84 Mr. Dominic P. Marrinucci ‘80 Mrs. Janice E. Marshall ‘82 Ms. Joan Martel ‘72 Mr. Eric A. Martin ‘91 Dr. and Mrs. Anthony M. Martin ‘82 Mrs. Kathy A. Marzilli-Miraglia ‘77 Mr. Maurice R. Masse ‘71 Mr. Raymond D. Masson ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. David Matathia Ms. Rosemary M. McAndrew ‘80 Mr. Colin R. McArdle ‘94 Mr. Bruce A. McCaffrey ‘75 Ms. Christine Boulanger McCarthy ‘96

Ms. Kathryn A. McCarthy Mr. David McCombs ‘94 Ms. Sandra McConnell ‘97 Mrs. Debra L. McCormick ‘77 Mr. Stephen J. McCumber ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. McDermott Ms. Cathleen M. McDevitt ‘84 Mr. Paul M. McDonald ‘79 Mr. Paul O. McGinn ‘77 Mrs. Barbara L. McGrath Spencer ‘76 Ms. Lynn M. McInnes ‘89 Mr. Richard T. McKenzie ‘79 Mr. John S. McKenzie ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Donald McKeton ‘78, ‘80 Ms. Jayme M. McLaughlin ‘05 Mrs. Erin McManus ‘93 Mr. Michael J. McNally ‘69 Mr. Gerard P. McNeil ‘85 Ms. Mary Anne McQuillan ‘69 Mr. David A. Medeiros ‘94 Mr. John Medeiros ‘60 Mr. John Medeiros, Jr. ‘91 Ms. Kiley Medeiros ‘99 Mr. Noe O. Medeiros ‘71 Ms. Patricia A. Medeiros ‘71 Captain and Mrs. Raymond Mello ‘72, ‘79 Mr. Richard C. Menard ‘69 Ms. Ruth E. Mendonca Ms. Patricia L. Miller ‘72 Ms. Angela M. Millette ‘72 Ms. Bernadette Miner Mr. Raymond E. Miner ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. David Minior ‘77, ‘79 Ms. Vickie Miranda ‘01 Mrs. Patricia M. Mitchell ‘77 Ms. Juliet Lea Mondshine ‘81 Mr. Roger O. Monty ‘71 Mr. John M. Moreira ‘84 Mr. Mark A. Moreira ‘85 Ms. Nancy Morgan-Boucher ‘96 Ms. Alison G. Moriarty ‘03 Mr. Raymond E. Morris ‘47 Mr. Michael J. Moulding ‘86 Dr. Ralph O. Moyer, Jr. ‘57 Mrs. M. Teresa Mozaz ‘94 Mr. Joseph P. Mroczka ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. John C. Muller ‘87 Mrs. Arleen Mundy ‘68 Ms. Gina M. Muscato ‘00 Mr. Hugh J. Neenan ‘78 Mr. Timothy J. Nelson ‘84 Mr. James A. Newkirk ‘76 Mrs. Joan M. Newman-Audley ‘78 Mrs. Cynthia J. Nock ‘77 Ms. Gina M. Nolan Mr. John Norris ‘82 Mr. Daniel P. Norton ‘95 Ms. Vicki J. Nurse ‘00

Mrs. Virginia M. O’Brien ‘87 Ms. Shea-Lynn M. Ocampo ‘06 Mr. Daniel C. O’Connell ‘64 Mr. David M. Oliveira Mrs. Joanne E. Oliveira ‘70 Mr. Richard T. Oliveira ‘63 Mr. Thomas D. O’Neil ‘61 Mr. Kevin R. O’Reilly ‘83 Ms. Ellen A. Osborn ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Osmun, Jr. Mr. Daniel Pacheco ‘64 Ms. Kimberly J. Pacheco ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Packert ‘78, ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. David P. Palmer ‘92, ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Leonidas Panagiotou Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Partridge ‘74 Mr. Robert M. Payer ‘67 Mr. Robert A. Pearson ‘52 Mr. Gregory A. Pelagio ‘66 Mr. Brian C. Pelletier ‘64 Mr. John P. Pereira, Jr. ‘64 Ms. Nancy M. Peresta ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Perkins ‘77, ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Vernon E. Perry Mrs. Sarabeth Persiani ‘89 Mrs. Lauralyn Persson ‘74 Mrs. Joanna L. Pettey ‘83 Mr. Robert Piazza ‘77 Mr. John Pigott ‘80 Ms. Heidi L. Piknick ‘94 Mr. Paul Pinault ‘73 Ms. Laurie A. Plante ‘92 Mr. James K. Plourde ‘60 Mr. Mark C. Plumley Mr. Joseph A. Polito ‘76 Mr. Donald G. Polselli ‘73 Ms. Arlene Pombo ‘00 Ms. Christine Porrell ‘87 Mr. Paul M. Potvin ‘04 Mr. John B. Powers, Jr. ‘95 Mrs. Anita L. Poyant ‘84 Mr. Derek J. Preston ‘94 Ms. Lesley S. Priest ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Armand H. Query, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Catherine A. Raker ‘89 Mr. Edward J. Rank ‘87 Mr. Joseph D. Raposa ‘52 Mrs. Donna Raymond Brown ‘81 Mr. Christopher Ready ‘92 Mr. Paul D. Reardon ‘81 Mr. Thomas Reilly III ‘74 Ms. Maria C. Reis ‘97 Ms. Kathy A. Reynolds ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Alan A. Richard ‘72 Ms. Martha A. Robertshaw ‘79 Mr. Donn L. Robidoux ‘75 Ms. Charlene M. Robillard ‘78 Dr. Dennis B. Roderick


Mr. David G. Rodrigues ‘75 Mr. Douglas Rodrigues ‘80 Mrs. Donna M. Rogers ‘81 Mr. Edward J. Rogers ‘82 Mrs. Janice M. Rogers ‘77 Mr. Stephen A. Romano ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Rosa ‘73, ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose Mrs. Mary Rose ‘86 Dr. and Mrs. Joel E. Rosenblatt Mrs. Wendy Roskowski ‘90 Ms. Cathleen M. Roughan ‘81 Ms. Susan R. Rudnick ‘77 Mr. John Runcis ‘76 Mrs. Cathy A. Russo ‘84 Ms. Eugenia A. Santos ‘87 Mrs. Maria C. Santos ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Mario Saojoao Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Sardonini ‘81, ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Chaouki W. Sarkis Mr. David A. Sarro ‘03 Ms. Paula A. Saunders ‘74 Mr. Robert D. Saunders Ms. Donna A. Schenkel ‘74 Dr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Schlitzer Mr. Gilbert N. Schofield ‘51 Mrs. Thelma Schwartz Mr. Stuart Schweidel Ms. Julie E. Scleparis ‘85 Mr. Thomas J. Sebastiao ‘88 Mrs. Suzanne Semedo ‘82 Mrs. Elise M. Servant ‘73 Mr. Steven C. Sharek ‘77 Mrs. Judith Ganson Shaw ‘60 Mr. Wayne S. Shaw ‘88 Ms. Catherine Sheehan ‘78 Mr. Gary R. Shepherd ‘78 Mr. Allen C. Sherman ‘76 Mr. Richard H. Showalter, Jr. ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. James M. Shruhan Mr. William A. Sicard ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Silva ‘73, ‘78 Mr. Kevin Silveira ‘95 Mr. Raymond K. Silveira ‘50 Mr. Thomas Silveria ‘96 Mrs. Diane M. Silvia ‘86 Ms. Rosemary Simmons ‘84 Mr. Edward R. Sirois ‘74 Mr. Leo N. Sirois ‘72 Mr. Edward D. Smith ‘94 Mrs. Sylvia M. Smith ‘89 Mrs. Tracie L. Smith ‘95 Mrs. Claudia A. Soares ‘73 Ms. Elizabeth Soares ‘03 Mr. Otto F. Solberg ‘80 Mr. John B. Sorel ‘90 Mr. Joseph L. Sousa ‘82 Ms. Priscilla L. Sousa ‘05 Mrs. Bridgit M. Souza ‘91 Mr. Richard F. Souza

Ms. Patricia A. Spellman ‘92 Mr. Gregory Spiker ‘77 Mrs. Rosemonde Reilly Spinelli ‘74 Ms. Jayne T. St. Pierre ‘81 Mrs. Nicole St. Pierre ‘98 Mr. Paul St. Pierre Ms. Susan D. Starrett ‘73 Mr. Theodore R. Steliga ‘78 Ms. Kay L. Stephens Dr. Laura J. Stewart ‘86 Ms. Lucy L. Stewart ‘94 Mr. Gregory R. Stidsen ‘71 Ms. Jennifer A. Stines ‘92 Mrs. Catherine M. Sullivan Ms. Rolande Sullivan ‘80 Ms. Murielann Surette Mrs. Patrice A. Sweeney ‘81 Mrs. Elisabete M. Swenson ‘91 Ms. Karin E. Swenson ‘96 Mr. Gordon L. Sykes, Jr. ‘71 Mr. Matthew C. Sylvain ‘97 Mr. Glenn C. Sylvia ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Szala Mr. Udai K. Tambar Mr. Robert Tarpey Ms. Jessica L. Tavares ‘05 Mr. Thomas B. Tavares ‘64 Mr. Paul E. Taylor ‘84 Ms. Theresa D. Taylor ‘81 Mr. William J. Taylor ‘67 Mrs. Melody R. Thompson ‘00 Ms. Elaine Tisdale Mrs. Nancy J. Tooley ‘99 Mr. Nathan L. Tracy ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Trahan ‘76 Ms. Maura C. Travers Mr. Albert R. Tremblay Mr. Gerard L. Tremblay, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Carrie L. Tremko ‘79 Mr. William L. Trepanier ‘83 Mr. Daniel J. Tschaen ‘77 Mrs. Gayle Turner ‘73 Ms. Lynn C. Turner ‘94 Mr. John M. Vaccaro ‘85 Mrs. Jean M. Van Doren ‘77 Mrs. Carol H. Vedrody ‘70 Mrs. Dawn C. Ventura ‘72 Mrs. Sally Ann Ventura ‘86 Mr. Peter M. Vercellone ‘69 Ms. Dolores L. Vieira ‘05 Mr. John Vieira, Jr. ‘76 Ms. Cynthia M. Viel ‘80 Mr. Glenn M. Viens ‘79 Mr. Gary W. Vincent ‘81 Ms. Karyn D. Vincent ‘85 Dr. Donna M. Viveiros ‘77 Mr. Ronald E. Waclawik ‘86 Mrs. Patricia A. Walker ‘88 Mrs. Nancy A. Walsh-Sayles ‘98 Ms. Joan M. Ward Mr. Richard C. Waring ‘69 U M a s s

Mr. John L. Waterman, Jr. ‘76 Mr. Kenneth P. Watts ‘97 Mrs. Eileen V. Waxler ‘80 Mrs. Penny S. Webster ‘84 Ms. Patricia A. Welsh ‘73 Ms. Nancy F. Wheelwright ‘74 Ms. Lori A. Whelan ‘85 Mr. Andrew Wiernicki ‘83 Mr. Maurice Wiernicki ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wilchynski Mr. and Mrs. Barry E. Wilhite Mr. Jeffrey D. Wilson ‘77 Professor Howard W. Windham ‘67 Ms. Audrey J. Witt ‘78 Mr. Allen Wong ‘81 Mr. Daniel J. Wood ‘92 Mr. Frank C. Woodfall ‘78 Mr. Walter J. Wordell ‘60 Ms. Audra Wright ‘91 Attorney Margaret D. Xifaras ‘78 Ms. Zhaohui Yang ‘97 Ms. Patricia Lane D. Young Ms. Elizabeth A. Zelski ‘73 Mr. Richard E. Zoino ‘65

Gifts-in-Kind Alkermes Corporation AstraZeneca Ms. Andrea N. Davis Mr. and Mrs. John Dutra Graham Printing Mr. John Graham ‘93 Ms. Jane M. Herman Reynolds DeWalt Printing, Inc. Professor Emeritus J. Donald Smith Sodexho, Inc. SouthCoast Hospitals Group Graduate Student Fellowship in Portuguese Studies Luso-American Development Foundation

Honor/Memorial Gifts The following list includes donors who designated gifts In Honor of or In Memory of their loved ones.

In Memory of Dr. Francis J. Berlandi Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

F o u n d a t i o n

In Memory of Mr. Ernest J. Boch, Sr. Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. Robert Burgess Mr. and Mrs. James M. Shruhan In Honor of Mr. Douglas Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Mr. Dylan Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 Mrs. Edith A. Kameron In Honor of Mr. H. Jay Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Ms. Kathleen V. Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Mrs. Lillian B. Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Mr. Mark H. Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Mr. Patrick Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Honor of Mr. Rad Kelham Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Memory of Ms. Dolores Carreiro Little People’s College, Inc. In Memory of Mr. Thomas R. Cashmore Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91 In Memory of Miss Chloe Cline Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91 In Memory of Ms. Ruth Coffin Mina Otis Gift Fund

In Memory of Ms. A. Helena Barnes Mr. Bruce E. Barnes ‘73

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In Memory of Ms. Fran Bernardi Ms. Cheryl Bushnell ‘00

In Honor of Ms. Caitlyn Cole Ms. Colleen Hughes

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In Honor of Mr. Carl Corrao, Jr. Ms. Colleen Hughes In Honor of Chancellor Professor Lester W. Cory Mr. Donald F. Wilbur ‘54

In Honor of Professor Alex J. Fowler Donor Advised Fund/Combined Jewish Philanthropies In Honor of Mrs. Maria D. Furman Mr. George W. Noyes

In Honor of Costa and Silva Families Mr. Scott W. Costa ‘78

In Memory of Ms. Terry Ganley Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mr. Corey Costa Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73

In Memory of Ms. Claire C. James Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. James ‘71, ‘70

In Memory of Ms. Doris Cox Mr. and Mrs. Barton M. Bresnik Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bryant Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Budka Ms. Denise A. Christian Ms. Elizabeth A. Mansfield Mr. and Mrs. George E. Moore Ms. Rena M. Rushlaw In Memory of Ms. Evelyn Curtis Ms. Cheryl Bushnell ‘00 In Memory of Ms. Ann Cutner Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose In Memory of Mr. Pasquale DeGrazia Mr. and Mrs. Peter Szala In Memory of Professor Ora M. DeJesus Mr. and Mrs. Vernon E. Perry Professor Gail E. Russell In Memory of Ms. Concetta A. DiCara Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. Arthur D. Ferreira Ms. Mona Provencher

In Memory of Mr. Percival J. Kingsley Bristol County Chapter of M.S.O.G. In Memory of Mr. Ronald A. Kostyla Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski In Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Lassoff Ms. Tillie J. Bederow Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Geller Mrs. Myra J. Goldberg Ms. Lori B. Graubart Mrs. Lois R. Horowitz Mr. and Mrs. Herman W. Isenstein Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Gerard M. Koot Mr. Lawrence R. Lassoff Mr. and Mrs. Dennis W. Manna Mrs. Judy Pollack Dr. and Mrs. Joel E. Rosenblatt Mr. and Mrs. David G. Sarles Attorney and Mrs. Peter Smola The Frances K. Shabica Trust Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tapper Mrs. Felix B. Waxler Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken

In Memory of Ms. May Ferris Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91

In Memory of Mr. Fred Lassoff Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler

In Memory of Mr. Monsour J. Ferris Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91

In Honor of Mrs. Eudine Laurans Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry

In Honor of Ms. D’Anna Fortunato UMass Dartmouth Library Associates

In Memory of Ms. Mary L. Leon Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73

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In Memory of Ms. Adelaide Adaskin Lindbergh Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mr. Belfred F. Pina Ms. June M. Pina ‘72

In Memory of Ms. Adeline Lindbergh Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry

In Memory of Mrs. Gerda Pollack Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler

In Honor of Dr. Jean F. MacCormack College Club of New Bedford, Inc. Dr. Robert W. Green Dean William Hogan ‘70 In Memory of Mr. Norman P. Medeiros Mr. Norman S. Medeiros ‘93 In Memory of Mr. James Mello Ms. Anabela L. Gouveia ‘05 In Memory of Ms. Eleanor M. Muir Bristol County Chapter of M.S.O.G. In Memory of Mr. Ryan P. Nolan ‘07 Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 The Honorable Mark C. Montigny ‘84 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken

In Memory of Ms. Sybil Radovsky Ornsteen Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Honor of Mrs. Rita T. Raymond Mr. and Mrs. Stanley A. Revzin In Memory of Ms. Patsy Ann Ripatrazone Ms. Koreen A. Santos In Honor of Mrs. Karan A. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Ross In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Evan J. Rosser Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 In Memory of Mrs. Dorothy Santos Mr. Keith Santos Mr. Kevin C. Santos ‘81 Ms. Koreen A. Santos

In Memory of Mr. William R. Norris Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73

In Memory of Ms. Barbara J. Sawyer Mrs. Joanne E. Greaves

In Memory of Ms. Elizabeth O’Hearn Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91

In Memory of Ms. Ann Sheibley Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mrs. Arlene M. Oliveira Ms. Gina M. Nolan Ms. Charlene Picard

In Memory of Ms. Sarah Silverstein Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler

In Honor of Mr. Bruce H. Palmer Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc.

In Memory of Ms. Florinda Smith Mrs. Catherine M. Hickey ‘90 University Campus Store

In Memory of Mr. George Paluso Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Irene and Harry Soares, Sr. Mr. Robert Soares

In Honor of Dr. Doreen C. Parkhurst Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73

In Honor of Professor T. Noel Stern Professor Donald G. McKinley

In Memory of Mr. John W. Pattison Mr. and Mrs. Earle L. Sylvia

In Memory of Ms. Anne Strauss Ms. Joan R. Adaskin


In Memory of Mr. Frank M. Texeira Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Medeiros ’85, ‘86 In Memory of Professor Richard Walder Mrs. Leona B. Walder In Memory of Mr. Felix B. Waxler Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler In Memory of Mr. Jonathan Blake Waxler Dr. Richard T. Burke Ms. Angela A. Fell Mrs. Claire Levovsky Mrs. Thelma Schwartz Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler In Honor of Mrs. Linda Waxler Mrs. Myra J. Goldberg Dr. and Mrs. Louis S. Levovsky ‘96 In Honor of Dr. Robert P. Waxler Mrs. Myra J. Goldberg Dr. and Mrs. Joel E. Rosenblatt In Memory of Mr. Stephen J. Weaver Mr. and Mrs. Thadeuz F. Swiszcz In Honor of Mr. Marc Widershien UMass Dartmouth Library Associates In Memory of Mrs. Esther A. Wojcik Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 To view the list of donors to the Annual Campaign according to the designated purpose of the gift, please go to: www.umassd.edu/institutional_ advancement/foundation

Corporations, Foundations and Organizations 100 Riggenbach, LLC A. D. Makepeace Company A. H. Ferguson Company Acushnet Company Advanced Tech Sales, Inc. AFFS, Inc. Alkermes Corporation

Alphee Laflamme Scholarship Fund Attorney Alan A. Amaral AstraZeneca Alice S. Ayling Scholarship Foundation Babbitt Steam Specialty Company Bacou-Dalloz USA, Inc. BankFive Beta Gamma Sigma The Boeing Company The Boston Foundation Bristol Community College Bristol County Chapter of M.S.O.G. Brown Associates Bufftree Building Company C D Designs Caddy Shack, Inc. Cannon Engineering Cape Cod Plastering, Inc. Cardoza’s Wine & Spirits Center for Marketing Research Center for Policy Analysis Century Food Service, Inc. Charles River Group, LLC Ida S. Charlton Charity Fund The Chickering Group Child & Family Services, Inc. Citizens Bank Foundation Citizens-Union Savings Bank Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Providence College Club of New Bedford, Inc. Combined Properties, Inc. Comcast Committee to Elect John T. Saunders Committee to Elect Mark C. Montigny Commonwealth Home Consultants Constar International, Inc. Core Business Technologies Corsair Logistics, Inc. Jon S. Corzine Foundation Cottage Antiques Courtyard Restaurant Jessie B. Cox Charitable Trust The Cranston Foundation of Cranston Print Works Company Henry H. Crapo Charitable Foundation Craven & Ober Policy Strategists, LLC Dancemakers Dartmouth Mall DBM Engineering Associates DHPC, Inc. Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, Inc. Dominican Sisters of Hope Donor Advised Fund/Combined Jewish Philanthropies Eastern Fisheries, Inc. Eating Options, Inc. EBSCO Industries Educators Society for the U M a s s

Heritage of India Egan Family Foundation Engineered Yarns America, Inc. Sander and Ray Epstein Charitable Foundation Fall River Ford, Inc. Fall River United Jewish Appeal, Inc. Robert B. Feingold & Associates, P.C. Fidelity Investments Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund Financial Planning Alternatives Fire Protection Services First Bristol Corporation First Pioneer Farm Credit, ACA Flavors of New England Fluor Foundation FM Global Foundation Fontaine Yacht Holdings, LLC Footpath, Inc. Fred and Sarah Lipsky Foundation Maria Furman Family Fund G. Lopes Construction, Inc. Gardiner Design Garzoni & Company, Inc. Global Glass of New England, Inc. Global Montello Group Corporation Graham Printing Greater New Bedford Choral Society, Inc. H & G Structures, Inc. Hannon Art Works, LLC Attorney Patricia A. Harrington Hope Nursing Home Care, LLC Howley Bread Group, Ltd. IDT IKON Office Solutions Instrument Technology, Inc. Insurit Agency, Inc. International Sourcing & Marketing, Ltd. Island Foundation, Inc. J & J Materials Corporation The Jarabek Family Charitable Foundation J.C. Cannistraro, LLC JVA Consulting Karam Financial Group Karam Insurance Agency, Inc. Karin Weller Interior Design, Inc. Kieliszak, Eggert & Company Lafrance Hospitality Company Lane Design, Inc. Langer Associates, Inc. Liberty Mutual Lighthouse Masonry, Inc. Little People’s College, Inc. Luso-American Development Foundation The MacLean Charitable Foundation

D a r t m o u t h

F o u n d a t i o n

Mail Boxes, Etc. Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass Mall Tanning and Skincare Center, Inc. Manomet Mystery Riders Manuel Rogers and Sons Funeral Home, Inc. Robert J. Marchand, Esq. Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc. Matthew J. Macy Memorial Fund William McAloon, Consultant Medical Nursing Consultant, Inc. Mellon Trust Merida Meridian, Inc. Micron Technology Foundation, Inc. M.P. & Sons Construction, Inc. MSLC Employee Activity Fund National Council of Jewish Women, N.B. Section Neto Insurance Agency, Inc. New Bedford Floor Covering Sales Company, Inc. New Bedford Mothers Club NSTAR Foundation Mina Otis Gift Fund Pedal Power Bicycle Shop, Inc. Peter Cross Photography The Pilgrim Foundation Portuguese Ministry of Culture PREIT Services, LLC Procter & Gamble Projx Corporation Promotional Advertising Associates, Inc. R. B. Textiles R. N. LeBoeuf Enterprises Mr. Alan F. Rainford, C.P.A. Rantuccio Boat Works, Inc. Raytheon Company Regal Floor Covering, Inc. Reynolds DeWalt Printing, Inc. Gladys M. Rezendes Memorial Scholarship Rock N. Hill Farm Rosenfield, Raymon & Pielech, PC Sheldon Friedland, Esq. Shin-Etsu Silicones of America Slades Bank Soares Sanitation Pumping, Inc. Sodexho, Inc. Solvay Solexis Somerset Paint & Decorating South Coast Memorials Southcoast Endodontics, PC SouthCoast Hospitals Group SouthWest NanoTechnologies, Inc. Sovereign Bank St. Anne’s Hospital St. Stanislaus Kostka Province

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The Standard-Times Star Holdings Limited Partnership Stephen J. Liuzzi Construction Corporation Sterling Resources, Ltd. Swansea Mall Swiftsure Editing Services, LLC Sylvia & Company Insurance Agency, Inc. Synergy Associates, Inc. The Gushue Law Firm Timothy Moran Charitable Fund The Charles Irwin Travelli Fund Tribosciences & Engineering, Inc. True North System Truesdale Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association, Inc. UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association UMass Dartmouth Library Associates United Way

University Campus Store The University of Chicago University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc. Ven-Elger Pet Care Center, Inc. Viana Homes Construction, Inc. VISTAssociates, Inc. W.B. Mason Company, Inc. West Dennis Yacht Club, Inc. Henry and Joan T. Wheeler Charitable Fund Whelan Associates, LLC Cheryl Whitehead Medical Fund WTH Engineering, Inc. Matching Gift Companies Aetna Aetna Life & Casualty Amica Mutual Insurance Company Automatic Data Processing Bank of America

Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation Eaton Corporation Exxon Education Foundation Factory Mutual Engineering & Research Service Bureau Fidelity Investments Fluor Foundation FM Global Foundation FMC Corporation General Electric Gilbane Building Company Match Company Gillette Company Greif Harvey Hubbell Foundation Haskon Aerospace International Business Machines Corporation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Juniper Networks Company

LaSalle Bank, N.A. Lockheed Martin Corporation Merck Company Foundation National Grid USA Service Company, Inc. Nordson Corporation NSTAR Foundation Pfizer Foundation Pfizer, Inc. Pitney Bowes Corporation Procter & Gamble Company Raytheon Company Shell Oil Stop & Shop Supermarket Company Sun Life of Canada Sun Microsystems, Inc. SunTrust Mid Atlantic Swarovski Matching Gift Program Tyco Electronics Corporation Verizon

Contributions from those who support public higher education and UMass Dartmouth enable the university to continue providing students with contemporary, superior instruction and facilities, and to offer its special resources to the region’s businesses and to the community.

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UMass Dartmouth Advancement Staff

UMass Dartmouth Foundation Board of Directors

Ways to Give

Executive Director Jeffrey A. Wolfman

President Dr. Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

Cash

Senior Philanthropic Officer Donald H. Ramsbottom

Vice President Dr. Tony Garro, V.C. Academic Affairs/Provost

Associate Vice Chancellor for Advancement Bill Annino

Chairman Mr. Gerald Mauretti ’65

Data Base Manager Judy Amaral

Vice Chairman Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ’91

Data Entry Operator Sandra Baker

Treasurer/Clerk Mr. John Feitelberg

Information Manager Ronald M. Biron

Ms. Maria Furman ’76 Mr. William T. Kennedy ’03 Ms. Mary Lyn Lenz Ms. Elizabeth Isherwood Moore ’80 Mr. Anthony Sapienza Mr. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ’00 Mr. Robert Stoico Mr. Robert Watkins ’02 Mr. Myron Wilner Attorney Margaret Xifaras ’78

Director of Donor Relations Tia Bullard Senior Outreach Coordinator Mary Ellen A. DeFrias ’94 Administrative Assistant Juanita Lopez ’95 Administrative Assistant Gina M. Nolan Accountant Charlene Picard Director of Prospect Management Jennifer L. Raxter ’98 Administrative Assistant Karen Tavares Administrative Assistant Elaine Tisdale Asselin

Alumni Relations Staff Director of Alumni Relations Joe F. DeMedeiros ’99 Administrative Assistant Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Many of the gifts received by the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are in the form of cash—usually by check. Increasingly, some alumni and friends have chosen to make their gifts to the Annual Fund using a major credit card. This allows the donor to take advantage of any benefits awarded by the credit card company such as frequent flyer miles, bonus points, etc. Both types of gifts are simple to make and are immediately available for use by the university.

Securities Gifts of appreciated stocks, bonds and mutual funds offer distinct advantages to the donor while benefiting the UMass Dartmouth Foundation. In the case of such gifts, the donor can earn a charitable income tax deduction and eliminate all or a large portion of the capital gains tax that the donor would otherwise be required to pay if the securities were sold.

Ex Officio Members Ms. Gloria T. Craven ’77 Dr. Susan J. Leclair ’77 Mr. William E. Giblin ’57, ’06 Dr. Susan T. Costa ’72

Gifts-in-Kind These donations to the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are not direct, monetary contributions; they may consist of real estate and other assets including antiques, paintings, rare books, and equipment. Gifts-in-kind may offer particular tax advantages, depending upon the circumstances of the donor. We suggest that the donor consult with professional counsel for advice on such gifts.

Other Officers Mr. Don Zekan Assistant Treasurer Mr. Jeffrey A. Wolfman Assistant Clerk Honorary Directors Mr. Alan Ades ’96 Mrs. Charlotte G. Babbitt Mr. Patrick Carney Mr. Kevin Champagne Mrs. Betty Chang Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. Dale Jones Mr. James J. Karam ’71, ’01 Mr. Harold G. Lash Mr. Gustave LaStaiti ’98 Ms. Karen G. Lloyd ’86 Honorable William Q. MacLean, Jr. ’80 Ms. Jean Whelan

Honor or Memorial Gifts Family or friends can make these gifts to benefit UMass Dartmouth and honor campus community members or loved ones. To make a donation, please contact the Advancement Office at 508.999.8200 or give online at umassd.edu/donate

Statement of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action UMass Dartmouth wholeheartedly supports and encourages the development of action programs designed to promote the employment and advancement of women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, persons with disabilities, and Vietnamera veterans as a means of assuring compliance with the provisions of campus Affirmative Action plans. The University firmly supports the concept of equal opportunity without

regard to an individual’s race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status as it applies to his/ her employment, admission to and participation in the University’s programs and activities, provision of services, and selection of vendors who provide services or products to the University.

U M a s s

The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant Chancellor for Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Outreach, Foster Administration Building, Room 305, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747 508.910.6405

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F o u n d a t i o n

A n n u a l

Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, J.W. McCormack Building, Room 222, Boston, MA 02109

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Alumni news

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Class Notes ’40s

Julien F. Paul ’47, chemistry, Fall River, is president of the Marine Museum in that city.

’50s

Stephen H. Downer ’56, textile engineering, Fredericksburg, VA, is the CEO of Axxxtion Atelier, Inc., a household furniture manufacturing company. Donald Gray ’59, mechanical engineering, Lincoln Park, NJ, celebrated his 50th wedding anniversary on August 17, 2007.

’60s

Herman J. Hunt ’60, electrical engineering, Plymouth, is a self-employed writer. He is a member of the American Legion, and Plymouth Antiquarian, Cordage Historical, and Planetary societies. An amateur radio operator and a volunteer in the history room of the Plymouth library, Hunt also enjoys mountain biking, walking, and reading. Charles H. Manley ’64, chemistry, Ringwood, NJ, retired as vice president of science and technology at Takasago International in May, 2007. He remains professionally active as a consultant, and loves sailing and skiing.

John T. Everett ’65, mechanical engineering, Arlington, VA, is the president of Ocean Associates, Inc., which provides consulting services in the public and private sectors, academe, and UN agencies. He is the owner and president of OceanArts.us, which specializes in photography focusing on scenery, wildlife, and water. He has a master’s and doctoral degree in business research management from Florida State University.

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We want to hear from you —send us your news—www.umassd.edu/alumni/ or Alumni Association, 285 Old Westport Rd., N. Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

Richard “Dick” Budd ‘66, marketing, Jupiter, FL, retired from the real estate business in 2001. He summers on Cape Cod and in Stowe, VT, and lives a single life devoted to health, fitness, and spirituality. Dick, who is involved with triathlons and a number of sports, would love to hear from other alumni. Ronald Souza ’67, electrical engineering, retired last December as a quality systems manager for Alcoa Fastening Systems in Stoughton. He has lived in New Bedford for more than 70 years. Richard D. Stone ’68, business administration, Mechanicsburg, PA, is a professor of marketing and logistics at Shippensburg University. Robert J. Snigger ’68, textile technology, Temple, TX, comanages the St. Vincent De Paul Thrift Store there. He retired from the DuPont Company in 2000 to do missionary work in Mexico. Snigger, a Roman Catholic deacon in the diocese of Austin, is active in the church prison ministry. Jak Beardsworth ’69, history, Punta Gorda, FL, hosted a tennis clinic with former Davis Cup captain and USA Olympic coach Tom Gullinson at his club, Vivante. Geraldine N. Pavo ’69, history, North Attleboro, is married to Joe Pavo, has taught elementary school, and has two children, Stephanie and Scott. The Pavos have moved around the country, with stays in Fall River, Portsmouth, RI, Shalimar, FL, Wrentham, Simsbury, CT, and Geneva, Il, and located in North Attleboro in 2001. The Pavos plan to retire to the south within the next year.

’70s

Bruce H. Brown ’71, civil engineering, Jefferson, has 36 years experience in engineering and construction on civil and environmental projects and construction of public buildings. He is senior resident representative for Weston & Sampson Engineers Inc.’s construction services department.

Carol Silva ’71, French, Dartmouth, writes, “Yes, I graduated and spent most of my career as a teacher of Portuguese. I was one of the first four teachers to move onto the campus (which was) the Group One building as well as the power plant. It was the only building that housed classrooms, clerical, medical, cafeteria and library!” Joan L. Pepin ’73, psychology, of Rochester, has four grandchildren. John Martin ’74, history, Bow, NH, retired as a First Sergeant after 29 years in the Army and Army Reserve, and a 21-year career as a unit manager with the New Hampshire Dept. of Corrections. Martin has published a novel Deployment, based on events in Darfur and the hypothetical involvement of US troops. It is available at iUniverse.com and Amazon.com. As a hobby, he tracks down artifacts from the former Furtado’s Dairy in New Bedford. His middle child, Michael, is touring Europe and Russia with the rock band “Stuck Mojo.” Ronald G. Reeves ’74, English, Seekonk, celebrated his 20th wedding anniversary on October 9th, 2007. He has been employed at the Barrington Public Library for 31 years.

Terence P. Garvey ’75, mathematics, Tiverton, RI, is a senior principal engineer for General Dynamics Information Technology. Deirdre H. Bass ’76, visual design, Cape Elizabeth, ME, has a son, Austin, majoring in psychology at Clark University. Her twins have begun the pre-college odyssey of PSATs, SATs, and college tours. “So to UMass we come! Best wishes to all you of ’76!” John G. Bergeron ’76, management, became a certified purchasing manager in 1998. He has worked for Lightolier, Inc. in Fall River for 17 years and is a commodities manager. He owns a tax preparation and bookkeeping business. He and his wife Carol live in Fairhaven. Donna L. Burns ’77, nursing, Worcester, is a hospice registered nurse for the Visiting Nurses Association Hospice in Southboro. David H. Jennings ’78, biology, Marion, has been a firefighter in New Bedford for 28 years. He and his wife Julie have two children, Sarah and Matthew. Evelyne LaFlamme ’78, ‘92, accounting and business administration, Fall River, is a contributing alumna as well as a lifelong student at UMass Dartmouth. Steven Lamarche ’78, humanities/ social sciences, New Bedford, is an administrator for the New Bedford public school system. Janet T. Morris ’78, textile design/hand weaving, is a design director for Tradewinds Imports, a textile import company. She lives in Westport, CT, with her two children.


Cl ass N otes

Karen O’Brien ’78, visual design, Jamaica Plain, is a realtor. She had lived in San Francisco for the past 22 years where she was a member of the Urban Forest organization. Robert Paleczka ’78, management, Nantucket, has been working for Stop & Shop for 37 years and is a sales representative for Keebler-Sunshine. Mark D. Sherwin ’78, visual design, New Bedford, married artist Roberta Calore Sherwin, and has a loft studio in New Bedford’s south end. “We are engraving in all metals for fine art and industrial applications as well as (offering) silkscreen, etching, painting, and illustration services. We welcome anyone with an interest in what we are doing to call, email, or come visit our studio. Our best regards to all!” John L. Ciccotelli ’79, biology, Canton, is the director of public health for that town’s health department. Donald Davidson Jr. ’79, management, Westport, is facilities manager with the Portsmouth, RI school department. Kathleen A. Meunier ’79, textile technology, South Attleboro, is a manager at Jones Retail Group in Wrentham. Dianne Rivet ’79, visual design, New Bedford, was elected as the youth council clerk for the Workforce Investment Board.

’80s

Arthur D’Aguiar ’80, humanities/social sciences, New Bedford, lives at the Sacred Hearts Home and writes, “Though I can’t attend any of the

See this video on YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/triciaOC1986

UMass Dartmouth on YouTube: two students recognized for the “Under 50” challenge

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Mass Dartmouth psychology majors Patricia Lynn O’Connor and Jenny Carreiro see themselves as “having it all” at age 50, balancing fulfilling careers with families and personal interests. That optimistic outlook, cleverly presented in brief YouTube videos, won the pair third and fourth place awards in the U@50 Challenge sponsored by the American Association of Retired Persons. The contest gave individuals aged 18 to 30 the opportunity to submit short videos on the subject of what they expect their lives to be like at age 50. Videos were selected based on technical quality, creativity, and their ability to foster discussion. “The aim of this contest was to create a dialogue between the generations and to gain an understanding of what concerns our future members,” says AARP Director of Academic Affairs Harry R. Moody. “We have been impressed with the enthusiasm young people have had for this contest. These videos have done a great job highlighting the issues that are important to younger Americans facing their futures.” O’Connor, a junior psychology major from Marlboro, received $1,000 for her third-place video. Her clip used a combination of photography and transforming illustrations to show the many roles she expects to juggle in her life. Her entry also features the declaration, “50 is the new 30,” which, she explains, means that people are living longer, taking better care of themselves, and having children later in life. “It’s a trend. I want to spread my life out and enjoy it...and take time to develop as an individual before settling down. Fifty is definitely not old.” Her future plans include pursuing master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology with an emphasis in social psychology research and

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possibly clinical work. “I just really love to learn and I’ll see where life takes me.” Carreiro, a senior psychology major from Fall River, will pursue a master’s degree in social work this fall at Boston College while working full-time. Her video featured a “breaking newscast segment,” with a reporter tracking her down to interview her about the contest and her possible life in approximately 30 years. Carreiro, who won the fourth prize award of $500, says she most enjoyed the experience’s educational aspect. “I learned that there are many different things that I want to accomplish in my lifetime. I had fun making the video. The editing was the most challenging part because I had a lot of things to say but I had to narrow it down to the most important.” Professor William Holt gave students in his “Psychology of Adulthood and Aging” class the option of submitting a video to the contest in lieu of writing a second paper. A frequent theme of the course is that today’s 50+ population may differ significantly from the individuals his students will become. “I hoped our students would gain a greater understanding of the aging process and a better perspective of their own involvement in aging from having to visualize themselves at age 50,” he explains. “I was gratified and pleased that our UMass Dartmouth students were able to compete on equal footing with all other college students. Even better, I learned that Pat and Jenny were the only winners who were enrolled in psychology or gerontology courses. The rest of the top tier were majoring in video design or filmmaking.” All of the U@50 videos can be seen on the contest’s website at www.youtube.com/ Uat50

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university functions, I am still a great promoter of education and all the benefits that come from that.” He is 90 years old. Mark Macedo ’80, nursing, Lowell, is director of clinical affairs for Levitronix LLC. Donald Mofford ‘81, electrical engineering, Randolph, is a patent attorney with Daly, Crowley, Mofford & Durkee in Canton. Michael Hardman ’82, multidisciplinary studies, Stoughton, is the sports editor for the Foxboro Reporter newspaper. He is married to Roseanne Felago and they have a daughter, Katie, and a son, Matt. Brian J. Anderson ’83, electrical engineering technology, Vietnam, is director of sales at Liberty Mutual. A member of Habitat for Humanity, he writes, “I live and work in Ho Chi Minh City.”

Homecoming Weekend Save the Date October 17-19 Come back and celebrate with us in the industry, GM, Pfizer, and now GE. Not bad for a public education that I paid for myself.”

1993, and their daughter, Gina, in 1996. Serena is working on her master’s degree at Bentley College.

Joseph J. White Jr. ’84, mechanical engineering, North Kingstown, RI, is senior vice president of operations and finance for Wright Line.

Maureen C. Keefe ’86, art education, Brookline, is the vice president of student development at MassArt in Boston. She received her master of education degree from University of Vermont, and expects to complete a doctorate in education at Johnson & Wales University this year. Maureen is head of the Charles Regatta.

Rita M. Gardner ’83, psychology, Dunstable, has a master’s in public health from the Public Health Dept. of Boston University’s School of Medicine. She is board certified in behavior analysis and is also an adjunct professor. Gardner is married with three sons, who are active in sports, chess, and school activities.

Brian Alves ’85, computer and information science, Alexandria, VA, is a technical and program line manager for Advanced Acoustic Concepts. He has a master’s degree in systems engineering from George Mason University. He is married with three children, Maddy, Coley, and Brian, and he coaches his daughter’s soccer teams.

Patricia J. Clark ’84, mathematics, North Chelmsford, and her husband adopted a son, Davis Sebastian, from Guatemala last May. He was born June 16, 2006.

Angel Villeneuve Errafay ’85, management, Orlando, FL, is vice president for wealth management for Sun Trust Bank. She has a daughter, Sarah.

Robert ‘Bob’ Gates ’84, engineering, his wife Debbie, and their three children, Elizabeth, Sam, and Rachel, live in Metuchen, NJ. “When we are not running from one child’s event to another, we enjoy our free time on our boat or just hanging out together and volunteering at St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Life has been good to us and we are very blessed with healthy children. Work life has been great… worked for leading companies

Paul R. Gendron ’85, chemistry, East Bridgewater, is a quality engineer at Electrochem in Canton. His wife Diane is a registered nurse case manager for the U.S. Department of Labor. They have a dog, two cats, two birds, and a fish. Their son Jason is a senior at UMass Dartmouth majoring in accounting.

David Metzdorf ’87, humanities/ social sciences, Burlington, is a real estate agent for Vidolir & Associate Realtors. He writes, “Hope all is well with the class of ’87!”

Serena Chechile ’86, computer and information science, Hopkinton, married Brendan Doyle in 1990. Their son, Vincent, was born in

Joanne E. Bedard ’88, English/ writing, Fall River, is president of marketing and sales for Bedard Ventures, Inc. in Dartmouth.

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Robert H. LeRoyer ’86, electrical engineering technology, Taunton, owns Bolts ElectroMechanical, Inc. and is employed by Wenther Flow, Inc. Michael W. Fitzgerald ’87, civil engineering, Stoughton, works as an assistant metals control engineer for the Massachusetts Highway Department. Dave A. Kuketz ’87, computer engineering, Oviedo, FL, received an MBA from Northeastern University in 1995.

Jeffrey P. ‘Boz’ Bosworth ’88, marketing, Altamonte Springs, FL, is an artist, performer, and owner of Island Estuary Music Publishing, Inc. He released an adult contemporary record, “Karma Knows,” last year, and has a website, www. bozmusic.com Ron Crowley ’88, electrical engineering technology, Dartmouth, is a transmission technician in the radio/television field for Verizon, with whom he has been for 20 years. He is a member of various veteran groups. Marlene M. Kalisz ’88, BA, ’91, MA, psychology, Acushnet, is director of client services for Sylvia & Company Insurance. Her husband, Michael Kalisz ’85, electrical engineering, is an engineer at the Naval Underwater Systems Center in Newport. Kathleen Brennan ’89, nursing, has advanced degrees from Boston University and UMass Boston. She is coordinator of student services at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital School of Nursing and has worked in higher education for 10 years. A member of the South Shore Tennis Association and the Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians, and a volunteer at the Quincy Animal Shelter, she lives on Wollaston Beach in Quincy with her two cats. Brennan enjoys running, playing tennis, travelling, and socializing with family and friends. Jo-Anne Green ’89, MFA/ visual design, Roslindale, is the co-director of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., whose website is http://new-radio.org Nancy Hawes ’89, BFA and art education, New Bedford, is a teacher in New Bedford and a member of the Alpha Kappa Gamma Educators Sorority, Eta chapter. She was a nominee in the Standard-Times newspaper Teacher of the Year competition.


Cl ass N otes Neal Meyers ’89, marketing, East Greenwich, RI, has a new position as a transportation supervisor at the Stop & Shop distribution center in Freetown, where he is responsible for outbound logistics for all Stop & Shop locations in New England. Meyers is a volunteer and fund-raiser for the Pine Street Inn, Boston, the Stop & Shop Family Foundation, the 2007 TPC Boston golf tournament, and the Rhode Island Food Bank.

’90s

Patrick J. Condon ’91, human resources management, Spring, TX, writes he still is recruiting, currently as a recruiting manager focused on engineering and construction professionals for a staffing and consulting firm. After moving to Texas from New England four years ago, he writes, “No More Snow! For those of you from ’91 who remember, my daughter was born in ’89, at the beginning of my junior year…. (She) is a marine biology major at Roger Williams University.” Condon is a member of Habitat for Humanity. Diana Jabbour ’91, marketing, Melbourne, FL, is a financial advisor for Raymond James Financial Service. Steven M. Leahy ’91, visual design and illustration, Stoughton, has been a freelance artist since graduation. Robert L. Childs ’92, political science, Olathes, KS, is the director at Sapient Corporation in Overland Park.

Nicole M. Porter Dwyer ’92, humanities/social sciences, Medway, lives with her husband and young daughter. Dwyer has worked for a training and consulting company for the past nine years. Robert Leblanc ’92, accounting, Lawrence, owns Merrimack Promotions.

Gregory J. McCann ‘92, Rehoboth, received his MBA from Salve Regina University, and attained the designation of Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter at a commencement ceremony in Honolulu in September 2007. He is an account underwriter for Liberty Mutual Group in Boston. Karen E. Quinn ’92, English/ writing and communications, Lakeville, married James Quinn ’93, design and photography. Karen has taken a break from her career in marketing and corporate communications to raise their two young children, Lucas and Phoebe. Denne Arruda ’93, mathematics, Rutland, reports that after working in the pharmaceutical research industry for 10 years, she married Richard Ziegler II, and is at home full-time with her two young children, Zoe and Logan. She enjoys yoga, knitting, and cooking, and received her Reiki Master/Teacher designation in Sedona, AZ. She has twice presented at the Successful Women in Math and Science Conference. Daniel J. Flanagan ’93, accounting, Sudbury, received a master’s degree in financial planning, and has earned CPA and CFP designations. He and his wife Kristine have a daughter. Theodore J. Greenblott ’93, humanities/social sciences, Sagle, ID, married Lisa Reppucci ‘92, human resources management, in 1999 and moved to northern Idaho in 2004. They have two children, Frederick and Josie. Theodore is president of a contracting firm and Lisa is president of a medical consulting firm. Peter C. Martin ’93, mechanical engineering, Assonet, who has been in the medical devices industry for 14 years, is a senior research engineer for Covidien.

Seeing 2007’s winning baseball teams through the work of ’90 graduate The talent of 1990 alumnus Brian Fox has provided him an up-close, enviable look at major league baseball, including members of the 2007 World Series teams. Fox, a Somerset resident, first worked with Upper Class Collectibles, licensed by Major League Baseball, to paint two large paintings at the 2007 All-Star Game in San Francisco. The large paintings featured players from the National and American League teams, and individual players signed the artwork prior to the game. Subsequently, MLB asked Fox to create an “official” work depicting the American League champs, the Red Sox, for the World Series’ first game last fall at Fenway Park. His painting featured crowd-pleasers Josh Beckett, David Ortiz, and Manny Ramirez. A fine arts major, Fox works from his Somerset studio and has built a solid reputation for his pieces (see www. brianfoxstudios.com), most notably his portraits of wellknown personalities.

Brian Colby ’94, mathematics, Hyde Park, has worked for Tufts Health Plan for almost 12 years. Andrew P. Flanagan ’94, biology, Bar Harbor, ME, has celebrated his second wedding anniversary. He is volunteering in D’Iberville, MS, for a week, helping to rebuild homes for Hurricane Katrina victims, his second such trip.

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Ucal T. Palmer ’94, accounting, Mableton, GA, writes, “I am a Little League coach and I participate in many volunteer events, such as Junior Achievement, offered through my job. I am married with three kids, and worked at IBM for 12 years before (going to) GE as an account executive. I am an avid bowler now. When I am not working, I am spending time with the family and enjoying life.” M a g a z i n e

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William A. Pettengill ’94, mechanical engineering, Brewster, writes, “Back in New England! Living on the Cape and have two children, and just what happened to the Outing Club?” He has worked mainly in manufacturing, design, and management, doing some medical device work. He has started a restaurant in Dennisport with his wife Lynn and another couple, with information at theoystercompany.com. Pettengill is also a member of the Orleans Yacht Club and Habitrail for Humanity. Holly Breton ’95, English, writing/ communications, Windham, NH, married Rob Breton. Tara Lee Davis ’95, biology, Worcester, is an adjunct faculty member at Quinsigamond Community College. Tara Lee married Jason Sparling last August.

Rev. Jeffrey Cabral ’95, mathematics, Dartmouth, is a priest for the Diocese of Fall River. Thomas J. Pendergast III ’95, business administration, Swansea, works as a senior consulting manager at Deloitte. Michael A. Blanton ’96, multidisciplinary studies, Monument Beach, attended graduate school at the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy at Tufts University. Blanton works as a realtor and real estate educator on Cape Cod and serves with several community organizations. Nicole Krafty ’96, accounting, Quincy, and Shawn Duhamel were to be married this May.

Your Letters… Kudos to Prof. Waxler and ‘Changing Lives’ program (Regarding the article in the fall 2007 issue on “Changing Lives through Literature”) The wonderful gift of encouragement, these professors and friends of juveniles have. A simple concept but with a powerful impact. My son went through a program called Teen Challenge out of Boston. The program has an 87 percent recovery rate for the drug and alcohol user. First they have to get their GED before they can graduate. Wouldn't it be awesome if the books Dr. Waxler speaks about can be incorporated in the GED portion of this program? What do you think? These men have struggled with this epidemic and one symptom of drug abuse is illiteracy. Let’s continue the encouragement of the mind through books instead of tearing the mind down with confusing, drugs and discouragement. Bravo UMass professors and friends! It’s because of the drug and alcohol epidemic I have become a student here, at the age of 49. I almost gave up my dream to finish because my husband and son were struggling with this epidemic. Now both are sober!!!!!!! Now it's my turn to succeed. God Bless. Keep up the faith in the human mind. Instead of clouding it, let's clear up the mess through education!! Madeline Brumley Student, UMass Dartmouth

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SAVE THE DATE October 4-5 Family and Friends are cordially invited to experience campus life in an event-filled weekend. Katherine Murphy ‘96, and Christopher Murphy, ‘96, accounting, Quincy, announce the birth of their daughter, Lauren Katherine, on November 24, 2007. She joins older brothers Joseph and Thomas. Melissa Ann Souliere Byrnes ’97, management, Raynham, is pursuing her MBA at Bryant University, and is a reliability engineer at Hasbro, Inc. in Pawtucket, RI. Janice Marie Durand Epstein ’97, psychology, Beaverton, OR, is a principal at JME Consulting. She is a member of the Theater Company and Psychology Association. Kristen Galpin-Pelfrey ’97, psychology, develops medical software for Meditech. A visiting lecturer in psychology at Bridgewater State College, she will take her licensing exam this year and plans to open a private practice. Lisa Joly Hird ’98, nursing, Rehoboth, is a manager for American Association of Colleges of Nursing in Boston. Jeremy T. Theerman ’98, history, Worcester, married Caroline Arena on August 4, 2007. He practices law with Homan A. Sullivan P.C., Westborough. Pierre-Samuel Reyne ’98, marketing, ’99 MBA, Reims, France, has been named sales director, North America, for Champagne Montaudon.

Daniel R. Cardoza ’99, medical laboratory science, Brighton, is a clinical laboratory scientist, specializing in hematology, at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His hobbies include reading world history, collecting and smoking fine cigars, weight lifting, mountain hiking, watching and attending New England Patriots football games, and traveling. Michelle Beth Kimball Clarke ’99, Spanish, Wolfeboro, NH, is married to Richard Clarke. Julie A. Fernandes ’99, sociology, New York City, earned a master’s degree at Simmons College, and is an executive assistant at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York. Kevin Giuliano ’99, psychology, is a business manager for Pediatric Specialists of Foxboro and Wrentham. He and his wife Allison live in North Smithfield, RI. Dr. Uvais Qidwai ’99, PhD electrical engineering, and his wife Farhana live in Doha, Qatar, and he is an assistant professor at Qatar University. Erin (O’Sullivan) Trabucco ’99, political science, Rockland, is general counsel for the Retailers Association of Massachusetts.


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’00s

Jennifer Cleveland ’00, humanities/ social sciences, New Bedford, is pursuing a law career, and earned paralegal certification from Bristol Community College in 2006. She is developing a freelance paralegal business.

Phillip L. Cordeiro ’00, civil engineering, Rochester, is a project manager for Allen & Major Associates, Inc., Middleboro. Rosalinde M. Cowles Fussell ’00, management, Woodbine, GA, is a “domestic engineer” and Navy wife raising her daughter Olivia Marie, born September 2006. “Olivia is our miracle baby, being born 10 weeks premature weighing 2lbs 6oz.” Since graduating in 2000, Rosalinde and husband Scott have lived in Connecticut, North Carolina, and Georgia.

Jeffrey C. Araujo ’01, visual design/photography, is a graphic/ interactive designer for Lightolier in Fall River. He and his wife Michelle live in Braintree. Shannon L. Moorehouse Gfroerer ’01, nursing, Wareham, is a laboratory staff nurse for Southcoast Hospitals Group. Dawn M. Abruzzi Murphy ’01, marketing, Dorchester, has a son, Marc, and expected a second child in March. After spending the last 22 years in the San Francisco area, where she was a member of Friends of the Urban Forest, she has returned to Massachusetts and hopes to connect with old friends. She is a self-employed realtor. Jeffrey Perry ’01, textile science, Milford, is a textile technologist for the US Army RDECOM.

Mashial Al-Abdulhadi ’02, computer engineering, Bayan, Kuwait, is a credit risk manager for the Nation Bank of Kuwait.

Melissa J. Guimont ’02, sociology and anthropology, Fairhaven, has worked in the public library for over 15 years. She enjoys outdoor activities such as camping, hiking, fishing, and skating, as well as hockey and punk rock music.

Heather E. (Belli) Alden ’02, political science, and husband Michael live in Whitinsville. Sarah C. Carriere ’02, visual design/photography, Egypt, is a second grade teacher for the American International School in New Cairo. Christopher Allen Cotter ‘02, sociology/criminal justice, New Bedford, has been a New Bedford police officer since 2000, and is now with the juvenile/sexual assault unit. He married Karyn Reeves in 1990, and they have two children: Kelsey, attending Stonehill College, and Kaylee, a student at New Bedford High School.

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Ryan R. Hazel ’02, finance, Wrentham, is a financial planner for Ameriprise, Cumberland, RI. Benito N. Maldari ’02, French, Aix en Provence, France, writes, “I am living in southeastern France and working for an agency that plans study abroad and cultural exchange programs.” He received a master’s degree in France in 2005.

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James Shepard ’02, accounting, Weymouth, passed the Massachusetts CPA exam last summer, and is an accountant for Kirkland Albrecht &

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Dartmouth Alumni Association Board of Directors. She received a master’s degree in arts administration from Boston University, and is an active member of that school’s Arts Administration Alumni Association. She is database manager for development and external affairs for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

Pocket guides for the orchid enthusiast Love orchids but aren’t sure what type you’re looking at? Paul Martin Brown, a ’97 master’s degree graduate, has authored a set of pocket guides: Lady’s-slippers in Your Pocket and Ladies’-tresses in Your Pocket. Each gives detailed descriptions of the variety of orchids that flourish throughout the country. Brown is a research associate at the University of Florida Herbarium, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, and at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.

Fredrickson, P.C. He was also commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserves. Vicki Abbott Bancroft ’03, professional writing, Dartmouth, is a member of the board of directors of Ability Plus, a program offering adaptive skiing and year-round recreational activities for children and adults with disabilities. Jacquelyn E. Briggs ’03, biology, Hingham, is a member of the UMass Club’s young executive committee and ambassador’s council. She holds a master’s degree in regulatory affairs from Northeastern University. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ’03, visual design/photography, is president of the UMass

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Patrick J. Joyce ’03, business information systems, North Weymouth, is an IT security consultant for Accenture. Jennifer Mathieu ’03, psychology, Stoughton, is a services provider for Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Kathleen C. Medeiros ’03, business information systems, Fall River, is a quality control administrator for Draka Cableteq. Carole C. Roy ’03, graphic design, Taunton, is the co-president of Masscribes, Inc. and owns Calligraphy for Your Fancy. Her best news is the birth of her grandson. Nicolette G. Brewster ’04, marketing, Haverhill, is a sales engineer for TAC in Andover. Kao Chen Fang ’04, MBA, Hsintien, Taipei, is assistant vice president of management for Avampo Development Ltd. in Taipei. Shawn H. Cambra ‘05, metals, New Bedford, and his wife welcomed their second child, Truman, in November 2006. Shawn is a full-time dad and a part-time art installer at the Fuller Craft Museum. Stevie Carvalho ’05, civil engineering, New Bedford, is an engineer for HaywardBoynton and Williams, Inc. Herbert Chao ’05, computer and information science, Chelmsford, is a software analyst for Manhattan Associates and an independent business owner.

Jennifer Chase ’05, medical laboratory science, Brockton, works at Beth Israel Deaconess. Adam J. Occaso ’05, sculpture/ 3D studies, Newport, RI, is a therapist/bodyworker/artist for Pranadudes. Matthew Rodgers ’05, mechanical engineering, Worcester, is a mechanical engineer at Bose Corporation. Nicole M. DiFabio ’06, multidisciplinary studies, Arlington, VA, is a research assistant at CPST. Julia R. Golden ’06, history, Springfield, is pursuing her graduate degree in higher education, and is a student personnel administrator at Springfield College. Judith Mandeville ’06, psychology, Southbridge, is studying for her master’s degree in sport and performance psychology at the University of Denver. Kenneth Ventura ‘06, electrical engineering, South Hadley, married Kathryne Medeiros on August 4, 2007. Formerly an electrical engineer for Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, he is now a systems engineer at General Dynamics Advance Information Systems. He has volunteered for IEEE/Eta Kappa Nu; the 2005 UMass Dartmouth Solar Decathlon; and the South Coast Baseball League.

William Francis Burke ’07, accounting, Natick, is a staff auditor for UHY Advisors in Boston. Peter J. DeOlympio ’07, marketing, Medway, is a marketing associate for the Cambridge Healthcare Institute. Timothy Paul Dunn ’07, economics, Marlborough, is a financial representative for the Northwestern Mutual Financial Network. Frederick Michael Joerg ’07, accounting, North Attleboro, is an accountant for Covidien in Mansfield. Natasha Medeiros ’07, psychology, Dartmouth, is the lead residential counselor St. Vincent’s Home. Dan P. Murdoch ’07, management information systems, Billerica, is president of Practical Computer Solutions, Inc., a Billerica-based technology consulting firm specializing in small businesses and consumers. Murdock is a disabled American Veterans life member, and has worked with the U.S. Navy in intelligence. Gina M. Ricciardi ’07, sociology, Shrewsbury, is a customer service specialist at MathWorks.

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evening Blue

Save the Date October 4 Come back and celebrate with us


The Claire T. Carney Library An update on progress The campaign to expand and renovate the Claire T. Carney Library has met with gratifying success and now moves into its final stages. Thanks to generous gifts from supporters, more than $5.6 million of the $6 million the university must secure has been raised (the remainder of the project’s $10 million cost is borne by the state). The fund-raising drive continues, primarily through the sale of memorial pavers to be laid within the library’s front terrace. Construction will continue throughout the funding campaign, with a 2010 target date for the project’s completion. The revitalization will transform what is the intellectual heart of the university. The improvements will reflect contemporary learning styles and requirements, and will afford students and the community an enhanced, welcoming place to read, study, attend programs, and exchange ideas. Support for establishment of the FerreiraMendes Portuguese-American Archives has been notable. Work on this key component of the library project started earlier in the year, with improvements to different parts of the infrastructure. The archives have been steadily expanding the collections of papers, manuscripts, and documents about the region’s Portuguese roots and residents. “When we launched this campaign in October of 2006, we knew this would be a challenge, but we were confident that the library would be attractive to the community as it is truly a resource for the region. The community’s response has been a tremendous validation and we have raised 95 percent of the goal from only 100 donors. We are now expanding the campaign and appealing to everyone to invest in this project to transform our library to better serve the needs of the campus and the community,” says Jeffrey Wolfman, vice chancellor for advancement. The memorial pavers enable donors to honor an individual, while demonstrating their support for UMass Dartmouth. The 4 by 8 inch engraved pavers, at a $250 cost, can be purchased by calling 508.999.8200, or online at www.umassd.edu/librarycampaign/pavers/

Help us complete our exciting transformation of the library with an enduring gift. Purchase one of the pavers that will be part of the design of a new space for the Claire T. Carney Library. The engraved eight-inch hexagon pavers will become a lasting part of the UMass Dartmouth landscape. Each time you come to campus, you can visit the terrace and be reminded of your commitment to and support of UMass Dartmouth. You can celebrate your own graduation, honor a professor who made a difference for you, remember a loved one, or celebrate a special occasion. Please call 508.999.8200 with questions or to order your paver. You may also purchase pavers online at www.umassd.edu/librarycampaign/pavers/


What’s coming

up at UMass Dartmouth

May 23-25

Class of 1958 50-year Reunion Weekend

May 24

Commencement, graduate students Dinner for honorary degree recipients

UMass Dartmouth Annual Fund Scholarships for students…programs and events such as Homecoming and the July 4 Freedom Festival…grants that enable special curriculum initiatives and projects by faculty

May 25

Commencement, undergraduate students

Dean Donald Howard Reception

June 5

Chancellor’s Night at the UMass Club

June 9

Day of Portugal with soccer game

June 13

Alumni Gala at Ocean Explorium

July 3

Freedom Festival

Oct. 4

3rd Annual Blue & Gold Evening

Family & Friends Weekend

munity, support important research by faculty, and strengthen our

Oct. 17-19

Homecoming 2008

reputation as a first-class, excellent public university.

Alumni Athletic Hall of Fame Banquet

Visit www.umassd.edu to stay informed about your university

You make possible all of these—and more—with your contribution to the Annual Fund, the cornerstone of the university’s fundraising efforts. Tuitions and state money cover only some of the cost of providing the superior, contemporary education for which UMass Dartmouth is known. Through the Annual Fund, the university is able to expand its programs, enhance our presence in the com-

join with your fellow UMass Dartmouth classmates and give back with a gift to the Annual Fund:

www.umassd.edu/institutional_advancement/donate.cfm

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UMass Dartmouth Spring 08 magazine