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Spring 2007

A magazine for alumni & friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

The complex world of Dan Braha Management Professor untangles the mystery of networks

Technology strengthens teacher-student links Two police chiefs build community connections


MESSAGE FROM

J e a n F . M a c Co r m ac k Dear friends:

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his spring a group of nearly 50 UMass Dartmouth administrators, faculty, staff and students gathered for two days of discussion about the future. The dialogue was energetic, realistic, and very thoughtful. There was friendly debate about strategy and priorities, and a very clear consensus was articulated — that our university must continue its development as a premier regional research university serving the region and Commonwealth. The dialogue followed the release of Engaged, Embedded, Evolving: A Report on Progress (www.umassd.edu/chancellor), that updated the community on our many achievements and the challenges we face at the mid-point of our 10-year strategic plan. We are educating more students and conducting more research, and we are more fully engaged in the community. We have perservered through some very difficult financial challenges. The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is stronger, smarter, and even more innovative than when we entered the 21st century. Over the next five years, we will be operating in an atmosphere of increasing accountability and higher expectations. A four-year degree is now considered the ticket to a viable vocation, yet we also want our students to be critical thinkers and to have imagination that will power a knowledge economy. We also want them to be kind, caring people who are committed to democracy and the social contract. The pages of this magazine illustrate the various impacts of our university on the greater community. Ethnic and religious conflict, climate change, technological progress, and other world-flattening issues are forcing us to rethink what we do within the confines of Ring Road. Closer to home, our region and Commonwealth continue to struggle with drop-out rates that are devastating to individuals, families, and communities. Our region is trying to emerge as a serious player in the bio-technology, advanced materials, and marine science industries. Young, smart, innovative people who graduate from college are leaving our state at an alarming rate, weakening our long-term economic and social fabric. What will be our response as students, teachers, researchers and citizens to these urgent challenges? I am confident that the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth— its faculty, students, staff, and alumni — is prepared to lead on these issues. Sincerely, Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

practice love #12, “ghosts” 36”x36,” mixed media on canvas, 2005

practice love #31, “ghosts” 36”x36,” mixed media on canvas, 2006


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his issue of the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Magazine discusses the way in which modern technology is both reflecting and changing the manner in which today’s students learn. You’ll also meet a professor whose notable research into the workings of networks has contemporary relevance, and we profile two graduates who have careers as police chiefs. There’s also information about recent developments on campus and impressive initiatives by professors and students alike, while the Class Notes section provides the latest news from alumni.

practice love #16, “ghosts” 36”x36,” mixed media on canvas, 2005

We welcome hearing from all our readers and would like to receive letters, news, and suggestions. Please send comments and letters to: Alumni Relations Office, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Rd., North Dartmouth, ma 02747, or email them to ntooley@umassd.edu Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement

Jeffrey A. Wolfman Managing Editor

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant to the Chancellor Director of Alumni Relations

Students tutor younger counterparts

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New doctoral programs added

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Hockey team’s triumphant season 4

New research building opens

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Feature stories The classroom of 2007

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Demystifying the complex network

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Alums are modern police chiefs

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Annual Report of the Foundation

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Alumni news Class notes

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Gift to the Claire T. Carney Library inside back cover

Joe F. DeMedeiros ’99 practice love #61, “ghosts” 36”x36,” mixed media on canvas, 2006

Designer

Rachel Cocroft

The vibrant, arresting paintings shown here represent the work of Design Professor Yoon Soo Lee, who “honors process” when she creates. “My paintings are the outcome and by-product of my pursuits. These pursuits include: finding a balance in contradiction, finding harmony in chaos, finding where the contemporary and history co-exist…breathing the same air, living, dying, and re-birthing within the same space.”

Writer/Editor

Diane H. Hartnett

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #015-139) Volume 11, Number 2, May 2007 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once in March, once in May, twice in June, once in July, once in August, and twice in November by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300 Periodicals postage paid at New Bedford, ma 02747

Contributing Writers

Will Dane, Robert Lovinger

postmaster: Send address corrections to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300

Photographers

Adam Clear, Kindra Clineff, D. Confar, Justin Maucione ’02 Alumni Class Notes

Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Cover: photo of Management Professor Dan Braha by Kindra Clineff, photo illustration by Rachel Cocroft

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Students provide 6,000 hours of reading tutoring to New Bedford children Bedford, we see our students rising to the challenge.” UMass Dartmouth Community ore than 120 UMass Service Coordinator Deirdre Healey Dartmouth students said, “America READS is really from 70 communities cool because the benefits to all will complete more than 6,000 the stakeholders are multi-dimenhours of reading, tutoring, and sional. UMass Dartmouth students related services to New Bedford learn more about themselves, their children during this academic year. career opportunities and their The university students deliver the community. Elementary school services at Carney Academy, children benefit from having a Hayden McFadden Elementary role model in their life, and the UMass Dartmouth students are giving their time, attention, and assistance as tutors and mentors to New School, and the Boys and Girls community benefits from a more Bedford youngsters. Among the university students Club as part of the America engaged citizenry.” involved with America READS and similar programs are READS Program and other Bernadette Souza, assistant (larger picture) Josmanie Wesche, shown with Kempton university-based service projects. director of the Boys and Girls School pupil Meghan Reeves, and Ashley Cunningham The America READS effort Club of New Bedford, said, with Brandon Booker at Carney Academy. was launched during the Clinton “Our kids just love the UMass Administration as a national stratDartmouth students from egy to address school drop-out rates. Studies have shown America READS. They are such a positive influence.” that students who are unable to read by the end of the third The New Bedford reading initiative is one of numerous grade are more likely to leave school in later years. UMass Dartmouth efforts to engage students, faculty, and “UMass Dartmouth students, staff, and faculty recognize staff in the life of the community. For instance, faculty have the importance of literacy in strengthening the social fabric worked closely with teachers and principals in the Fall River of our communities,” said UMass Dartmouth Chancellor schools to improve math teaching, and nursing students have Jean F. MacCormack, who is co-chair of the Massachusetts been assisting the Dartmouth Council on Aging. Campus Compact, a coalition of Massachusetts colleges Will Dane is a graduate student in the professional writing program and universities devoted to enhancing education on their at UMass Dartmouth. campuses through community service. “Here in New

By Will Dane

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New s of N ote Trustees approve doctoral programs for nursing, Luso-AfroBrazilian studies; Higher Education board approval sought Responding to two significant comThe program aims to educate replacemunity needs, UMass Dartmouth plans ments for retiring professors, and expand to add doctoral programs in nursing and overall the number of faculty. Luso-Afro-Brazilian Studies. The Board of Doctoral candidates will be matched Trustees approved the plan at its March with a faculty researcher and mentor. meeting, and Board of Higher Education “At this level, it’s more to do with trainapproval will be sought in June. ing future faculty in engaging nursing “We have a critical nursing shortage science research and method skills with in our region and across the a focus on chronic illness such as diabeCommonwealth that needs to be tes, heart failure or gerontology,” Fain addressed, and said. The Ph.D. we have a rich  We want to establish studies complePortuguese-American ment the master’s UMass Dartmouth as the culture that is part of degree offerings our community fabric by preparing not pre-eminent intellectual and needs to be preonly nurse pracserved and studied,” center in the Portuguese- titioners, but also said Chancellor Jean nurse scientists. speaking world. F. MacCormack. Courses will The Luso-Afrobe offered one —Dean William Hogan Brazilian Studies day per week; Ph.D. program reprethere will be three sents the most recent action by UMass education classes and experiential activiDartmouth in establishing a leadership ties integrated with the more traditional role in the field. The Ferreira-Mendes research methods courses. Students, Portuguese-American Archives has been either full or part-time, can complete the organized; the university publishes a 54-credit degree program over a three highly-regarded academic journal and to four-year period. An initial class of six book series on Portuguese culture; and students is anticipated. The college now Portuguese Professor Anna Klobucka has 630 students, with 87 pursuing masis lead author of a ground-breaking ter’s degrees and 79 in the “RN to Be” textbook on European and Brazilian program. Portuguese. Regarding the Luso-Afro-Brazilian The nursing doctoral program will doctorate, Dean William Hogan noted prepare nurses to become faculty that this would be the first discrete, members, thus expanding the number campus-specific doctoral degree in the of undergraduate nursing majors and College of Arts and Sciences. It repreaddressing the chronic nursing shortage. sents a logical extension of the master’s There have been nearly 900 applicants program and the expansion of the for 115 freshman slots in the class enterCenter for Portuguese Studies and the ing this fall. Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American “The establishment of a Ph.D. nursing Archives. “The castle is built and this program will contribute significantly to doctoral degree is its flag flying at the the mission of the university by facilitattop,” said Hogan. ing the recruitment of faculty who are This fall, two faculty and an archivist productive scholars, skilled to obtain will teach courses, manage the archives, external funding and attract first-rate give lectures, and undertake research. students,” said Dean James Fain. Hogan explained that the Luso-AfroThe shortage of registered nurses, he Brazilian name reflects the fact that continued, is not due to a lack of qualithe curriculum will encompass not only fied students, but rather to an “inadliterature and language, but also the equate pool of people to teach them.” Doctoral programs Continued on page 4

Check out the cosmos The university’s observatory, soon to be reopened after a twoyear closing for renovations, has partnered with the Astronomical Society of Southern New England for an outreach program. A fiberglass model has replaced the handfabricated, 20-year-old wooden dome, and a number of other improvements were made. The monthly open houses are to resume, with the amateur astronomers of the Society helping with educational initiatives. For information about open houses (which generally occur monthly during the academic year), check the observatory calendar at www.umassd.edu or call 508.999.8715.

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Doctoral programs Continued from page 3

geography, politics, culture, and critical theory of Lusophone people worldwide. “We want to establish UMass Dartmouth as the pre-eminent intellectual center in the Portuguese-speaking world,” Dr. Hogan said. The Ph.D will require a minimum of 54 graduate course credits and 12 dissertation credits. An initial enrollment of five to ten students is expected, and studies would range from two to five years.

University cannot rely on the status quo, cautions Chancellor MacCormack

Corsairs hockey team does university proud The university’s ice hockey squad had another outstanding season this winter: a 25-3-1 record, a trip to the quarter-finals, post-season honors for four members,

of Plan The Universitys Dartmouth Strategic Massachusett on Progress A Report 2007 February,

and co-coach of the year title for John Rolli. The hard-playing Corsairs beat perennial rival Wentworth to again advance to the NCAA quarter-final playoff game in March against Middlebury College, which triumphed (as it had in ‘06) over UMass Dartmouth, 3-2. “Two power play goals were the difference this year, and they were the

Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack, speaking to the campus community in February, urged faculty, students, and staff to act with urgency, innovation, and collaboration on issues facing the region, the state, and the world. “We know that in our fast-changing world, clinging to old ways is a strategy for stagnation, indeed failure,” she said. “There is simply no time for complacency, no time for parochialism, no time for blind defense of the status quo. No resting on our laurels.” The speech, which came as the campus updates its 2000-2010 strategic plan, reflected on the university’s growth in student population and research in the last six years. The chancellor urged the university’s role be reconsidered in an era of accelerating globalization, increasing diversity, and rapidly advancing technology. “Ethnic and religious conflict, climate change, technological progress, and other world-flattening issues are forcing us to rethink what we do within the confines of Ring Road,” she said. Citing the university’s responsibility to UMass

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difference last year,” said Coach Rolli. “We knew we couldn’t afford to take any stick penalties, and they got a power play and took advantage of it. They use all of the ice and make you loosen up, and they’re a very good team.” The Corsairs spent most of the season nationally ranked, and went into tournament play ranked eighth in the U.S. College Hockey Online Division III standings. Four players received post-season honors from the Eastern College Athletic Conference Northeast. Sophomore Jeff Green, Medway, was Goaltender of the Year. He led the conference in goals-against average with a 1.86 mark, was first in save percentage at .924, and led in winning percentage at .911. He and junior forward Jeff Grant, Burlington, were named to the All-Conference first team. Forward Kyle McCullough, Danvers, and defenseman Paul Carr, Springfield, received second team All-Conference honors.

inspire lifelong learning, encourage civic engagement, and ignite the innovation economy, MacCormack called on the campus community to “become more accessible, more innovative, more collaborative, and more willing to examine ourselves on all fundamental issues that define quality.

“We must be more nimble in everything we do if we are to continue serving our students, the Commonwealth, our nation and our global community.” The full text of the chancellor’s speech and a report on progress of the 2000-2010 strategic plan can be found at www.umassd.edu/chancellor


New s of N ote Building devoted to innovative research opens on campus The university in April opened a new 22,000 square foot research building that will focus on science critical to the development of the innovation economy in the region and state. The facility will be the home of the National Botulinum Research Center and other laboratories focusing on biotechnology-related science. The building, the first on campus devoted entirely to research, strengthens an “Innovation Triangle” in southeastern Massachusetts that includes the UMass School for Marine Science and Technology in New Bedford and the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center in Fall River. “Today, we celebrate more than the opening of a building,’’ Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. “This is the latest stage in a rapid evolution of our university and our region.” “This new research building is the latest state-of-the-art facility opening on a University of Massachusetts campus, one that will enable our faculty and students to make further advances in the important area of biotechnology,’’ added UMass President Jack M. Wilson.

“Today’s opening ceremony for a new research building on the UMass Dartmouth campus is great news for faculty and students here, as well as for everyone concerned about efforts to develop methods of treating and possibly curing the effects of botulism, a deadly bioterrorism threat,’’ UMass Chairman Stephen P. Tocco said. Professor Bal Ram Singh, one of the nation’s leading experts on botulism, leads the National Botulinum Center at UMass Dartmouth, and has been working on similar projects at the university for the last 17 years.

Senator Kerry is speaker at university commencement Design Professor Harvey Goldman's "Undulation" was chosen for the first Visual Music Marathon, held April 28 at Northeastern University. The piece, a collaboration with former music professor James Bohn, reflects visual and sonic elements of factors such as cadence and matter.

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry will deliver the main address and his wife Teresa Heinz Kerry will receive an honorary degree at UMass Dartmouth’s 107th commencement on May 27. The pair co-authored the recently published book, This Moment on Earth: Today’s New Environmentalists and Their Vision for the Future. Honorary degrees will also be presented

to: Edmund Barry Gaither, director and curator of Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists; Robert P. Lawrence, pastor of First Congregational Church of Fall River; and Julie Moir Messervy, garden designer and author. Kerry has been the Massachusetts junior senator since 1984. A former lieutenant governor and decorated Vietnam War veteran, he was the 2004 Democratic Party nominee for the presidency. He is a member of several key Senate committees. Teresa Heinz Kerry is a well-known philanthropist who has been active in environmental causes.

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Motivational speaker and awards mark the 5th annual Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was never “a talk show host. He didn’t know basketball. He wasn’t a rapper. He had a Ph.D. before he was 25.” That was Salome Thomas-EL’s recollection of the slain civil rights leader at UMass Dartmouth’s fifth Drum Major Awards



Dr. King wasn’t

a talk show host. He didn’t know basketball. He wasn’t a rapper. He had a Ph.D. before he was 25. ceremony this past February. The ceremony annually pays tribute to Dr. King and honors persons whose actions and deeds keep his message alive. Thomas-EL, this year’s keynote speaker for the event, is widely recognized for motivating hundreds of Philadelphia students to stay in school and pursue a college education. While overseeing a number of urban schools, Thomas-EL used the game of chess to inspire young people, and his Vaux Middle School students have been eight-time national chess champions. His best-selling autobiography, I Choose UMass

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to Stay, is being developed into a film by the Walt Disney Company. Decrying the type of individuals too many young people try to emulate, Thomas-EL told his audience, “Young people should pause and think about their role models today. “If we are to break the cycle of poverty, we have to teach young people that the most important job they will have when they become adults is being somebody’s mother or father.” The Drum Major awards this year went to UMass Dartmouth English Prof. Robert Waxler, and Dorothy Lopes, a retired elementary school teacher. Both were cited for years of work that reflect King’s legacy. Professor Waxler co-founded the widely-recognized “Changing Lives through Literature” alternative sentencing program, which substitutes the classroom for a prison cell. Lopes spent 17 years as a teacher at New Bedford’s Carney Academy, helped establish the city’s first charter school, and has been involved in numerous civic and charitable initiatives. “So much of what Dr. King fought for still requires our active engagement: economic justice, peace, true brotherhood. That is why we celebrate those people who today continue to be drum majors for justice,” said Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack.

Charlton College dean named to national business school accrediting group Dr. Eileen Peacock, dean of the Charlton College of Business, has been elected to the board of directors of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International. She joins 27 other board members, representing academe and business, from around the world. Dr. Peacock will be the sole dean from business schools in the Northeast (New England and New York) on the board; given the number of prestigious business schools within the region, her election is particularly notable. Her three-year term begins this July.

The association is considered to be the premier accrediting agency for international education programs of all levels in business and accounting. The group’s accreditation signals the highest standard of achievement by a business school. Of its 1,081 member institutions in 71 countries, 540 have achieved accreditation, including UMass Dartmouth.

Professor Sharon Sousa receives university’s Public Service Award College of Nursing Professor Sharon Sousa has been honored for her multifaceted work on mental health issues with the University of Massachusetts 2006 President’s Public Service Award. Dr. Sousa, one of six recipients of the award, has taught at UMass Dartmouth since 1999. A licensed psychologist and nurse clinical specialist, she specializes in family therapy, substance abuse, mental illnesses, and genetics, with research

interests in psychotropic medications, and genetics in psychotic illnesses. Most recently, she has been working on the human genome project, exploring schizophrenia and bipolar disorder among persons of Azorean heritage. Sousa teamed with Counseling Center Director Christine Frizzell to organize a UMass Dartmouth chapter of Compeer International, which works to educate persons about mental illness, and improve the quality of life for those with such an illness. Its mentor program brings together a trained, sensitive volunteer and an individual with a mental illness in a one-on-one relationship.


New s of N ote Swami Yogatmananda installed as Hindu chaplain for university Swami Yogatmananda was installed as the Hindu chaplain for UMass Dartmouth at a February ceremony, enabling Hindu students to now receive spiritual support and counseling on campus. Swami Yogatmananda is the minister at the Providence Vedanta Society, holds a master’s degree in mathematics, and has been ordained as a Swami under the Ramakrishna Mission order.

Professor hartigan to teach in Manila as a Fulbright scholar Music Professor royal hartigan has been named a J. William Fulbright Scholar, awarded through the U.S. State Department and the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars. In addition to teaching at the University of the Philippines in Manila, hartigan will be researching the traditions of dance and music in villages throughout the country.

Student who fled the Sudan sworn in as U.S. citizen UMass Dartmouth student James Dup, a native of strife-torn Sudan, was sworn in as a United States citizen aboard the USS John F. Kennedy in March. Dup joined 300 immigrants on the JFK, which was making its last voy-

James celebrates citizenship at a surprise party in his honor.

age prior to being retired. “It was a very remarkable moment,” said Dup, who was only 10 years old when a militia captured him and took him away from his village. He escaped five years later, making a rugged trip into the neighboring country of Ethiopia, where he lived in refugee camps until church groups sponsored his trip to the U.S. Speaking to the new citizens, Senator Edward M. Kennedy said his brother, President Kennedy, “loved the idea that our country inspired

Blogs, podcasts, and wikis… Center for Marketing Research surveys use of new media The survey of 121 of Inc. 500 companies undertaken by UMass Dartmouth’s Center for Marketing Research found “that corporate familiarity and usage of social media is racing far ahead of what many have predicted,” said Center Director Nora Barnes. The country’s fastest-growing firms are making significant use of social network sites— blogs, podcasts, and other social media tools, the survey found. Two out of three of the Inc. 500 companies cited social media as playing a “very important” or “somewhat important” role in their business and marketing strategies. The Inc. 500 is the list of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies, as defined by the magazine Inc. The social medium most familiar to the Inc. 500 is social networking (MySpace, Facebook, etc.), followed by message/bulletin boards, blogging, online video, podcasting, and wikis (websites that allow users to change content, i.e., Wikipedia).

people throughout the world to come to America to join our great experiment as the world’s oldest and strongest democracy. We say welcome to you today, and thank you for believing in the idea of America…. There are so many incredible personal stories among you that demonstrate the importance and the precious gift of citizenship in our America— stories like those of James Padiet Dup.” Dup entered UMass Dartmouth through College Now. Anne Boisvert, assistant director of the alternative admissions program, hosted a surprise party to congratulate Dup, complete with a giant cake decorated like an American flag. “People at UMass Dartmouth are nice and supportive, especially those in College Now,” said Dup. “I am challenged by academics, because I am still learning English. However, I am holding my ground so far, and I think I am going to make it.” Dup said he was drawn to his major in political science because he wants to work for the United Nations some day. He added that his coursework helped him prepare for the citizenship test.

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The university ramps up technologically

By Robert Lovinger

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he university’s technological makeover began five years ago, and in that time, two million dollars have been spent to revamp classrooms and lecture halls, outfit faculty with laptop computers, and build the virtual infrastructure to enable multimedia instruction, podcasts, distance learning, and outside-the-classroom engagement. It is a new day. “The static classroom is dead. It’s gone,” says Art History Professor Magali Carrera. Such dramatic change inevitably sparks questions. One of the central ones is: When the tools of the trade change, how does it affect the trade? Some of those quickest to adopt the new tools suspect that technology may be altering the nature of teaching. It is generating “a real emphasis on reflecting about the education process,” says Robert Green, vice chancellor for library services, information resources and technology. “It reenergizes my teaching, because you have to constantly

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go back and assess what you did,” says Jeannette Riley, associate professor of English and women’s studies. “When you teach online, the pedagogy changes,” says Carrera, who came to the university in 1979 and was 20022003 Teacher of the Year. Online, you cannot see the facial expressions or body language of students. Every other month, Carrera and Riley run a two-week course for colleagues in the ways of web-based teaching. To their surprise, “We have people talking across disciplines about teaching,” Riley says. And Math Professor Stephen Hegedus is at work on a project with huge off-campus implications: changing the way math and perhaps other subjects are taught in middle and high schools. Vice Chancellor Green is overseeing a seismic shift in the way students are educated—or in which they educate themselves. Green sees two major thrusts: changing the classroom environment and providing new avenues for learning beyond the classroom. Today nearly 90 percent of classes are taught in rooms newly equipped with such things as overhead projectors, DVD players,


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wireless capability, laptop hook-ups, and yes, telephones. In one back-tothe-future move, chairs are being replaced by new ones equipped with half-tables on which students can rest their laptops. Today, when text is no longer confined to textbooks, “I can send students directly to an article on the Internet,” Riley says. Here, standardization can be a good thing. In addition, with the classroom experience becoming an increasingly multimedia one, it’s critical that faculty know what to expect in each room. “When I first arrived here, I had to take my computer and my projector into a classroom designed for teaching about literature,” Hegedus says. “I was pushing a cart around for a few years,” echoes Carrera. “Administration had the vision to put together a coherent infrastructure and to think ahead as much as possible.” Green says faculty members have surprised themselves with the speed at which they’ve adopted technology. There’s no going back: professors must now use the Internet to post grades, even to find out who is in their classes. “There is always the risk of progressing so far ahead of the curve that you’re getting technology that is not appropriate for your faculty,” says Hegedus, who believes the university is moving at the right pace. An increasing number of professors are creating podcasts— recording their classes and making them available online. In some cases, these are for “distance learners,” folks who will never come on campus. In other cases, the podcasts are provided as supplements. Hegedus posts his classes, but he insists, “I’m all about learning inside the classroom.” While students can access his classes online, they also must attend in person. Podcasts, he says, “are a resource for them to go back and watch afterwards.” “Students are out there on Facebook and using their MP3 players. When they’re coming from that rich environment, we have to rethink what we do in the classroom,” Carrera says. She and Jen Riley came together five years ago with the idea of opening up the world of online teaching to other faculty. They created the Instructional Development team, whose members today include Kathy Bancroft, Damon Gatenby, Bev Johnson, and Tracey Russo. Carrera is particularly excited about how technology is making it possible to archive and rebroadcast. “When you had a great classroom discussion five years ago, it may have been great, but it just disappeared. Now, it is forever.” When Hegedus arrived at UMass Dartmouth, he imme-

diately became involved in the university’s SimCalc project. In partnership with Texas Instruments, he and his colleagues are focusing on the role that technology plays in middle and high school classrooms, particularly regarding math and how youngsters learn it. SimCalc, simply put, is graphical software that puts a handheld device — half calculator/half Gameboy — into young hands; it makes math more accessible by dropping the fancy symbols and turning it into something that can be manipulated by students and teachers into moving pictures. The calculators are linked to a classroom computer via a wireless network. SimCalc is being piloted in local classrooms, Hegedus notes, “and what we’ve found is that this is having a profound impact on learning and participation…. We think it will lead to a restructuring of the classroom.” Is there a downside to plunging forward with all this technology? Hegedus does worry that while students in his pilot projects are gaining in conceptual skills, little is being done to cure what he calls “an epidemic” in the lack of core math and science skills. Asked whether anything is being lost, Bob Green replies, “I don’t think so. In general, faculty find that it doesn’t depersonalize teaching. If anything, it increases it because there’s more interaction than before.” Riley says the only downside she sees is that occasionally, fully online students will find something too technical, and say they miss the fact-to-face interaction.

Is technology changing what’s being taught? Carrera says no. “The material is the material.” But she sees some evidence of a shift in students’ majors, towards subjects — graphic design, for example — that dovetail more with modern technology. “The question I have is: Are we really improving learning outcomes?” says Green, adding that a lot of people in academia are asking the same question. He feels that the

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variety of learning options offered by high technology may allow teachers to engage more students. For example, podcasting classes could prove invaluable to students who need to listen to a class twice. Or the student who never contributes in class may turn out to be an unstoppable conversationalist at 2 a.m. online. Riley also finds that “when people talk online, they start talking more in class.”

What’s still to come?



ing system for the work which students produce. It accepts different media and hosts Internet links, and continues to evolve. It is also a place where students can comment on their work and on what they’re experiencing. In an era of Facebook and MySpace, it may feel very familiar to young people increasingly comfortable with jotting down their thoughts and self-examination. “Sometimes you realize what college was about 15 years later,” Carrera says. “We want students to be thinking about it from Day One.” Eportfolios might have a number of interfaces giving different access to several types of users. Students could use their eportfolios to track progress and Magali Carrera to create portfolios for job interviews. For the university, they would serve as tools to help gauge what students are learning. An eportfolio pilot program has been underway on campus for 18 months. A full-blown eportfolio program is at least several years away. Each campus of the University of Massachusetts system is

Students are out

there on Facebook and

using their MP3 players. When they’re coming from that rich envi-

ronment, we have to

rethink what we do in

Immersion, Green says, whether it’s using virtual reality media to plunk students inside an atom, alongside ocean currents, or walking through an art museum in Europe. —Professor Looking ahead, Riley sees virtual language labs and “learning object repositories.” The latter are online storage facilities, which she predicts will inspire community and the sharing of resources. Perhaps the development generating the most excitement is the electronic portfolio, or “eportfolio,” software that acts as a fil-

the classroom.

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UMass Dartmouth establishes James J. Kaput Center for Research and Innovation in Mathematics Education

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he James J. Kaput Center for Research and Innovation in Mathematics Education, named for the late UMass Dartmouth professor whose innovative thinking and leadership inspired researchers and teachers around the world, opened in March. The goal of the center is to engage students as early as kindergarten in the concepts that are the foundations of algebra and calculus. Fundamental problems in mathematics education will be studied, discussed and analyzed through conferences, basic research, commissioned reports, and think-tank meetings. “Improving the teaching and learning of mathematics is a major national security issue for this country and the Kaput At left, business students in Professor Godwin Ariguzo’s marketing class project a marketing plan for the university. A virtual reality chamber in the College of Visual and Performing Arts allows design students to interactively view student work.

largely pursuing its own course when it comes to technology, Green says, but there is communication and sharing. “We try to see where the synergy is. We learn from each other.” He sees the University of Massachusetts system moving to the technological cutting-edge among its peers. “We’re not way out front, but we’re positioning ourselves well. Within our resources, we’re doing what we can.” Carrera, who specializes in ancient art and culture, is one of UMass Dartmouth’s most passionate advocates for the use of high technology. She finds no irony or contradiction between what she has devoted her life to as a scholar and her championship of technological change: “I’ve always wanted to do the next thing and to be challenged.” In fact, she sees it as seamless and completely logical. “The Maya were the group who came up with the concept of ‘zero.’ It’s about a quality of mind and an amazing vision of the world. And isn’t that what we’re doing now? “I am a teacher, and I will do whatever it takes to help my students learn,” she says. “The material is the material, but today, why would you want to use only a whiteboard?” Robert Lovinger is senior writer with Lifespan in Providence.

SimCalc MathWorlds™ is a cross-platform software, which incorporates computers, TI graphing calculators, and wireless networks, to help students learn core mathematical concepts in dynamic, interactive ways.

center is dedicated to this task,’’ said Dr. Stephen Hegedus, director of the center. “Unless we change the way children learn math in the early grades and create new technology to advance learning, our high schools and colleges will be turning out a generation of graduates who are ill-equipped to compete in the global economy.’’ Dr. Hegedus and his colleagues at the center—Drs. Maria Blanton and Luis Moreno Armella — have been working with teachers and students in Fall River, Wareham, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, New Bedford, and many other Massachusetts communities in developing new methods to engage younger students in the concepts of advanced mathematical thinking. Key to the strategy is encouraging students and teachers to engage in a dialogue—even debate—about the concepts rather than simply have the teacher lecture about content. The center also has begun international collaborative projects with Mexico, Colombia, England, Greece, and Singapore.

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From fighting terrorism to stemming epidemics: Professor Dan Braha takes a new approach to exploring networks

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Example of a typical scale-free biological network used with permission from Philippe Cluzel, University of Chicago

Example of a blogging network used with permission from www.orgnet.com

Example of a yeast protein network map used with permission from Albert-László Barabási

By Diane Hartnett

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hen Professor Dan Braha talks about “complex networks,” what might have seemed obscure or complicated becomes fascinating and provocative. And this business professor’s research —which, at the most simplistic level, is all about interactions — assumes extraordinary relevance, applicable to everything from building airplanes to halting epidemics, fighting terrorists, stemming computer viruses, and running corporations. What’s more, Braha is so direct and straightforward— as well as enthusiastic and animated — that virtually any audience easily grasps how his work correlates to everyday situations and phenomena.

Braha came to UMass Dartmouth in 2004 from MIT, where he was a visiting lecturer, and Boston University, where he worked as a research scientist. A member of the New England Complex Systems Institute, he’s an associate management professor in the Charlton College of Business, yet the bulk of his education and experience is in engineering—he has a doctorate in operations research and industrial engineering from Tel Aviv University, and was an engineering professor at Ben-Gurion University. “My work involves the interface between technology and management,” says Braha, explaining that the cornerstone of his research is the interplay between basic engineering and management concepts. And at the center of his work are “large scale networks,” which can encompass anything from corporations to flu epidemics. In a major paper last fall in the prestigious Complexity

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Anyone familiar with the subway system of New York City can understand what Dr. Dan Braha means when he talks of “complex networks,” complicated series of connections among various elements. Braha has emerged as a leading scholar in this field, which has assumed more importance with its potential for real-world application.

journal, Braha and collaborator Yaneer Bar-Yam (president of the Complex Systems Institute) argue for a new way of looking at networks, a way that will significantly benefit society. The modern complex network, says Braha, is not the static, “fixed rod” entity that constitutes the traditional viewpoint. Rather, it is a dynamic combination of elements operating more like “flickering strings” with all sorts of connections.

A new view of networks The study of complex networks is a growing, inter-disciplinary field, as researchers maintain that a new, more accurate

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understanding would mean better responses to a host of social, scientific, economic, and political issues. Ask Braha for a basic introduction to his work, and he puts forth construction of an airplane. Consider that the project requires perhaps 6,800 workers, each with a distinct task, as diverse as designing the engine, to choosing seat upholstery, to ordering brake pads. Not one of those workers operates in a vacuum—what each does impacts another’s work, and ultimately influences the outcome of the entire project. “The interactions become as much of a social issue as a technological one,” Braha explains. “Let’s say one person working on one part of the plane doesn’t provide the information the person designing the wings needs. The airplane doesn’t fly. “If something is not managed well, then the system often fails… or there will be delays, or it comes in over budget. To do something well, you must look at a system as a whole, within a large-scale network.” All networks comprise certain elements (or players). “Hubs” are considered the pivotal, commanding elements around and from which the multiple links emanate. In his work, Braha debunks the common notion that hubs are more or less “fixed.” He and Bar-Yam challenge this fixed nature in their piece in Complexity. They studied the actions of thousands of emailers over a period of four months. The exchanges constituted a social network, the type exemplified by the popular MySpace and FaceBook. Conventional wisdom says that the “hub” of such a network is the emailer with far more contacts than anyone else, and that the network changes only slightly over time. Not so, found Braha and Bar-Yam. In reviewing the emails, the pair saw that the hubs changed constantly—a person could send or receive a handful of emails one day, with a deluge the following day. “The results were astounding. How important someone is changes so fast we might be better off saying it is like ‘15 minutes of fame’,” says Braha. So, the researchers maintain, the number of contacts someone has within a network is less important than who is communicating with whom, and when. Braha carries out his research as a scientist, using data and tests to monitor interactions and patterns, then developing his theses. His exploration of networks is multi-faceted, encompassing a wide range of the factors that shape networks and give them their dynamism. For example, there is “coupling,” a term for various interactions and linkages. “If you or I have a mutual friend, we are ‘coupled.’ Decisions that share attributes are coupled.” But why is that important? Because, explains Braha, “when the degree of coupling increases, the likelihood of more creativity increases. And more coupling can increase the performance of a product. “At the same time, the system becomes more vulnerable to errors, diseases, viruses.” Consider the dinner party. If you invite only three couples, will the conversation lag? But are six couples too many? Frivolous as the example is, it explains a fundamental premise Braha


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articulates: “if the degree of coupling is below a certain threshold, a system will perform well. If it is above that threshold, it becomes more problematic. “It’s like a seesaw. With research and a scientific approach, we can predict the best ‘edge’ for coupling” in networks that can vary from roadways, to anti-virus computer software, to suitable groupings of persons in the workplace. Those whom Braha calls “informed decision-makers” understand the significance of coupling within networks —which nodes are more likely to couple repeatedly, and possibly become problematic within the network as a whole. That decision-maker can then direct the necessary resources to prevent that: “the idea is to act before the problem occurs,” says Braha.

The future of management Braha offers an idealized vision of management, when networks are recognized as vibrant, energetic, multi-layered. “I see the managers of the future sitting before a computer that shows a large, enmeshed network. They have backgrounds in science, management, and engineering. They can see that one node might be too far from another, or that another is not robust. So they will play with the system and rearrange it— always taking into account the constraints of reality.” Among the more intriguing applications of Braha’s research involves terrorist networks. He argues that governments must look at these networks in a markedly different fashion, acting more flexibly and creatively, and relying less on the traditional approach of assuming a central, supreme hub. Monitoring methods must recognize that terrorist networks and their so-called hubs can change rapidly. For example, a stable, quiet network “node” that suddenly develops more links, and exhibits more activity, could signal a major network change or even terrorist movement— and prompt the appropriate response. Effective monitoring of terrorist networks, Braha continues, “requires constant surveillance. You have to monitor the degree of erratic behavior continually, over time.” Braha has also examined the management and communication modes that prevail in institutions such as industries, hospitals, or universities— which constitute networks — and for the most part is unimpressed. Formally and officially, these institutions have a conventional, hierarchical structure, says Braha: “The boss is at the top and controls everything. “And that is completely wrong,” in terms of how those institutions actually function. Braha says the “official” structure is based on wishful thinking. Traditional organizational charts, for example, generally reflect theories about how workers interact, how policy is made, and how communication occurs. “They do not capture the reality of how information actually is disseminated.” In actuality, these institutions/networks, with their many employees, “are not hierarchical in reality. They have many loops, are cyclical, and are always changing.” Until the institutions recognize that, and modify their structure accordingly, they cannot realize full potential or remain, using Braha’s term, “robust.” “The only way to achieve robustness is to connect the nodes

The image above serves to illustrate the research being done by Charlton College of Business Professor Dan Braha on complex networks. It reflects the non-traditional findings he and collaborator Yaneer Bar-Yam have arrived at in their study of the dynamics of links within those networks. The image of the clocks indicates the rapid changes that occur over time in real-world complex network structures. The corresponding film strip represents the thesis that nodes that rank marginally at one point in time become more vibrant, and evolve into local hubs at a different point. This image was designed by Braha, Sageet Braha, and Cherry Ogata. It was the cover art for the December 2006 issue of the journal Complexity, which featured an article by Braha and Bar-Yam on their work.

in a network in a way different than the hierarchical.” Braha has published his research on networks in a number of journals, and co-authored two books. He has also consulted on communications issues for several large companies, and is continuing his research while teaching about complex managerial systems and operations. “I’ve found that UMass Dartmouth offers a flexible and collegial environment that fosters innovation, promotes growth for both the individual and the university, and enables individuals to contribute in a significant way to both research and teaching.” Diane Hartnett is the writer for the university Publications Office.

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“How can we help you?” The dialogues of community police work

By Diane Hartnett

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hen Ronald Teachman was studying political science at Southeastern Massachusetts University, he considered doing a stint in the Peace Corps after graduation. Then he thought that perhaps he’d leave his native New Bedford to teach youngsters in another urban area. Neither the Peace Corps nor the move from his hometown ever took place. Instead Teachman stayed in his own backyard, and thanks to a curious series of events that began unfolding in his student days, the ’76 graduate has become one of New Bedford’s most high-profile residents—chief of police of the state’s seventh-largest city. It is hardly an easy job, given contemporary realities and the unflattering media attention New Bedford often receives. But Teachman “loves it,” drawn by the opportunity to try innovative approaches and involve the community in his efforts. Over 30 years on the force, Teachman had risen to captain rank when new mayor Scott Lang named him to lead the 289-member department last spring. Classmates from SMU may have been surprised; “I certainly was one of very few guys in the room with long hair” during the Civil Service police exam Teachman took while still in college. The test was actually part of a class project from then-sociology professor Will Tate, who maintained that a subtle racism—such as test biases—could hide behind initiatives such as affirmative action. Teachman agreed to take the next scheduled Civil Service exam to test the theory, and it happened to be the one for municipal police appointments. Scores were delayed for 15 months, pending settlement of, ironically, a charge of gender bias by female

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applicants. By then, Teachman had graduated, and was taking post-graduate courses for teacher certification while working at the Center for Human Services, where he got to know a number of police officers. The Civil Service exam was virtually forgotten until an officer visited his family to complete a background check on him—Teachman had finished in the top 10 of New Bedford residents taking the test. “And I decided that rather than go someplace like Detroit, why not stay in your own hometown and serve your own city?” Now he serves the city in a position with both greater demands and opportunities. Asked about stemming crime rates, Teachman talks of the critical importance of “reaching out to the community,” a community that encompasses neighborhood and civic organizations, educators, the clergy, businesses, politicians, and young people, individually and in groups. “Community policing” goes beyond the neighborhood officer, on foot or in cruisers, and the community officers squad. It also means dialogue that can translate into action with all the forces that comprise New Bedford. Teachman spends considerable time meeting with all sorts of groups on their issues and concerns. “That gives me a greater depth and breadth of knowledge about this city. “I hope the theme of this department is, ‘How can we help you?’” That is the question Teachman posed repeatedly, to a series of constituencies, during his swearing-in ceremony. It was a vehicle for conveying his priorities and intentions. To those with information about unsolved murders, said Teachman, “How can we help you find the courage to come forward? How can we help you recognize your moral duty…and understand you are safer with the murderers behind bars than walking among us?”

Adam Clear photography

Two UMass Dartmouth graduates have found their way to careers in law enforcement and positions as police chiefs. Ronald Teachman ’76 now heads the force in the state’s seventh largest city, while Mary Lyons ’81 is just down the road, in comparatively small Mattapoisett. Neither enrolled in the university with a law enforcement career in mind, but ironically their college experiences steered both in that direction.


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“I know this city. I’ve never left and I’ve been comfortable here.” —Ron Teachman New Bedford police chief

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To neighborhood activists: “Howl can we work together to stop the littering, the graffiti, the property neglect…the drug dealing, and other nuisances that devalue your home and your neighborhood?” To New Bedford police officers: “How can we keep our focus on helping people, which was the reason we all gave for joining the force however long ago?” Teachman was shaped, to a large extent, by all that occurred in his youth: the legacy of JFK, the Vietnam War, and the civil rights movement. His mother, a legal secretary most of her life, at one point worked at the Fort Rodman Job Corps. Teachmen met many of the young black men who worked in that program, and watched some play with the New Bedford Sweepers football team. That many of the men were greeted with hostility surprised Teachman, but also taught him about prejudice and ignorance. And he dealt with that in the wake of the 2006 “gay bar” attacks by Jacob Robida, who later died in a gun battle with Arizona police. City officials, the police, and residents denounced the act as counter to the inclusive nature of New Bedford. Says Teachman (not chief at the time), “There is nothing this community did to own that, or be responsible for it. Jacob Robida did it.” When reporters asked about the “need” for a vigil on the year anniversary of the tragedy, Teachman replied, “If you are trying to confront hate, you need to be vigi-

lant, with ongoing reminders that you do need to do that.” Articulate and affable, Teachman offers opinions freely and gives thoughtful, detailed answers to questions. He holds a bachelor’s in criminal justice from Salve Regina College and a law degree from New England School of Law. He volunteers with the SMILES mentoring program, spending time each week with a New Bedford youngster. Despite what many may think, he believes New Bedford is a safe community, but people do carry some responsibility for their well-being: “I think everyone has to be more conscientious…. You don’t leave your keys in your car or your car running.” That the mayor named a police chief who began as a patrolman and rose through the ranks is, in Teachman’s words, “best case scenario.” “There’s not the learning curve that would be involved otherwise. I know this city—I’ve never left and have been comfortable here. I know the leaders, elected and not elected.” Hiring outside the department dampens morale—“it’s tough if you put a glass ceiling on people.” It also declares that no veteran officer is qualified, and whose fault is that, Teachman asks rhetorically. “If we aren’t able, then why weren’t we given opportunities for professional development? “I hope that part of my legacy is that the person who follows me comes from within and does a better job.”

Beyond enforcement 1981 alumna Mary Lyons is one of a handful of female police chiefs in the state

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nvite all of the female police chiefs for Massachusetts’ communities to dinner, and don’t worry about the room size — there would be only four at the table. And 1981 graduate Mary Lyons is one. Lyons, who majored in psychology, has been chief of police in Mattapoisett since 2001. After stints as a UMass Dartmouth officer and emergency medical technician in Mattapoisett, she became the town’s first female patrol officer in 1985, and was promoted to detective in ’93. Lyons wasn’t named chief because she was female. But she does feel that women bring a distinctive, invaluable perspective to police work. Such as the ability to empathize with female crime victims, an ability Lyons demonstrated in investigating one of the area’s most notorious cases, 1997 rape charges against a well-liked teacher and coach. While the bulk of her work involves less sensational, more typical small-town crime, she has pursued a man suspected of trying to lure a 13-year-old girl to another state and handled a computer hacker fraud case. She is enthusiastic about her work: “I have a very good job here. We have a very good police force and everyone gets along well.” Yet she sought the top spot when it became available six years ago only when pressed byc colleagues. “I think they

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thought that it would be beneficial for everybody. They see me as open and honest and fair, and I’m a pretty direct person.” Being chief in a town with a population of 6,500 (considerably higher during the summer) has its special challenges. No matter how low a social profile she maintains, there is an easy familiarity between residents and police chief that’s absent in larger communities. Lyons often finds herself more of a mediator and advisor than enforcer, and “you have to be a good listener. “I like the constant change there is in police work, the excitement, the ability to use the law in ways other than only enforcement, to help people. “You need the right temperament, and you definitely have to like people. You cannot be a powermonger—and this is a position of power, where what you do has a tremendous impact on people’s lives. So you must have a sense of compassion.” Lyons’ father, grandfather, and brother were police officers, but she had no plans for a law enforcement career when she started at SMU. While “everyone thought I could be a great nurse,” Lyons was thinking social work. As a student, she worked as a dispatcher for the public safety department and joined the Department of Social Services’ KEY program in Fall River after graduation. But when then-chief Ray McKearney


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“You need the right

and you definitely have

where what you do has a

Adam Clear photography

to like people. You cannot be a powermonger— and this is a position of

temperament, power,

tremendous impact on people’s lives.

So you must have

a sense of

compassion.”

had an opening on the campus sive investigation—and in her force, he offered her the job and own hometown — Lyons says, Lyons became the university’s “I tried to keep my emotions first female officer. in check. I think I was so tired She subsequently was certified that it was difficult to feel much as an emergency medical techniemotion.” The case, she feels, cian on the Mattapoisett force. had a widespread benefit: people When offered a police departbecame more willing to disclose ment post there, she demurred they had been victimized, and until she could work on patrol, more confident that they would rather than “inside.” Joining the be vindicated. department in ’85 as its first Lyons, who has a master’s female patrol officer was another in criminal justice from Anna landmark for Lyons. Maria College, has emerged as When she became detective a leader among her colleagues. eight years later, it became Lyons’ She heads the Southeastern job to investigate the explosive Massachusetts Law Enforcecharges against Old Rochester ment Council, whose 21 memRegional gym teacher and coach ber communities share informaJohn Shockro. The accusations tion and assistance, and is also of rape against the widelySoutheastern Massachusetts “I like the constant change... known, hitherto well-respected Po-lice Chief Association presifigure sent Mattapoisett reeling, dent. Now third vice president the ability to use the law to help people.” brought the national media to of the Massachusetts Chiefs of —Mary Lyons the town, and led to bitter conPolice Association, Lyons will flicts among townspeople. assume the presidency in four Mattapoisett police chief Lyons stayed detached from years. the controversy as she doggedly Crime is neither as violent pursued leads, separated rumor nor as pervasive in Mattapoisett from fact, and interviewed more as in urban areas. But Lyons says than 100 persons, not all of them willing to be drawn into the her 28-member force (four of them women) must be as prepared case. Shockro ultimately pleaded guilty to raping two students for murders as it is for burglaries. She believes today’s police and was jailed for eight years. officers “absolutely” need a college education, and not only for “I just persevered and did what I had to do,” Lyons recalls, the analytical abilities it instills. “It gives you the opportunity to who says her training and her instincts convinced her of the see what’s beyond your own white picket fence, to learn about truthfulness of Shockro’s accusers. diversity and interact with a whole other dynamic.” “I think I was one of the first people who believed them,” She has no current plans to seek a spot on a larger force in during a tumultuous time when many considered the victims a busier community. “Law enforcement is a great career. You liars and worse. “I know it was easier for them to talk to me, as can always advance. There may be more opportunity in a bigger a woman. I also know that it is therapeutic for people to feel that department, but not necessarily more happiness.” others believe in them and will prosecute on their behalf.” Diane Hartnett is the writer for the university Publications Office. Asked about the personal impact of undertaking such a diviA l u m n i

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A message from Jeffrey Wolfman Executive Director, UMass Dartmouth Foundation; Vice Chancellor for Advancement

Dear UMass Dartmouth Friends and Donors: As the Executive Director of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation and Vice Chancellor for Advancement, I am pleased to present our fiscal year 2006 annual report, which lists contributions to the university during the period July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2006. As you read through the report and see the hundreds of donors listed, I hope you will agree that we have begun, in earnest, the process of building a culture of philanthropy on our campus and in our community. We are fortunate to have the confidence of many alumni who attended our predecessor schools as evidenced by the donations of Harold Bannister ’35, John F. Kane ’34 and Edward M. Murphy ’34. Our younger alumni are giving in greater numbers than ever before; our campus community of faculty and staff, from administration to maintainers, has stepped forward to support their place of employment; and our friends in the community not only make donations to, but serve as advocates and ambassadors for, UMass Dartmouth and its mission of providing personalized teaching, innovative research, and serving as an intellectual catalyst for regional and global economic, social, and cultural development. There are some highlights that give me a sense of optimism that our efforts have been effective in making this campus an active participant in the culture of philanthropy. Fiscal year 2006 was a great success for us. We raised $7,595,457, surpassing our $5 million goal by more than $2.5 million. Fundraising highlights included: n a $2,000,000 anonymous pledge for library renovations n over $110,000 from area corporations for the SouthCoast Development Partnership n a $100,000 scholarship endowment from the family and friends of the late Cecil Milton Lopes III n a total of $60,000 from the Charles Irwin Travelli Fund and the Alice S. Ayling

Scholarship Foundation for tuition assistance for 18 UMass Dartmouth students

n $50,000 from recently retired provost Louis Esposito, to initiate the John and Mary Esposito

Visiting Faculty Fellowship, in memory of his parents

n $25,000 to create the Senator Mary L. Fonseca Scholarship from the late senator’s daughter

and many of her friends.

Our endowment has grown significantly through the years and is now over $20,000,000. The interest generated from the endowment provides us with approximately $800,000 to fund new programs and initiatives and expand existing ones. We are grateful for all of the private support we receive from our alumni, our friends, and our campus community, and we thank each of you for the important part you play in helping our students achieve their dreams. It is clear that UMass Dartmouth is a highly respected and valued institution in our region, and I take great pride in being associated with it. I hope you will continue to be involved with our beautiful campus and become a part of the next exciting chapter in the history of UMass Dartmouth.

Sincerely,

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Jeffrey A. Wolfman, Executive Director


The following list includes donors to the Annual Campaign alphabetically according to their giving levels.

Blue Mentor

This listing represents donations received between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2006.

Mr. Michael S. Aizenstadt ‘79 Dr. Cynthia M. Alves ‘84 Mrs. Charlotte G. Babbitt Mr. John I. Babbitt, Jr. Mr. Benjamin B. Baker Mr. Harold R. Bannister ‘35 Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Bogan ‘59 Mr. Leonard V. Brophy ‘78 Mr. & Mrs. John K. Bullard ‘91, ‘94 Mr. Paul M. Camara ‘69 Crystal & Edwin Campbell Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Carney Estate of Marion M. Chace Dr. & Mrs. Paul Chervinsky Chancellor Professor John A. Chopoorian Chancellor Professor & Mrs. Lester W. Cory ‘63 Professor David J. Creamer ‘58 Dr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Curry ‘64 Dr. Joseph C. Deck Mr. Peter M. DeWalt Mr. & Mrs. Allan W. Ditchfield Mr. Paul C. Downey Mr. Michael P. Duarte ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Roy Enoksen Drs. Louis & Frances Esposito Mr. & Mrs. Joseph H. Feitelberg ‘03 Attorney & Mrs. Sheldon Friedland Mr. & Mrs. John J. Galiher, Jr. ‘84 Mr. John H. Gallant Professor Geraldine Gamburd Mr. William E. Giblin ‘57 Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. Green Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Gross Mr. Lawrence C. Hall Mr. & Mrs. Warren Hathaway Mr. & Mrs. John G. Hawes ‘66 Dean William Hogan ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. David A. Holmes Dean Donald C. Howard The Jarabek Family Professor Madhu H. Jhaveri Mr. Fengzhi Ke ‘00 Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Lafrance Mr. Thomas A. Lambalot ‘85 Dr. Susan C. Lane The Honorable & Mrs. William Q. MacLean, Jr. ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Hubert C. Mandeville Mr. Gianluca Marchi ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Gerald J. Mauretti ‘65 Dr. & Mrs. J. Greer McBratney Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth C. Petitti ‘71, ‘79

A special thank you to those who have joined the Chancellor’s Circle by contributing $1,000 or more in a single year.

Distinguished Patron

Ms. Elisia M. Saab

Major Patron

Mr. Antonio F. Andrade ‘04 Mr. and Mrs. Earle P. Charlton II Ms. Otilia S. Ferreira ‘87 Ms. Irene V. Fonseca Mr. Charles J. Hoff Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ‘00

Patron

Anonymous Dr. Peter H. Cressy Joseph W. Houth Charitable Trust Estate of Joseph W. Houth ‘24 Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 Dr. Thomas Lawton ‘53 Ms. Deirdre L. Lopes Estate of Walter S. MacPhail ‘36 Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Quinn

Gold Mentor

Mr. Michael P. Biszko ‘70 Mr. Richard Cardoza Mrs. Maria D. Furman ‘76 Professor Howard T. Glasser Mr. and Mrs. Brian T. Helgeland ‘83 Ms. Susan C. Kaput ‘70 Mr. Thomas F. Lyons Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Estate of Alvida Quill Mr. Robert F. Stoico Mr. Yong Zhang ‘93 and Mrs. Jian Shi ‘95

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Mr. & Mrs. Donald H. Ramsbottom Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Reynolds Mr. Kenneth R. Rezendes Mr. Kevin C. Santos ‘81 Ms. Susan Shubitowski ‘86 Mr. David A. Sluter ‘75 Dr. George S. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Larry K. Sowder Mrs. Mary M. Sullivan Ms. Pearl R. Szatek ‘78 Mr. Paul L. Vigeant ‘74 Professor Emeritus Richard J. Ward Mr. & Mrs. Sumner J. Waring, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert Watkins ‘02 Mr. & Mrs. Sidney J. Weinberg, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Myron Wilner Mr. Donald G. Wood ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Xavier ‘72 Attorney Margaret D. Xifaras ‘78

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Mentor

Anonymous Anonymous Mrs. Ann Ley Benoit Ms. Camellia Bocchino Bloch ‘80 Judge Bettina Borders & Dr. Victor Mailey Mr. Donald J. Brody ‘71 Mr. Wendell S. Brown Dr. & Mrs. Donald R. Cappadona ‘78, ‘79 Ms. LaVerne Cawthorne Dr. Julie A. Cleare Mr. & Mrs. Antone Correia ‘67, ‘83 Mr. Scott W. Costa ‘78 Mr. Thomas G. Davis Dr. & Mrs. John P. Dowd Ms. Eudora Dronge ‘42 Mr. Virgulino L. Duarte ‘73 Mr. John A. Freeman ‘58 Ms. Christine Frizzell Dr. James A. Golen ‘65 Mr. Bernard H. Gould Mr. & Mrs. Philip R. Graham ‘78, ‘’79 Dr. Susan J. Leclair ‘77 & Chancellor Professor James T. Griffith ‘70 Mr. Frederic J. Lamoureux ‘51 Mr. & Mrs. Stephen W. Lenhardt Ms. N. L. Liu Mr. & Mrs. John T. Ludes Mr. & Mrs. Michael Macy Attorney Robert J. Marchand ‘66 Brian & Cindy McGreevy ‘79, ‘78 Mr. Nicholas Mendes Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Milne Mrs. Elizabeth Isherwood-Moore ‘80 & Mr. John D. Moore ‘96

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UMass

Ms. Christine Nounou ‘74 Mr. George W. Noyes Ms. Mina Otis Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Pickette, Jr. Mr. Thomas F. Quinlan, Jr. ‘76 Mr. Milton Rhodes ‘41 Mr. Thomas A. Romberg Mr. & Mrs. Jeremy Roschelle Mr. & Mrs. Mohammad Shahid ‘82 Mr. & Mrs. Paul W. Souza ‘79, ‘78 Ms. Jane Tompkins Mr. John E. Tuttle ‘63 Ms. Ellen Ventura Ms. Elizabeth W. Vorenberg Patricia White ‘77 Dr. & Mrs. Donald L. Zekan Campanile Society

Ms. Joan R. Adaskin Mrs. Parveen S. Ali Mr. Brian Alves ‘85 Mr. Normand G. Audette ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Joseph W. Augustyn ‘69, ‘73 Mr. Ralph A. Boardman ‘63 Mrs. Anne B. Boisvert ‘74 Mr. David A. Brownell Mr. James F. Buckley ‘81 Mr. Edward Cabral ‘89 Mrs. Mary E. Canning ‘83 Mr. Jeffrey K. Carignan ‘81 Mr. Jianrong Chen ‘99 Ms. Vernell L. M. Clouden ‘99 Dr. Susan T. Costa ‘72 Ms. Maria F. Crivello ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dufresne ‘05, ‘72 Mr. Roger J. Dugal ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. Nathan S. Duhamel ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence P. Egan ‘80 Mr. Martin W. Flinn ‘79 Mr. Kevin F. Frey Dr. & Mrs. Peter Friedman Mr. Peter D. Garvey ‘70 Mr. Edwin B. Gentle III ‘94 Ms. Paige M. Gibbs Dr. & Mrs. Frederick V. Gifun Mr. Stephen R. Giordano ‘96 Mr. Jose C. Gonsalves ‘69 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Grandmaison ‘73, ‘74 Mr. John E. Grenier, Jr. ‘74 Mr. Henry A. Guay ‘65 Mr. Mark J. Hahn ‘75 Dr. James A. Hijiya Ms. Judith A. Hodge ‘77 Mr. Ronald W. Hoy ‘64 Professor Raymond Jackson D a r t m o u t h

Mr. John F. Kane ‘34 Mr. Craig Klinedinst ‘01 Mr. Bruce W. Larson ‘74 Dr. Rita Linggood Dr. & Mrs. Amine B. Maalouf Mrs. Kerry A. Manchester ‘92 Ms. Janice R. McDonough ‘93 Professor Donald G. McKinley Mr. & Mrs. Antonio N. Melo Mr. Andrew M. Mendes Ms. Natalie Mendes Ms. Jane B. Metzger Mr. & Mrs. Nick Mucciardi Mr. & Mrs. Vincent John Murphy ‘77, ‘93 Mr. Curtis W. Nelson ‘89 Ms. Andrea L. Nixon ‘77 Mr. Paul A. Nolin ‘70 Drs. Richard & Carolyn Panofsky Mrs. June Paoline ‘70 Mrs. Susan L. Payne ‘78 Dean Eileen Peacock Mr. Richard L. Pepin ‘83 Mr. William J. Perron ‘56 Mr. Jeffrey S. Reback ‘71 Mr. Zhibin Ren ‘97 Mrs. Patricia A. Rucker ‘78 Ms. Gerda A. Sano ‘81 Ms. Pamela Sarno Mr. Walter O. Shepard, Jr. ‘65 Mrs. Edith R. Skinner ‘83 Mrs. Deborah C. Smith ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Paul Souza ‘91 Lt. Col. Audrey Stebenne, USAF (Ret.) ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. Clay V. Stites Mr. Sheldon I. B. Straker ‘99 Mr. & Mrs. David M. Teixeira ‘78 Professor Doris Thibault Dr. J. Gethyn Timothy Mr. & Mrs. Toomey Dr. Linus Travers Professor Ann E. Tschirch Mr. Eric S. Watson ‘73 Mr. Jeffrey Weissman ‘72 Mr. J. Charles West ‘78 Mr. Kevin G. White Mr. Mitchell M. Winkler ‘80 Mr. Jeffrey A. Wolfman Mr. David F. Wood ‘72 Ms. Liming Yang ‘96 Century Club

Mr. Magnus Aadland ‘76 Ms. Lynne M. Abelson ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Abraham ‘82 Ms. Elizabeth Acheson Mr. & Mrs. Saleem Ali ‘01

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Allen ‘80, ‘79 Ms. Elizabeth Ann Almeida ‘95 Mr. Joel Alstein Mr. Alexander T. Alvarez ‘90 Mr. Michael J. Ambrosini ‘70 Ms. Mary I. Andrade ‘81 Mr. Ernest S. Angstadt ‘88 Mr. & Mrs. Stephen G. Anness ‘73 Mr. Dimitrios Antonopoulos ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Asquith S. Armstrong, Jr. ‘99, ‘00 Mr. & Mrs. Mark J. Arpino Professor Naseer H. Aruri Mrs. Ann E. Ashley ‘73 Mr. Arthur S. Ashley ‘50 Ms. Patricia A. Ashworth ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Volley Dean Bagley Mr. Edward J. Bajakian ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. Mohammed S. Bajwa Mr. Thomas S. Bancroft ‘60 Mr. James D. Barber ‘68 Mr. George Barboza ‘59 Mr. Ronald Barboza Mr. & Mrs. Barrett Mr. & Mrs. George S. Barron Mr. & Mrs. Joaquim C. Barros ‘89, ‘85 Dr. Clyde W. Barrow Mr. & Mrs. Nathan D. Barry Ms. Michelle Bartholdi Mr. Dennis E. Beals ‘69 Mr. & Mrs. James E. Beaulieu Mr. Norman R. Beauregard ‘76 Mrs. Barbara E. Belanger ‘77 Mr. Manuel Benevides ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Dennis J. Benjamin Mr. Arnold H. Bennett ‘62 Ms. Denise Benoit ‘83 Mr. Normand R. Benoit ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Benoit ‘81, ‘84 Mr. John S. Berg ‘85 Mr. Richard H. Bergman ‘71 Mr. A. Robert Bernstein ‘53 Attorney Donald A. Berube ‘84 Dr. Louis G. Bianco Miss Sheila Blackwell Mr. Ernest J. Blais ‘74 Mr. Scott W. Blevins ‘80 Mr. Thomas C. Bliss ‘71 Mrs. Alvin Bodzioch Mr. Thomas J. Boivin ‘60 Mr. Alan R. Boling ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Bonomo Ms. Marcia Booker Ms. Marietta E. Booth ‘73 Mr. Jeffrey P. Bosworth ‘88 Mr. John P. Botelho, Jr. ‘93 & Mrs. Christine A. Botelho ‘93 Mr. James A. Botellio ‘59 Mrs. Elizabeth L. Bowen ‘82

Ms. Mary L. Bowen ‘82 Mr. Bruce P. Branchaud ‘76 Mrs. Sally Brisson Mr. Bruce H. Brown ‘71 Dr. John Buck Mr. Bruce H. Buckley ‘60 Peter & Tia Bullard Dr. & Mrs. Richard T. Burke Dr. I. A. Butt Mr. & Mrs. William J. Butts ‘88 Mr. James A. Byrne ‘89 Mr. & Mrs. George M. Cabral ‘92, ‘88 Mr. John N. Cabral ‘94 Mr. Kevin T. Cabral ‘99 Ms. Cindy L. Callisto ‘99 Dr. & Mrs. Wayne J. Camara ‘78 Ms. Rosemary Aleixo Caras ‘83 Mr. Wayne M. Cardoza ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Carpenter Mr. David W. Carreau ‘55 Ms. Ruth Carroll Mr. Stephen T. Carter ‘76 Mrs. Mary Anne Cary ‘76 Ms. Valerie E. Caswell Mr. Pat Cavanaugh Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan D. Chace ‘88, ‘81 Mr. William D. Chamberlain ‘71 Mr. James F. Charrette ‘97 Mr. Eric R. Chartier ‘86 Mr. Everett Charves ‘52 Ms. Jennifer L. Chase ‘05 Ms. Wen Chen ‘95 Ms. Pamela J. Cherry ‘95 Mr. David M. Chick ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Frederic Christen, Jr. ‘77, ‘74 Mr. & Mrs. Randall Christensen ‘85, ‘86 Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Clancy Mr. Stephen M. Clancy ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Francis P. Clegg ‘73, ‘74 Mr. John J. Clement Mr. Philip A. Clorite ‘50 Mr. Maurice G. Coderre ‘66 Mr. & Mrs. David A. Collins Ms. Brianne Como ‘03 Mr. & Mrs. Stephen A. Cook Ms. Dyanne F. Cooney ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Cordeiro ‘74 Mr. & Mrs. Gerard Cormier The Honorable Robert Correia ‘62 Mr. Alvin Costa ‘84 Mr. Carlos A. Costa ‘92 Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Costa ‘78, ‘80 Mr. Thomas F. Costa ‘85 Mr. Michael J. Cote ‘74 Mr. William J. Cote ‘73 Ms. Christine M. Coughlin ‘82


Mr. Robert J. Counihan ‘73 Professor Alden W. Counsell ‘42 Mr. George Couto ‘93 Mrs. Gabrielle Coyne Giblin ‘58 Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Crompton ‘67, ‘71 Colonel Ronald J. Cruz (Ret.) ‘69 Mr. & Mrs. Cullity Ms. Marcia Cunningham Mr. Kurt R. Dahlberg ‘73 Mr. Nicholas M. Davio ‘02 Mr. John S. Davis ‘76 Mr. Thomas A. Davol, Jr. ‘62 Mr. Robert F. Deans ‘70 Mr. Wesley T. Decampos ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. DeCoste, Jr. ‘84, ‘95 Mr. Glenn I. Deming ‘82 Ms. Carolyn J. DeMoranville Mr. Frank E. Denzer ‘76 Ms. Debora J. DePaola ‘74 Mr. Rodney P. DeRego ‘67 Mrs. Kelly L. DeSenti ‘92 Mr. Ronald R. Desruisseaux ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. George R. Diggle Mr. & Mrs. Andrew P. DiGiammo Professor Mary Ann Dillon Ms. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ‘03 Mr. Rui M. Dos Santos ‘05 Mr. James A. Doucet ‘55 Mr. Bob Drach Mr. & Mrs. Dragon Mr. Peter A. Draymore ‘79 Mr. Peter J. Driscoll ‘84 Mr. Robert P. Duarte Mr. & Mrs. Edward Dubrawski, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. John F. Duclos Mr. Roland J. Duphily ‘66 Mr. & Mrs. George L. Durant III Ms. Helen J. Duryea ‘79 Mr. Theodore J. Dziedzic ‘76 Mr. James R. Eggert ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Eisenberg Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. England ‘65, ‘85 Mr. Selwyn Epstein Ms. Laurie C. Esancy ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Steven P. Espindola ‘79, ‘77 Mr. Leonard R. Euart, Jr. ‘74 Chancellor Professor Gilbert Fain Mr. & Mrs. Scott C. Faulkner ‘83 Mr. William J. Fawcett ‘60 Mr. Kevin J. Feeney ‘89 Mr. & Mrs. Paul Ferrara Mr. Anthony J. Ferreira ‘54 Mr. Scott M. Ferson ‘87 Mr. Richard S. Fine ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Finger Dr. John Finnie Mr. David T. Fisher ‘83

Professor Edward J. Fitzpatrick, Jr. Mr. Richard W. Flood ‘65 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Flynn Mr. & Mrs. James P. Forance ‘86, ‘84 Mrs. Faith B. Ford ‘42 Ms. Dorothy S. Frade ‘77 Mr. Robert W. Frank ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Fredericks Mr. & Mrs. Charles Fried Mr. Kristopher G. Furtney ‘80 Mr. Richard L. Fyans ‘65 Mr. & Mrs. Pierre J. Gabriel ‘75, ‘78 Mr. Donald A. Gagnon ‘81 Mr. Roger J. Gagnon ‘61 Mrs. Eugene Galkowski Mr. Robert J. Ganson ‘81 Ms. Virginia M. Garcia Mr. Stephen F. Gardiner ‘74 Mr. Peter Gargas Reverend F. Richard Garland ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Gauvin ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Gemme ‘84, ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Paul R. Gendron ‘85, ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Paul Geoghegan ‘78, ‘79 Mr. Alvin I. Gerstein Mr. Todd Gibbons ‘88 Mr. David Gibbs ‘81 Mr. Thomas M. Gibney ‘86 Mr. & Mrs. Peter T. Gibson Mrs. Susan E. Gibson ‘76 Mr. James R. Gilbert ‘80 Mr. Jay N. Gillis ‘84 Mr. Peter C. Giusti ‘65 Mr. Stanley M. Goldstein Ms. Roberta J. Gomes Ms. Jacqueline Gonzales Professor Emeritus Fryderyk E. Gorczyca ‘58 Ms. Cindy Gorman Mr. & Mrs. Douglas S. Gould ‘86, ‘84 Mr. & Mrs. Dennis M. Grant ‘75 Dr. Lawrence W. Gray ‘77 Mr. Paul J. Grebla ‘69 Lt. Col. Donna L.B. Grenon ‘71 Mr. Zheng-Yu Gu ‘92 Mr. Paul B. Guillet ‘79 Dr. & Mrs. A. Gunasekaran Mrs. Katherine H. Gutman ‘86 Ms. Lucille R. Hadley Mr. & Mrs. Thomas K. Hall ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. Armand R. Hamel ‘87, ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Roger Harnois Mrs. Marlene Ayash Harrington ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Kevin M. Harris ‘88, ‘85 U M a s s

Mr. John Hartford Mr. Kambiz Hashemi ‘92 Ms. Melissa E. Haskell Mr. William R. Hathaway ‘77 Mr. Peter J. Hawes Mr. Raymond F. Haworth ‘51 Ms. Kathleen Hazen Ms. Patti Heath Mr. William D. Hennessy Mr. & Mrs. James Hickox Mr. & Mrs. Nestor T. Hinojales Mr. Jonathan E. Hird Mr. & Mrs. Michael B. Hochman Mr. & Mrs. John T. Hoey Mr. James E. Holding ‘77 Mrs. Marilyn E. Hopkins ‘86 Professor Elliott P. Horch Mr. & Mrs. William J. Hunt Mr. & Mrs. Kim M. Hyland ‘84, ‘73 Professor Vernon Ingraham Mr. & Mrs. James Irving Mr. Russell R. Jackson ‘68 Mr. Charles W. Janda ‘69 Mr. Gregory P. Jarosik ‘79 Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Jencks Mr. Hui Jiang ‘96 Mr. David W. Johnson ‘75 Mr. John R. Johnson ‘73 Ms. Judith D. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Joyce Josefson Mr. Kenneth N. Josephson ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Gary H. Juvinall ‘84, ‘83 Mrs. Edith A. Kameron Mr. & Mrs. William Kannan Barbara & Sidney Kaplan Mr. & Mrs. Bjorn Kaplan-Bie Mr. Harold G. Katzman Mr. William F. Keating, Jr. ‘62 Ms. Jennifer M. Keenan ‘94 Mr. Mark W. Keighley ‘88 Mr. Parris F. Kellermann ‘91 & Mrs. Monica A. DeSalvo ‘87 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Kenyon Mr. & Mrs. Edward R. Kessler Professor Sat Dev Khanna Professor Saeja Oh Kim Ms. Doris M. Kingman ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Mahmoud K. Kobeissi ‘79 Dr. Richard W. Kocon ‘63 Ms. Jean M. Murphy ‘85 & Mr. Cesar R. Kothe ‘86 Mr. Zheng-Jie Kuo ‘99 Mr. & Mrs. Lucien R. LaFlamme ‘82 Mr. Jeffrey B. Lafleur Ms. Nan M. Laird Mr. John T. Lally ‘84 Mr. David E. Lambert ‘91 Dr. Nancy Lamontagne ‘65 Mr. Norman J. Lamontagne, Jr. ‘73 D a r t m o u t h

F o u n d a t i o n

Ms. Lillian Lamoureux Mr. Paul A. Lamoureux ‘53 Mr. Paul K. Lamoureux ‘72 Ms. Mary K. Langevin ‘98 Ms. Arlene Lanson Mr. Mark A. Lavallee ‘84 Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘61 Mr. Brian A. Lawton ‘78 Mr. Joseph R. Leal ‘40 Ms. Amy M. Lebeau ‘97 Mr. J. Louis LeBlanc ‘62 Ms. Joyce M. LeBlanc ‘89 Mr. & Mrs. Paul LeBlanc Mr. Robert G. Ledoux ‘83 Mr. Donald R. Lee ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Lee Mr. Daniel R. LePage ‘76 Mr. Donald W. Lepore ‘61 Mr. Richard A. Lesh Mr. Wei Liang ‘97 Mrs. Judith A. Lima ‘87 Ms. Susan D. Lincoln Mr. & Mrs. Michael Linnane Mr. Martin A. Lipman & Dr. Barbara Pearl Mr. Jens F. Lisinski ‘88 Dr. & Mrs. Peter London Ms. Nanette Defeo Longley ‘76 Mr. William F. Lopes ‘66 Mr. Gennaro R. Lopriore ‘56 Ms. Cynthia J. Lord ‘78 Mr. Paul A. Lovett, Jr. ‘78 Mr. Paul R. Lundberg ‘84 Ms. Mary P. Lyons Mr. John G. Machado ‘91 Ms. Martha Macinnis Ms. Susan M. Mackiewicz ‘82 Mr. Glenn S. MacNaught ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Paul Maitoza ‘75, ‘76 Mr. Christopher Makepeace Dr. Charles H. Manley ‘64 Ms. Paulette L. Manssuer ‘78 Mrs. Anne E. Manzi ‘42 Mr. David F. Marcille ‘84 Mr. & Mrs. William R. Markey ‘55, ‘54 Mr. William H. Marsden ‘54 Mr. Richard T. Marsland ‘73 Ms. Georgette F. Martin ‘84 Mrs. Margaret A. Martinez ‘72 Friends from Massachusetts State Lottery Ms. Marta E. Massi ‘97 Mr. Michael C. May ‘97 Mr. & Mrs. Les Mayo Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. McCabe Mr. Hugh R. McCartney III ‘77 Mrs. Debra L. McCormick ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. William McCormick Mr. Frederick B. McDonald ‘55 Mr. Jerry B. McGinnis ‘68 A n n u a l

R e p o r t

|

UMass Dartmouth Donors

IV

Spring 2007


UMass Dartmouth Annual Report 2006

V

UMass

Mr. Shawn Mcguire Mr. Kenison A. McIntosh ‘59 Mr. Robert C. McLaughlin, Jr. ‘61 Mr. & Mrs. Douglas B. McLeod Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey A. McNally ‘85, ‘86 Mr. John Medeiros ‘70 Mr. Raymond Medeiros ‘64 Mr. Stephen O. Medeiros ‘73 Mr. Philip W. Mello ‘75 Mr. Andrew M. Mendes Mr. & Mrs. James Mendes ‘82, ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Mercer ‘48 Ms. Elaine R. Meredith ‘81 Mr. Robert Messier ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Jack R. Meyer Dr. Katherine A. Meyer Mrs. Beth Paul Milham ‘92 Ms. Elizabeth A. Miller ‘55 Ms. Julia M. Miller ‘89 Mr. John P. Montigny ‘85 Ms. Judith M. Mooney ‘86 Mr. John M. Moreira ‘84 Mr. Mark A. Moreira ‘85 Mr. D. Milo Morin ‘81 Ms. Barbara A. Morrell Mr. Richard T. Moses Mrs. M. Teresa Mozaz ‘94 Mr. & Mrs. James Mulford Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Mullen Mr. Cornelius J. Murphy, Jr. ‘52 Mr. Edward M. Murphy ‘34 Mr. John M. Murphy ‘81 Mr. William J. Murphy ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. David A. Murray Ms. Ellen R. Nagle Mr. Donald E. Napert ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Earle L. Nash Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Nicastro Mrs. Susan B. Nicolau ‘86 Mr. Michael J. O’Brien Ms. Donna M. O’Connor ‘78 Dr. Nancy J. O’Connor ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Ogorzalek Mr. & Mrs. Paul B. O’Keefe Ms. Sheila K. Oliva ‘91 Mr. Dennis Olson ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. James Olson Mr. Henry A. Openshaw ‘02 Mr. James B. Osborne, Jr. ‘63 Mr. & Mrs. David P. Palmer ‘93, ‘92 Mr. James S. Panos Ms. Eileen Parise ‘87 Mr. Joseph E. Parola ‘82 Ms. Mary Ann Partridge ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Robert Paulding Mr. Robert M. Payer ‘67 Ms. Leslie Pearson ‘83 Mr. Thomas M. Pease ‘77 Mr. Brian C. Pelletier ‘64 Ms. Susan Peloquin ‘81 D a r t m o u t h

Mr. John P. Pereira, Jr. ‘64 Mr. Bruce B. Perry ‘73 Mr. Joe Perry ‘72 Mrs. Rose A. Perry ‘76 Mrs. Geraldine A. Perry-Lopes ‘69 Mrs. Lauralyn Persson ‘74 Mrs. Anne Marie Petit ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Randolph A. Philipp Ms. Charlene Picard Mr. Gerald F. Pietruska ‘67 Ms. June M. Pina ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Antonio M. Pinto Mr. Clinton E. Pires ‘75 Dr. Walter M. Platt, Jr. Mr. Vincent D. Plourde ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Poe Mrs. Mary Alice Post ‘77 Mr. John B. Powers ‘95 Mr. James R. Pratt, Jr. ‘89 Mr. & Mrs. Pulver Ms. Barbara Purdy Mr. William B. Purtell, Jr. ‘75 Ms. Aiyun Qi ‘00 Mr. & Mrs. Dennis P. Qiunn Ms. Mary D. Quigley Mr. Luis M. Raposo ‘83 Mrs. Rita T. Raymond Mr. Christopher Ready ‘92 Mr. Ronald J. Rego ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Stanley A. Revzin Mr. & Mrs. Timothy J. Rezendes ‘84, ‘93 Mr. F. Paul Richards ‘74 Mrs. Caralinn Rinoldo ‘87 Mr. Richard Robbins Mrs. Claire Robinson ‘78 Mrs. Donna M. Rogers ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Tom F. Rose Mr. Kevin M. Rowles ‘77 Mr. Philip H. Viall ‘80 & Mrs. Claudette A. Roy-Viall ‘68 Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Ruppert Professor Gail E. Russell Mr. & Mrs. James J. Ryan III Mr. Howard W. Salden ‘84 Ms. Fran Salubro Mr. & Mrs. Gail Santos Ms. Paula A. Saunders ‘74 Dr. Joseph P. Sauro Mr. Vincent J. Savino Mr. & Mrs. Vaughn H. Schlieff Ms. Sue E. Schuerman ‘90 Mr. Bruce C. Scofield ‘71 Ms. Margaret C. Serpa Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Sheehan Mr. & Mrs. Tahir M. Sheikh Mr. & Mrs. David Shore Mr. & Mrs. Shteyn Mr. & Mrs. Roger L. Silva ‘73, ‘78 Mr. Raymond K. Silveira ‘50 Mr. Peter J. Silvia ‘70

Ms. Eunice E. Simmons Mr. Michael Sitarz ‘72 Dr. & Mrs. William E. Skinner ‘83 Dr. Walter Smietana ‘64 Mrs. Patricia Smith ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Smith ‘80 Mrs. Virginia M. Smith ‘84 Mrs. Louise E. Snyder ‘69 Ms. Denise M. Soucy ‘86 Mr. George M. Sousa ‘05 Ms. Joyce C. Spence Mr. Thomas Spence III Mr. & Mrs. Kevin J. Spratt ‘89 Mr. & Mrs. Joseph St. Onge Professor & Mrs. Marc St. Pierre ‘98 Mr. Raymond H. St. Pierre ‘52 Mr. David A. St. Yves ‘78 Dr. James A. Stahley ‘62 Dr. & Mrs. Jeremy B. Stern Mr. Alexander J. Stevenson ‘78 Mr. & Mrs. Joe Stoddard Dr. Richard D. Stone ‘68 Mr. John R. Stratford ‘54 Ms. Jane Strillchuk Brookins ‘82 Mr. Christopher P. Sullivan, Jr. ‘92 Mr. & Mrs. David M. Sullivan Ms. Dorothea A. Sullivan Mr. Eugene Sullivan Mr. John J. Sullivan Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Sullivan ‘73 Ms. Murielann Surette Mr. & Mrs. Abrar Syed Mr. & Ms. Edward J. Sylvia ‘80 Mr. Paul E. Sylvia ‘74 & Mrs. Mary L. Francis-Sylvia ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Peter Szala Mr. Michael L. Szydlowski ‘64 Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Szymanski Mr. Frederick L. Taber ‘70 Mr. Steven W. Taber ‘77 Mr. David O. Tall Ms. Diane M. Tavares ‘74 Mr. Alden F. Taylor ‘41 Mr. Donald F. Taylor ‘54 Mr. William J. Taylor ‘67 Mr. & Mrs. Luis M. Teixeira Mr. Joseph G. Thomas, Jr. ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Scott Thrasher Mr. & Mrs. Todd Ms. Claire E. Travers ‘73 Mrs. Lorraine A. Travers ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Treanor Mr. Stephen S. Trond ‘55 Mr. Mark Truelson ‘83 Ms. Kathleen F. Trumbull ‘79 Mr. & Mrs. Tully Mr. Michael L. Tushman Dr. Sanford W. Udis UMass Dartmouth Financial Aid Office Mr. & Mrs. Harvey D. Varnet ‘75, ‘69

Ms. Maria S. Vicente Mr. Gerald Victorino ‘04 Dr. Antone C. Vieira ‘68 Mr. Stephen A. Vieira ‘63 Ms. Karyn D. Vincent ‘85 Mr. Samuel Walder ‘52 Mrs. Patricia A. Walker ‘88 Mr. Richard C. Walker ‘74 Ms. Kathleen M. Walsh Ms. Susan Warren ‘76 Attorney & Mrs. David H. Waxler ‘80 Dr. & Mrs. Robert P. Waxler Mr. & Mrs. David A. Webster ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. David F. Westgate Westport Elementry School Staff Mrs. Judith G. White Mr. John W. Whitehead ‘64 Mr. Robert M. Whitehead ‘66 Mr. John F. Whiteside ‘52 Mr. Francis P. Whitsitt-Lynch ‘85 Mr. Maurice Wiernicki ‘81 William E. & Edith R. Skinner Trust Mrs. Jean E. Williams ‘90 Mr. Maurice J. Wills ‘65 Mr. Francis P. Wilson ‘62 Mrs. Theresa A. Winsor ‘73 Mrs. Norma A. Winsper ‘73 Mr. Michael J. Winters ‘92 Mr. Edward B. Wood ‘50 Mr. Malcolm D. Woodward III ‘78 Ms. Jenny Xifaras ‘60 Mr. Jun Xu ‘96 Mr. Rongwei Xuan ‘98 & Mrs. Hui Hu ‘01 Ms. Erna B. Yackel Chancellor Professor & Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken Mrs. Joyce L. Youngberg ‘68 Mr. Michael F. Yourey ‘71 Mr. Liliang Zhang ‘02 Mr. Zhiqiang Zhang ‘94 & Mrs. Hongjun Han ‘97 Mr. Jinyuan Zhou ‘91 Mr. Zhao Ji Zhou ‘95 Ms. Susan Senesac Zipoli ‘92 Dr. Rosemary A. Zurawel ‘73 Mr. Dirk A. Zwart ‘77 Contributor

Mr. David Abdow ‘85 Ms. Michelle A. Albernaz ‘91 Ms. Patricia Mildred Almeida ‘03 Dr. Charles M. Alty ‘61 Ms. Maria N. Alves ‘83 Mr. Steven Alves ‘79 Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Amaral Ms. Gail L. Anderson ‘79


Mr. Robert J. Angeli ‘86 Ms. Janice Antonellis Mrs. Margarita Arcand ‘73 Professor Godwin C. Ariguzo Mrs. Andrea S. Arquette ‘01 Mr. John D. Arsenault ‘78 Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence D. Art Mr. Gary Ashworth ‘81 Mrs. Janis M. Aten ‘80 Mr. John L. Aumann ‘75 Ms. Connie V. Avila Mrs. Maureen F. Avila ‘59 Mr. & Mrs. Shad D. Avila Mrs. Lorraine M. Azar ‘71 Ms. Delores M. Azevedo Mr. James A. Baird ‘52 Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Banys ‘80, ‘81 Mr. Michael J. Barber ‘62 Chancellor Professor Nora Ganim Barnes Ms. Phyllis J. Barney ‘76 Dr. Wayne E. Bates ‘87 Mr. Alan Bayreuther ‘55 Mrs. Priscilla M. Bayreuther ‘54 Mr. Thomas A. Beal ‘86 Mrs. Carolyn M. Beaulieu ‘65 Mrs. Karen M. Belcher ‘81 Mr. Everett H. Bennett ‘56 Mr. Marc W. Bennett Mr. & Mrs. William J. Bennett Mrs. Elizabeth Benoit ‘81 Ms. Joanne Benshoff ‘94 Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery Berenson Professor Dorothy A. Bergeron Ms. Damaris Berner ‘81 Mr. Conrad Bernier ‘98 Ms. Myra R. Besen ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Bethoney Mr. Bradford R. Bibeau ‘77 Ms. Kathleen Billings Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Biron Ms. Judith E. Black ‘60 Mr. Andrew D. Blake ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Harold Bociek Mr. Richard J. Boehler ‘69 Ms. Ann E. Bojack Mrs. Therese A. Bonelli Dean Kathleen M. Boozang Mr. Wayne T. Borge ‘76 Mr. Paul A. Borkman ‘60 Mrs. Stella Stanek Borowiec ‘65 Mr. & Mrs. Paul Bourassa ‘77 Mrs. Marie A. Bourassa ‘91 Ms. Mary Bourque ‘01 Mr. Richard W. Bowman, Jr. ‘80 Ms. Dianne M. Bradley ‘87 Mrs. Jayne Brady Prescott ‘79 Ms. Francine M. Breault ‘71 Mr. David A. Bridgwood ‘78

Mr. Steven T. Briggs Mr. & Mrs. Theodore G. Brillon Ms. Lillian C. Brisebois ‘70 Ms. Nancy M. Briss ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Antonio N. Brito Mr. Norman L. Brooks Mr. & Mrs. Bruce M. Brown Mrs. Lori B. Brown ‘86 Ms. Patricia P. Buckley ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Burdick Mr. David J. Burke ‘83 Mr. Paul C. Burke ‘77 Ms. Tamia A. Burt ‘01 Mr. Richard Bussiere ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Bustard Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cabral Mr. Thomas H. Cadieux ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. John A. Caledonia Mr. James J. Camacho ‘82 Ms. Jeanne C. Campbell Mr. John M. Canto ‘57 Mr. John A. Cappelano ‘84 Mr. Brian S. Cardoza ‘95 Mr. Robert L. Carroll ‘48 Mr. Thomas J. Carroll ‘60 Mr. William Carter, Jr. ‘54 Mr. Thomas Cartin ‘88 Ms. Veronica A. Casey ‘92 Mr. Alan H. Cass ‘98 Ms. Mary C. Cassidy ‘77 Ms. Joy I. Cawley ‘83 Mrs. Dianne M. Cerone ‘71 Mr. Philip A. Champagne ‘80 Mr. Samuel G. Chapin ‘87 Mr. Kieran J. Chapman ‘71 Professor Linsum Cheng Ms. Jeanne Chin Mr. & Mrs. Phil Chin Ms. Nasira Aslam Choudhary Mr. William A. Chouinard ‘66 Mr. & Mrs. Edward Chrusciel Mr. David W. Ciszkowski ‘97 Ms. Dianne Clark ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Clarke Ms. Cheryl Clarke Ms. Susan A. Clarke ‘01 Mr. Earl E. Clay ‘77 Ms. Alice Clifford Ms. Sandra J. Coelho ‘82 Professor Carl H. Coleman Mr. George A. Collard ‘91 Mr. Brian P. Comeau ‘97 Mr. Darin D. Conforti ‘90 Mr. & Mrs. Steven H. Conner Mr. Leonard C. Connors ‘50 Mrs. Colleen C. Considine ‘75 Mr. Christopher Cooney ‘90 Mrs. Deborah A. Corbett ‘74 Ms. Cathy J. Cormier ‘88 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Correia ‘97, ‘02

U M a s s

Ms. Goodie M.J. Corriveau ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Simeon V. Cortezano Ms. Lisa S. Cory ‘86 Mr. & Mrs. Costa Ms. Augusta M. Costa ‘92 Mr. Eugene Costa, Jr. ‘62 Mr. John M. Costa ‘95 Mr. Michael E. Costa ‘80 Mr. Mike Costa ‘01 Mr. Robert M. Costa ‘01 Mr. Edward R. Cote ‘66 Ms. Deborah Lee Cottuli ‘00 Mr. Daniel N. Cronin ‘05 Mr. Peter A. Cross ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Roland J. Croteau, Jr. ‘91, ‘82 Mr. Gary W. Crowley ‘77 Ms. Ethel M. Crumley ‘01 Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Cyr Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Dacey Mr. Mark Dagnall ‘92 Attorney Peter Daigle ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Daigle ‘81 Mrs. Pauline G. D’Alio ‘88 Ms. Maria J. DeSousa D’Alu ‘71 Ms. Celia M. daLuz Mr. Marc A. Dangora ‘05 Mr. Fredric C. Danhauser ‘74 Ms. Janice W. Daniel ‘87 Mr. David B. Dauer ‘75 Ms. Sharon A. Day ‘70 Mr. & Mrs. C. Ivor de Silva Mr. & Mrs. Andrew DeFrias ‘94 Mr. & Mrs. John L. DeFusco Ms. Michele Linda DeGrazia ‘96 Mr. & Mrs. Arthur J. Delano ‘57 Ms. Maria DelBeccaro Mr. Joao-Luis DeMedeiros ‘97 Mr. Joe F. DeMedeiros ‘99 Mr. James F. DeMelo ‘72 Mr. Paul R. Desforges ‘62 Ms. Dorothy L. Desrosiers ‘73 Mr. Raymond Dextraze ‘62 Mr. Mario J. DiGiacomo, Jr. ‘02 Mr. Scott J. Diogenes ‘94 Chancellor Professor & Mrs. Ronald DiPippo Ms. Beverly Do Carmo ‘76 Mr. Brian C. Donlan ‘93 Mr. & Mrs. James T. Donovan Mrs. Karen M. Dorgan ‘75 Ms. Beverly Ann Downey Mrs. Carol Doyle ‘80 Ms. Paula M. Duarte ‘90 Mr. & Mrs. Donald G. Ducharme Mr. Donald J. Dufault ‘86 Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Dumas Mr. Charles W. Dunham, Jr. ‘85 Mr. Bradley K. Dunkelberger ‘91 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Duval ‘92

D a r t m o u t h

F o u n d a t i o n

Mrs. Margery E. Eagles ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Arthur W. Eddleston ‘82, ‘89 Mr. James Edwards Mr. Kerry C. Elinskas ‘82 Mr. & Mrs. Steven Carl Erickson Dr. John T. Everett ‘65 Mrs. Gayle Exworthy ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. David Eycleshymer Mr. & Mrs. James R. Fallon Dr. Qinguo Fan Mrs. Maureen J. Fanning ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. Abilio Igreja Faria Ms. Linda A. Farrell ‘70 Mr. Ian T. Farrington ‘02 Dr. John W. Farrington ‘66 Mr. Norman A. Faucher ‘60 Mr. William C. Faye ‘80 Mr. Bruce E. Fernandes ‘81 Mr. Jeffrey R. Feroce ‘83 Mr. Gerald J. Ferreira ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. John Ferreira Ms. M. Conceicao Ferreira ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Jose M. Figueiredo Mrs. Ruth Filler ‘76 Mrs. Joyce B. Finkenstadt ‘60 Ms. Sheri A. Fish ‘93 Ms. Kathleen Flanagan ‘00 Mr. Thomas R. Flanagan ‘73 Mr. Kenneth S. Flood ‘87 Mr. Richard M. Flood ‘93 Mr. Michael A. Fogarty ‘93 Mrs. Rose A. Follett ‘97 Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Fontaine Mr. Robert G. Fortes ‘77 Mr. Roger H. Fortier ‘78 Mr. Ronald R. Fortier ‘75 Ms. Catherine A. Fortier-Barnes Mr. Richard A. Foster ‘64 Dr. & Mrs. Irving A. Fradkin Mrs. Suzette M. Fraser ‘83 Dr. Janet L. Freedman Mr. Geoffrey W. Fuchs ‘80 Mr. John R. Funderburk ‘86 Mr. & Mrs. Leonildo J. Furtado Ms. Julia Furtado-Lavoie ‘87 Mrs. Cheryl C. Furze ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. James E. Gaffney Ms. Cheryl A. Gagliardi ‘88 Mr. Robert W. Gagne ‘54 Mr. Henry Galary ‘57 Mrs. Mary A. Galipeau ‘91 Ms. Theresa R. Galligan ‘74 Mr. Ronald M. Gamache ‘74 Mr. Robert M. Gaouette ‘00 Ms. Lynn J. Garant ‘83 Mr. Justin H. Garrison ‘04 Mr. Michael J. Gaudreau ‘77 Mr. David W. Gavigan ‘61 Mrs. Lisa A. Gay ‘84

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Mr. Michael Gaydou ‘80 Mr. Bernard W. George ‘76 Ms. Karen A. Geraci ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. John Gerry ‘69 Mr. James Gilchrist Mr. & Mrs. Gillis Mr. Peter Gilson Ms. Barbara H. Glicksman ‘81 Mr. William J. Gobush ‘97 Mr. Gordon E. Goldberg ‘93 Professor Richard F. Golen ‘74 & Mrs. Debra Marzano-Golen ‘89 Mr. Walter R. Goldstein, Jr. ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Ludgero Gomez Ms. Patricia E. Gonet ‘73 Dr. & Mrs. Ronald B. Goodspeed Mrs. Margaret T. Goslin ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Russell Goulet Ms. Virginia G. Gouveia Mr. & Mrs. Jim Gow Ms. Sandra J. Grace Mr. & Mrs. John P. Grant ‘71, ‘62 Ms. Joan Sullivan Gray Ms. Linda Green Mr. & Mrs. Ron Grein Mr. & Mrs. Christopher A. Griffin Mr. & Mrs. Daryl Grimes Mrs. Laura F. Gula ‘71 Mrs. Jill A. Guthrie ‘90 Mr. John F. Halloran ‘79 Mrs. Diane B. Halstead ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Hambly Mrs. Carolyn W. Hamel Mr. Bradford G. Hammel ‘78 Mr. David P. Handleman ‘91 Mrs. Carol A. Hanley ‘68 Ms. Susan M. Hansen ‘78 Mr. Robert J. Harpham ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Richard Lloyd Harrington III Mr. James W. Harrison ‘58 Mr. David F. Harwood ‘72 Mr. & Mrs. Jamshed N. Hassan Ms. Saleha Hassan Mr. & Mrs. James W. Hathaway ‘80 Ms. Lorraine Roy Hawkes ‘71 Mr. David S. Hawkins ‘85 Ms. Kathleen E. Hawkins ‘71 Mr. & Mrs. Arthur H. Henderson ‘62 Ms. Megan Hergrueter Mrs. Catherine M. Hickey ‘90 Mr. Brian C. Hildebrant ‘00 Dr. & Mrs. Alan W. Hirshfeld Mr. Thomas C. Hoder ‘95 Ms. Janice L. Hodson ‘84 Mr. & Mrs. Hoerburger Ms. Patricia C. Holdsworth Mrs. Susan M. Holland ‘92 Mr. & Mrs. Frederic C. Hood Mrs. Deborah A. Horan ‘85 Mr. Raymond J. Houtman ‘78 D a r t m o u t h

Dr. Bertram E. Howard Mr. & Mrs. James Hubbard Ms. Hughes Mr. Daniel E. Hughes ‘89 Professor Maureen A. Hull Mrs. Susan J. Husk ‘88 Mrs. Jill Hynes ‘79 Mrs. Gail Isaksen ‘67 Mr. Harold I. Isserlis ‘54 Mrs. Oksana V. Jackim ‘04 Professor John V. Jacobi Ms. Danusia T. Jacobs ‘87 Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Jalbert Mr. Michael T. Jamgochian ‘65 Mr. & Mrs. Chantal Jean-Pierre Mr. Eric Jermyn ‘92 Ms. Courtney L. Jones ‘01 Ms. Debra L. Jones ‘91 The Honorable Malcolm Jones Ms. Nikhat Kalim Mr. Frederick M. Kalisz, Jr. ‘79 Mr. Noah Kaput Mr. Boris Katan ‘84 Mrs. Erin Keaney-Moynihan ‘89 Ms. Maureen Kelliher Mr. Joseph D. Kelly ‘72 Professor Lori Keough Mrs. Kelly A. Khachadourian ‘96 Mr. Iftikhar Khan Mr. & Mrs. Salman Khan Mr. & Mrs. Klein Chancellor Professor & Mrs. Gerard M. Koot Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Kopaczewski ‘73, ‘94 Ms. Janet D. Krobot ‘80 Mr. & Mrs. Russell R. Kroszner ‘77 Mrs. Maura J. Krueger Ms. Susan T. Krumholz Mrs. Sylvia L. Kulpa ‘90 Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery P. Kurth Mr. & Mrs. John C. Kyranos ‘93 Mr. & Mrs. Daniel M. La Perriere ‘73, ‘74 Mr. Richard M. La Vache ‘86 Mrs. Janice E. Labrosse ‘88 Mr. John J. Lacasse ‘84 Mr. & Mrs. James F. LaFrancois Mr. Henry C. Lamontagne ‘68 Ms. Mary Ann Lamontagne ‘01 Mr. Paul A. Lamoureux ‘81 Ms. Dawn M. Landreville ‘81 Ms. Thondra Lanese ‘91 Mr. Jonathan Langfield ‘86 Dr. Lynne A. Lapierre ‘81 Mr. Thomas J. Lapointe ‘75 Mr. Jeffrey P. Larivee ‘77 Mr. Robert J. Larochelle ‘78 Mr. Mack Laudon Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘75 Mr. Frank J. Lawrence ‘67

Ms. Sara-Jane Lawrence ‘75 Mr. Marc Laxer Ms. Jeannette Leal Mr. Michael G. Leandro ‘79 Ms. Michelle C. LeBlanc-Murray ‘88 Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. LeRoyer ‘86 Mr. Paul E. Levasseur ‘59 Ms. Kathleen Levesque Ms. Michelle M. Levesque Mrs. Suzanne D. Levesque ‘89 Dr. & Mrs. Clinton N. Levin Mr. Jerry Levin ‘87 Mr. & Mrs. Melvin H. Levine Mr. John L. Lewis ‘81 Ms. Stephanie A. Lipka ‘02 Mrs. Cynthia M. Lipsett ‘78 Mr. Stephen Liuzzi ‘84 Mr. & Mrs. Larry Lollar Mr. Frank X. Lothschuetz Mr. Armindo P. Louro ‘77 Mr. Steven Lowe ‘73 Mrs. Elayne G. Lowenthal ‘68 Mr. & Mrs. Albert Lucardi Mrs. Suzanne M. Lucas ‘85 Mr. Louis Lussier, Jr. ‘81 Mr. Steven F. Lynch ‘78 Mr. Robert D. Machado ‘68 Mr. Gregory B. MacKilligan ‘83 Mr. Edwin L. Maclean ‘79 Mr. Benjamin H. Macomber ‘59 Mrs. Christine M. Magalhaes ‘92 Mr. Ronald A. Magnant ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Maguire Mr. Paul D. Malcolm ‘57 Mr. & Mrs. Paul S. Malinowski Mr. & Mrs. Vincent J. Malkoski ‘82, ‘81 Mrs. Donna M. Malliaros ‘78 Mr. Edward J. Maloney Mr. Michael S. Manchester ‘67 Mrs. Debra A. Mancini ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. Timothy A. Mancour ‘88, ‘89 Ms. Kathleen M. Marcille ‘90 Ms. Risha H. Margolis ‘69 Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Marnik Ms. Ana E. Marques ‘93 Ms. Joan Martel ‘72 Mr. Paul G. Martins ‘78 Mrs. Marie T. Massaro ‘83 Mrs. Donna E. Matthews ‘85 Mr. Joseph G. Mayall ‘03 Ms. Eleanor M. Mayo ‘90 Mr. & Mrs. McArthur Mrs. Theresa A. McAvoy ‘71 Ms. Mary M. McBrady Mr. & Mrs. Shawn McCafferty Mr. James M. McCarthy ‘68 Mr. & Mrs. Richard McCarthy Mrs. Veronica T. McConnell ‘64

Ms. Julie A. McCormack ‘03 Mr. Patrick L. McCormack ‘84 Mr. Paul M. McDonald ‘79 & Mrs. Kathleen S. McDonald ‘79 Mr. Paul O. McGinn ‘77 Mr. John S. McKenzie ‘75 Ms. Jayme M. McLaughlin ‘05 Mrs. Erin McManus ‘93 Mr. & Mrs. Jay McManus Ms. Mary Anne McQuillan ‘69 Mr. Donald C. Medeiros ‘64 Ms. Gale M. Medeiros ‘80 Mr. John Medeiros ‘60 Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Medeiros ‘79, ‘59 Mr. & Mrs. John J. Medeiros ‘88 Mr. Sean D. Medeiros ‘88 Mr. Steven C. Medeiros ‘80 Mr. David Mello ‘70 Captain & Mrs. Raymond Mello ‘79, ‘72 Mr. Frank A. Mello ‘85 Mr. James E. Mello ‘68 Mr. & Mrs. William E. Mendes ‘74, ‘76 Ms. Francisco J. Mendonca Mr. Anthony Mercadante ‘81 Mr. Peter A. Michno ‘85 Mr. Alfred J. Mikus ‘39 Mrs. Patricia M. Mitchell ‘77 Mr. Joseph F. Mocker, Jr. ‘61 Ms. Juliet L. Mondshine ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Moody Mr. Garner Morgan, Jr. ‘80 Ms. Alison G. Moriarty ‘03 Mr. Paul J. Moses ‘89 Mr. Alan A. Motta ‘63 Mr. & Mrs. George Mouratidis Mr. Curt Muller Ms. Barbara A. Mulligan Mrs. Amy Muratore ‘89 Mrs. Anne L. Murphy ‘82 Mr. & Mrs. Christopher E. Murphy ‘96 Ms. Elizabeth M. Murray ‘72 Mr. Charles J. Nannery ‘37 Mr. & Mrs. William S. Napolitano ‘78, ‘82 Ms. F. Lee Nason Mr. Francis E. Nasser ‘52 Mr. Mark A. Nault ‘95 Mr. Joseph E. Nawazelski ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. William E. Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Byron A. Niederhelman ‘61 Mr. Phillip W. Nimeskern, Jr. ‘77 Ms. Susan E. Norlin-Staudaher ‘79 Mr. Harry D. Nunez ‘05 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Nunnelley Mr. & Mrs. O’Brien Mr. & Mrs. James O’Dell


Ms. Kathy J. Oldrid ‘01 Mrs. Arlette M. Oliveira ‘98 Mr. Bruce J. Oliveira ‘98 Ms. Sharon G. Oliveira ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Omeara Mr. John C. O’Neil Mr. William L. O’Neil ‘54 Mr. & Mrs. John W. Orcutt, Jr. Mr. Kevin R. O’Reilly ‘83 Mr. Michael R. Oswald ‘85 Mr. John H. Pacheco ‘63 Mr. & Mrs. Valdomiro Pacheco Ms. Kathleen Paiva ‘82 Mr. Lewis C. Palmer II ‘63 Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Paquette ‘75, ‘74 Mr. Robert J. Parente ‘83 Ms. Christina Braga Parker ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Stephen W. Parola ‘85 Mr. Robert V. Partington ‘50 Dr. Joyce Y. Passos Mr. Paul S. Pastie ‘66 Mr. Keith B. Paton ‘83 Mrs. Margaret Patricio ‘92 Mr. Elliot M. Pavao ‘83 Ms. Alice Pearse Mr. Robert A. Pearson ‘52 Mr. Gregory A. Pelagio ‘66 Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington Ms. Joan L. Pepin ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. Manuel F. Pereira Mr. & Mrs. Jaime Pereira ‘71, ‘75 Mr. William T. Pereira ‘84 Ms. Nancy M. Peresta ‘83 Mr. & Mrs. Roger J. Perreault, Sr. Ms. Susan J. Perry ‘81 Mr. William J. Perry ‘66 Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell S. Pettey ‘79, ‘99 Mr. & Mrs. Marc Picquendar ‘88, ‘92 Mr. David Kendall Pierce ‘95 Mr. Donald I. Pierce, Jr. ‘53 Mr. & Mrs. Mario A. Pimental Attorney & Mrs. Ronald Pina ‘77 Ms. Kim M. Place ‘95 Mr. Joel N. Plotnick ‘76 Mr. John M. Plourde ‘64 Mr. Dennis J. Pontes ‘74 Ms. Diane Pound Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Powell Ms. Patricia L. Powers Mr. Steven P. Powers ‘80 Mrs. Anita L. Poyant ‘84 Mr. Derek J. Preston ‘94 Mr. George Procter Ms. Mona Provencher Mr. & Mrs. Armand H. Query, Jr. ‘73 Mr. Eric I. Radin Mrs. Catherine A. Raker ‘89 Ms. Janice A. Raphael ‘69 Ms. Barbara A. Raposa ‘01 Ms. Jane B. Reardon ‘05

Mr. & Mrs. Todd Reed Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Reid Ms. Joan M. Remmes ‘02 Ms. Danielle K. Renaud ‘99 Mr. & Mrs. Eric Rezendes Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Rheaume Mr. James J. Ricci ‘74 Mr. & Mrs. Alan Richard ‘72 Mr. Raymond C. Richardson, Jr. ‘57 Mr. & Mrs. Novel Ricketts Dr. Harold F. Riley ‘37 Ms. Sara Ringler ‘89 Ms. Mary B. Riordan ‘88 Mr. Kenneth B. Ritchie ‘95 Ms. Carol A. Roberts ‘74 Mr. Donn L. Robidoux ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Antone Roderigues Mr. Antonio Rodrigues Mr. David G. Rodrigues ‘75 Ms. Mary J. Rodrigues Mrs. Rosemary Rodrigues ‘73 Mr. Richard F. Rogers ‘50 Ms. Anne-Marie J. Rosa ‘01 Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Rosa ‘75, ‘73 Dr. Bruce A. Rose & Mrs. Cynthia A. Barboza Mr. & Mrs. Edward H. Rose Mr. Joseph G. Rose III ‘39 Professor Manuel C. Rosenfield Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Roy ‘96 Ms. Ann D. Rubin Ms. Susan R. Rudnick ‘77 Mr. David J. Ruggeri ‘85 Mr. & Mrs. Uriel Ruiz Mr. Tom Frank Rusek ‘89 Mrs. Dorothy S. Ryan ‘96 Mr. & Mrs. James I. Sammons Mrs. Gail Sampieri ‘70 Ms. Christine J. Sampson ‘95 Mr. David D. Sanders ‘49 Ms. Eugenia A. Santos ‘87 Mr. & Mrs. Mario Saojoao Mr. & Mrs. Chaouki W. Sarkis Ms. Kimberly M. Saunders, CPA ‘92 Mrs. Dolores Scaldini-Klimm ‘95 Mr. & Mrs. Paul W. Scannell ‘80, ‘90 Mrs. Diane Scheffler ‘84 Ms. Sharron D. Schofield Mrs. Sandra M. Schutt ‘82 Ms. Mary Blum Schwartz ‘79 Ms. Laura E. Seabury ‘94 Mrs. Elise M. Servant ‘73 Mr. & Mrs. George L. Sessine Mr. & Mrs. Michael Shand ‘69 Mr. Steven C. Sharek ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Wayne S. Shaw ‘88 Ms. Catherine Sheehan ‘78 Ms. Ann E. Shor ‘95 Mrs. Joan G. Shuttleworth ‘54 Mr. & Mrs. Shwalb

U M a s s

Mr. & Mrs. Mark Sideris Mr. & Mrs. Calvin Siegal Mr. August P. Silva ‘69 Ms. Fernanda P. Silva Mr. James Silva ‘79 Mr. Manuel H. Silva ‘80 Ms. Mary Silva Mr. Robert J. Silva ‘67 Mr. Stephen J. Silva ‘73 Mr. Thomas Silveria ‘96 Mr. & Mrs. Mark Silverman Ms. Janine E. Simmons ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Simmons Ms. Sarah Simon Ms. Kathleen Sitarz ‘78 Mr. Thomas Skibinski ‘76 Mr. Christopher Smallis ‘84 Mr. Edward D. Smith ‘94 Professor Emeritus J. Donald Smith Mrs. Sylvia M. Smith ‘89 Ms. Elizabeth Soares ‘03 Mr. & Mrs. Ronald A. Soares ‘70, ‘73 Mr. Otto F. Solberg ‘80 Mr. Donald R. Sorelle ‘71 Mr. Joao M. Sousa ‘96 Mr. John S. Souza ‘50 Ms. Sophie T. Souza Ms. Patricia A. Spellman ‘92 Mr. Gregory Spiker ‘77 Mr. Henry L. Spingler ‘68 Mr. Richard A. St Amour ‘72 Ms. Kathleen M. St. Laurent ‘79 Ms. Marianne Stebenne ‘80 Mr. Richard W. Stenberg ‘75 Ms. Kay L. Stephens Ms. Lucy L. Stewart ‘94 Mr. Gregory R. Stidsen ‘71 Mr. Dennis R. Streeter ‘87 Mr. & Mrs. Roger F. Sullivan ‘74, ‘76 Mrs. Patrice A. Sweeney ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Swirbalus Mrs. Doreen M. Sylvia Hutchinson ‘88 Ms. Gail M. Sylvia Mrs. Johanna A. Sylvia-Leahey ‘76 Mr. & Mrs. John M. Szymanski Professor Priscilla R. Tabachnik ‘63 Mr. Francis L. Tanzella ‘75 Mr. & Mrs. Tavares Mr. & Mrs. Taylor Mr. Carl D. Taylor ‘55 Ms. G. Elinor Teasdale ‘73 Ms. Erin Tierney Mr. & Mrs. Mark A. Tirrell Ms. Elaine Tisdale Mr. Gerard L. Tremblay, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Carrie L. Tremko ‘79 Mr. Daniel J. Tschaen ‘77 Dr. & Mrs. Albin F. Turbak ‘51 Mr. & Mrs. Brian J. Turgeon

D a r t m o u t h

F o u n d a t i o n

Mr. Douglas J. Turner ‘69 Ms. Lynn C. Turner ‘94 Mr. & Mrs. Upham Mrs. Jean M. Van Doren ‘77 Mr. & Mrs. Luis M. Viana ‘81 Mr. Gary W. Vincent ‘81 Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Violante Mr. & Mrs. Rob Vrolyk Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Walser ‘85 Mr. Timothy P. Walsh ‘78 Mr. Robert J. Ward Mrs. Penny S. Webster ‘84 Mr. Richard S. Whiting, Jr. ‘80 Mrs. Virginia F. Wilkens ‘82 Ms. Linda Williams Ms. Maria F. B. Williams ‘97 Mr. Jeffrey D. Wilson ‘77 Dr. Paul F. Wilson ‘61 Mrs. Paula Prayzner Wilson ‘91 Mr. James A. Wolstenholme ‘57 Ms. Andrea L. Wood ‘86 Mr. Frank C. Woodfall ‘78 Ms. Delia C. Woodward ‘02 Mr. Walter J. Wordell ‘60 Mr. Donald Yousif ‘70 Mr. Raul A. Zaritsky Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Zeman Ms. Donna J. Zitano ‘02 Ms. Jeannette C. Zurc ‘05

UMass Dartmouth Donors

VIII

Gifts-in-Kind ASTRAZENECA Dr. Clyde W. Barrow Mr. Leonard V. Brophy ‘78 Frontier Fishing Corporation Mr. David Harvey Ms. Jan Kaprielian Nightsen, Inc. Mr. Ishvar Patel Pfizer, Inc. - Groton CT Ms. Barbara Shamblin Sky Line Screenprinting Sodexho, Inc. Ms. Randi L. Sullivan ‘03 Swarovski Optik North America Xantrex Mr. Zhonglin Zhao ‘03 Honor/Memorial Gifts The following list includes donors who designated gifts or their loved ones.

In Memory of Professor Shaukat Ali Mrs. Parveen S. Ali

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In Memory of Mr. Angus A. Bailey, Jr. Insurit Agency, Inc.

In Memory of Ms. Frances Durant Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90

In Memory of Mr. Stephen Baker Mr. & Mrs. Peter Szala

In Memory of Dr. Mary Leite Fonseca ‘74 Ms. Irene V. Fonseca

In Memory of Mr. Joseph Barry Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mr. Jesse B. Frizzell Ms. Christine Frizzell

In Memory of Mr. Brian Bent Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mr. Samuel Gamburd Professor Geraldine Gamburd

In Memory of Mrs. Lola Blumenthal Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Ms. Virginia M. Garcia Ms. Murielann Surette

In Honor of Ms. Jane K. Booth Mrs. Ann Ley Benoit

In Memory of Mr. William E. Gathright Mr. Leonard V. Brophy Ms. Kathryn L. Dooley ECAC-SIDA Mr. & Mrs. David S. George Dr. Susan J. Leclair ‘77 & Chancellor Professor James T. Griffith ‘70

In Memory of Ms. Mary Boucher Ms. Erin Tierney In Memory of Mr. William Cardoza J. S. Luiz 3rd, Inc. In Memory of Mr. John Carey Sr. Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mrs. Yvonne Carlisle Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. Victor Carte Ms. Erin Tierney In Memory of Ms. Maria DeMelo Ms. Pamela Picaro In Memory of Mr. Ronald DeSouza J. S. Luiz 3rd, Inc. In Memory of Mr. Vincent DiMailo Mr. & Mrs. Edward H. Rose In Memory of Mrs. Anita Dungan Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

UMass

D a r t m o u t h

In Honor of Ms. Marian Getzoff Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. & Mrs. Karl Grunert Mr. & Mrs. James R. Fallon In Memory of Mr. Albert Hill Professor Donald G. McKinley In Memory of Ms. Leann Howard Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. Harry Jenkins American Flock Association In Memory of Professor Anthony J. John Anonymous Mrs. Mary Ellen DeFrias In Honor of Mrs. Edith A. Kameron Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90

In Memory of Chancellor Professor James Kaput Mrs. Anne B. Boisvert Ms. Susan C. Kaput ‘70 Dr. Robert P. Waxler & Mrs. Linda Waxler In Memory of Mrs. Mary Lambert Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. Joshua Leonard Mr. & Mrs. Peter Szala In Honor of Dr. & Mrs. Clinton N. Levin Mr. & Mrs. Nathan D. Barry In Memory of Ms. Bonnie L’Italien Ms. Cynthia A. Barboza In Memory of Ms. Christine M. Lonczak Mr. & Mrs. David A. Collins In Honor of Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Mrs. Kerriann Cardoza Ms. Robbie D. Watkins In Memory of Mr. Matthew J. Macy Mr. & Mrs. Michael Macy In Memory of Ms. Phyllis Mayer Mr. Leonard N. Bebchick Ms. Evelyn Danis Ms. Arlene R. Levenson Mr. & Mrs. James D. Peck In Memory of Mrs. Jennie Mierzejewski Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 UMass Dartmouth Library Associates In Memory of Mr. George Miller Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mrs. Nancy Morris Dr. Robert P. Waxler & Mrs. Linda Waxler In Memory of Mr. Raymond Osowiecki Ms. Erin Tierney

In Memory of Mr. Paul Packard Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Honor of Mr. Bruce H. Palmer Jewish Federation of Greater New Bedford, Inc. In Memory of Ms. Margot Patterson Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Honor of Mr. Kenneth Rezendes Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. George W. Ripley III J. S. Luiz 3rd, Inc. In Memory of Mr. Kenneth A. Rose Mr. James C. Rose & Mrs. Eileen A. Rose In Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Shapira Mr. Bernard H. Gould In Memory of Ms. Florinda Smith Mrs. Catherine M. Hickey ‘90 University Campus Store In Honor of Mr. Milan Splitstone Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Ms. Colleen Sullivan Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mrs. Madeline F. Sykes Ms. Marjorie Sykes In Memory of Mr. Gerry Thomas Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mrs. Clare J. Vancini Dr. & Mrs. John P. Dowd In Memory of Mr. Paul P. Vancini Dr. & Mrs. John P. Dowd


In Honor of Mr. & Mrs. Henry B. Wainer Sid Wainer & Son In Memory of Mrs. Edna Walsh Ms. Murielann Surette In Memory of Mr. Felix B. Waxler Dr. Robert P. Waxler & Mrs. Linda Waxler In Memory of Mr. Jonathan Blake Waxler Ms. Angela A. Fell Dr. Robert P. Waxler & Mrs. Linda Waxler In Honor of Mrs. Linda Waxler Mrs. Milton S. Goldberg In Honor of Ms. Mary Frances White Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Ms. Madelyn Williams Ms. Mona Provencher In Memory of Ms. Naomi Winegar Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. Jack Wolitz Dr. Robert P. Waxler & Mrs. Linda Waxler Corporations, Foundations and Organizations according to the designated purpose of the gift, please go to: www.umassd.edu/institutional_ advancement/docsnforms.cfm Acushnet Company ADM Cranberry Company, LLC. Advanced Polymers, Inc. Aetna Life & Casualty AFFS, Inc. Alperts Furniture Showroom Alpha Systems Edgartown Visitors Center American Flock Association AND-MO LLC A&S Tackle Corporation ASTRAZENECA ATMC Advancement Fund

AVAYA Alice S. Ayling Scholarship Foundation Babbitt Steam Specialty Company Bacou-Dalloz USA, Inc. Bank of America Bank of Fall River BankFive Bechtel Group, Inc. Bristol Community College Bristol District Attorney Bufftree Building Company C. A. Geldmacher, Inc. Camsco Insurance Agency Cardoza’s Wine & Spirits Jose S. Castelo Real Estate, Inc. Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation Ida S. Charlton Charity Fund Circle G LLC Citigroup Foundation Citizens-Union Savings Bank Clean Rentals Comcast Committee to Elect Mark C. Montigny Committee to Elect Robert Correia Committee to Re-Elect Paul F. Walsh, Jr. Commonwealth Home Consultants Concord Foods, Inc. Converse Company Realtors Cove Charitable Trust Cranston Foundation of Cranston Print Works Company Craven & Ober Policy Strategists, LLC Dartmouth Grange Dartmouth Mall Delegation Du Quebec A Boston Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, Inc. Donor Advised Fund/Combined Jewish Philanthropies East Coast Form Co., Inc. Eastern Fisheries, Inc. Eaton Vance Management ECAC-SIDA Edgewood Bogs LLC Exxon Education Foundation Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank A. H. Ferguson Company Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund Fleet Bank FundaCao Calouste Gulbenkian Garzoni & Company, Inc. General Electric Gillette Company Milton A. Glicksman, D.M.D. H & G Structures, Inc. U M a s s

Harvey Hubbell Foundation Hillel Hope Nursing Home Care LLC Instrument Technology, Inc. Insurit Agency, Inc. International Business Machines Corporation Islamic Society of Western Mass. Island Foundation, Inc. J & R Industrial Wiring J. S. Luiz 3rd, Inc. The Jarabek Family Charitable Foundation JCM Electrical Contractors, Inc. Jewish Federation of Greater New Bedford, Inc. JJ & Z Enterprises LLC John Hancock Mutual Life Johnson Controls, Inc. Karam Insurance Agency, Inc. Keith, Meadows & Dunn, LLC Kenneth T. & Mildred S. Gammons Charitable Foundation, Inc. Key Foundation Lafrance Hospitality Company Lambalot Charitable Foundation Trust Lockheed Martin Corporation Lockheed Martin Sippican, Inc. Ludes Family Foundation Luso-American Development Foundation The MacLean Charitable Foundation Mall Tanning & Skincare Center, Inc. Massachusetts Federation of Teachers Massachusetts Technology Collaborative Matthew J. Macy Memorial Fund Merck & Company, Inc. Merck Company Foundation Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky & Popeo, P.C. Munro Artists Management National Council of Jewish Women, N.B. Section National Grid USA Service Company, Inc. New Bedford Floor Covering Sales Company, Inc. New England Construction Company, Inc. Newport County Officials Association NGM Charitable Foundation Nightsen, Inc. Partridge, Snow & Hahn, LLP Pfizer, Inc. The Pilgrim Foundation D a r t m o u t h

F o u n d a t i o n

Precix, Inc. Procter & Gamble Company R & S Zeckhauser Foundation Mr. Alan F. Rainford, C.P.A. Ramsbottom Printing, Inc. Raytheon Company Reebok Foundation Reynolds DeWalt Printing, Inc. K. R. Rezendes, Inc. The Rhode Island Foundation River Road Family Medicine Rockwell Roofing, Inc. Manuel Rogers & Son Funeral Home, Inc. Saint Anne’s Hospital Sakonnet Properties, Inc. Salary.com, Inc. SBS Technologies S.C. Thrasher Builder/Contractor Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving Seaward Management Clients Shell Oil Sidney H. Kaplan Real Estate Sigma Theta Tau, Inc. Sky Line Screenprinting Slade’s Ferry Trust Company Smith Associates Sodexho, Inc. SPX Foundation The Standard-Times State Street Bank Stevens Home Improvement Center The Robert F. Stoico FirstFed Charitable Foundation SunTrust Mid Atlantic Swain School of Design Swank, Inc. Swarovski Optik North America Sylvia & Company Insurance Agency, Inc. Tarkin Hill Nominee TR Texas Instruments, Inc. The ACE Foundation Time Warner Foundation, Inc. Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. The Charles Irwin Travelli Fund Trees & Shrubs, Inc. Truesdale Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association, Inc. UMass Dartmouth Library Associates United Way of Greater New Bedford, Inc. United Way of Merrimack Valley University Campus Store Ven-Elger Pet Care Center, Inc. Verizon Sid Wainer & Son Waters Corporation Sidney J. Weinberg Foundation Westport Federation of Teachers A n n u a l

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Westport Middle School Henry & Joan T. Wheeler Charitable Fund WJAR WJFD 97.3 FM Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories Xantrex Matching Gift Companies Aetna Life & Casualty AVAYA Bechtel Group, Inc. Charles Schwab Corp. Foundation Citigroup Foundation Cranston Foundation of Cranston Print Works Company Dominion Foundation Match Gift Program Eaton Vance Management Exxon Education Foundation Fleet Bank General Electric Gillette Company Harvey Hubbell Foundation International Business Machines Corporation John Hancock Mutual Life Key Foundation Lockheed Martin Corporation Merck & Company, Inc. Merck Company Foundation National Grid USA Service Company, Inc. NGM Charitable Foundation Procter & Gamble Company Raytheon Company Reebok Foundation SBS Technologies Shell Oil SPX Foundation State Street Bank SunTrust Mid Atlantic Swank, Inc. Swarovski Matching Gift Program Synopsys Foundation Matching Gift Program Texas Instruments, Inc. The ACE Foundation Time Warner Foundation, Inc. Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Verizon Waters Corporation Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories

D a r t m o u t h

Bringing the most modern technology to the Claire T. Carney Library is among the goals of the university’s fund-raising efforts. Above, English Professor Jen Riley (right) and student Kathleen Gearty review her eportfolio on her laptop computer, used by most of today’s students for their classwork.

James Lau and Katelyn Huynh work on projects in the virtual reality lab in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The lab contains 5 leading-edge, dual-monitor Windows workstations designed specifically to deliver high-end virtual reality simulations.


Ways to Give UMass Dartmouth Advancement Staff

UMass Dartmouth Foundation Board of Directors

Executive Director Jeffrey A. Wolfman

President Dr. Jean F. MacCormack

Senior Philanthropic Officer Donald H. Ramsbottom

Vice President Dr. Louis Esposito

Associate Vice Chancellor for Advancement Bill Annino

Chairman Mr. Gerald Mauretti ’65

Data Base Manager Judy Amaral Data Entry Operator Sandra Baker Information Manager Ronald M. Biron Director of Donor Relations Tia Bullard Senior Outreach Coordinator Mary Ellen A. DeFrias ’94 Administrative Assistant Juanita Lopez ’95 Administrative Assistant Gina M. Nolan Accountant Charlene Picard Director of Prospect Management Jennifer L. Raxter ’98 Administrative Assistant Karen Tavares Administrative Assistant Elaine Tisdale Asselin

Alumni Relations Staff Director of Alumni Relations Joe F. DeMedeiros ’99 Administrative Assistant Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Vice Chairman Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ’91 Treasurer/Clerk Mr. John Feitelberg

Cash Many of the gifts received by the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are in the form of cash-usually by check. Increasingly, some alumni and friends have chosen to make their gifts to the Annual Fund using a major credit card. This allows the donor to take advantage of any benefits awarded by the credit card company such as frequent flyer miles, bonus points, etc. Both types of gifts are simple to make and are immediately available for use by the university.

Securities

Ms. Maria Furman ’76 Mr. William T. Kennedy ’03 Ms. Mary Lyn Lenz Ms. Elizabeth Isherwood Moore ’80 Mr. Anthony Sapienza Mr. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ’00 Mr. Robert Stoico Mr. Robert Watkins ’02 Mr. Myron Wilner Attorney Margaret Xifaras ’78

Gifts of appreciated stocks, bonds and mutual funds offer distinct advantages to the donor while benefiting the UMass Dartmouth Foundation. In the case of such gifts, the donor can earn a charitable income tax deduction and eliminate all or a large portion of the capital gains tax that the donor would otherwise be required to pay if the securities were sold.

Ex Officio Members Representative Michael Rodrigues ’83 Professor Susan Leclair ’77 Mr. William Giblin ’57 Dr. Susan Costa ’72

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Gifts-in-Kind

Other Officers Mr. Don Zekan (Asst. Treasurer) Mr. Jeffrey A. Wolfman (Asst. Clerk) Honorary Directors Mr. Alan Ades ’96 Mrs. Charlotte Babbitt Mr. Patrick Carney Mr. Kevin Champagne Mrs. Betty Chang Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. Dale Jones Mr. James J. Karam ’71, ’01 Mr. Harold G. Lash Mr. Gustave LaStaiti ’98 Ms. Karen G. Lloyd ’86 Honorable William Q. MacLean, Jr. ’80 Ms. Jean Whelan

These donations to the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are not direct, monetary contributions; they may consist of real estate and other assets including antiques, paintings, rare books, and equipment. Gifts-in-kind may offer particular tax advantages, depending upon the circumstances of the donor. We suggest that the donor consult with professional counsel for advice on such gifts.

Honor or Memorial Gifts Family or friends can make these gifts to benefit UMass Dartmouth and honor campus community members or loved ones. To make a donation, please contact the Advancement Office at 508.999.8200 or give online at umassd.edu/donate

Statement of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action UMass Dartmouth wholeheartedly supports and encourages the development of action programs designed to promote the employment and advancement of women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, persons with disabilities, and Vietnamera veterans as a means of assuring compliance with the provisions of campus Affirmative Action plans. The University firmly supports the concept of equal opportunity without

regard to an individual’s race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status as it applies to his/ her employment, admission to and participation in the University’s programs and activities, provision of services, and selection of vendors who provide services or products to the University.

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The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant Chancellor for Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Outreach, Foster Administration Building, Room 305, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747 508.910.6405

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F o u n d a t i o n

Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, J.W. McCormack Building, Room 222, Boston, MA 02109

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Class Notes ’30s

Michael Poster ‘39, chemistry, of Croton on the Hudson, NY, celebrated his 90th birthday and 60th wedding anniversary and keeps active by swimming and health walking. He continues to sculpt and stays healthy.

’40s

Evalyn Marie Fox-Berlenback ‘42, textile finishing, Toms River, NJ, writes she enjoys going to Florida for a few months every year to escape the snow and cold weather. Francis Wobecky ‘42, chemistry dyeing, Camden, SC, enjoys over 27 years of retirement from Kendall/Colgate-Palmolive, and golfs twice a week.

Henry Siegel ‘49, textile engineering, moved from Flushing, NY, to Lake Worth, Fl. He wants classmates to know he is disappointed his class did not organize a reunion for the class of 1949. We hope he’ll see some classmates and represent his class at the Commencement weekend activities when alumni of 50+ years are honored.

’50s

William Sevilla ‘50, textile engineering, of Lakeville, MN, and wife Edna celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary in December 2006. They were married December 1, 1945 in Inglewood, CA. Gilbert Schofield ‘51, textile chemistry, retired from DuPont and lives in Wilmington, DE. William Marsden ‘54, chemistry dyeing, worked all four years and summers while attending Bradford Durfee College of Technology. He worked at two plants in Fall River and New Bedford until 1958, then spent

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the next 38 years working with two companies in Massachusetts and New York in research and development, tech services, and tech marketing. He retired in 1996, moving with wife Dale from Long Island to Eastham. After 54 years of marriage, they have four children, seven grandchildren, and one great grandchild as well as white hair and a lot of good memories. His brothers Jim ‘69 and Steve ‘72 are also happily retired. Donald Taylor ‘54, textile engineering, completed his term on the Alumni Board of Directors after six years of service and now spends his time with his wife Yvonne between their homes in Bow, NH, and Westport Point. Raymond Medeiros ‘58, textile engineering, retired after 44 years of teaching and coaching in the Fall River public school system. Bernard ‘Babe” Forcier ‘59, civil engineering, lives in Export, PA, and remains involved with railroads, sharing over 47 years of experience by teaching track and roadway maintenance and instruction to Army civilian and military personnel. Benjamin Macomber ‘59, fashion illustration, retired from teaching visual arts in the Attleboro schools, but teaches watercolor painting at RISD, Attleboro Arts Museum, and senior centers.

’60s

Thomas Carroll ‘60, business administration, was recently named a Professor Emeritus at Roger Williams University for his many years of exemplary service. Tom retired in 2001 after serving there for 20 years. He has graduate degrees from George Washington University ‘66 and

American University ‘69. He and his wife, the former Mary Hammond, have six children and 15 grandchildren. Carolyn S. Bendiksen ‘62, management, of Fairhaven, retired as management analyst at Bearing Point, Middletown, RI, where she was involved with public services. Thomas Flynn ‘62, business engineering, Westport Point, retired from Brunswick Corporation where he was the vice president of marketing. He is president of the New Bedford Whaling Museum volunteer council, treasurer of the Friends of Fall River public library, and consultant-owner of Acoaxet International, a defense/aerospace market consultancy. Anthony Lopes ‘62, Brookline, retired from teaching art and loves living in the Boston area. He still owns a painting he bought from Professor Frank McCoy in 1962. John Pacheco ‘63, accounting, New Bedford, was inducted into the Corsairs Hall of Fame in 2006 for soccer. Gordon Brown ‘64, civil engineering, Wetumpka, AL, retired from the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration in 2004 after 40 years of service. In October, he and wife Doris celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary. They have three children and five grandchildren. John Everett ‘65, mechanical engineering, Arlington, VA, writes that since retiring from the NOAA-National Marine Fisheries in 2002, he has increased his consulting business, Oceans Associates, Inc., to more than 15 people. His business is located

at www.oceanassoc.com and his ocean art web business is located at www.oceanart.us. Donat Roy ‘66, mechanical engineering, is an aerospace logistics engineering consultant and lives with his wife Marleen in Hobe Sound, FL. Leonard Santos ‘66, accounting, Dartmouth, retired in 2000 after over 34 years with the Internal Revenue Service. Raymond Ripley ‘67, management, MBA ‘79, Boynton Beach, FL, retired in June 2005. John Rondelli ‘68, accounting, Raynham, is the executive team leader for Hardlines, Target Corporation in Milford. Jak Beardsworth ‘69, history, has been busy lately. His book, More Than Just the Strokes: Personal Best Tennis in Clubland and Beyond, was published in 2005. Last fall, he opened The Club at Vivante in Punta Gorda, FL, for stock development, and was a featured professional at the recent opening of Napa (CA) Valley College’s new tennis complex. He also works with the National Soccer Hall of Fame as a liaison for tennis fundraising events. His grandfather, Fred Beardsworth, was a former professor of textiles and soccer coach at NBIT, and a Hall of Fame member. Ed Booth ‘69, psychology, ’76 nursing, Port St. Lucie, FL, is academic dean at the Academy for Practical Nursing and Health Occupations in West Palm Beach. John T. Fielding ‘69, political science, is the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs at Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner.


Cl ass N otes Fernando Garcia ‘69, Portuguese, was named the 2006 Outstanding Citizen of the year by the Fall River Area Chamber of Commerce & Industry for his volunteer work and contributions to dozens of local organizations and charities. He was honored at the Roger Valcourt Memorial Outstanding Citizen of the Year Gala, and also received the “Ordem do Comendador,” the highest title given to a civilian by the Portuguese government. An entrepreneur, Garcia is the owner of Fall River Ford and employs over 100 employees.

’70s

Byron Ford ‘70, political science, joined the professional team of sales associates at Almeida Realty Group. Byron is the vice president of sales for MBN Vending Services, Inc., and a mortgage consultant. He remains active in politics in New Bedford, where he lives with his daughter Lauren. David Mello ‘70, management, writes “hello to all my Delta Kappa Phi brothers. Remember the late ‘60s, our frat house, the Dipper Café— great times!” David is a lead purchasing specialist with AT & T. He and his wife Diane live in Austin, TX, and would like to hear from anyone at mellod@prodigy.net Laura Gula ‘71, psychology, a longtime New Bedford teacher, plans to retire this year. Theresa McAvoy ‘71, liberal arts, works as an international regulatory affairs specialist for Codman and Shurtleff, a Johnson & Johnson Co. in Raynham. Adalino Cabral ‘72, Portuguese, Medford, received his MBA in general management, with concentrations in organizational communication, marketing, and human resource management, from Plymouth (NH) State University, in May 2006. He immigrated to New Bedford with his family and received

Some things don’t change— like advice on romance and relationships Some people collect stamps, or seashells, or teapots. For Abigail Grotke ‘91, it’s old advice books—“classics” like The Unfair Sex, published in 1953, or How to Get a Teenage Boy and What To Do With Him When You Get Him, 1969. While her collecting began as a lark, it has evolved into far more. There’s the popular web site — missabigail.com where Grotke draws on her 1,000 books to answer loveand-life questions that have a timeless ring about them. The site has led to considerable media attention, as well as an 18-month stint, from 2001 to early 2003, as a London Times magazine weekly columnist. Last year, approached by Thunder’s Mouth Press, Grotke wrote Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating, and Marriage: Classic Advice for Contemporary Dilemmas, which includes web site advice columns with sidebar pieces and illustrations of a days-gone-by nature. The book is “charmingly retro,” said the Washington Post. And she has managed all this while remaining digital media projects coordinator at the Library of Congress. Grotke began collecting the books in 1985. Browsing a Salvation Army store in Greensboro, North Carolina, she and a friend were intrigued by The Art of Dating, written in 1967 by Evelyn Mills Duvall. The two spent several afternoons with their 50-cent find, “reading aloud Evelyn’s words of wisdom, written for the teens of 1967.” The book launched Grotke’s collection, which now comprises works from the 1820s through the 1970s. The Art of Dating accompanied her when she transferred from Greensboro College to Swain School of Design in ‘87; Swain later became part of Southeastern Massachusetts University, and Grotke switched her major from graphic design to art history. Upon graduation, Grotke landed an internship with the Smithsonian Institution, eventually becoming an editor and overseeing new media development. She and her colleagues, eager to “do something fun for ourselves,” launched a webzine in 1998 that included a Miss Abigail advice site. Miss Abigail then moved to its own site, with Grotke delivering what she calls “classic advice for contemporary dilemmas” in a breezy, reassuring style. “Some of the advice seems so ridiculous nowadays,” says Grotke (who is single and lives in Takoma Park, Maryland, with her terrier Felix). “But for a lot of questions, it seems that our problems are the same today as in the past.” Such as the perennial “I like this boy/girl but don’t know how to tell them….That is a theme that’s ageless,” says Grotke. It’s the response that changes, varying with the time period. Consider the letter at left: Grotke responds by quoting Ellen Peck’s How to Get a Teenage Boy: “Schools are, in fact, lab situations in Living with Others. It is absolutely just as important for you to be aware of your classmates as… of the teacher’s lecture. Your future life may not be any happier if you know all about mean annual temperatures, but it can be happier if you know something about Greg, who sits three rows over. “In short, your ‘Guy-Q’ is as important as your ‘IQ,’” writes Peck, then suggests ways Sampalooza can approach the boy she likes. While Grotke has taken a break from answering new questions, the lovelorn can still be helped on her web site. Once there, they can find their problem by visiting the different categories, i.e., “What is Love?” “Minding Your Manners,” or “Forever Single.” Miss Abigail’s Guide has done well, Grotke says, and the royalties indicate “it’s not just my mother who’s buying copies.” She is a contributor to the just-released Single State of the Union: Single Women Speak Out on Life, Love, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Grotke recalls her Southeastern Massachusetts University days fondly. “I worked in the art gallery and that was great. And I had my first computer experience at SMU.” ♥

in “I like this gIuy’m my class andhe likes not sure if Should I me or not. ? ” ask him out , Signed oza Sampalo

—Diane Hartnett

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1933 alum a smash hit on Florida tennis courts Describing 1933 alumnus Roger Gentilhomme as robust hardly does him justice. Gentilhomme has earned a reputation as one of the most fierce — and most successful — competitors on Florida’s tennis courts. What makes him particularly impressive is his age: 97. The New Bedford native placed second in December’s gold-medal match of the Florida Senior Games, held at Florida Gulf Coast University in San Carlos Park. The oldest player in the contest, Gentilhomme lost 6-2, 6-4 to 85-year-old Irv Newman of Sarasota. Gentilhomme had already established himself as one of the best in senior tennis circles. In 1995, he won a national singles title in the 85-89 age bracket in the Senior Olympics, held in San Antonio. Four years later, he was the gold medalist in both singles and doubles competition in the

undergraduate degrees from Bristol Community College, SUNY Albany, and Lisbon and Coimbra Universities, Portugal. He is a decorated veteran of the Army, Air Force, and Massachusetts Army National Guard, and served in the Vietnam War during 196869. He lives with his wife Mary and works in the Boston area. Deborah Vendetti ‘72, painting/ 2Dstudies, Hope, ME, is an elementary school librarian, independent filmmaker, artist, coordinator of the mid-coast chapter of Union of Maine visual artists, and teacher of animation workshops statewide. Claire Carney ‘73, English, honorary doctorate, Dartmouth, was singled out on October 14, 2006, by UMass Dartmouth, which has named the library in her honor. Barry Fisher ‘73, electrical engineering, Charlton, has three grandchildren, Travis, Keith, and Lily. Leighton Peck, Jr. ‘73, civil engineering technology, retired in 2003 after 32 years of public works service. He worked for Easton, Carver, Middleboro, and Plymouth, and is doing engineering consulting for Earth Tech in Concord.

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Susan Pierce ‘73, nursing, lives in Oak Island, NC, and was elected secretary of the American Nurses Association 2006-08. Paul Pinault ‘73, civil engineering, has resigned as executive director of the Narragansett Bay Commission after 25 years to accept a position with an engineering firm in Florida. Paul worked with the Bay Commission since its inception in 1980, first as a project engineer on loan from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, overseeing the reconstruction of the failing Fields Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Providence. He joined the agency’s staff in 1984 as assistant director for construction and grants, became deputy director in 1988, and executive director in 1991. Paul began serving on the Alumni Association Board of Directors in 1995 and was an executive board member from 1996 thru 2001. Nancy Possinger ‘73, Spanish, Berkley, writes “Poss and I have been married for 34 years. Our daughter, Angela, started college this year at Roger Williams University. She and I coached the 4-H Bristol County Envirothon team that represented Massachusetts at the Canon

National Senior Olympic Games, held in Orlando. Gentilhomme earned his diploma of manufacturing from the New Bedford Textile Institute, and worked in the textile industry until retiring in 1975. A year later, he took up tennis. “After I retired, I really didn’t have any special plans except to bum around,” he told the St. Petersburg Times in an April, 2006 interview. “Then I read about recreation classes in tennis and decided to take them.” While playing, one of Gentilhomme’s three children is usually among the spectators. His wife, Florence, died in January, 2005; the two were married for 69 years. Gentilhomme now splits his time between Dunedin, FL, and Cape Cod. Gentilhomme was honored in March by the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association at a reception in Palm Beach, and in April was named Florida Male Athlete of the Year.

Envirothon in Manitoba in July 2006. We are all active with an organic garden/educational program at The Farm at 181 Bayview Ave in Berkley.” Patrick W. Chung ‘74, mechanical engineering, retired from Atomic Energy of Canada and resides in Toronto. Raymond Swenton ‘74, sociology/anthropology, Portland, ME, owns Bristol Seafood, Inc. He is vice president of the New England Seafood Producers Association, and a member of the research committee of the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. Four of his five children are attending college and one is in middle school: Daniella, doctoral candidate, University of New Mexico; Deborah, premed at Syracuse; Jordan, engineering, University of Maine; Richard, arts and sciences, University of West Virginia; and Timothy, seventh grader at Lincoln Middle School. John Belli ‘76, English, retired from his company, Boston Productions, after 30 years in the film and video productions business as producer, director, and CEO. Boston Productions specializes in production of immersive media exhibits for museums and

visitor centers. John credits his experience at UMass Dartmouth in photography and as an English major for his successful career. “No matter what business you’re in, the ability to write is key. I’ve had to write business plans, proposals, scripts, marketing and advertising copy, and legal agreements. I wouldn’t have gotten far without developing this skill set.” John still consults with his company, and his interests remain varied. They range from his ‘32 Ford street rod to his backyard koi pond, art lessons, and welding. John invites friends to email him at johnbelli@comcast.net Peter Kuchinski ‘76, civil engineering technology, of Newton, NJ, welcomed his second grandchild on May 10, born to his oldest daughter and her husband. His youngest daughter graduated from Centenary College, Hackettstown, NJ, with a fashion design major. Her senior line of 12 outfits won a critics’ award for professionalism of design and marketability of the pieces. Debra Rue Laushine ‘76, business/industrial relations, lives in Candia, NH, and is human resources director for Sanborn, Head and Associates, Inc.


Cl ass N otes Martin Rooney ‘76, civil engineering, Marlborough, is the CEO and chief engineer for Residential Engineers, Inc., which provides civil engineering services to homes, condominiums, and apartment complexes. Martin is licensed as a professional engineer, Title 5 designer, soil evaluator, and contractor. He received his masters and doctoral degrees from Carnegie Mellon University. Olukayode James Komolafe ‘77, industrial relations technology, worked for more than 25 years with Ajastanta Steel Co., Ltd. of Nigeria. He retired and joined his family in the U.S., and joined Drimerica, a member of City Group, helping families become financially independent. Thomas Packard ‘77, English, of West Hollywood, CA, a clinical social worker and psychotherapist, works as a case manager for Child Protective Services, County of Los Angeles. Jean Van Doren ‘77, political science, is enrolled at Syracuse University in an advanced studies program for digital librarianship. Her daughter, Covie, is a freshman at Syracuse University, and Meredith is a senior in high school. Edwardo Velazquez ‘77, sociology/anthropology, Rutland, is married to Sandra Aviles Velazquez and is an assistant district attorney. Howard J. Lazerowich’78, accounting, Stratham, NH, is the president of International Furnishings 2, (IFL2 LLC), an importer of custom hotel furniture, based in Portsmouth, NH, with engineering offices in Canada, Shanghai, and Bogotá. Melvin Lightford ‘78, marketing, Brockton, opened a bookstore with new and used books at amazon.com and is the author of books titled The Strategist #21 and The Called Vessel. Melvin, of Melvin Lightford Ministries, Inc. owns a veterans care home facility.

Andrew Sherry ‘78, medical laboratory science, Mapleville, RI, and his wife, Beverly E. McKenna Sherry, have retired and are enjoying life.

on 25,” and will be embarking on sourcing operations from the Orient to Latin America this fall while relocating once again. He writes “God bless Don and SMU.”

Steven Charest ‘79, business management, was named by the Somerset Federal Credit Union to its supervisory committee, which is responsible for oversight and auditing of credit union functions for internal control as well as for regulatory requirements. He is a member of the Dartmouth High School business and information technology department, where he teaches accounting and coaches tennis. He holds a master’s degree in education from Lesley University. A Somerset resident, he is a Confraternity of Christian Doctrine teacher and a Boy Scout leader.

Victor Santos ‘80, accounting, was elected to Mechanics Co-operative Bank’s Board of Directors. He is the owner of Victor P. Santos, CPA, is involved in community organizations, and volunteers for various community and civic councils. He and his wife Mary live in Taunton.

Carol LePage ‘79, marketing, and husband Eric LePage ‘76, management, reside in Tiverton and are the owners and managers of LePage’s Seafood and Grill in Fall River. Bruce DeMoranville ‘79, psychology, of Fairhaven, married Karen Silvia Savery last July. He retired as director of the Falmouth welfare office. Mary Blum Schwartz ‘79, humanities & social sciences, Dartmouth, writes articles for newspapers and magazines.

’80s

Sandra Hathaway ‘80, business administration, has joined the law office of Moira E. Tierney and practices family and probate law in New Bedford. Donald Livsey ‘80, medical technology, Danville, CA, and his wife Kitt have two daughters, Jordan and Brooke. Don is vice president at Children’s Hospital Oakdale. Dominic Marrinucci ‘80, industrial relations, Trenton, NJ, has been working in New York City for the past six years. He has a beautiful daughter, “12 going

Mitch Winkler ‘80, civil engineering, relocated to The Netherlands, just outside The Hague, from the New Orleans area with his wife Teresa and children Lauren and Lee. He works as research and development project manager for Shell International Exploration and Production B.V. “We were very lucky with Hurricane Katrina in that our house suffered no damage and the children’s school reopened in early October. Nevertheless, the move was a welcome relief after commuting to Houston for almost 10 months. New Orleans was home for over 10 years and we think often of the good friends that we left behind and the challenges the city faces as it works to rebuild.” Eileen Waxler ‘80, industrial relations, Dartmouth, has three teenage children. Her oldest son is attending UMass Dartmouth as a business major. Eileen is a Silpada Designs jewelry representative. Theresa Taylor ‘81, art history, works as a special education teacher in Merrimack, NH. Sandra Schutt ‘82, nursing, a school nurse at Wareham High School, has three children and four grandchildren, and is an associate member of the Wareham Board of Health. Cynthia Blondin ‘83, civil engineering, of Douglas, and her husband, John, have set sail on

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their boat Tashmoo for a sabbatical. “We plan to spend two years sailing the Caribbean and hope to extend our trip to circumnavigate the globe. Our journey can be followed at www.sailblogs/ member/ tashmoo.fairwinds Victor Duphily ‘83, English, of Clinton, CT, served in the U.S. Army, and writes of his support for the ROTC program at UMass Dartmouth. He is a police officer in Connecticut. Vic received his master’s in criminal justice degree from the University of New Haven, and a graduate certificate in Forensic Computer Crime Investigation. He looks forward to retiring early and moving on to other venues. Diane Gendron ‘83, nursing, East Bridgewater, works as a nurse case manager for the U.S. Government Workers Compensation Program. Her husband, Paul Gendron ‘85, chemistry, is a quality manager at Electrochem in Canton. Their son Jason, is a junior at UMass Dartmouth majoring in accounting/finance. Lisa Poyant Pelletier ‘83, English, was married in 2005 to Denis A. Pelletier ‘83, management, and they live in Houston. Susan Roycroft ‘83, biology, Plainville, writes, “I have been teaching science on the secondary level since graduation at various high schools in Massachusetts (North Attleboro, Walpole, and Milford). I am very actively involved in YMCA swimming with my two children, Courtney, who is a sophomore at King Philip High School, and Carl, who is in the eighth grade at King Philip Junior High School. I have been coaching swimming for the Hockomock YMCA for the past eight years and did coach Milford High School’s girls & boys teams….” Paula Stebbins Becker ‘84, textile design/handweaving, Tiverton, RI, works as a fabric designer for Quaker Fabrics in Fall River.

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Joy Ferrell has the expertise to help others Joy E. Ferrell, who graduated in 1971 with a bachelor of science in chemistry, has risen through the ranks of the pharmaceutical industry to the position of Senior Director of Regulatory Affairs for the United States division of Glaxo Smith Kline in North Carolina. Throughout the process of drug development, Ferrell gives regulatory advice to the project teams. Her first job after college was as a laboratory assistant at the Institute of Textile Technology in Charlottesville, Virginia. “My bachelor’s in chemistry has given me the opportunity to work in different areas, from textiles to pharmaceuticals,” she said. “Chemistry is what’s gotten me in the door.” While at UMass Dartmouth, Ferrell and other chemistry students worked for Professor George Thomas Sr. “He took us under his wing,” Ferrell said. “My first year, I was stationed in the old New Bedford building, with the engineering students. It was nice to move into our own space on the new campus.” In April 2007, Ferrell is taking early retirement from Glaxo and plans to travel. “I’ve been to six of the continents and want to get to Australia to make all seven,’’ she said. “Once the dust settles, I’d like to volunteer time to a nonprofit organization and am especially interested in what I might do to assist in the Darfur situation.”

Mark D. Leavitt ‘84, electrical engineering technology, Newburyport, is a systems engineer at Raytheon in Andover. Mary F. Martins ‘84, accounting, Somerset, was appointed Vice President and Profitability Manager in Corporate Planning at Citizens Bank of Rhode Island. She is responsible for managing monthly reporting to the Royal Bank of Scotland Group. Mary was formerly a vice president from Bank of America. Paul Taylor ‘84, electrical engineering, received his MBA from Northeastern University and lives in Chelmsford. He is the product manager for Vectron International in Hudson, NH. He and his wife, Yoko, have three children, Erika, Michael, and Jeffrey. Daniel Patten ‘85, accounting, is chief financial officer/treasurer in Fall River. He has 20 years of experience serving various finance-related functions for New Bedford’s municipal government. Dan is married to Lynn Poyant ‘85, humanities and English, and resides in New Bedford.

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Michelle Burns Kessler, ‘85, design, an artist, writes she has been living in Nagasaki since July 2005, and has been studying Japanese and Japanese fine arts. Her husband, Brian, is the liaison between IBM and Sony, and son Nathan is in Japanese pre-school. Michael Amarello ‘86, computer science, writes, “I am currently living in Merrimack, NH with my wife of 10 years, Virginia, and our three children: Chris, Charlene,

Deaths Harold E. Taylor ’30 John R. Golden, Sr. ’34 Mark W. Knowlton, Jr. ’37 Alfred Szala ’40 Joseph Jacintho, Jr. ’56 Stanley W. Drewniak ’59 Albert Bienvenue ’61 John O. Braga ’68 Gregory J. Zurawel ’74 Leo J Brunelle ’77 Edward Cormier ’78 Joanne E. Noble ’79 Mary Jane Pollock ’83 Kathleen Reis ’83 Mark D. Anderson ’88 Christopher Maloney ’93 Sarah Anne Coggeshall ’98

and Charles. Charles was born on October 10, 2006. I am a principal software engineer at L1 Identity Solutions in Billerica, working on border security, identification management, and document issuance solutions. Hundreds, if not thousands, of UMass Dartmouth alumni carry the output of my work in their wallets and purses… I am also co-owner with my wife of 3C Race Productions LLC, a professional (running) race production and timing company. We produce events such as the Moose On The Loose 10 Mile Trail Race & Relay (Nashua, NH), the Luv2Run Race Series (ME, NH, MA, & RI), and the Artesani Park 5K Race Series (Boston, MA).” Susan M. Gonsalves ‘86, English, is a part-time writer/editor in the College of Engineering, and freelance editor of New England Psychologists, a monthly trade publication for licensed psychologists in seven states. Terrance P. Brown ‘87, political science, is president of the Charles River Group, an executive search firm located in Wisconsin. Terry and his wife Sarah have three children, Patrick, Elise, and Ann. Terry says hello to all his

former basketball buddies from Klotche Center. Joseph Macrina ‘87, civil engineering, was appointed chief operating officer at Wolverton and Associates in Duluth, Georgia. Joe also serves as department head within this consulting engineering firm. Lynne Nassiff ‘87, English, a guidance counselor, retired after a 20-year career the New Bedford schools. Kathleen Brennan ‘89, sociology, is an admissions officer at Quincy College. “I have been in education since 1997 and love empowering students and helping them realize their goals. I have my (master’s degree) from UMass Boston in applied sociology and my master’s of education from Boston University in Counseling. I have also traveled the world and have visited Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Portugal, England, France and Switzerland, as well as many states.” Kimberly Costa-Morgan ‘89, political science, was named the 2006 Maine High School Teacher of the Year by UnmProvident, a nationwide insurance agency, and the Portland Pirates. CostaMorgan is a special education teacher and head of the special education department at Bucksport High School. She earned her master’s degree in special education last year at the University of Maine. Danielle Poyant McCue ‘89, accounting, is a principal at the regional accounting firm of Tofias, PC. Danielle lives in New Bedford with her daughter Corrie. Dennis McGowan ‘89, psychology, US Army Major, spent 17 years moving up the ranks in the military, earned his MBA, and was deployed to Baghdad last year as part of the First Brigade Combat Team Tenth Mountain Division out of Fort Drum, NY. He has worked in Iraq as a business advisor and


Cl ass N otes contracting acquisition officer to the commander Because of his extraordinary service, he was awarded the prestigious Bronze Star medal, the fourth highest military medal available. Neal Meyers ‘89, marketing, is the senior operations manager for Fedex Ground for Southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod and the Islands, and Rhode Island. Sarahbeth Parda ‘89, humanities/ social sciences married Anthony Persiani ‘88, visual design. They have a daughter, Chloe Cadence, and two dogs, Ruby and Buddy. Tony is a successful illustrator/ designer and Sarahbeth works in the educational services field.

’90s

John Amaral ‘90, electrical engineering, is the chief technology officer for Vericept Corporation of Denver, responsible for creation, development, and overall management of Vericept’s product line, and overseeing research and development efforts to continue to deliver market-leading technology. Amaral joined Vericept in February 2006 from Network Engines. Previously he managed technology definitions, product concepts, and product development at Artel. He has worked for several premier technology companies including Digital Equipment, Raytheon, and Polaroid Advanced Technology Laboratory. Shelly Armstrong ‘90, management, writes that after 13 years as the secretary at the First Congregational Church, she is now a grants assistant at Bristol Community College. She is also a member of the BCC Alumni Association Board. Richard Gelman ‘90, management, is the general manager of Linens ‘N Things in Taunton. Andrew Kelley ‘90, marketing, Rehoboth, is a pharmacist at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro.

Chrisann Leal ‘90, humanities/ social sciences, Dartmouth, is a junior partner at a civil litigation firm in Boston. Timothy Lund ‘90, computer and information science, Needham, is living the life of a soccer parent. Weekends are usually spent traveling to games or tournaments in Greater Boston. Tim opened his own architectural firm in Needham after completing his master’s degree at RISD. He spends quite a bit of time with KC van Colen ‘87, computer and information science, and his wife Katie McMahon van Colen ‘00, economics, of Swansea. Erik Holden ‘91, political science, lives in Scituate with his wife Cresson, daughter Abigail, and son Charles Kenrick, who was born on January 1, 2006, and was the first baby born in 2006 on the South Shore. Erik works in professional development for the National Fire Protection Association in Quincy. Ernest Lijoi ‘91, multidisciplinary studies, is an accomplished guitarist, vocalist, composer, and actor well-known for his music in the Boston area. He now works in New York City. Kathy Haase Nelson ‘91, sociology, is a staffing specialist at Laconia Savings Bank in New Hampshire. Glenn Soulia ‘91, visual design, joined Seidler Bernstein Inc., a full-service marketing communications agency as art director of its creative department. Glenn has worked for clients such as Gillette, Hasbro, Clarks Footwear, Duracell, Oral-B, Colgate, and Tensor, and his experience includes identity, branding, packaging, advertising, collateral, outdoor media, and Web site design. Glenn was awarded How magazine’s 2003 International Design Award for his work on Gillette’s Xtreme Sport packaging, and ID magazine’s 2003 Annual Design Award for his work on Cool Dog branding/

packaging. Glenn was a principal with The Media Collaborative, and has been senior designer at Davis Partners, art director at Feinstein & Partners, and art director/designer at Phillips Design Group. Alda Rego-Weathers ‘91, political science, who holds a master’s in public administration from Suffolk University, was named by former Gov. Mitt Romney to the University Of Massachusetts Board Of Trustees. She is the deputy commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Jessica White ‘91, electrical engineering, of Atlanta, GA, has been married to John A. Foster since May 31, 1996. They have three daughters, Claire, Helen, and Jane. Christopher Alderman ‘92, management, of Franklin, TN, announces the birth of his son Brody Dean on June 27, 2006. Chris is the tour manager for the award-winning country music group Rascal Flatts.

Jeffrey M. Allen ‘92, humanities/ social sciences, is a full-time firefighter and lifeguard captain on Nantucket, where he has lived since 1995. His brother John is also a firefighter on the island. Jeffrey can be reached at jeffnfd@yahoo.com. David R. Borges ‘92, political science, Westport, was appointed assistant director at the Center for Policy Analysis at UMass Dartmouth. He also welcomed his second son, Ryan James, in June 2006. Michael Lee ‘92, English, is the literary editor of the Cape Cod Voice and a member of the National Book Critics Circle. His second book is a collection of essays entitled In an Elevator with Brigitte Bardot and Other Appreciations. Lee’s first book, published in ‘02, was a shortstory collection, Paradise Dance. Bruce Bachand ‘93, sociology/ anthropology, received a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Arizona in 2006. His archaeo-

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logical research in the Guatemala rainforest documented the changing fortunes of a Preclassic Maya (700 B.C.-A.D.420) monument center. Bruce is currently a research associate for the New World Archaeological Foundation of Brigham Young University, living in South Jordan, Utah, with his wife Holly, a doctoral candidate in anthropology at the University of California Berkeley, daughter Emory, and son Lucas. Mark Berube ‘93, philosophy, is based in the New York office of White Collar and Civil Fraud Defense Practice Group, and practices in the areas of white-collar, antitrust, bankruptcy, securities regulation, employment, and complex commercial litigation. Berube’s experience includes representing defendants in white-collar criminal matters, and plaintiffs and defendants in business disputes involving claims of fraud, breach of contract, etc. Berube received his law degree, cum laude, from New York University in 1997. Joseph DeAngelo ‘93, political science, received his master’s in education from Boston College in 1995 and master’s in project management from George Washington University in 1998. His has been living in Boston since 1993, and for the past six years has been a licensed broker selling real estate in Boston. He would love to hear from friends at joed@gibsondd.com.

Gerald Gagne ‘93, accounting, works as a consultant for Wolf & Company, PC, in Boston and is married to Natalie Richardson Gagne ‘92, sociology. They reside in Hudson and have three children, Kyle, Keith, and Cole. Amy Gendreau ‘93, mechanical engineering technology, is the owner of StoLat Organics in Newmarket, NH, the first personal care products company, with items such as salves to spaquality scrubs, to be ‘certified organic’ by New Hampshire. The business began with Amy’s effort to ease her children’s discomfort caused by their eczema. Contact Amy at amgendreau@msn.com Frank Glenowicz ‘93, sociology/ criminal justice, Conway, is the assistant chief probation officer for Franklin County Superior Court. Scott Levesque ‘93, painting/3D, is a singer and guitarist with drummer Brendan Harney ‘91 in the band “Wheat,” which has released “That’s Exactly What I Wanted…Exactly That.” They released “Per Second, Per Second, Per Second…Every Second” three years ago. They met at UMass Dartmouth. Dawn Dailey-Begin ‘94, nursing, is the assistant clinical manager at the Hasbro Children’s Hospital emergency department in Providence.

Homecoming 2007 October 12-14

Save the Date http://alumni.umassd.edu/

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Jim Boyle ‘94, political science, is assistant director of economic development for the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, and analyzes and prepares legislative, public policy, and regulatory data, testifies on behalf of the Chamber before government groups, and lobbies government officials. Last year, former Gov. Mitt Romney named him to the Workforce Investment Board. Jim lives in New Bedford with his wife, Maureen ‘92, human resource management, and their two children, Aileen and Donovan. Andrew Flanagan ‘94, business information systems, lives in Bar Harbor, ME, with his wife Susan. He is self-employed and enjoys hiking, climbing, kayaking, and biking in Arcadia National Park. The couple also skis in western Maine and Mount Washington Valley. Lori Marie Kelly ‘93, medical laboratory science, lives in North Easton with her husband Jim and their three children, Martin, Virginia, and Eoghan. Roy Nascimento ‘94, political science, Taunton, was chosen from a field of more than 30 candidates to take the helm of the New Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce. Roy was previously vice president of the MetroSouth Chamber of Commerce in Brockton for nearly seven years. He has been Attleboro Chamber of Commerce president since February of 2005. He also served as sales and service associate for BankBoston for more than two years. He holds a Master of Public Administration from Suffolk University and several certificates, and has served as director of numerous organizations. Dennis Aikman ‘95, management, and his wife Kate, of Marblehead, announce the birth of a daughter, Jennifer Heloise, born June 6, 2006.

Joseph M. Dana ‘95, business management, Millbury, works in sales at TiSales, Inc. in Sudbury. Tara Davis ‘95, biology, has been teaching orientation courses, ESL writing courses, and algebra at Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester. Crystal Howard ‘95, English, earned a master’s degree at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and has joined ESPN as director of communications. The Providence native is responsible for publicity and media relations relating to the company’s ESPN Enterprises division, encompassing consumer products, home entertainment and branded experiences, ESPN Interactive, ESPN Direct and ESPN Zones. She will also oversee publicity for ESPN Publishing (ESPN Books and ESPN The Magazine). Howard was with the New Era Cap Company, where she served as corporate communications manager for three years. She also has worked in communications at Foote, Cone & Belding, Westhill Partners and Bad Boy Entertainment, all in New York. Arthur Hurley ‘95, finance, a chartered financial analyst, was hired as the portfolio manager of the Columbia Real Estate Equity Fund for Columbia Management, the primary investment manager of Bank of America. Hurley joins Columbia Management after more than three years at Lee Munder Capital Group where he was the lead portfolio manager and founding partner of all REIT strategies. Andrew Tripp ‘95, accounting, and Heather Yale Tripp ‘95, visual design/graphic design, Hamilton, married in 2000 and have two children, Joshua and Allie. Drew works as a consultant for Agency Port in Boston and Heather is an admissions director for a private school in Salem. Tom Becker ’96, marketing, is biking from San Francisco to Los Angeles this June as a participant


Cl ass N otes in the fund-raising “AIDS/LifeCycle” and as of March had raised nearly half of his $5,000 goal. Michelle Camara ‘96, nursing, lives in Windsor, CT, with her husband, young son, and baby daughter. Kris Kulander Hopping ‘96, human resources management, married Christopher Hopping ‘96, visual design, in August 1996. They have a son, Jacob, and a daughter, Stephanie, and live in California. Kris has worked in the human resources field since graduating. Roxanne Mihal ‘96, nursing, Abington, was appointed the dean of nurse education and health professions at Bunker Hill Community College. She oversees allied health, nurse education, medical imaging, and surgical technology at the college. She formerly was program director at the Adult Practical Nursing program at the Tri-County Regional Vocational School in Franklin. A nurse for more than 30 years, she is a nurse practitioner for Boston Health Care and Homeless Program and also works in surgery/nutritional support for Massachusetts General Hospital. She holds a master’s in nursing from MGH Institute of Health Professions and associate’s degree in nursing from Catherine Laboure Junior College in Dorchester. Matthew Morrissey ‘96, English, was named executive director of the New Bedford Economic Development Corporation where he had served as interim director. He formerly held an administrative position with UMass Dartmouth’s Professional and Continuing Education Division. Thomas Silveria ‘96, computer information science, of Portsmouth, RI, reports that his daughter, Charlotte Mary, a.k.a. Charlie, a kindergarten student at All Saints Academy in Middletown, was named the student of the month for October 2006.

Joao-Luis DeMedeiros ‘97, humanities/social sciences, received his master’s degree in human resources management from Chapman University, Orange, CA. He is the human resources manager for Western Horizon Medical Group, Inc. in Rancho Mirage. Linda Hall ‘97, psychology, of Anaheim, married former UMass Dartmouth student Marion “Pooch” Hall, currently starring on a CW television show called “The Game.” Linda is a realtor in California, working from home while caring for daughters Djanai and Djaeda. Allison Abrams Russell, ‘97, marketing, Plainville, works as an account manager for Infinita. Tricia Hegner Walker ‘97, visual design/illustration, married James Scott Walker, an architect with Bergmeyer Architecture, Boston, on May 20, 2006 in Bourne. UMass Dartmouth alums Heather Kauffman McCobb, Sarah Mangrum Burt and Pat Burt, Lauren Harman Hoffman and Mark Hoffman attended. The couple lives in Brookline. Brenda Young ‘97, Spanish, Leominster, has joined Fidelity Bank of Fitchburg as branch services manager for the Gardner office, and previously was the assistant branch manager at Clinton Savings Bank. Erick Brown ‘98, computer engineering, married Christine Reilly in 2005, and they live in Milford. Erick is employed by EMC Corporation in Hopkinton. Danielle Drabble ‘98, management, of Dartmouth, married Louis Almeida III in November 2006. William Alexander ‘99, electrical engineering, is a senior engineer at BAE Systems, primarily doing digital signal processing work. He has been there for seven years since graduation. He and

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his wife, Emily Traubel Alexander ‘97, economics, are raising two children in New Hampshire. Kimberly Brodeur ‘99, medical laboratory science, Fall River, works as a medical technologist/massage therapist at Own Therapeutic Massage. Sandra (Cabral) Pimental ‘99, biology, was promoted at Slade’s Ferry Bank to manager of the branch located on Linden Street, Fall River. She also volunteers as secretary of the FWI Massasoit Group and as a committee chair for the United Way of Fall River. Sandra lives in Acushnet with her husband and their son. Brian D. Santos ‘99, English, of Warwick, RI, was promoted to officer/branch manager of the Lincoln Stop & Shop Citizens Bank branch, where he had been assistant manager. He joined Citizens in 2002 as the assistant branch manager of the North Providence Stop & Shop branch.

’00s

Stephanie Oles ‘00, Spanish, of Tucson, is completing her master’s in education degree in educational psychology at the University of Arizona. David White ‘00, civil engineering, MS civil engineering, Berkley, has joined Woodard & Curran, a national engineering, science,

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and operations firm, at its Providence office. David is a senior project manager with over 15 years of managerial and technical experience, specializing in managing multidisciplinary project teams of engineers, scientists, and regulatory specialists to obtain entitlements for commercial, residential, and industrial facilities from local, state, and federal regulatory agencies. Daniel Beaudry ‘01, accounting, of Attleboro, works as a portfolio accounting supervisor for Putnam Investments while pursuing his MBA at Suffolk University. Heather Chu ‘01, art education, will spend the next two years as a Peace Corps volunteer on the South Pacific Island of Tonga where she will be teaching English to local children. Heather has taught art at Nashoba Brooks School in Concord for the past five years. A Rochester resident of Irish and Asian decent, she has been involved in diversity and community service learning and feels this is a phenomenal opportunity to experience another culture. Robert Dunn ‘01, photography, Kingston, is a mortgage consultant with Mortgage Master, Inc. in Hanover. Karen Muhlin ‘01, textile science, lives in Oakland, CA, and is tech-

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From the president Please join us for the first Alumni Association Membership meeting on June 7 at 6 p.m. at the Star Store campus in downtown New Bedford. The event will be an opportunity to meet old friends, make new ones, and do some networking. And we’re celebrating the fact that association members, assisted by the executive director and professional staff, have so far raised ten times the amount of scholarship money over last year’s. Most organizations sponsor annual meetings in order to socialize and to bring members together over common goals. The Alumni Association of UMass Dartmouth continues to grow. Through its programs and events, it demonstrates the critical role that a solid education plays in preparing one for professional success. Our alums are employed in a wide range of careers, thereby enriching the intellectual and

nology lab coordinator for The North Face, Inc. Karen recently became engaged to Brian Frumedebar, a successful entrepreneur. The couple plans to travel extensively before settling down. Karen would like to give a shout-out to her 3B 127 ladies who keep her grounded. Kathylee Medeiros Alves ‘02, nursing, of New Bedford married Nelson Alves in July 2005. Amy Freeman ‘02, MFA, of Greenville, NC, works as an assistant professor at East Carolina University and held an exhibit in November 2006 at the Community Council for the Arts in Kingston. She paints portraits and paintings portraying private moments of emotions and movement. Her resume includes a position as a visiting professor of painting in the Lacoste School of Arts, Savannah College of Art and Design, and a Mediterranean Studies program at the University of Messina, Sicily. She received her bachelor’s degree in studio arts-painting in 1995 from the University of Wyoming, Laramie. Jeremy Pereira ‘02, painting/ 2D studies, Fall River, works as a fine artist, subcontracting work

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economic well-being of the state and the region. Our graduates have also increasingly voiced a desire to help the current generation of graduates as they too enter the workforce. We see that commitment as more and more alumni join the association, sign up for the interactive web site, and contribute to the alumni scholarship fund. The event at the Star Store will be a chance both to celebrate the Association, and discuss ways to strengthen it. We will focus on ways to build scholarship opportunities, and you’re invited to bring your business card so the event can benefit your professional life. There will be music, food, and great conversation. Please consider yourself personally invited from the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association Board of Directors and let Nancy Tooley know that you are coming by emailing her at: ntooley @umassd.edu or calling 508.999.8031.

restoring antique yachts and historical houses. He also works in the film industry with the scenic artists on television and film sets. He writes, “Long live Group 6 and the Star Store.” Victoria Tsatsus ‘02, textile science, is a product analyst for the Gap, Inc. in New York City. Stacy Dialida Arsenault ‘03 and Mike Arsenault ‘03, visual design/ photography, married in 2004 and reside in Whitinsville. Stacy works as a designer for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette and their magazine, Worcester Living. Mike is an art teacher in Bellingham. Corey Bachand ‘03, electrical engineering, MSEE 2005, completed his first marathon this past January at Disney World in under three hours. Corey has his sights on running the Boston Marathon next. He was an Academic AllAmerican at UMass Dartmouth, excelling in both cross-country and in the classroom, and had the highest grade point average in the College of Engineering. Sidelined by an injury earlier this year, Corey rebounded and

trained hard to achieve this personal goal. He says that he really wants to run the “Boston” and needed to qualify at another venue before being considered for the local race. A New Bedford resident, he is a research and development engineer for a small sonar technology firm located at the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center, Fall River. Christine Disanto Charette ‘03, textile science, married Raymond Charette in October 2005, and is a graduate student in the master of textile program at North Carolina State University. Christine works as a textile technologist in the war fighter protection and aerial delivery directorate at the US Army Natick Soldier Center. Brianne Como ‘03, biology/ marine biology, works at AMGEN as a lab associate/ technician in West Greenwich, RI. Jason DeVincent ‘03, management, Marlborough, who is self-employed, married Karen DiModica on August 5, 2006.

Jennifer Lassins ‘03, humanities/ social sciences, teaches fourth grade in Winchester. She completed her master’s degree in elementary education at Lesley University in December 2006. Ana Lauzon ‘03, humanities/ social sciences, Dartmouth, is administrative supervisor for Hawthorne Medical Associates, one of the area’s largest medical facilities. She also teaches ballet part-time at the YMCA and has been active in animal advocate groups. Edward P. Mangalhaes ‘03, biology, is a medical student in Roanoke, VA. Phil Oliveira ‘03, visual design, is area coordinator for the firstyear housing program at the Rhode Island School of Design. Kristen Stanton ‘03, multidisciplinary studies, works as a producer for WCVB-TV in Needham. Bryan Wallace, ‘03, marketing, Miami, works as a prep school teacher and coach in Coral Gables. Lindsey M. Coleman ‘04, accounting, Somerset, received her master’s degree in taxation in 2005 from Bentley College ‘05 and is a senior accountant with Prescott Chatellier Fontaine & Wilkinson, LLP, Providence. The firm provides strategic financial services to public and private companies, as well as to individuals and families. Aaron Guillotte ‘05, economics, New Bedford, works as a research associate for Pyramis Global Advisors—Real Estate Group, an institutional investing arm of Fidelity Investments. Carl Turgeon ‘05, marketing, Dartmouth, is a graduate student at Salve Regina University.


The Claire T. Carney Library seeks your support to expand as an educational and community resource There is currently a capital campaign underway to raise $6 million to transform the Claire T. Carney Library. The university needs your assistance in improving the library so that it can continue to be a rich resource for students, faculty, scholars, and the community. Funds raised will be used to:

respond to students’ new learning styles, which are increasingly reliant on modern technology and collaborative approaches; offer improved areas for presentations, lectures, and meetings — formal and informal —that will engage students, faculty, and visitors; support scholarship by upgrading spaces for the library’s ever-increasing collections, complemented by new physical and virtual services to serve the region; provide the best accommodations for the special archival materials that distinguish the Claire T. Carney Library.

Among the recent gifts to the fund-raising campaign to update the library is a $150,000 contribution from former District Attorney Edmund Dinis. With his donation, Dinis establishes the Edmund Dinis PortugueseAmerican Political, Legal and Public Service Collection at the Ferreira-Mendes PortugueseAmerican Archives within the Claire T. Carney Library. Former state legislator and owner of New Bedford-based Portuguese radio station WJFD, Dinis has long been involved in the region’s politics and civic affairs, and played a lead role in promoting citizenship and voter registration among Portuguese immigrants. He joins many members of the Portuguese community in their efforts to raise a total of $1.5 million specifically for the FerreiraMendes Portuguese-American Archives.

Edmund Dinis is thanked for his gift by Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack and former State Senator William Q. MacLean, Jr., who co-chairs the Development Committee of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation with Robert Karam ‘67, former trustees’ chairman.

To learn more about the library campaign, go to

www.umassd.edu/librarycampaign


Your online alumni network UMass Dartmouth’s Alumni Association has launched a new online community that makes it easy for alums and friends to stay connected to the university and one another. Register to become part of the network at alumni.umassd.edu Becoming part of the community enables you to stay up-to-date about what’s happening at UMass Dartmouth, learn about alumni programs and projects, submit news about yourself as well as photos, visit group pages, and maintain a personal profile page. You can also make a contribution online. Also, if you’re not already one, you can become a member of the Alumni Association. Registration to access the site is required to protect the confidentiality of your information. Register now; once approved, you can enjoy the benefits of staying connected. Become a part of our powerful network of 40,000 alumni worldwide.

The Campanil-E Get the latest news about UMass Dartmouth right in your inbox! Subscribe to the Campanil-E today at www.umassd.edu/campanile

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