Page 1

Capsule

Winter 2017

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Magazine for Alumni and Friends

Celebrating

175 YEARS OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

IN THIS ISSUE:

FY ’15 Annual Report


DEAN’S MESSAGE This

issue

of

Capsule

continues

the theme of celebrating the 175th anniversary of the School of Pharmacy’s founding in 1841. In the last issue, we presented a brief timeline of the School’s history. Now we are focusing on alumni during our 175 years who have made contributions to the School, the pharmacy profession, the research field, or industry. You may recognize some of the names and faces. You may be meeting others for the first time. With the recent graduation of the Class of 2016, we now have more than 5,600 alumni spread across the world. That’s more than 5,600 University of Maryland School of Pharmacy ambassadors.

Each of our alumni over the life span of our School has been an important part

of our community. Alumni from our early years were involved in the formation of today’s professional pharmacy associations. Others founded international companies or created health products still on the market today. Living alumni work daily in their local communities to improve patient health or the way health care is delivered. And still others labor to educate the next generation of pharmacy professionals and researchers. I hope, like me, you find an enormous sense of pride in reading about your fellow alumni.

Our alumni are a stellar group of men and women. It would be impossible to

recognize all of you, but know that, in this our 175th year, we value each of you for your contributions to the School of Pharmacy and our profession. In the spirit of expertise, influence, and impact,

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP Dean and Professor Executive Director, University Regional Partnerships

MISSION The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy leads pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement in the state of Maryland and beyond. VISION We will achieve our mission by: • inspiring excellence in our students through a contemporary curriculum, innovative educational experiences, and strategic professional relationships. • advancing scientific knowledge across the spectrum of drug discovery, health services, and practice based and translational research with significant focus on collaborative partnerships. • expanding the impact of the pharmacist’s role on direct patient care and health outcomes. • building and nurturing relationships with all members of our community. • capitalizing on our entrepreneurial spirit to improve pharmaceutical research, practice, and education in Maryland and throughout the world. PLEDGE We are proud to be critical thinkers, lifelong learners, and leaders who are sought for our expertise. We earn our reputation with the highest standards of personal ethics and professional conduct. Students and education are central to everything we do. We engage the community; together, we contribute to the improved health of society. We celebrate the distinctive talents of our faculty, staff, and students. We honor our traditions and advocate for dynamic changes in pharmacy practice, education, and research. We create the future of pharmacy.


Capsule Contents University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Alumni Magazine

Winter 2017 Becky Ceraul, Capsule Editor Assistant Dean, Communications and Marketing School of Pharmacy

2

Chris Zang, Assistant Director, Editorial Services

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

22

MAINSTAYS

Julie Bower, Assistant Director, Design Services University of Maryland, Baltimore Office of Communications and Public Affairs

SCHOOL NEWS

13 CELEBRATING 175 YEARS OF

24 STUDENT NEWS

Special thanks to the following contributors:

32 RESIDENT PROFILE

Ken Boyden, JD, EdD Associate Dean Development and Alumni Affairs

33 DONOR PROFILE

Malissa Carroll Web Content Specialist Greer Griffith Assistant Director, Alumni Giving Erin Merino Senior Marketing Specialist

34 ALUMNI NEWS 39 ANNUAL REPORT

School of Pharmacy Student Government Association

We welcome your comments, news, and suggestions for articles. Send your ideas to Becky Ceraul at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N. Pine St., Room N302, Baltimore, MD 21201. Email: rceraul@rx.umaryland.edu; Telephone: 410-706-1690; Fax: 410-706-4012. Copyright © 2017 University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Read More, See More, Share More! Read in-depth biographies of faculty, see additional pictures of School events, and share School news with your friends on social media. More details on the articles covered in this issue of Capsule are available in an electronic version — online. You can view Capsule from any mobile device. Visit www.pharmacy.umaryland. edu/capsule and start learning more about the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.


SCHOOL NEWS

Alumna, Longtime Supporter Donates $500,000 to School Ellen H. Yankellow, PharmD ’96, BSP ’73, president and chief executive officer of Correct Rx Pharmacy Services and chair of the School of Pharmacy’s Board of Visitors, has committed a gift of $500,000 to the School. The donation — for which Ellen H. Yankellow Yankellow contributed $200,000 that was matched by both an anonymous donor and the Scholarship Matching Program established by the University of Maryland Baltimore Foundation, Inc. (UMBF) — establishes the first endowed scholarships to provide a full year of financial support for a fellow in the Ellen H. Yankellow Health Outcomes Fellowship and a full year of tuition assistance for a graduate student enrolled in either the School’s online MS in Regulatory Science Program or MS in Pharmacometrics Program, alternatively. “As chair of the School’s Board of Visitors, I recognize all that the School has accomplished in terms of inspiring excellence in its students, advancing scientific knowledge, and expanding the impact of the pharmacist’s role on direct patient care and health outcomes,” says Yankellow. “However, there remain areas in the School for which the need is great, but funding is difficult to acquire. The matching funds provided by both the anonymous donor and UMBF will maximize the impact of my gift to the School, and help ensure that the School continues to attract the best and brightest students to its programs.” Yankellow’s gift celebrating the School’s 175th anniversary follows an earlier gift that she committed during the School’s most recent capital campaign, which remains the largest gift ever from a female graduate and resulted in the naming of the Ellen H. Yankellow Grand Atrium in Pharmacy Hall and the establishment of a first-of-its-kind fellowship at the School designed to capture health outcomes and economic data about the value of

Letter to the

Editor

clinical pharmacy services. Initially funded for 10 years, the Ellen H. Yankellow Health Outcomes Fellowship will now continue in perpetuity as a result of her most recent gift. “When I started my company, I knew that involving a clinical pharmacist in patients’ care would result in better health outcomes for those patients, but I did not have the data to prove it,” says Yankellow. “The fellowship that I established at the School of Pharmacy allows an independent, objective fellow to analyze the data that Correct Rx’s clinical team has gathered over the years to assess the impact, trends, and outcomes associated with incorporating clinical pharmacists as members of the health care team. The fellows’ work is validating what we are doing, and this scholarship will ensure that this important work continues and brings awareness to the value of clinical pharmacy.” The scholarships established with Yankellow’s gift also will provide a full year of tuition assistance for a student enrolled in the School’s online MS in Regulatory Science Program or MS in Pharmacometrics Program every other year. The MS in Regulatory Science Program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to contribute to drug and biologics regulation and pharmaceutical product life cycles. The MS in Pharmacometrics Program prepares students for scientific leadership through mastery of quantitative disease, drug, and trial models to influence key strategic decisions during drug development to clinical trials and beyond. “Leadership donations from alumni are vital to sustaining the excellence of our programs,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy. “Dr. Yankellow has long supported the School, and we thank her for her contributions. Her entrepreneurial spirit and forward-thinking ideas are an inspiration to our faculty, students, and to all who know her. We appreciate the innovative example she sets for the profession and for pharmacists across the country.” b

Ms. Ceraul, The Spring 2016 issue of Capsule is the best ever. Congratulations on an excellent publication. Melvin Lessing, BSP ’66, PD

Capsule CELEB R AT I N G

YEARS UNIVERSI

TY OF MA

2

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Spring 2016 ONE OF U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT’S

TOP SCHOO OF PHARMALS CY

University of Mary land School of Pharmacy Magazine for Alum ni and Friends

RYLAND

SCHOOL

OF PHARM

ACY


Pumpian Lecture Puts Patients First in Health Care The School of Pharmacy welcomed faculty, staff, students, and members of the health care and patient advocacy communities to Pharmacy Hall in March for its Freda Lewis-Hall annual Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture. Titled “Patients Taking the Lead in 21st-Century Health Care and Research,” the event featured a keynote lecture by Freda Lewis-Hall, MD, DFAPA, chief medical officer for Pfizer. The audience also was treated to two panel discussions that included patients and representatives from academia, government, industry, and the local community to provide an in-depth look at patient-centered health care and research in the United States, with a particular focus on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Patient-Focused Drug Development Initiative. “The United States is embarking on the final frontier of creating a more impactful, responsive, and successful health care system, with leaders across academia, government, and industry now recognizing the patient’s role as the final arbiter for effective health care,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BS, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “The School of Pharmacy truly stands apart in our focus on patient-centered outcomes research [PCOR], and I am exceptionally proud of the work that our faculty, staff, and students continue to do to advance PCOR methods, conduct PCOR studies, and train members of both academia as well as the community in PCOR. We are here today to learn from each other and to begin to implement these theories and applications to create a patient-centered approach that will lead us to effective health care.”

Peppered with real-world examples in which patients served as the driving force behind health care innovation — from advancing the discovery of new medications to advocating for more research in a number of disease areas — the keynote lecture by Lewis-Hall examined the importance of “patientcenteredness” in health care. She noted that society is on the precipice of its third “Golden Age” in biomedical research and offered insight into the value that patients can bring as partners in health care and research, explaining how that value might be incorporated into studies and translated into the development of new cures for a wide range of illnesses. “The concept of patient centricity — putting patients at the heart of all we do in health care research and delivery — is now at the forefront of health care,” said Lewis-Hall. “We have capabilities that we never had before, and are poised to see more biomedical advancements over the next two decades than we have seen in the past two millennia. However, the only way that we will be able to truly experience this remarkable progress is if we change our current paradigm to bring patients from the periphery of health care to the center.” To further emphasize the importance of engaging patients across the spectrum of drug discovery and delivery, LewisHall called for large “meta-collaborations” among health care professionals and researchers from academia, government, and industry. She spoke about the disadvantages of researchers working in silos and called for audience members to come together to address the challenges facing the nation’s current health care system. Following the keynote lecture, C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), and Eleanor Perfetto, PhD, MS, professor in PHSR, convened two panels of experts that included patients and representatives from government, industry, and the community who offered their perspectives on the importance of actively engaging patients in their health care. b

Klein-Schwartz Retires In May, School of Pharmacy professor Wendy Klein-Schwartz, PharmD ’77, MPH, retired from the School after 39 years on faculty. Klein-Schwartz most recently served as coordinator of research and education at the Maryland Poison Center and as director of its clinical toxicology fellowship program, but over the years she served as its assistant director and director. During her career, Klein-Schwartz received more than $4.5 million in sponsored research grants, many of which were a critical component of the funding necessary to sustain the Poison Center and the educational services it provides to PharmD, PhD, and other toxicology graduate and professional students. Upon her retirement, she was honored by Dean Eddington with professor emeritus status from the University of Maryland, Baltimore.  Wendy Klein-Schwartz win t e r 2 0 1 7

3


SCHOOL NEWS

Coop Succeeds Dalby as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Following more than five years as the associate dean for academic affairs at the School of Pharmacy, Richard Dalby, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC), has returned to his Andrew Coop full-time faculty position at the School. Andrew Coop, PhD, professor and former chair of PSC, has been named as Dalby’s successor in this role. “I thank Dr. Dalby for the many contributions that he made to the School during his tenure as associate dean for academic affairs,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BS, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. Richard Dalby “Dr. Dalby oversaw many noteworthy achievements in the Office of Academic Affairs, where he led a successful self-study that resulted in the reaccreditation of our School’s Doctor of Pharmacy [PharmD] program in 2013. I am truly grateful for his service, counsel, and expertise.” The Office of Academic Affairs manages the School’s PharmD program and policies, as well as oversees academic scheduling, instructional technology, and institutional assessment. In addition to leading the self-study, Dalby helped to further advance the PharmD program by developing and implementing new approaches to address student performance on both the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) and Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination (MJPE) — exams that all student pharmacists are required to pass to become licensed pharmacists in the United States. He also implemented a number of new academic policies that continue to guide the development of both faculty and students, as well as increased the School’s visibility within the American

4

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and on the Committee on Inter-institutional Collaboration created by the nation’s Big Ten colleges and schools of pharmacy. “I appreciated the opportunity to serve as associate dean for academic affairs,” says Dalby. “I enjoyed the time that I spent working alongside faculty, staff, and students who shared my desire to ensure that our academic programs operated at the level of excellence expected of a school that prides itself on leading pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement across the state of Maryland and beyond. I am now excited to re-engage with faculty, staff, and students through teaching, research, and my other professional commitments at the School.” Coop comes into his new role with much leadership experience, as a former vice chair of education, chair of PSC, and a variety of other positions. “Dr. Coop is a natural choice to serve as the School’s new associate dean for academic affairs,” says Eddington. “In addition to his involvement with the School’s wellestablished PhD in PSC program and recently launched MS in Regulatory Science Program, Dr. Coop has taught extensively in our PharmD program, mentoring pharmacy students interested in research and supporting doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in his laboratory. I look forward to working alongside him to continue advancing our academic programs and preparing our students and trainees to excel as practitioners, researchers, and innovators in the profession.” Coop joined the School’s faculty in 1999, and has been recognized nationally for his achievements in the field of medicinal chemistry. He received the 2003 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems for Drug Dependence, as well as the 2014 AACP James E. Wynn Memorial Award from the organization’s Chemistry Section. In November 2016, he was named a fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. During his tenure as chair of PSC, the department created a state-of-the-art Good Manufacturing Practice facility to produce capsules and tablets, secured a multimilliondollar award from the Food and Drug Administration to establish a Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation, launched the MS in Regulatory Science Program, and experienced consistent growth and diversity in the department’s research funding. b


M-CERSI Event Highlights Need for National Medical Device Evaluation System Researchers from across academia, government, and industry gathered in Pharmacy Hall in March for “Building the National Evaluation System for Medical Devices: Using Real-World Evidence to Improve Device Safety and Effectiveness,” a daylong conference sponsored by the University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Led by Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, the conference explored the need for a national evaluation system for medical devices and examined the potential of harnessing real-world evidence to improve the safety and effectiveness of those devices. The event kicked off with a keynote presentation delivered by Jeffrey Shuren, MD, JD, director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA, who highlighted the agency’s perspective on the development of a national medical device evaluation system. In addition to discussing the current challenges surrounding the approval process for medical devices, Shuren spoke about the requirements that a national evaluation system would need to fulfill to have the greatest impact on ensuring the safety and effectiveness of new medical devices. Shuren also noted that the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health has laid the foundation for a new national evaluation system for medical devices, explaining that two multi-stakeholder groups issued reports last

year that provided recommendations on how to move the project forward. Following Shuren’s presentation, the conference was divided into four sessions that explored how the digital revolution might be harnessed for medical device Fadia Shaya evaluation, presentday foundations for a national evaluation system, how to make the learning health care system a reality, and the importance of public-private partnerships and unique device identification. In her concluding remarks, Shaya noted that the conference represented only one step in the journey toward establishing a national evaluation system for medical devices. She spoke about the new questions raised surrounding data security and safety as a result of the day’s presentations and encouraged attendees to further consider the role they might play as work on the system moves forward. “Most importantly, we need to ensure that we are including patient reported outcomes and patient input as we continue to develop this system,” she said. b

Study Finds Depression Linked to Reduced COPD Medication Adherence A first-of-its-kind study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society by Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, Parke-Davis Endowed Chair in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, examining a sample of Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has found that patients’ adherence to COPD maintenance medications decreased when they experienced new bouts of depression. “For many chronic conditions, medications are a mainstay of health — preventing disease progression, improving quality of life, and staving off mortality,” says Simoni-Wastila,

who is also director of research and policy for the School’s Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging. “Yet, there is limited research on how multiple chronic conditions, such as COPD and depression, influence each other, especially in regards to how patients and their caregivers manage treatments for those co-occurring illnesses.” Titled “Adherence to Maintenance Medications Among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Role of Depression,” the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, used Medicare administrative claims data to assess a 5 percent random sample of Medicare Continued on page 6 win t e r 2 0 1 7

5


SCHOOL NEWS

Continued from page 5 beneficiaries with an average age of 68 years from 2006 to 2012, focusing on beneficiaries with two years of continuous coverage for Medicare Parts A, B, and D, and at least two prescription fills for medications commonly used to treat COPD. Adherence was based on the number of prescriptions filled, while the presence of depression was characterized by at least one diagnosis code on at least Linda Simoni-Wastila one inpatient claim or two outpatient claims during the study period. Of the more than 31,000 beneficiaries who met the criteria for this study, 20 percent were diagnosed with depression following their COPD diagnosis. Patients’ average monthly adherence to their COPD maintenance medications was low,

reaching only 57 percent in the month following their first prescription fill, and decreasing to 25 percent within six months. Depression remains one of the most common, yet least recognized, co-morbidities among patients with COPD, with 17 to 44 percent of COPD patients experiencing symptoms associated with the illness. “Our current health care system often treats illness and individuals living with illness as two separate, unrelated entities,” says Simoni-Wastila. “Through this study, we aimed to help health care practitioners, policymakers, and patients and their caregivers think more holistically about health, and to consider how the presence of one medical condition can influence the progression and management of another condition.” She adds: “More health care professionals should screen their older adult patients with COPD for depression. Early intervention is key to starting the conversation between providers and patients about other factors that might be impeding patients’ adherence to their COPD medications, and to ensure that patients are receiving the best treatments to address all of their medical conditions.” b

New Assistant Dean for Experiential Learning Named Agnes Ann Feemster, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), has been named assistant dean for experiential learning at the School of Pharmacy. A member of the School’s faculty since 2014, Feemster brings Agnes Ann Feemster more than 15 years of clinical, leadership, and management experience to her new role. The Office of Experiential Learning at the School of Pharmacy recruits and oversees preceptors — full-time or part-time pharmacy practitioners and other professionals who serve as affiliate faculty for the School and supervise students during their experiential rotations. The office also manages introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences for students, experiences that account for more than 30 percent of the School’s PharmD curriculum. As assistant dean for experiential learning, Feemster will work with staff to increase the School’s roster of ambulatory care rotations and implement experiences

6

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

focused on the Joint Commission of Pharmacy Practitioners’ Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process and Entrustable Professional Activities. Feemster received a bachelor’s degree in pre-professional health studies from Clemson University, and a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from the Medical University of South Carolina. She completed her PharmD at the University of South Carolina, and later pursued a pharmacy practice residency at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Her research interests include pharmacy practice management and leadership, medication safety, educational methods and outcomes, pharmacy informatics, global health, and interprofessional education. Before joining the School of Pharmacy, Feemster was interim director of pharmacy at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where she also served as assistant director of clinical pharmacy, investigational drug, and central production services. Now a member of the School’s Curriculum Committee, she leads the pharmacy practice management and health system pharmacy course in the PharmD program, manages the practice lab experience for first-year student pharmacists, and coordinates the international training program in PPS. b


Layson-Wolf Named President-Elect of MPhA Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD ’00, CGP, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs, has been named vice president and president-elect Cherokee Layson-Wolf of the Maryland Pharmacists Association (MPhA). Installed into office on June 12, Layson-Wolf also will serve as president of the organization for 2017-2018. “The members of MPhA have made an outstanding decision in electing Dr. Layson-Wolf to serve as their next vice president and president-elect,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy. “During her time at the School, Dr. Layson-Wolf has demonstrated a continued commitment to advancing the pharmacy profession across the state of Maryland and beyond. In her service as both the previous assistant dean for experiential learning and current associate dean for student affairs, Dr. Layson-Wolf has proven herself to be an exemplary role model for students and faculty alike, and I am confident that she will bring the same focus, dedication, and leadership to her role with MPhA.” Layson-Wolf joined MPhA in 1998, while still a student at the School of Pharmacy. Since that time, she has worked alongside its leadership and staff to support a wide range of pharmacy education, practice, and advocacy initiatives, including the national Script Your Future campaign to raise awareness about medication adherence. She previously served as the organization’s Speaker of the House and as a member of its Board of Trustees. “We are thrilled that Dr. Layson-Wolf has been selected to serve as vice president and president-elect of MPhA,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “Through the numerous leadership positions that she has held both inside and outside of the

School of Pharmacy, Dr. Layson-Wolf has advocated for and helped put into practice a number of advancements in the areas of pharmacist-delivered immunizations, point of care testing, medication adherence, and patient care program implementation. She is a true pioneer in her field, and someone who is regularly sought out for her knowledge and expertise. We look forward to hearing about all that she is sure to accomplish in her new role.” As vice president and president-elect of MPhA, Layson-Wolf will support and assist the organization’s president, while working alongside other officers on the Board of Trustees to respond to the changing needs of its members. Upon assuming the role of president, Layson-Wolf will oversee the Board of Trustees to help ensure that members fulfill their responsibilities for the continued governance of the organization. “The relationships and connections that I have gained through my work with MPhA have been invaluable to my development as a practicing pharmacist and pharmacy educator,” says Layson-Wolf. “I have professionally benefited from a number of advancements that can be credited to my colleagues in MPhA, who believed that pharmacists could do more to serve patients, and advocated to help make those beliefs a reality for practicing pharmacists across the state. However, while our profession has made great strides in recent years, there still exist a number of opportunities to expand pharmacists’ access to patient care. I look forward to working with fellow members of MPhA to determine how we can best leverage those opportunities and continue to move the profession forward for future generations of practitioners.” In addition to assuming her new role as vice president and president-elect of MPhA, Layson-Wolf will maintain her current appointments at the School, including her roles as director of the University of Maryland PGY-1 Community Pharmacy Residency Program and pharmacist with the School’s Patients, Pharmacists, Partnerships (P3) Program — a pharmacistdelivered comprehensive medication management program for individuals with chronic diseases. b

win t e r 2 0 1 7

7


SCHOOL NEWS

Study: Penicillin Testing Can Change Treatment Course A new study from the University of Maryland reveals that testing hospital patients for penicillin allergy leads to optimal antibiotic treatment, since most people who think they are allergic to penicillin are actually not. And finding out doesn’t take an allergist: the study evaluated a penicillin allergy skin testing program that was managed by infectious diseases physician Emily Heil fellows who were able to appropriately assess patients for penicillin allergy and perform the testing. “Our study confirmed that many people who think they have a penicillin allergy actually do not when penicillin allergy testing is performed,” says Emily L. Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ ID, lead author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science at the School of Pharmacy. “This is hugely important since patients with reported penicillin allergies tend to get suboptimal antibiotic therapy compared to patients without reported penicillin allergies.” Skin testing was conducted on 76 people who said they were allergic to penicillin while they were patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Of the valid tests, 96 percent were negative (not allergic), according to the study published in July 2016 in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, a peer-reviewed journal from Oxford University Press.

The outcome mirrors the results of several national studies that have led the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to alert health care professionals to implement specific interventions, such as a penicillin allergy assessment protocol, to improve antibiotic use at the hospital. Heil and colleagues, who include several researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, conducted a study to assess the feasibility of a penicillin allergy skin testing service managed by physicians in the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program. Fellows received education and training in penicillin allergy testing, then consulted with various hospital departments to select patients for assessment and to undergo skin testing. Training infectious diseases fellows proved to be a “great resource,” Heil says, since many allergists work only in outpatient settings and do not see patients in hospitals. In fact, a national survey of infectious disease specialists, conducted by the University of Maryland, indicates that lack of time and inadequate personnel are the main barriers to penicillin skin testing. Yet, those surveyed note that penicillin allergy is often overstated and affects antibiotic choice, so teaching infectious disease fellows how to evaluate and test for penicillin allergy could enhance patient care and cost savings, Heil notes. “For other institutions without access to inpatient allergist services, infectious diseases physicians can help provide this important service,” Heil says. b

Treatment can be improved as a result of penicillin allergy testing, according to the study: u 84 percent of those who tested negative for penicillin allergy were given antibiotic changes u 63 percent received a narrower spectrum antibiotic u 80 percent received more effective therapy u 61 percent received more cost-effective therapy

8

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


Longtime West Baltimore Pharmacist Inducted into Dean’s Hall of Fame Dwayne Weaver, BSP, RPh, pharmacist and owner of Keystone Pharmacy in West Baltimore, was inducted into the Dean’s Hall of Fame for Distinguished Community Pharmacists as part of the annual banquet hosted by the School of Pharmacy’s National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) student chapter on April 9. Established in 2006, the Hall of Fame Award is presented each year in recognition of a pharmacist’s leadership, entrepreneurship, and passion for independent pharmacy. “Independent pharmacies like Keystone provide a range of valuable services that help ensure the health and well-being of the residents in their neighborhoods,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “It is the independent pharmacy owner who has an intimate knowledge of the community that he or she serves and is able to customize offerings to meet patients’ unique needs. “It is also the independent pharmacy owner who has a platform to evaluate innovation and creation in his or her health care setting. The focus on independent pharmacies and the services that they provide cannot be understated, and it is our responsibility as one of the top 10 schools of pharmacy in the country to ensure that these businesses can continue serving the communities that desperately depend on them.” In 1985, Weaver, a graduate of Ohio Northern University, part-

Dean Eddington and Dwayne Weaver with his nered to establish pharmacy staff and third-year student Elias Inscoe, Keystone Pharmacy a member of the student chapter of NCPA. in West Baltimore, and later became the sole owner. In 1997, an electrical fire destroyed the pharmacy’s original location. Weaver relocated the pharmacy, and he and his staff continued their important work helping patients access lifesaving medications, counseling them on side effects and drug-drug interactions, and advocating for them with their physicians’ offices and insurance providers. In 2015, Keystone Pharmacy was devastated by the riots in Baltimore following the death of Freddie Gray. Doors and windows were smashed, prescription drugs were stolen, chips and drinks were taken, and trash littered the floor. Although he could have relocated again, Weaver chose to stay in the community, working with his staff to clean and repair the damage. “It was the collective strength of the community that helped us pull through that difficult time,” said Weaver. “After the unrest, many of my patients visited the store to see how they could help us rebuild. Those selfless acts of kindness removed any doubt that my staff and I had about reopening the store. They reminded me that pharmacists are truly the most accessible members of the health care team. We have the power and the tools necessary to impact lives through education, counseling, and advocacy.” b

‘Master Preceptor’ Receives National Recognition Peter Mbi, PharmD, owner of Global Health Pharmacy in Laurel and preceptor for the Experiential Learning Program (ELP) at the School of Pharmacy since 1990, received the Peter Mbi Master Preceptor Award from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) at its annual meeting in July. Mbi was one of seven selected to receive the award, which recognizes preceptors from across the United States for their sustained commitment to excellence in experiential education. “As a two-time recipient of the School’s Preceptor of the Year Award, Dr. Mbi has a great reputation and is one of our most popular preceptors,” says Mark Brueckl, RPh, MBA, assistant director for ELP at the School. “Whether it’s providing direct patient care services such as blood glucose monitoring and immunizations or conducting a thorough medication review for a patient who has been prescribed a new medicine, our office is consistently impressed with the opportunities that Dr. Mbi makes available for students, as well as the activities in which he gets them involved. He truly embodies

all of the qualities of a master preceptor.” With experiential learning accounting for more than 30 percent of the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum, preceptors are an important asset to the School of Pharmacy. These individuals are full-time or part-time pharmacy practitioners who serve as affiliate faculty for the School and oversee students during their introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences. Brueckl and his colleagues in ELP, who manage a roster of more than 850 preceptors and 500 practice sites for the School, nominated Mbi for AACP’s Master Preceptor Award. “Many students enter my practice site with preconceptions about what it means to be a pharmacist,” says Mbi. “They sometimes view their role as that of a medication dispenser, but pharmacists are much more than that. We are medication experts who strive to use our knowledge for the greater good, educating the public about proper medication use as well as adverse drug reactions. It has always been my goal to help students understand that pharmacy practice is real — it’s alive — and we can find both personal and professional fulfillment practicing the profession.”  win t e r 2 0 1 7

9


SCHOOL NEWS

Lamy Center Announces Transitions in Leadership Nicole Brandt

Changes are taking place in the leadership of the Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging following the announcement that executive director Bruce Stuart, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), will retire from the School of Pharmacy at the end of 2016. Nicole Brandt, PharmD ’97, MBA, BCPP, CGP, FASCP, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), has been named the center’s new executive director. Chanel Whittaker, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, FASCP, associate professor in PPS, and Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, professor and Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy in PHSR, also have been named as director of education and training programs and director of research and policy for the center, respectively. “The School of Pharmacy is eternally grateful to Dr. Stuart for his nearly 20 years of dedication and contributions to the Lamy Center,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “Because of his extraordinary efforts, the center has become the focal point for research, education, and service in geriatric pharmacotherapy at the School. Dr. Brandt is a nationally known leader for her work in geriatric pharmacotherapy, and she brings a wealth of experience leading numerous clinical, practice, policy, and educational initiatives in the field to her new position. With her knowledge and unique skill set, I am confident that she will uphold the center’s legacy of improving drug therapy for older adults.” Brandt received her Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) from the School of Pharmacy in 1997. She completed a residency in geriatric pharmacotherapy at the School in 1998, and joined the faculty in 1999. Before being named its executive director, she served as director of education and training programs for the Lamy Center, where she was instrumental in expanding the geriatric pharmacy training opportunities available at the School through the PharmD program’s geriatrics and palliative care pathway, the PGY-2 Geriatric Pharmacy Residency Program, and as a co-investigator with Johns Hopkins University on a geriatric workforce enhancement program for primary care providers. She also currently serves as president of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, where she collaborates with a variety of national organizations to improve medication use and safety in older adults. “Dr. Stuart has been a mentor in my professional development for many years, so it is a tremendous honor to succeed him as executive director of the Lamy Center,” says Brandt. “It is also humbling to know that the leadership at our School has bestowed in me the confidence to lead the center. My passion for 10

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Chanel Whittaker

Linda Simoni-Wastila

promoting optimal care for older adults continues to drive my career, and I know that my experiences as both a practitioner and educator have prepared me well to serve at this level. I am excited to continue the center’s lasting legacy of improving drug therapy for older adults through new and innovative research, education, and clinical initiatives.” Whittaker now steps into Brandt’s former role as director of education and training programs for the Lamy Center. She received her PharmD from Rutgers University and completed both a managed care pharmacy practice residency with Kaiser Permanente Mid-Atlantic States and a primary care specialty residency at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She also completed a fellowship with the Stanford Geriatric Education Center in ethnogeriatrics. She specializes in geriatric pharmacotherapy, chronic kidney disease, and health communication. Whittaker has practiced in a number of ambulatory and community settings, where she provided services to older adults in Baltimore and surrounding areas. She also currently serves as director for the PGY-2 Geriatric Pharmacy Residency Program at the University of Maryland. Simoni-Wastila, the new director of research for the Lamy Center, received her doctorate in health policy from Brandeis University. Her research focuses on a wide range of issues related to prescription drug policy, including prescription drug abuse and diversion, psychopharmacological medication use and outcomes in older adults, the intended and unintended impacts of policy on access and health outcomes, and the comparative safety and effectiveness of medication regimens in vulnerable populations. Named in honor of Peter Lamy, MSc, PhD, former ParkeDavis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy at the School and internationally renowned pioneer in geriatric pharmacotherapy, the Lamy Center is a first-of-its-kind center dedicated to improving drug therapy for older adults, producing new scientific knowledge with practical applications for improving the outcomes of pharmaceutical care for older adults, and providing information on best practices in geriatric pharmacotherapy. The center has garnered more than $10 million in funding from a variety of federal, state, and local agencies, as well as industry, to fund numerous projects on aging-related issues. Producing nearly 150 peer-reviewed publications in the last five years, it has established a national reputation for high-quality research, particularly in the areas of Medicare drug policy, nursing home pharmacy, and medication quality and adherence in elderly patients with chronic disease. 


Laurels Mark Brueckl, RPh, MBA, was named the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) April Employee of the Month. Becky Ceraul has been elected secretary of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy’s (AACP) Administrative Services Section. Catherine Cooke, PharmD, has been elected vice president of the School’s Faculty Assembly. Andrew Coop, PhD, has been named chair-elect of the AACP’s Chemistry Section and has been named a fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. Lindsay Currier was named UMB’s March Employee of the Month. Sandeep Devabhakthuni, PharmD, has been named by his faculty peers as the School’s AACP Teacher of the Year. Susan dosReis, PhD ’99, has been elected co-chair of the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology’s Pediatric Special Interest Group. She also was selected as the School’s 2016 Student Government Association and Kappa Psi Faculty Advisor of the Year. Hillary Edwards, MPH, has been elected to the UMB Staff Senate.

Steven Fletcher, PhD, received a U.S. patent for “Potent Analogues of the C-MYC Inhibitor 10074G5 with Improved Cell Permeability.” Peter Hur, PharmD, MBA, received a Best New Investigator Podium Research Presentations Award at the annual meeting of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Tabassum Majid, PhD, received second place in the postdoctoral category in the Johns Hopkins University Research on Aging Showcase. Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, received the Faculty Teacher of the Year Award from the School’s graduating Class of 2016. Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, has been appointed to a two-year term on the Executive Committee of UMB’s Center to Advance Chronic Pain Research and has been named chair of the Society of Palliative Care Pharmacists’ Education Committee. She and Kathryn Walker, PharmD, have been elected to the society’s inaugural Board of Trustees. C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, has been named a member of the BD4P Steering Committee of the Reagan-Udall Foundation for the Food and Drug Administration.

Heather Neu, PhD, received the American Chemical Society’s Division of Inorganic Chemistry’s Young Investigator Award. Ebere Onukwugha, PhD, MS, has been elected the School’s representative to UMB’s Graduate Council. Frank Palumbo, PhD, JD, has been named to the Board of Directors of the Food and Drug Law Institute. Kathleen Pincus, PharmD, BCPS, received a Faculty Teacher of the Year Award from the Division of Medical Student Education in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS, has been appointed to the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Leadership Committee of the Council on Quality Care and Outcomes Research and has been named chair of the Maryland Advocacy Coordinating Committee of AHA’s Mid-Atlantic Affiliate.

Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, has been named the School’s Parke-Davis Endowed Chair. Deanna Tran, PharmD ’11, has been appointed chair of the Recognition Committee of the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management’s (APhA-APPM) Immunizing Pharmacists Special Interest Group, and has been appointed to APhAAPPM’s Education Standing Committee. Chanel Whittaker, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, FASCP, received the Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award from the School’s graduating Class of 2016. Bruce Yu, PhD, received U.S. patents for “Noninvasive Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Materials and Tissues Using Magnetic Resonance Techniques” and for “Dendrimers and Methods of Preparing Same Through Proportionate Branching.”

Gerald Rosen, PhD, JD, has received professor emeritus status at UMB. Fadia Shaya, PhD, has been elected to the Maryland Higher Education Commission and was named Woman of the Year in Health Services by the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

11


Ride with Pride!

Now you can ride with pride with the new customized University of Maryland School of Pharmacy license plate!

The School of Pharmacy is celebrating the 175th anniversary of our founding in 1841. We also are celebrating our ranking as a Top 10 school of pharmacy. And now you can own the Maryland license plate that tells everyone that you’re a proud member of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy community! Show your pride with this unique license plate for just a one-time payment of $50, $25 of which is 100 percent tax-deductible. Even better, part of your plate purchase will help fund student scholarships and other programs offered by your alma mater.

Download the application at

pharmacy.umaryland.edu/licenseplate Download the application, complete and sign it, and mail it with a $50 check made payable to “University of Maryland School of Pharmacy” to: University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Office of Development and Alumni Affairs 20 N. Pine St., Suite S740 Baltimore, MD 21201 For more information, contact Greer Griffith, associate director of alumni affairs and annual giving, at 410-706-5893 or ggriffith@rx.umaryland.edu.


Celebrating

175 YEARS OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI As one of the oldest schools of pharmacy in the United States, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has been perfectly positioned throughout its history to graduate students who shaped the field with their innumerable contributions. Alumni from the School helped create regional and national professional organizations still in existence today. They championed progressive coursework and curriculum standards. They’ve pressed the envelope with drug development and established safety standards through state and federal regulatory work. The contributions of School alumni in education, practice, research, entrepreneurship, and in the community have been invaluable to creating the dynamic field of pharmacy we enjoy today.

By Christianna McCausland

wint e r 2 0 1 7

13


MAN OF LETTERS

SHATTERING THE GLASS CEILING

Charles Caspari Jr., PhG 1869

Lady Mary Johnson, PhG 1898, MD

Though he learned pharmacy from his father and as an apprentice to Louis Dohme, Caspari preferred research and writing, leaving commercial pharmacy to open the first-ever pharmaceutical laboratory in Maryland. He became dean of the School and the first appointed food and drug commissioner of Maryland as well as permanent secretary of the American Pharmaceutical Association.

The Baltimore Sun reported that no graduate of the Class of 1898 received such resounding applause as Miss L.M. Johnson, the first female to graduate from the School. It wasn’t the first barrier she’d broken. Having obtained her MD the previous spring, she was the first doctor of either gender to enter the School.

EDUCATION

FIRST LADY OF PHARMACY

LIFELONG SCHOLAR

B. Olive Cole, PharD 1913

Lawrence H. Block, BSP ’62, PhD ’69 Pharmaceutical Sciences

Cole began her career as a stenographer at Sharp & Dohme. By the end of her life she was the preeminent woman of pharmacy. Her list of firsts is remarkable: first female law school graduate (in 1923, specializing in legal aspects of pharmacy); first female with a full professorship at the School; and, in 1948, the first female acting dean of the School. She was a lifetime member of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association and author of several histories of pharmacy.

Block’s career in academia began in 1968 as an assistant professor of pharmaceutics at the University of Pittsburgh. Two years later he moved to Duquesne University where he’s remained, authoring more than 100 publications and mentoring over 70 research students. Currently professor emeritus of pharmaceutics at the Mylan School of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Duquesne University, he received the school’s President’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship in 2000.

EDUCATOR FOR A NEW GENERATION Wanda T. Maldonado-Dávila, BSP ’82, PharmD ’86 Maldonado-Dávila recalls the collegiality between students and teachers as being an important part of her time at the School and credits the mentorship she received from faculty while she was a student, as well as after graduation as being an asset to her professional development. Now she’s shaping a new generation of students as dean of the School of Pharmacy at the University of Puerto Rico, where she’s led curriculum development and implementation that’s providing graduates a competitive edge in the workforce.

Celebrating 175 YEARS DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI of


THE PRACTITIONER’S ACADEMIC Alan Lyles, BSP ’80, MPH, ScD Lyles thinks of himself as a “pracademic” — a practitioner academic. Following pharmacy school he completed an MPH and ScD at Johns Hopkins. After working early in his career as a pharmacist and in health care administration, in 1995 he moved to academia where he has built an international reputation as an expert in pharmaceutical economics and health policy. Pharmaceutical Public Policy, of which he is a co-author (with Thomas Fulda and Albert Wertheimer), has been described as a “must read” resource for all health policymakers by the CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Currently he’s the Henry A. Rosenberg Professor of Government, Business, and Nonprofit Partnerships in the College of Public Affairs at the University of Baltimore.

FROM PRACTITIONER TO EDUCATOR AND ADMINISTRATOR Anthony Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96 Pharmaceutical Health Services Research When Wutoh was a pharmacy and graduate student at the School of Pharmacy, he never expected to one day be the provost and chief academic officer at Howard University in Washington, D.C. But the leadership, research, and mentorship opportunities he had as a student, along with an early career in hospital pharmacy, set him on a course to be dean of Howard’s College of Pharmacy and now, one of the broader university’s most respected administrators. Following graduation with a BSP, Wutoh worked as a hospital pharmacist for the University of Maryland Medical System while working on his PhD in pharmaceutical health services research (then known as pharmacy administration) at the School. After completing his PhD, he accepted an assistant professor position at Howard, setting him on a 20-plusyear career in academics. As the university’s provost, he is responsible for ensuring the quality of Howard’s academic and clinical offerings, its faculty, and its student academic experience. His office might be far from the pharmacy, but he remains engaged in the profession and excited by the impact pharmacists have on patients’ lives.

THE THEUNLIKELY UNLIKELY ACADEMIC ACADEMIC Craig Svensson, PharmD ’81, PhD Craig K. K. Svensson, PharmD ’81, PhD

When took a job Wilde Lake PharmacyininColumbia, Columbia, When hehe took a job at at Wilde Lake Pharmacy Md., Svensson was a pseudo hippie with long hair andnono idea Md., Svensson was a pseudo hippie with long hair and what to do with his life except avoid going to college. But the idea what to do with his life except avoid going to college. pharmacist, Bill Jackson, BSP ’50, took Svensson under But the pharmacist, Bill Jackson, BSP ’50, took Svensson his winghis and encouraged him to attend School. he found under wing and encouraged him tothe attend the There School. outstanding teachers and mentors, worked in the Maryland There he found outstanding teachers and mentors, worked in Center, and Center, participated in the Student Committee thePoison Maryland Poison and participated in the Studenton Drug Abuse Education. These experiences offered important Committee on Drug Abuse Education. These experiences lessons in communication still uses todayheasstill dean and offered important lessons in he communication uses professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology today as dean and professor of medicinal chemistry and at the College of Pharmacy at College Purdue University. molecular pharmacology at the of Pharmacy at Purdue Perhaps more importantly, he learned not only the content University. his classes, also how toheteach. ofPerhaps morebut importantly, learned not only the content “It was obvious me to that our faculty were highly of his classes, but alsotohow teach. to excellence teaching and passionate dedicated “It was obvious to me in that our faculty were highlyabout their subject material,” Svensson says. “That is something I have tried dedicated to excellence in teaching and passionate about their to emulate throughout my career. subject material,” Svensson says. “That is something I have to “I emulate was verythroughout impressed that Dean Bill Kinnard continued tried my career. some level of teaching despite his very busy administrative “I was very impressed that Dean Bill Kinnard continued load,” he continues. “I have followed his example and continue some level of teaching despite his very busy administrative to be engaged in teaching during my own tenure as acontinue dean.” load,” he continues. “I have followed his example and If only Bill Jackson could see him now. to be engaged in teaching during my own tenure as a dean.” If only Bill Jackson could see him now.

wint er 2 0 1 7

15


Celebrating 175 YEARS of DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

RENAISSANCE MAN Francis Balassone, BSP ’40 It’s hard to imagine a career as varied as Balassone’s. He was a pharmacist, professor, board member, Food and Drug Administration consultant, chief of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s drug control division, and president of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. In 1965, the School awarded him the alumnus medal to acknowledge his achievements as a professor, as president of the alumni association, and as a passionate administrator of food and drug laws. One of the School’s four endowed lectures is named in his honor.

PRACTICE

BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS

AN EVER EVOLVING CAREER

Simu K. Thomas, PhD ’02 Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

Leonette Kemp, PharmD ’06

Early in his career Thomas took on a challenging opportunity to head U.S. Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) for Novartis Oncology. He established robust research programs across disease conditions and developed the blueprint to build an organization to staff and support oncology. His efforts at his company netted him a Novartis Business Excellence award and set him on a fast-paced trajectory to his current position as global head of market access and health and economic outcomes research for the cell and gene therapies unit at Novartis. Thomas is a recognized thought leader in health economics who has authored numerous manuscripts, congressional presentations, and book chapters. He also serves as adjunct assistant professor at the School and at Rutgers University of New Jersey.

Before her admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy program, Kemp’s only interaction with pharmacy was as a customer at a retail store. But her four years at the School of Pharmacy and subsequent one-year residency at the University of Maryland transformed her into the clinical pharmacy specialist she is today. Following completion of her residency, Kemp moved to Memphis, Tenn., for a clinical pharmacist position at Methodist University Hospital, where she split her time between the oncology satellite clinic and the hospital’s fledgling pain and palliative care service. Three years later, she was promoted to clinical pharmacy specialist focused on pain and palliative care. Kemp now spends the majority of her time on the oncology service, a move she has embraced as part of her evolution. She sees her career continuing to evolve and dreams of working in academia or administration, being actively involved in research and in the development of pharmacy students, residents, and clinical practice sites.

ADVANCING THE BASIC SCIENCES Ellis Grollman, PhG ’26 Grollman made important contributions to the city of Baltimore as a hospital pharmacist at Johns Hopkins and Sinai hospitals and as a community pharmacist in several locations in Maryland. Grollman’s sister Evelyn created an endowed lecture fund to honor her late brother and, upon her death, funded the Evelyn GrollmanGlick Endowed Professorship to recognize and advance the work of an outstanding member of the School’s faculty in the pharmaceutical or related basic sciences.


FATHER OF COMMUNITY PHARMACY

THE PATH LESS TAKEN

Henry Parr Hynson, PhG 1877

David W. Miller, PhD ’93 – Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

Hynson dedicated his life to the practice and progress of community pharmacy. He pressed for the publication of professional compounding journals and was an early champion of doctorate degrees for pharmacists. His local and national advocacy brought into existence organizations with which the School is heavily involved today including the National Community Pharmacists Association and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

OUT OF THIS WORLD PRACTITIONER

Raised by a pharmacist father and a politically active mother, Miller had an interest in pharmacy that included community pharmacy, which he briefly practiced, and public policy. He found a fitting home as a fellow at the School’s then new Center on Drugs and Public Policy. Rather than a career in academia, he took an opportunity at GlaxoSmithKline after graduation, a fork in the road that has led him to a career in the biopharmaceutical industry including his current position as senior vice president of global market access at the biotech company Biogen, where he works from the United Kingdom on global projects. He is a member of the School’s Board of Visitors.

RESEARCH

Tina Bayuse, PharmD ’00 You could say Bayuse is in community pharmacy, only her clients tend to be in space. As the lead pharmacist for pharmacy operations at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, Bayuse is responsible for providing pharmaceutical care and medication management to both the terrestrial and spaceflightbased employees at JSC. Her work encompasses everything from promoting a healthy workforce and providing pharmacy support for workplace injuries to managing care for astronauts. “Space medicine pharmacy practice is a major part of our work and what makes the pharmacy team at JSC unique,” she states. “We provided services to the Space Shuttle Program before it retired, and now to the continuously crewed International Space Station. In my role as pharmacy operations lead, we’ve already begun work for commercial crew flights, which are on the horizon.” This out-of-this-world career owes itself in part to a pivotal opportunity while at the School of Pharmacy. “I was granted permission to create a pharmacy rotation at JSC in the Pharmacology Lab,” she explains. “It didn’t fit neatly into a pharmacy practice experience category at the time. I was incredibly fortunate to have the Experiential Learning Program’s management and faculty support and encouragement to create one. That seemingly small event opened the door to the career I now enjoy.” Bayuse also has been pleased to see her career grow during an evolutionary time when pharmacy has become an essential part of any comprehensive health care team. This is certainly apparent as NASA begins to research and plan for explorations beyond the International Space Station. In 2016, Bayuse joined the Exploration Medical Capabilities Element. As part of this new, multidisciplinary team, she provides pharmaceutical expertise and research that will be essential to one day helping astronauts on places like Mars.

REGULATORY RISING STAR

RESEARCH THAT IMPACTS LIVES

Pallavi Nithyanandan, PhD ’05 Pharmaceutical Sciences

Joanne Ruyu Chang, PhD ’95, MD Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

Nithyanandan is establishing herself as a rising star in the leadership of regulatory science and policy. As the acting branch chief for the compendial operations and standards branch at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Nithyanandan plays an important role in the agency’s public health mission. She leads a group that manages the FDA’s interactions with entities like the U.S. Pharmacopeia and organizations that set quality standards, like ASTM. She serves as an expert on compendial issues and takes an active role in policy development related to standards and pharmaceutical quality. Her work has a tremendous impact on public health; most recently her group created the FDA Guidance to Industry for the control of elemental impurities in drug products.

The graduate work Chang completed at the School was a complement to her medical degree, giving her a clinical research perspective essential to her development into a leader in the global health care industry. Currently vice president and head of medical, clinical, and regulatory affairs at Alcon US & Canada (a division of Novartis focused on eye care), Chang and her team collaborate with health care providers to develop innovative, life-changing clinical and outcomes studies to ensure their advanced treatments have beneficial impacts on patients with eye disorders like cataracts and glaucoma. As chair of the Grant Review Committee for Alcon US’s Independent Medical Education Committee, Chang oversees funding for educational programs that promote scientific knowledge, medical advancement, and delivery of effective health care in the area of ophthalmology.


ACADEMY ALL-STAR

LAW MAN

Kathleen Rauen Stratton, PhD ’85 Pharmaceutical Sciences

Paul A. Pumpian, BSP ’50, JD

Moving from bench science to health policy was a critical transition for Stratton, who built a career at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in the then Institute of Medicine (now the health and medicine division). She continues supporting the rewarding work of the Academies, specifically those related to public health issues such as vaccine safety and smoking cessation. She became a staff scholar in 2005 not long after she was recognized with the Cecil Research Award, the highest staff honor given by the Institute of Medicine.

As both a patent attorney and a pharmacist, Pumpian’s contributions were wide. He created the first pharmacy administration department in a college of pharmacy at the University of Maryland and was the first person to serve on two state boards of pharmacy (New Jersey and Wisconsin). He was instrumental in New Jersey’s move to mandate patient profiles, a step that set the stage for today’s expanded clinical roles for dispensing pharmacists. He held leadership positions at numerous national organizations. During a brief tenure with the Food and Drug Administration, he held several posts including director of the Office of Legislative and Governmental Services in the Office of the Commissioner. The Paul A. Pumpian lecture series was established at the School of Pharmacy in 2004, shortly before his death in 2008.

COMMUNITY

DRUG DEVELOPMENT DRIVER Michael J. Fossler Jr., PharmD ’92, PhD ’95, FCP Pharmaceutical Sciences A clinical pharmacologist requires both clinical and technical knowledge. Fossler received both in his PharmD/ PhD program, which included valuable bedside rotations that grounded his clinical expertise. Fossler began his career at the Food and Drug Administration before moving to private industry to work in drug discovery and development. As vice president of Quantitative Sciences at Trevena, Inc., a small biotech company, he now heads clinical pharmacology, statistics, and programming. Fossler is not only a superb scientist, but a great mentor and teacher. (He won the BristolMyers Squibb Mentorship in Clinical Pharmacology Award in 2011.) He holds adjunct faculty appointments at the School of Pharmacy, Mercer University, and the University of North Texas. He is a past president of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology, which named him honorary regent in 2015.

HOSPITAL/HEALTH SYSTEM PHARMACY CHAMPION Stephen J. Allen, MS ’78 A career that spans four decades began at Children’s Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where Allen was director of pharmacy, and then at Kaiser Permanente, Suburban Hospital, and Georgetown University Hospital. He has participated in and led a transformation of pharmacy practice from a distributive focus to a clinical patient care focus. He’s cultivated a national reputation for his advocacy on behalf of health system pharmacists, particularly in his current role as CEO of the ASHP Research and Education Foundation, and he is a champion of professional organizations. He is a member of the Board of Visitors at the School.

A PROACTIVE EXECUTIVE

THE COMMUNITY’S PHARMACIST

David M. Yoder, PharmD ’98, MBA

Michelle Andoll, BSP ’90, JD

It pays to be flexible and seize every opportunity. As a freshfrom-school pharmacy manager at a company owned by a local insurer, Yoder was everything from a hospice pharmacist to an oncology pharmacist. Meeting challenges with aplomb helped him rise; now he’s executive director of integrated care management at the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Federal Employees Program where he leads all medical and pharmacy management functions for 5.3 million federal employees.

When Andoll learned that the West Baltimore community where she was raised was undergoing redevelopment efforts, she wanted to help. She opened a community pharmacy in the underserved neighborhood that she ran for almost a decade before returning to hospital pharmacy where she continues as a pharmacist at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center and its Kaufman Cancer Center. She served as a compliance officer for the Maryland Board of Pharmacy and remains active in many state industry associations. In 2011, she was inducted into the Dean’s Hall of Fame for Community Pharmacists in recognition of her leadership, entrepreneurship, and passion for independent community pharmacy.


INSURANCE EXPERT

PRODUCT INNOVATOR

MANUFACTURING POWERHOUSES

Bruce D. Roffe, MS ’78

George Bunting, PhG 1899

The two-year, ASHP-accredited joint residency/master’s program with the School of Pharmacy and Johns Hopkins Hospital was an extraordinary challenge that shaped a young Roffe into an unstoppable force. As president and CEO at H.H.C. Group (and a licensed pharmacist), he uses his expertise in medication treatment, hospital cost, and hospital charges to help clients of his consultancy as they navigate the complex landscape of health insurance reimbursement.

This School of Pharmacy valedictorian did not disappoint after his graduation. Bunting supported the industry as president of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association and as a leader in national groups including the then American Pharmaceutical Association. But the soothing cream he developed in 1914 at his drugstore on North Avenue in Baltimore created his legacy. He sold a little blue jar to a customer who said it “knocked out his eczema.” Noxema was born.

Alpheus Sharp, PhG 1842, and Louis Dohme, PhG 1856 Sharp ran a chemist shop in Baltimore City. In 1851, he hired a young German immigrant, Dohme, as a clerk. Dohme worked his way through the School of Pharmacy, graduating with honors. He also worked his way up in the business, which became Sharp & Dohme in 1860 and began large-scale manufacturing of medications. In 1953, the company merged into Merck Sharp & Dohme International, today’s global health care leader worth more than $42 billion.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

ENTREPRENEUR AND PHILANTHROPIST Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP ’73, PharmD ’96 Yankellow has been one of the School of Pharmacy’s most dedicated alumni, giving of both her time and financial resources. She has served many years on the School’s Board of Visitors, most recently completing an eight-year term as chair, has given generously to name the Ellen H. Yankellow Atrium in Pharmacy Hall, funded the Ellen H. Yankellow Health Outcomes Fellowship, and established scholarships for students in the MS in Pharmacometrics and MS in Regulatory Science programs. She hopes that current students who see her name on the sign in Pharmacy Hall will be inspired to embrace the mission of pharmacy and feel challenged to make an impact of their own. Yankellow’s dedication to pharmacy began at Good Samaritan Hospital in the 1970s and continued as senior vice president at PharMerica Pharmacy Services in the 1990s. In 2003, she founded Correct Rx Pharmacy Services to provide clinical programs that truly make a difference in the lives of patients. Today, the company provides institutional pharmacy services to clients locally and nationwide. It is currently the only institutional pharmacy provider that fully incorporates the practice of clinical pharmacy across all of its services.

USING SCIENCE TO IMPROVE HEALTH OUTCOMES Calvin H. Knowlton, PhD ’93, MDiv, BScPharm Knowlton, founder and CEO of Tabula Rasa Healthcare and the 2015 American Pharmacists Association Remington Medalist, recalls two pivotal moments that have significantly impacted his professional journey. In the late 1990s, Knowlton genotyped his father for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and realized that the medication side effects he was experiencing were due to his genetic variants. Through this experience, the importance of precise prescribing hit home. Then, in 2011, Knowlton read a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publication on unintentional overdoses as a significant cause of adverse drug events (ADEs). These two factors led to the founding of Tabula Rasa Healthcare, which focuses on bringing science (pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, pharmacodynamics) to the forefront, embedded within medication risk mitigation software and decision support, with the purpose of reducing ADEs. Using the company’s state-of-the-art technology, his father experienced a 75 percent reduction in drug intake and a reduction in the potential for drug toxicity and/or other potential medicationinduced problems. Knowlton’s company is extending these health outcomes to all patients, working to avert hospital stays, ER visits, and falls from medication-related incidents.


ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

TAKING CHANCES

Sally Van Doren, PharmD ’85

Karriem Farrakhan, PharmD ’03, MBA

A renowned drug safety expert, entrepreneur, and philanthropist, and former member of the Board of Visitors, Van Doren founded the California-based company BioSoteria (now part of Dohmen Life Science Services) in 2007. It provides drug safety services to the biopharmaceutical industry. She passed away in 2012, but her generosity to the School and future generations of pharmacists lives on through the Doris Nuessle McCaig Scholarship (which Van Doren established in memory of her aunt) that provides support for students in financial need.

One might say that Farrakhan’s desire to take chances began at the School of Pharmacy, when he enrolled in the School’s dual MBA degree program with the University of Baltimore. He knew early on that he wanted to combine his love of pharmacy with his desire to work for himself. His first job out of pharmacy school was in retail pharmacy, a job he loved but one he knew he needed to leave if he wanted to achieve his professional goals. Now a contract clinical manager for Xerox Government Healthcare Solutions, Farrakhan works with the Maryland Medicaid Pharmacy Program, dealing with Medicaid pharmacy pointof-sale claims including processing, system programming, and prior authorization. Leaving traditional employment and taking this contract position was the beginning of his path toward entrepreneurship. He and his wife, Tecoya (PharmD ’02, MBA), a fellow School of Pharmacy alum, started Primo Pharmacy Services, a pharmacy staffing company, in 2007 that they plan to grow while launching their health and wellness practice, Wellness to a T.

RESOURCEFUL AND RESILIENT Tecoya Farrakhan, PharmD ’02, MBA Resourcefulness and resiliency are qualities Farrakhan says were ingrained in her during pharmacy school, and these attributes are ones she says are very present in both her personal and professional life today. Practicing resourcefulness and resiliency throughout her career, first as a staff pharmacist at Safeway and then as a small business owner with her husband, has given her confidence to take on new challenges, like entrepreneurship. Currently a pharmacy consultant at Willis Towers Watson, a global consulting firm, Farrakhan serves as an advisor to clients needing subject matter expertise on the profession, particularly pharmacy benefit design, pharmacy benefit management procurement and oversight, contract reviews, pharmacy audits, marketplace intelligence, operations, and clinical pharmacy management. Next for her is the launch of Wellness to a T, the second small business she will have started with her husband and fellow School of Pharmacy alum Karriem (PharmD ’03, MBA). The company will focus on maximizing patients’ health and wellness by offering health coaching that empowers physical and emotional healing from the inside out. As a pharmacist, she will provide additional patient consultations to address the gaps often created by time constraints and other challenges in most health care provider settings. 20

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

GIANT OF INDUSTRY John M. Gregory, BSP ’76, DPS ’02 (hon.) As a student, John Gregory enjoyed the camaraderie of his peers in the Phi Delta Phi fraternity, living on the fourth floor of the student union building. He also found an important mentor in then-Dean David Knapp. “I helped to gather data on several different utilization review projects which Dr. Knapp accomplished,” says Gregory. “I will never forget that Dr. Knapp put my name on several of the articles that were published in leading pharmaceutical journals. I was a young student just collecting the data for him, but he included me as one of the authors of the project. It said a lot to me about how he and the faculty of the School of Pharmacy wanted the students to succeed.” Perhaps Dean Knapp foresaw Gregory’s success. After starting his career at a retail pharmacy, Gregory co-founded General Injectables and Vaccines, which he turned into a successful enterprise with annual revenues of more than $150 million. In 1993, Gregory and his family founded King Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which was sold in 2010 to Pfizer Pharmaceuticals for approximately $4 billion. Taking King Pharmaceuticals from IPO to listing on the New York Stock Exchange (where the company was acknowledged as an important up and comer in the NYSE’s annual report) was a pivotal moment in Gregory’s career development. “I have often said that although I learned how to be a pharmacist at the School of Pharmacy, one of the best courses I took at the School was an accounting class,” he explains, “because this class helped me to understand all about profit and loss and balance sheets and capital requirements, and this was crucial in my own pharmacy and later when I owned several pharmaceutical companies.” Gregory is now chairman and CEO of Gregory Pharmaceutical Holdings, Inc., a Tennessee-based, family-owned organization composed of UPM Pharmaceuticals and NFI Consumer Products. Among his many accolades, Gregory was named Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year in 2002. He is president of two charitable organizations — The Lazarus Foundation and Kingsway Charities — the latter of which provides pharmaceuticals and medical supplies to developing countries.


Make an Impact Today and Tomorrow with a Charitable Gift Annuity One of the most creative ways to support the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is with a charitable gift annuity through the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) Foundation, Inc., providing future funding for the School of Pharmacy and immediate benefits for you or your loved ones.

HOW IT WORKS: In exchange for your gift of cash or appreciated securities of $25,000 or more, the UMB Foundation will make fixed annuity payments for life. Gift annuity rates are currently very attractive compared to other commercial fixed-income options. When the annuity ends, the balance supports your designated University of Maryland School of Pharmacy priority.

Benefits of a charitable gift annuity include: • Attractive fixed-income payments for life, backed by the UMB Foundation • A current income tax deduction and partially tax-free income over your life expectancy (in most cases) • Portfolio diversification • Deferred support to the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy • Your gift qualifies you for membership in the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Legacy Society

Single-Life Rate Chart for $25,000 UMB Foundation Charitable Annuity (two-life rates also available) Annuitant Age at Gift

70

75

80

85

Annuity Rate

5.1%

5.8%

6.8%

7.8%

Annual Payment

$1,275

$1,450

$1,700

$1,950

Charitable Deduction

$9,752

$11,065

$12,270

$13,955

PLEASE NOTE: Charitable gift annuities are provided through the University of Maryland Baltimore Foundation, Inc. Payments under such agreements are not protected or otherwise guaranteed by any government agency. Annuities are subject to regulation by the states of California, Hawaii, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Washington, and others. The above examples are for educational purposes only and do not constitute an offer to issue annuities where precluded by state law. Donors should always consult with their tax advisors before making a planned gift. Rates are set at the time of the gift and may vary from those illustrated.

Want your gift to provide support for a loved one or a friend? Contact us to learn how.

Consider a UMB Foundation annuity to support the School of Pharmacy today! For more information, including a customized illustration, contact: Ken Boyden, JD, EdD Associate Dean Office of Development and Alumni Affairs University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 20 N. Pine St., S740 Baltimore, MD 21201 Office 410-706-5893 | Fax 410-706-6049 kboyden@rx.umaryland.edu

wint e r 2 0 1 7

21


MAINSTAYS

Life and Career in ‘the Long Run’ BY RANDOLPH FILLMORE BY RANDOLPH FILLMORE

Susan dosReis

That life and career can be talked about in terms of “the long run” is an important metaphor for Susan dosReis, PhD ’99, associate professor and vice chair for research in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) at the School of Pharmacy. It is only by looking back over the long run that she can see the path that led from her job as a staff pharmacist at CVS after earning her bachelor’s degree in pharmacy in 1991, to a PhD in pharmacoepidemiology in 1999, to working today to improve psychopharmacologic treatment for children within the child welfare system. “If someone had told me 20 years ago I would be doing what I am doing, I would not have believed it,” says dosReis. Perhaps her career path has been a little like running a “mystery” marathon — a term dosReis can appreciate, given her interest in long-distance running and competing in triathlons. “I try to log miles in every state and country I visit,” she says. “Some of my most spectacular runs have been in beautiful cities in Greece, Cyprus, and South Africa.” While one might think that such exertion would sap energy needed for work, dosReis says the opposite is true; it builds endurance. Her CV reflects that energy and drive. Fresh off her PhD, and at the suggestion of Julie Zito, PhD, professor in PHSR, dosReis served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in child mental health services. For nearly a decade after earning her PhD, dosReis worked as an assistant professor in Hopkins’ Department of Psychiatry and Health Policy and Management before returning to the School of Pharmacy in 2010 as an associate professor in PHSR with an adjunct appointment in the Division of Child and 22 22

c caapsu psullee

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “Watching Dr. dosReis’ career develop has been a joy — starting out as a rather serious pharmacy graduate from Rhode Island, she set a new standard in PHSR and later at Johns Hopkins for hard work, attention to detail, and excellent followup,” says Zito. “From her early work surveying the families of children with behavior disorders, she brought a parental perspective to disparities in medication use. Today, her early work has blossomed into a patient-oriented focus on expanding research methods beyond the limits of the ‘big data’ approach of pharmacoepidemiology.” There is no “loneliness” for this long-distance runner. She works collaboratively with colleagues in other professional schools, especially the School of Social Work, and with those who serve in state, federal, and professional groups. Through several grants from the National Institutes of Health she has conducted research on psychotropic medication use in children looking across many demographic profiles. She advises the state of Maryland on child pharmacologic treatment of children and adolescents in the public mental health system. She is evaluating the comparative effectiveness of care management. She appreciates what mentors such as Zito have done for her and is quick to credit them with what she is doing now, including mentoring the next generation. Her students include PharmD, pharmacy residents, child psychiatry residents, and postdoctoral fellows. The courses she teaches are just as diverse as her students’ careers, from pharmacoepidemiology to critical readings in the child psychiatry literature. “I like to provide an opportunity for students to grow,” explains dosReis. It’s that desire to give back that motivated C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, chair of PHSR, to tap her for the role of vice chair for research in the department. “Dr. dosReis is precisely the type of researcher you want leading the research initiatives of the department,” says Mullins. “She fosters an environment and mindset among our faculty members and trainees that we can go farther as a department if we strategically build programmatic research and encourage interprofessional and interdisciplinary research.” b


MAINSTAYS

Johnson Gets Job Done, In Style BY ELIZABETH HEUBECK

Yolanda Johnson

By all accounts, Yolanda Johnson is a dream employee. “She’s diligent, extremely punctual, very reliable, and she works to bring solutions to problems. Things that come up daily? She’ll run them down until they’re resolved,” says Lisa Calvert Chalk, operations manager in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the School of Pharmacy. Nearly concluding her lengthy rave of her longtime employee’s attributes, Calvert Chalk pauses briefly. Then she adds: “And she dresses really well. She always matches, from head to toe.” She should know. Calvert Chalk has been Johnson’s supervisor for a decade. In that time, she’s come to appreciate and rely on the PPS business services specialist’s keen attention to detail, solid problem-solving ability, and general can-do attitude. These skills represent just the sort of expertise that any operations manager would want in a key support employee like Johnson, whose lengthy job description includes, but is not limited to, supervising administrative staff, analyzing office procedures, overseeing space planning moves, providing input on operating budget, tracking spending, acting as travel liaison, leading preparation for faculty interviews, and serving as front-line representative to all incoming requests. Just the sound of it is exhausting. What’s so remarkable about Johnson is that, in addition to performing her demanding job so effectively, she continuously makes time to focus on enhancing other areas of her life — from education to personal health.

Some time ago, Johnson decided it was time to go back to school. “I was training people for jobs I felt I should have had. The reason I wasn’t getting the jobs was that I didn’t have a bachelor’s degree,” she said. So Johnson began attending college at night and on weekends, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Health Administration and Public Policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. It took her six years, and sometimes involved getting to her job early in the morning so she could leave for evening classes. Despite its challenges, Johnson reflects on that period of her life fondly. “It was a great experience,” she says, as she considers returning to school again — this time for her master’s degree. In addition to education, Johnson has made her personal health a priority in recent years. “When I couldn’t walk up the steps without feeling I was going to die, I knew I had to do something different,” she says. In 2013, she joined Fitness Fever, a fitness incentive program through the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). Before long, one of the trainers from the program encouraged Johnson and others to join Run Buddies. Just a few short years later, Johnson proudly declares herself a “halffanatic” — someone who has successfully completed three half-marathons (13.1 miles in length) within 90 days. Johnson continues to train with some of the same employees she met at the University’s fitness incentive program; they gather at Druid Hill Park, Canton Waterfront Park, and other city landmarks for early morning or evening and weekend runs. Johnson’s “can-do” attitude, which has had a positive impact on many aspects of her life, contributes to making her the valued employee she’s become at the School of Pharmacy since coming to UMB in 2004. “I have become the go-to person here in the office, even the whole School,” Johnson says. “Everybody calls me, and they tell everybody else to call me. They know I will get it done or figure out who can.” b

wint e r 2 0 1 7

23


STUDENT NEWS

Laurels The School of Pharmacy’s American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhAASP) chapter was second runner-up for the Division A (enrollment of 550 or more) Chapter Achievement Award at the APhA Annual Meeting and Expo in March and won Region 2 Operation Diabetes and Region 2 Operation Immunization Awards. The School’s Beta Lambda Chapter of Phi Lambda Sigma received the 2016 Charles Thomas Leadership Challenge Award from the organization’s national office. The School’s student chapter of the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) was one of three finalists in the 2016 Good Neighbor Pharmacy NCPA Puritt-Schutte Student Business Plan Competition. The School’s chapter of the Student Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists received an Outstanding Professional Development Project Award for its efforts in organizing the annual Interprofessional Patient Management Competition. A team of students from the School received the Creative Inter-Professional Team Event Award in the 2016 Script Your Future Medication Adherence Team Challenge.

24

c a psu l e

Heather Boyce, a graduate student in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC), received a Formulation Design & Development Section Travel Award to attend the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists’ (AAPS) 2016 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Denver. Tanvi Deshpande, a graduate student in PSC, won first place in the ExcipientFest Americas’ Poster Contest at its annual meeting in Baltimore in April. Bowen Jiang, also a graduate student in PSC, won second place. Brandon Drennen, graduate student in PSC, received travel awards to attend the American Chemical Society’s National Meeting in March in San Diego. Priyanka Gaitonde and Joseph Vandigo, both graduate students in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), received the department’s 2015 Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship. Meryam Gharbi, a thirdyear PharmD student, has been appointed to the APhA-ASP National Standing Committee on Communications.

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

William Hedrich, a graduate student in PSC, received the Outstanding Presentation Award at the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Graduate Research Conference. Anna Hung, a graduate student in PHSR, has been accepted into the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy’s Walmart Scholars Program along with her faculty advisor Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA. Aida Kuzucan, a graduate student in PHSR, received PHSR’s 2016 Harris Zuckerman Scholarship. Elissa Lechtenstein, a fourth-year PharmD student and past president of the School’s APhA-ASP chapter, has been elected an APhAASP member-at-large. She also received the 2016 APhA Foundation’s Mary Louise Andersen Scholarship. Brian Lindner, a fourth-year PharmD student, received the Maryland Pharmacists Association Foundation Student Scholarship. Laura Murphy, MPH, a student in the MS in Regulatory Science Program, has received its 2016 Ellen H. Yankellow Scholarship.

Elisabeth Oehrlein, a graduate student in PHSR, received PHSR’s 2016 Donald O. Fedder Memorial Fellowship. Judy Park, PharmD, a student in the MS in Regulatory Science Program, has received its 2016 GlaxoSmithKline Scholarship. Melissa Ross, a graduate student in PHSR, received the Lee B. Lusted Student Prize from the Society for Medical Decision Making. Soo Hyeon Shin, a graduate student in PSC, received a Dermatopharmaceutics Focus Group Travel Award to attend the AAPS 2016 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Denver. Jan Sieluk, a graduate student in PHSR, received PHSR’s 2016 Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship.


Going Fourth The School’s chapter of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy hosted a Fourth-Year Student Research Symposium in April to introduce first-, second-, and third-year pharmacy students to the wealth of research opportunities that exist for students at the School of Pharmacy. b

Attendees at the event included, first row, from left: Caitlin Corker Relph, Class of 2017; Meryam Gharbi, Class of 2018; Vivian Dang and Odera Ekwunife, both of the Class of 2019; Jenny Nguyen, Class of 2018; Anu Divakaruni, Vy Nguyen, Melissa McCarty, Jasmine Ebron, and Michael Goldenhorn, all of the Class of 2016. Back row, from left: Jonathan Meyer, Class of 2017; Sophia Ma, Class of 2018; Nam Nguyen, Class of 2019; Akosua Owusu-Dommey, Class of 2018; Tomefa Asempa and Brian Ung, both of the Class of 2016; Felicia Bartlett, Class of 2017; and Teny Joseph and Mark Bickley, both of the Class of 2019.

Flash and Mash Members of the student chapter of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) had a busy spring semester, with participation in a flash mob on the University of Maryland, Baltimore County campus in February to raise awareness of mental health issues and a baked potato fundraiser in Pharmacy Hall in May. b

CPNP members Allison Cowett, James Bonifant, and Sebastian Bilitza of the Class of 2019 and Joseph Martin, Class of 2018, participated in the Mental Health Flash Mob.

Members at the baked potato fundraiser, from left: Kayla Otto, Class of 2018; Sebastian Bilitza, Allison Cowett, Andrew Wherley, and James Bonifant of the Class of 2019; Ryan Starr, Class of 2017; and Philip Kong and Joseph Martin, both of the Class of 2018.

Taking Care of Business The School’s student chapter of the National Community Pharmacists Association saw great success in the organization’s local Business Plan Competition, qualifying the Broadneck Pharmacy team to compete in the national competition in October, where it placed third runner-up. b Members of the School team from left: Caleb Goodrich, David Tran, Elaine Pranski, and Brandon Biggs, all of the Class of 2017, and Emily Chen of the Class of 2016. wint e r 2 0 1 7

25


STUDENT NEWS

Global Medical Brigade School of Pharmacy students joined students from other schools at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) for the University’s annual Global Medical Brigade trip, this time to Nicaragua, in January. During the three-day trip, more than 30 UMB students worked interprofessionally to provide health care services to 820 residents of a remote area of the country. b Group photo of the 2016 UMB Global Medical Brigade in Las Lomas, Nicaragua.

Sumit Gandotra, Class of 2019, (left) and Mudit Verma, Class of 2018, with a patient.

Alexandra Kirsch, Class of 2018, with a community member of Las Lomas, Nicaragua.

Members of the Class of 2018 on the trip (back row, from left): Mudit Verma, Kelvin Nguyen, Mehak Suddle, Dana Valentine, and Chioma Uwandu. Front row, from left: Jenny Nguyen, Kelly Murphy, Alexandra Kirsch, and Ahrang Yoo.

Sharing Interview Tips Students from the School’s chapter of the Student National Pharmaceutical Association visited the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in January to conduct mock pharmacy school interviews with undergraduate students interested in applying to the School of Pharmacy. b

From left, Class of 2017 students Ava-Dawn Hammond and Kumaran Ramakrishnan with Triet Tran, Class of 2018, and Leigh Cervino, Class of 2019.

26

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


Giving to Others Kappa Psi, the nation’s oldest pharmaceutical fraternity, hosted several events during the spring, including the creation of blankets for the local Ronald McDonald House, a National Poison Prevention Week outreach event, and its 12th Annual Wing-a-Thon benefit for the University of Maryland Medical Center Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. b From left, Masoumeh Saleh, Class of 2019, and Hongzhuo Lin, Jenny Nguyen, and Meryam Gharbi, all of the Class of 2018, show off the no-sew fleece blankets they created for the Ronald McDonald House in February.

Faculty and friends participated in the Wing-a-Thon event in April, helping to raise more than $2,200 for the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. From left, Ryan D’Angelo, PharmD, former pharmacy resident; Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, and Sandeep Devabhakthuni, PharmD, BCPS, both assistant professors in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS); Benjamin Laliberte, PharmD, former pharmacy resident; and Brent Reed, PharmD, assistant professor in PPS.

From left, bottom to top, Jennifer Tsang, Class of 2019; SeJeong Yoon, Class of 2018; and Theresa Villa and Long Phan of the Class of 2019 at Lexington Pharmacy in Baltimore during National Poison Prevention Week in March.

Dangers of Drinking The Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) hosted or participated in two events in April to raise awareness of the public health field and the dangers of underage drinking. b

The 2016 Public Health Roundtable held at the Universities at Shady Grove introduced pharmacy students to the multiple career opportunities for pharmacists within the U.S. Public Health Service (USPH). Several USPH officers attended to share career information with students.

Quynh-Nhu Nguyen of the Class of 2019 staffed SMdPHA’s booth at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County at an event it organized to raise awareness of the dangers of underage drinking.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

27


STUDENT NEWS

Spreading Safety The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) organized and participated in several events during the spring semester focused on medication safety in children and healthy lifestyles. b

PPAG members, along with students from the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists, visited Southwest Baltimore Charter School in February to play games with the students and educate them about medication safety during a Fitness Fun and Games event. From left with the schoolchildren and charter school staff are: Wenye Yang and Ahrang Yoo, both of the Class of 2018; Amrita Singh, Class of 2017; Emily Eline, Class of 2019; Lynn Kayali, Class of 2018; Emily Witcraft, Class of 2019; Dennisse RubioColon, Class of 2017; Max Ditlevson, Class of 2018; and Jonathan Tran, Class of 2019.

PPAG members visited Paul’s Place in West Baltimore in March to teach local schoolchildren about healthy habits. From left out front of Paul’s Place are: Felicia Bartlett, Class of 2017; Nathan Shen and Dominick Ruggiero, Class of 2019; a fellow volunteer; Amrita Singh, Dennisse Rubio-Colon, Ha Phan, and Katarina Stelzer, all of the Class of 2017; Ahrang Yoo, Class of 2018; and Ting He, Class of 2017.

Real-Life Advice The School’s Student Society of Health-System Pharmacists hosted its final General Body Meeting of the school year in April at which School of Pharmacy alumnus Julian Chun, PharmD ’02, past president of the Alumni Association, spoke about his career as a clinical pharmacist at the outpatient pharmacy at Johns Hopkins Hospital. b

From left, Mary Pothen, June Trinos, and Alan Lin, all of the Class of 2019; Triet Tran and Alvin Yee, both of the Class of 2018; Jonathan Meyer, Class of 2017; Dr. Chun; Anne Williams, Class of 2018; and Elaine Pranski, Class of 2017.

28

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


UMSOP Graduates! Family, friends, faculty, preceptors, and staff watched proudly as members of the Class of 2016 walked across the stage to receive their Doctor of Pharmacy hoods at the School’s annual convocation ceremony on May 20 at the Hilton Baltimore. Brent Reed, PharmD, assistant professor in the School’s Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, was chosen by the Class of 2016 as the keynote speaker for convocation. The School’s morning ceremony was followed by a campuswide graduation ceremony at the Royal Farms Arena, where Freda Lewis-Hall, MD, DFAPA, chief medical officer for Pfizer, received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), an honor for which she was nominated by the School of Pharmacy. Ten students from the School’s two PhD programs in pharmaceutical health services research (PHSR) and pharmaceutical sciences (PSC) received their hoods during an afternoon ceremony on May 19. The School hosted its first convocation ceremony for graduates from the online MS in Regulatory Science Program, at which the 52 graduates of the Classes of 2015 and 2016 were recognized. b

Freda Lewis-Hall (center) is awarded the honorary Doctor of Science by UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, with assistance from School of Pharmacy Dean Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, BSP, FAAPS, FCP (left).

Class of 2016 faculty advisor Kathryn Walker (lower right), PharmD, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, takes a selfie with members of the graduating Doctor of Pharmacy class at the UMB ceremony.

Tomefa Asempa and his family.

Continued on Page 30 wint e r 2 0 1 7

29


STUDENT NEWS

UMSOP Graduates! Continued from Page 29 Alexander Kravetz, Courtney LaCotti, Andrea Cheung, and Mark Kiwon Lee.

MS in Regulatory Science graduate Cmdr. Keith J. Kiedrow (center), PharmD, RAC, a member of the U.S. Public Health Service based at the Food and Drug Administration, receives his master’s hood from James Polli (left), PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in PSC and director of the MS in Regulatory Science Program, and Paul Shapiro, PhD, professor and chair of PSC.

Richard Dalby (right), PhD, professor in PSC, with his newly graduated student Mukul Kelkar.

Amanda Batdorf, Astrid Bernal, and Michael Boblitz.

Faculty and graduates from the PHSR PhD Program, from left: Ebere Onukwugha, PhD, MS, associate professor; Frank Palumbo, PhD, JD, professor; Jinani Jayasekera-Devadoss; Bruce Stuart, PhD, professor; Franklin Hendrick; Candice Yong; Ting-Ying “Jane” Huang; and Viktor Chirikov. 30

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


Establish a Scholarship Today More than half of School of Pharmacy students rely on scholarships and financial aid to make their dream of becoming a pharmacist a reality.

“It is truly an honor to be a recipient of the Student Ambassador Award. As an out-of-state student, I constantly worry about financing my education and the loan debt I acquire. I work part-time to help alleviate some of the financial constraints. Receiving this award helps relieve the financial burden that comes with being an out-of-state student. Additionally, the award allows me to represent the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy to external institutions. As a student ambassador, I discuss the Doctor of Pharmacy program with prospective students and share my personal experiences in applying to our program and preparing for pharmacy school. I work closely with the Office of Student Affairs in order to increase outreach efforts and recruitment of prospective students.” ­­­— Gloria Rinomhota Student Pharmacist, Class of 2019 Student Ambassador

Please contact Ken Boyden, JD, EdD, associate dean for development and alumni affairs, at kboyden@rx.umaryland.edu or 410-706-3816 to create an endowed scholarship to benefit the next generation of pharmacists.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

31


RESIDENT PROFILE

Joseph M. LaRochelle

The Value of Improvisation BY RANDOLPH FILLMORE For Joseph M. LaRochelle, PharmD ’06, BCPPS, a pediatric clinical care pharmacist and clinical associate professor at Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy, life in the jazz capital of the world is more than a movable feast of great food and music, although he enjoys the availability of both. For him, New Orleans is a city where he helps save pediatric patients whose lives are on the line. Although pediatric patients represent a significant part of a pharmacist’s caseload, says LaRochelle, pharmacy students receive limited pediatric education and, once in practice, there is limited guidance as most medication treatment information is limited to the adult population. “Seventy percent of available drugs have either not been studied, or under-studied in children — this makes for a great challenge,” he explains. “Children don’t process medications like adults do. For example, a 45-year-old man and a 55-year-old man may process medications in a very similar way. “However, when an infant is a day old, he or she may process medication differently than a week-old infant; a 1-year-old may process differently than a 2-year-old.” Out of necessity, LaRochelle often has to improvise, which Webster’s New World College Dictionary defines as “to compose

32

c a psu l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

on the spur of the moment without any preparation.” Because there is comparatively little in terms of standard pharmacological practice for pediatric patients, especially for infants, LaRochelle says he often relies on professional networks for guidance on standards of care. He cautiously calls this approach using “anecdotal evidence.” Given the challenges associated with pediatric clinical pharmacy, he counts himself as fortunate to have had both a third-year elective course and a fourth-year rotation in pediatrics while a student at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. He also received training through pediatric residencies at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., from 2006 to 2007 and at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and Hospital for Children from 2007 to 2008. “I first met Joe when he was on a tour of the School as a prospective student,” says Jill Morgan, PharmD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. “He was always interested in pediatric pharmacy and the care of critically ill children. During his residency, he savored the fast pace and challenge of the Pediatric ICU.” Originally from New Hampshire, LaRochelle received his bachelor’s degree in biology in 2002 from Saint Anselm College and subsequently landed a job as a pharmacy technician at a local hospital. He was pleased to find that his work made a real difference. His interest in making a bigger difference in pharmacy grew from that experience and eventually took him to Maryland and the School of Pharmacy, where he completed his PharmD in 2006. For LaRochelle, who also serves as a clinical associate professor of pediatrics at Louisiana State University School of Medicine, critical care pediatric pharmacy has not only great challenges but great rewards as well. He recalls a 6-year-old boy with flu so serious that every organ failed, but he recovered. “We managed his serious complications and infections using medications that had not been well-studied in pediatric patients,” recollects LaRochelle. He also remembers the boy’s upbeat courage. “He and I swapped jokes every day,” LaRochelle adds. According to Morgan, besides being a dedicated and effective clinician, LaRochelle also is making his mark as a national leader in pediatric pharmacy, serving as chair of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research Network, work from which came an influential position paper on recommendations for meeting pediatric patients’ need for a clinical pharmacist. “Joe works constantly to improve the care of critically ill children,” says Morgan. “It was a great pleasure to have him as a student and resident. He’s passionate about pediatrics, and very hard-working.” b


DONOR PROFILE

A Portrait Of Giving BY LYDIA LEVIS BLOCH

Leonard and Gwynne Horwits

On a recent afternoon in his Baltimore area condominium, Leonard Horwits, BSP ’60, was examining one of his paintings, a street scene from the Greek island of Mykonos. He had painted a figure in black against a chalk white, narrow cobblestoned lane. A bold streak of red accentuates the background. Mr. Horwits has created 300 captivating cityscapes and landscapes based on his travels. Many of these compositions decorate the home he shares with his wife, Gwynne L. Horwits, MD. Here’s one of the rooftops in Siena, there’s a castle from Scotland. “I look at a scene and see how it would make a painting,” he says. Prior to discovering his avocation, he was a hard-working student at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. “There were long hours. You needed to be tenacious and conscientious,” he recalls. After graduating, he worked for several years in independent and chain pharmacies in Baltimore. Despite enjoying his first career, Mr. Horwits wanted to engage more directly with people, so he earned a master’s degree in guidance and counseling. After teaching junior high school for three years, he was a guidance counselor in the Baltimore City public schools for 26 years. In 1970, he married Gwynne, a 1971 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. An anesthesiologist, Dr. Horwits began her career in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The demands of their professions were considerable but the Horwitses indulged in a shared passion: world travel. They acquired curios such as pottery, porcelain figurines, carved wooden animals, and plates from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Central America, and the Caribbean. “We’ve always tried to collect beautiful things that represent quality work,” says Dr. Horwits. Today the couple is retired. Although health issues limit

their travel, they eagerly pursue another favorite project, their support of the School of Pharmacy. Dr. Horwits is impressed by the scope and growth of the School’s curriculum and its interdisciplinary collaboration with other health care professionals. She notes that U.S.News & World Report ranked the School of Pharmacy among the top 10 schools of pharmacy in the country in 2016. “The School of Pharmacy provided the foundation for my first career,” says Mr. Horwits. “I consider it very highly. We want the School to succeed and are helping ensure its future.” In their estate planning, the couple has established the Leonard and Gwynne L. Horwits Scholarship Endowment in Geriatrics for the School of Pharmacy for a student who exhibits an interest and proficiency in geriatrics, and the Leonard and Gwynne Horwits Scholarship for a student of high academic achievement who also shows empathy for the community and for public service. The couple has begun funding the second scholarship with a generous charitable gift. Besides the scholarships, the Leonard and Gwynne L. Horwits Endowment for the Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS) will provide unrestricted support for the highest priorities of the center. CIPS is a national resource center and leader in the development of patient care initiatives. “I am so grateful for Leonard and Gwynne’s support,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, professor and dean of the School of Pharmacy. “They are strongly and clearly establishing a firm foundation for the School to provide essential services to our students and for our research and practice enterprises. After successful careers of their own, they are helping ensure the success of future generations of pharmacists and researchers.” Mr. Horwits offers pharmacy students this advice. “Follow your ambitions, and then devote yourself entirely to accomplishing your aims.” Considering the vigor of his careers and painting, he has taken that recommendation to heart. b wint e r 2 0 1 7

33


ALUMNI NEWS

A Message from the Alumni President

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2016-2017

Andrew Phan

Capt. James Bresette, PharmD ’97 Dear fellow alumni, Newly minted PharmD, PhD, and MS graduates of 2016: Congratulations! As you continue on your path away from the classrooms and labs of Pharmacy Hall, take pride in the foundations and relationships you have built here. You are joining an alumni network thousands strong, 175 years old, and embedded across the world. Alumni, I hope that as you all become successful in your new positions and pursuits, you remember the classrooms and laboratories, the faculty and mentors, the foundations and relationships that have helped shape you. As graduates, we carry a piece of our School reputation with us wherever we go. We can continue to support the School’s excellent legacy by being actively involved alumni. Every year, students organize mock interviews, curriculum vitae reviews, career roundtables, and mentoring and networking events. The School hosts reunions, receptions, socials, celebrations, and more. Take part. Volunteer. Even as we finish being students, our relationship with the School does not need to end. The Alumni Association serves to bridge and reconnect alumni to the School and its students. I understand many alumni take root far from Baltimore, and it is more difficult for some to attend an alumni reunion or critique a student’s interview skills in person. This year, I hope to make distance insignificant in engaging all alumni. We all deserve the opportunity to give back to the institution that laid the foundation for our lives as students and as alumni. Sincerely, Andrew Phan, PharmD ’13 President

34

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Julian Chun, PharmD ’02 Lt. Mathilda Fienkeng, PharmD ’08 Denise Fu, PharmD ’10 Brian Hose, PharmD ’06 Una Kim, PharmD ’13 Samuel Lichter, BSP ’60 Daniel Mansour, PharmD ’06 Gina McKnight-Smith, PharmD ’97, MBA Andong Nkobena, PharmD ’16 Sharon Park, PharmD ’04 Andrew Phan, PharmD ’13 Matthew Shimoda, PharmD ’84 Jackie Tran, PharmD ’13 Hoai-An Truong, PharmD ’05 Doris Voigt, PharmD ’04


Class of 1975 Reunion The Class of 1975 organized a reunion in 2015 hosted by Carol Rosenberg Shap and Ann Myers. 

Front row: Monica Carter and Rick Moszner; Second row: Ann Myers, Leon Newman, Melinda Lee, Jim Caro and Mike Ranke (arm in arm), and Angela Ferrari; Third row: Marc Grosman, Ben Kowarski, Howard Gampel (striped shirt), Carol Rosenberg Shap, Dave Porter, Bruce Krug, Ed McCagh, and Ron Logan; Fourth row: Cleveland Yee.

ISPOR Alumni and Friends Lunch The School’s Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) hosted an Alumni and Friends Lunch for graduates of its PhD program at the 21st annual meeting of the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in May in Washington, D.C. 

From left, Ashley Slagle, PhD ’08; Michelle Campbell, PhD ’14; Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, and PHSR graduate student; Pamela Roberto, PHSR graduate student; Xian Shen, PhD ’16; Matthew Pickering, PharmD, PHSR postdoctoral fellow. From left, Yewande Oladeinde, PhD, PHSR postdoctoral fellow; Opeoluwa Fagbemi, PharmD ’16; Juan-David Rueda, PHSR graduate student; Dinci Pennap, PHSR graduate student; Aida Kuzukan, PHSR graduate student; Mehmet Burcu, PHSR graduate student; and Jayesh Parmar, PhD, faculty member at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

35


ALUMNI NEWS

Homecoming and All Alumni Reunion The School of Pharmacy welcomed alumni back to Pharmacy Hall Sept. 16 and 17 at its annual Homecoming and All Alumni Reunion. The weekend featured something for every graduate, their family, friends, faculty, staff, and students. Activities included a cookout and Orioles baseball game on Friday night, and a campus scavenger hunt, brunch, a historical clinical/pathological investigation into the death of Edgar Allan Poe, ice cream, and class reunions on Saturday. 

Jill Morgan (left), PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, professor and chair of the School’s Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, and Wanda Maldonado, PharmD ’86, BSP ’82, enjoy the Friday night cookout before the Orioles beat the Tampa Bay Rays, 5-4.

Sailesh Patel (left), PharmD, and Timir Patel, PharmD, both from the Class of 1987, enjoy the Orioles game in their School of Pharmacy baseball caps.

School alumnae and Maryland Poison Center staff Jeanne Wunderer, PharmD ’94 (black shirt) and Jennifer Malloy, PharmD ’10, MPH, pose at the pre-game cookout with Wunderer’s son Lucas and Malloy’s cousin Gregory Vasquez (Orioles hat).

Jerome Fine (left), BSP, and Fred Abramson, BSP, are recognized at the Saturday lunch with certificates honoring the 60th anniversary of their graduation from the School of Pharmacy in 1956.

James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences and director of the online MS in Regulatory Science Program, poses with current regulatory science students, from left, Keisha Hines-Harris, Sue Mathew, Sadie Frary, and Garima Sharma. Dean Eddington presents Harris Miller (left), PhD ’65, and Martin Mintz, BSP ’65, with certificates recognizing the 50th anniversary of Miller and Mintz’s graduation.

A scavenger hunt team poses in front of one of the stops on the hunt — Pascault Row on Lexington Street. From left, Mudit Verma, Class of 2018; Julian Chun, PharmD ’02; Eman Ventura, Class of 2017; Denise Fu, PharmD ’10; and Andrew Phan, PharmD ’13, and his wife, Casey Phan, MD.

36

ca apsu p sullee c

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Barry Bloom (left), BSP, and David Via, BSP, both of the Class of 1966, are shown one of the research labs during a School tour led by Andrew Coop, PhD, professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and associate dean for academic affairs.

Joe DeMino, BSP ’84, and his daughter Anna enjoy a treat from the Miss Twist ice cream truck.


Graduation Banquet Students, alumni, and faculty celebrated an evening of achievements at the 2016 graduation banquet hosted by the Alumni Association on May 18. The annual banquet is a way of welcoming the new graduates into the alumni family. 

From left, PharmD ’16 graduates Kevin Ngo, Chun-Wei Chen, Samuel Brackett (and his wife, Paula), and Wai Chan.

Andrew Michaelson (left), PharmD ’10, pharmacy manager, and Kent Farmer, district manager, represent event sponsor Walgreens.

From left, Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, and associate dean, clinical services and practice transformation; Paul Shapiro, PhD, professor and chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Mark Williams, MS ’16, a new graduate of the School’s online MS in Regulatory Science Program.

Members of the Class of 2016, from left: Christina Fomuso, Paulomi Patel, Violet Igwacho, Mary Li, all PharmD ’16, and guest Carlson Igwacho.

Amanda Batdorf (left), PharmD ’16, and Andong Nkobena (right), PharmD ’16, present Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, with the Class of 2016’s Faculty Teacher of the Year Award.

Andrew Phan, PharmD ’13, incoming president of the Alumni Association, presents outgoing president Sharon Park, PharmD ’04, with an engraved gavel recognizing her service to the association.

Representatives of event sponsor Rite Aid, from left: Jermaine Smith, RPh, senior director of college relations and a member of the School’s Board of Visitors; Akash Patel, PharmD, pharmacy district manager; and Robert Serafini, regional pharmacy recruiter. wint e r 2 0 1 7

37


ALUMNI NEWS

Class Notes 1969

G. Lawrence Hogue, BSP, PD, received the Maryland Pharmacists Association’s (MPhA) Seidman Distinguished Achievement Award for his contributions to MPhA, organized pharmacy, and the profession of pharmacy.

1973

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP, PharmD ’96, received the 2016 Bowl of Hygeia Award from the American Pharmacists Association Foundation, an honor for which she was selected by MPhA.

1982

Wanda Maldonado, BSP, PharmD ’86, is dean and professor at the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy. She lives in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, and is married to Radames Sierra. They have three children — Francisco, Ana Maria, and Isabel.

1984

Matthew Shimoda, PharmD, has been elected treasurer of MPhA’s Board of Trustees.

1997

James Bresette, PharmD, received MPhA’s Mentor Award, which is presented to an individual who encourages pharmacists, technicians, and/or students in the pursuit of excellence in education, pharmacy practice, service, and/or advocacy.

2011

Ashley Moody, PharmD, received the Distinguished Young Pharmacist Award from MPhA. It is presented to a pharmacist who has graduated within the past 10 years and who has made a significant contribution to the profession through service in a local, state, or national pharmacy organization.

2002

Tali Johnson, PharmD, received MPhA’s Cardinal Health Generation RX Champions Award, which is presented to a pharmacist who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to raising awareness of the dangers of prescription drug abuse among the general public and the pharmacy community.

2003

Laura Hignutt, PharmD, received certification as a specialist in poison information through the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC).

2013

Darci Eubank, PharmD, has been elected to MPhA’s Board of Trustees. Kashelle Lockman, PharmD, received a Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with graduate certificates in instructional systems development and instructional technology. Christopher Wolff, PharmD, received certification as a specialist in poison information through AAPCC.

2010

Amy Nathanson, PharmD, has been elected to MPhA’s Board of Trustees.

In Memoriam As the Maryland pharmacy profession is a close-knit community, we are honored to share the names of recently deceased alumni who have in some way impacted the profession and the practice of pharmacy. The School learned of the passing of the following alumni between Jan. 1, 2016, and June 30, 2016.

Joseph T. Christopher, BSP ’51 Bernard S. Isaacson, BSP ’58 Melvin G. Kitt, BSP ’53 Seymour L. London, BSP ’49

Irwin E. Meyers, BSP ’53 Jules B. Prag, BSP ’55 Frank J. Wesolowski, BSP ’56 Ferdinand F. Wirth Jr., BSP ’52

If you would like to make a memorial gift, please use the enclosed envelope or call 410-706-5893.

38

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


2014-2015 ANNUAL REPORT

wint e r 2 0 1 7

39


LEADERSHIP

LEADERSHIP

Dean Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, BSP, FAAPS, FCP Senior Associate Dean for Administration and Finance William J. Cooper, MBA Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Andrew Coop, PhD Associate Dean for Clinical Services and Practice Transformation Magaly Rodriguez de Bitttner, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Affairs Ken Boyden, JD, EdD Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education Peter Swaan, PhD Associate Dean for Student Affairs Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, CGP, BCACP, FAPhA Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Assessment Lisa Lebovitz, JD

Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Jill Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS

CENTERS

Bio- and Nano-techology Center Bruce Yu, PhD, Director Center for Drug Safety Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, Executive Director Center for Translational Medicine Joga Gobburu, PhD, MBA, FCP, Director Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation James Polli, PhD, Co-director Center on Drugs and Public Policy Francis B. Palumbo, PhD, JD, Executive Director Computer-Aided Drug Design Center Alexander D. MacKerell Jr., PhD, Director Jana Shen, PhD, Co-director

Assistant Dean for Communications and Marketing Rebecca Ceraul

Maryland Poison Center Bruce D. Anderson, PharmD, Director

Assistant Dean for Experiential Learning Agnes Ann Feemster, PharmD, BCPS

Mass Spectrometry Center Maureen Kane, PhD, Executive Director

Assistant Dean for Information Technology Tim Munn

Mental Health Program Raymond Love, PharmD, Director

Assistant Dean for Instructional Design and Technology Shannon Tucker, MS Assistant Dean for Policy and Planning Deborah Dewitt, JD Assistant Dean for the Universities at Shady Grove Heather Brennan Congdon, PharmD, CACP, CDE Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research C. Daniel Mullins, PhD

40

Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Paul Shapiro, PhD

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging Nicole Brandt, PharmD, MBA, BCPP, CGP, FASCP, Executive Director Pharmaceutical Research Computing Center Ebere Onukwugha, PhD, MS, Executive Director

BOARD OF VISITORS

Stephen J. Allen, RPh, MS ’78, FASHP Executive Vice President and CEO American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation Mary E. W. Baxter, MBA, RPh Vice President, National Practice Leader, Performance and Outcomes Cardinal Health Hon. Harold E. Chappelear, DSC ’98, RPh, LLD, Chair Principal InternaSource, LLC Gina McKnight-Smith, PharmD ’97, MBA, CGP, BCPS Regulatory Review Officer U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Thomas E. Menighan, BSPharm, MBA, FAPhA Executive Vice President and CEO American Pharmacists Association David Miller, PhD ’93 Senior Vice President, Global Market Access Biogen Idec, Inc. Hon. Joseline Pena-Melnyk, JD Maryland House of Delegates Jane Shaab, MBA Senior Vice President, RPC Assistant Vice President for Economic Development University of Maryland, Baltimore Jermaine Smith, RPh Senior Director of College Relations and Professional Recruitment Rite Aid Pharmacy John Spearman, MBA President and COO Laurel Regional Hospital Ellen H. Yankellow, PharmD ’96, BSP ’73 President and CEO Correct Rx Pharmacy Services, Inc.

Special thanks to the following contributors: Nancy Bowers William Cooper Greer Griffith

Cherokee Layson-Wolf Lisa Lebovitz Alicia Walters


KEY FACTS

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

STAFF

PHARMD PROGRAM

74

Administrative, business, development and alumni

640

Total enrollment

affairs, experiential learning, human resources,

892

Total applicants

communications and marketing, student affairs,

160

Entering class

and faculty support

18%

Acceptance rate

82%

With undergraduate degree or higher

230

Technical, research staff, postdoctoral fellows,

3.49

Average incoming GPA

and teaching assistants

81%

Average PCAT composite percentile rank

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

Race/ethnicity across all four years

107

Principal investigators

43% Asian

1

Published books (edited, authored, or co-authored)

30% Caucasian

408

Refereed works published (authored or co-authored)

16%

105

Non-refereed works published (authored or

African-American and African

5% International

co-authored)

3% Multi-ethnic

570

2% Hispanic 1%

No response

Papers presented at professional meetings

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 137

Review panels (off-campus peer review panels and

accreditation and certification teams)

PHD PROGRAMS

1,778

Manuscripts read/reviewed for professional journals,

78

conferences, and publishers

Number may not total 100 percent due to rounding

Total enrollment

85

Editors/associate editors for professional journals

Department of Pharmaceutical Health

69

Officeholders of professional associations

Services Research

229

Departmental, institutional, and University System

25 Students

of Maryland committees

312

Total days in public service (non-consulting role with

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

K-12 schools and community colleges, government

53 Students

agencies, nonprofit organizations, or businesses)

MASTER’S PROGRAMS

EMPLOYMENT SURVEYS

103

Job Placements for the Class of 2015

Total enrollment

Data is based on an employment survey voluntarily completed

Pharmacometrics

by graduating students in May.

42 students 163

Total graduates

Regulatory Science

52

Residency/fellowship

61 students

48

Community pharmacy

1

Hospital pharmacy

ACADEMIC TRAINING

14

Other (Industry/PHS/Etc.)

54

10

No job by graduation

38

Did not respond to survey

Postdoctoral fellows

20 Residents

FACULTY 88

Full-time faculty

60

Affiliate faculty

882

Preceptor faculty

wint e r 2 0 1 7

41


FINANCIALS

SOURCES OF OPERATING REVENUES SUPPORTING THE SCHOOL This report is an unaudited presentation of revenues supporting the School. Gifts $771,426

FISCAL YEAR 2014-2015 Total Source of Funds $60,176,873

Grants and Contract Awards and Designated Research Initiative Funds $27,836,709

Net General Appropriation and Tuition and Fees $26,615,588

Auxiliary and Misc. $3,318,073

FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 Total Source of Funds $56,905,079

Scholarships, Fellowships, and Endowments $1,267,761

Grants and Contract Awards and Designated Research Initiative Funds $25,090,586

Federal Funds $367,316

Auxiliary and Misc. $2,828,101

Net General Appropriation and Tuition and Fees $25,488,541 Gifts $1,752,243 Scholarships, Fellowships, and Endowments $1,332,292

42

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Federal Funds $413,316


NEW FACULTY

Kimberly Claeys, PharmD Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Claeys received a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Wayne State University Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Detroit. She completed a pharmacy practice residency at University of Illinois at Chicago School of Pharmacy and University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago, followed by a two-year Infectious Diseases Health Outcomes Fellowship at the Anti-Infective Research Laboratory in Detroit. An assistant professor at the School of Pharmacy, she is also a member of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Her research interests include clinical and economic outcomes of health care-associated infections and development of predictive and prognostic models and decision analysis tools to improve antimicrobial stewardship and patient outcomes.

Emily Heil, PharmD Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Heil completed her undergraduate and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and subsequently completed a pharmacy practice and infectious diseases pharmacy residency training at the University of North Carolina Hospitals. An assistant professor at the School of Pharmacy, she also has served for the last five years as coordinator of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Her research interests include individualization of antimicrobial dosing, particularly in critically ill patients, gram-negative resistance, and antimicrobial stewardship.

Sophia L. Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Johnson received a Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Illinois-Chicago College of Pharmacy, a Master of Public Health in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, and a PhD in population health sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. She has extensive experience as a clinical pharmacist in several roles including home infusion and institutional drug policy

development. Her work in clinical pharmacy inspired her to better understand the impact of social determinants of health on drug therapy utilization and chronic disease management, particularly among vulnerable populations. Johnson attained an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) F32 postdoctoral fellowship for her dissertation work on predictors, use, and consequences of biologics and other agents in older inflammatory bowel disease patients. During the fellowship, she studied drug utilization using quantitative methods in older chronic disease patients at risk for receiving inappropriate therapy and therapy that is difficult to use at home. Shortly after her PhD training, she earned a Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. At the School of Pharmacy, she focuses on patient-centered outcomes research and has built community partnerships in rural areas of Maryland to explore pharmacotherapy self-management in a diverse, intersectional community. Johnson is the principal investigator on an AHRQ R24 infrastructure pilot grant focused on patient experience, work tasks, and desired outcomes associated with pharmacotherapy self-management in older multi-morbid patients. This work will contribute to future mixed methodologic studies examining support mechanisms for midlife and older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complicated drug regimens, particularly members of diverse and low-resourced communities. Jace Jones, PhD Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Director, Mass Spectrometry Center Jones received his PhD in analytical chemistry from the University of Washington Department of Chemistry and earned his BS in biology (chemistry minor) from Whitworth University in Spokane, Wash. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, he spent several years as technical director at a chemical analysis firm in Fullerton, Calif., that specialized in the analysis of environmental contaminants. Upon transitioning back to academics at the School of Pharmacy, Jones’ research interests have focused on the development of mass spectrometry-based platforms that couple biomarker discovery to quantitative validation from circulating and tissue metabolites and lipids. In particular, he is focused on the use of high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry to structurally elucidate, identify, and quantify biologically active metabolites/ lipids to further understand disease and injury mechanisms of action and provide insight for drug development targets.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

43


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH (PHSR) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

SPONSOR NAME

PROJECT TOTAL

Peter Doshi Assistant Professor

The Possible Harms of Statins: American Association of What Do Product Labels and Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Leaflets Tell Us?

Peter Doshi

Secondment Agreement

BMJ Publishing Group Limited, Inc. $90,000

Susan dosReis Associate Professor Susan dosReis Associate Professor

Maryland State Foster Care Psychotropic Monitoring

Maryland Department of Human Resources

$89,675

Methods for Prioritizing Surrogate Desired Health Outcomes for Patients

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

$372,163

C. Daniel Mullins Professor and Chair

Modeling Long-Run ICERs Over the Drug Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. Life Cycle with Dynamic Price Considerations

C. Daniel Mullins Professor and Chair

PATIENTS: PATient-centered Involvement Agency for Healthcare Research $1,205,087 in Evaluating effectiveNess of TreatmentS and Quality

C. Daniel Mullins Professor and Chair

Publication of Studies on Real-World Evidence: Journal Editor Perceptions and Approaches

National Pharmaceutical Council $178,251

Eleanor Perfetto Professor

What Industry Needs to Know About Quality Metrics

National Pharmaceutical Council $79,113

Assistant Professor

Eleanor Perfetto Professor PCOR Training for Non-Usual Suspects: A Program for Rare Disease Patient Advocates

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

$10,000

$107,588

$179,636

Eleanor Perfetto Professor

Patient-Centered Research for Outcomes, PhRMA Foundation Effectiveness, and Measurement (PROEM)

$83,333

Francoise Pradel Professor

Postmarketing Surveillance of Generic Drug Usage and Substitution Patterns

IMPAQ International LLC

$113,471

Francoise Pradel Professor

Opioid Misuse Prevention Program D14 Technical Assistance and Evaluation

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$50,000

Francoise Pradel Professor

Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework D15 Process and Outcome Evaluation

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$380,000

Francoise Pradel Professor

Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework Substance Abuse and Mental Process and Outcome Evaluation Health Services Administration

$20,000

Xian Shen Graduate Student

Impact of Characteristics of Medicare Part D Plans on Medication Adherence Among Randomized Beneficiaries with Low-Income Subsidies

$25,000

44

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Linda Simoni-Wastila

Parke-Davis Chair Statewide Epidemiological Outcomes of Geriatric Workgroup FY15 Pharmacotherapy

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$200,000

Linda Simoni-Wastila Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy

Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Evaluation

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$161,930

Linda Simoni-Wastila Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy

MOU - Maryland Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Measurers

Maryland Health Care Commission

$63,597

Linda Simoni-Wastila Parke-Davis Chair MOU - Maryland PCMH Shared Savings of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy

Maryland Health Care Commission

$94,703

Linda Simoni-Wastila Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharnacotherapy

Novartis HEOR Fellowships

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.

$207,593

Bruce Stuart Professor

Proximal Predictors and Cost Merck & Co, Inc. Consequences of Discontinuance with Oral Hypoglycemic Agents in the Elderly

$31,861

Bruce Stuart Professor

How Medication Therapy Management National Association of Programs and Formulary Designs Differ Chain Drug Stores Across Part D Plans and What That Means for Patients, Plans, and Medicare

$140,000

Bruce Stuart Professor

Building the Evidence Base for Evaluating Drug Formulary Design

National Pharmaceutical Council $185,675

Bruce Stuart Professor

Assessing the Costs of Disability Among Medicare Beneficiaries

Pfizer Inc.

$20,000

Bruce Stuart Professor

Common Mistakes in Adherence Research and How to Avoid Them

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America

$35,774

Bruce Stuart Professor

Understanding of Differences in Generic Pharmaceutical Research and and Brand Medication Utilization Patterns Manufacturers of America Among Part D Enrollees With and Without the Low Income Subsidy Supplement

$10,500

Bruce Stuart Professor

2012 PhRMA Abbreviated Chartbook on Medicare Part D Drug Adherence and Outcomes

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America

$43,000

Bruce Stuart Professor

Landscape Review and Policy Implications of Restricted Access to Government-Funded Health Care Data

University of Pennsylvania

$46,377

wint e r 2 0 1 7

45


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Ilene Zuckerman Professor

MOU - Maryland Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Shared Savings

Maryland Health Care Commission $95,397

Ilene Zuckerman

Novartis Fellowship

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.

$97,345

Total PHSR

$4,417,070

Professor

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY PRACTICE AND SCIENCE (PPS) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

Bruce Anderson

Professor

Avon Products Support

Avon Products Inc.

$26,980

Bruce Anderson Professor

After Hours Support to Provide Medical Information

Combe Inc.

$30,996

Bruce Anderson Professor

Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Denver Health and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS) Hospital Authority System by Poison Control Centers

$27,799

Bruce Anderson Professor

Poison Control Stabilization and Enhancement Program

Health Resources and Services Administration

$219,560

Bruce Anderson Professor

State Children’s Health Insurance Information

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$2,925,848

Bruce Anderson Professor

Enhanced Toxidromic Surveillance Using Poison Center Data

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$35,000

Nicole Brandt Professor

CMS Medication Therapy Management (MTM) Program Improvement Contract: Develop Standards for Delivery and Documentation of MTM Services Part D

Econometrica, Inc.

$105,849

Bethany DiPaula

FY15 Howard County Health Department Howard County Health Department $80,981

Associate Professor

SPONSOR NAME

PROJECT TOTAL

Bethany DiPaula Associate Professor

FY14 Springfield Hospital Center – Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,349,250

Thomas Dowling

ORFM-1B Clinical Trial Study

MediBeacon

$5,068

Thomas Dowling Professor

Fasting Bioequivalence Study of Nilotinib Capsules

Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$297,454

Agnes Ann Feemster Assistant Professor

MOU between JHH Department of Pharmacy and UMB School of Pharmacy

Johns Hopkins Hospital

$20,004

46

c a p su l e

Professor

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Joga Gobburu Professor

Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic, Dose-Toxicity Modeling and Simulation for Narrow Therapeutic Index (NTI) Drugs

Food & Drug Administration

$207,980

Joga Gobburu Professor

Pharmacometric Modeling and Simulation for a Generic Drug Substitutability Evaluation and Post-Marketing Risk Assessment

Food & Drug Administration

$207,980

Joga Gobburu Professor

Development of Quantitative Translational Medicine Decision Kit for RA Disease

Johnson & Johnson

$40,575

Joga Gobburu Professor

Ex-Vivo Model Analysis Consultant Amendment #3

Medicines360

$20,650

Joga Gobburu Professor Breathe Consultancy

Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$20,000

Joga Gobburu Professor RBP7000 Modeling and Report Project

Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$65,000

Joga Gobburu Professor

In Vitro-In Vivo Correlations for Ophthalmic Implants

University of Colorado, Denver

$10,000

Joga Gobburu Professor

Long-Term Modeling and Simulation Support for Wockhardt Projects

Wockhardt Ltd.

$995,000

Mathangi Research Assistant Gopalakrishnan Professor

Doxycycline Project

Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd.

$50,000

Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$120,000

Mathangi Gopalakrishnan

Research Assistant RBP6000 Modeling and Report Project Professor

Lauren Hynicka Assistant Professor Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Review Program Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$244,332

Allison Lardieri Assistant Professor

University of Tennessee

$8,626

Stability of Lactulose (Kristalose) Compared to Polyethylenegly (Miralax) at Varying Time Points and in Common Liquids

Cherokee Layson-Wolf

Associate Professor Professional Pharmacy Resident and Associate Dean Training Agreement

Professional Pharmacy Services, Inc.

$45,813

Cherokee Layson-Wolf

Associate Professor Sharpsburg Pharmacy Resident and Associate Dean Agreement

Sharpsburg Pharmacy

$29,066

wint e r 2 0 1 7

47


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Cherokee Layson-Wolf

Associate Professor Whitesell Pharmacy Resident and Associate Dean Agreement

Whitesell Pharmacy

$29,066

Raymond Love Professor

Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center - Improving Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$661,541

Raymond Love Professor

Thomas B. Finan Center - Improving Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$348,931

Raymond Love Professor

MHA - Centralized Administration of Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$541,418

Raymond Love Professor

Potomac Center - Secure Evaluation and Therapeutic Treatment

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$141,826

Raymond Love Professor

Antipsychotic Prescription Review Program

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$899,899

Raymond Love Professor

Spring Grove Hospital Center - Improving Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,690,185

Raymond Love Professor

Peer to Peer Review for Mental Health Drug Programs – Pediatrics

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$2,099,999

Raymond Love Professor

Eastern Shore Hospital Center and Upper Shore Community Mental Health Center - Improving Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$361,983

Mary Lynn McPherson Professor

Improvements in Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Regarding Medication Management in Patients with Advanced Illnesses: An Educational Intervention

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$101,729

Mary Lynn McPherson

Pain and Palliative Care Residency

Union Memorial Hospital

$67,813

Professor

Jason Noel Associate Professor Developmental Disabilities Administration Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$52,528

Neha Pandit Associate Professor

Policy and Routines to Operationalize Compliance and Effectiveness for ARV Therapy

$25,000

Tim Rocafort Assistant Professor

MOU Between Johns Hopkins Home Johns Hopkins Home Care Group $36,299 Care Group and UMB School of Pharmacy

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

Joint Clinical and Educational Collaboration

48

c a p su l e

Professor and Associate Dean

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education

Baltimore Washington Medical Center

$191,299


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

Professor and Associate Dean

Medstar - Georgetown University Hospital Training Agreement

Georgetown University Hospital

$71,799

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

Professor and Associate Dean

Evaluation of Pharmacy Services

Giant of Maryland, LLC

$61,602

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

Professor and Clinical Pharmacy Services Associate Dean

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$179,280

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

Professor and Associate Dean

Maryland State Medical Society

$5,000

Leah Sera Assistant Professor Joint Clinical and Educational Collaboration

MedStar Health Inc.

$89,563

Leah Sera Assistant Professor

Management of Opiod-Induced Constipation in Advanced Illness: A Survey of Hospice Organizations

University of Tennessee

$6,040

Kathryn Walker Associate Professor

Controlled Dangerous Substance Emergency Preparedness Plan

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$80,058

Total PPS

$14,932,598

Physician Dispensing in Maryland: An Educational Series

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES (PSC) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

SPONSOR NAME

Heather Boyce Graduate Student

Understanding Material Properties and Abuse Deterrent Formulations

PhRMA Foundation

$20,000

Andrew Coop

UMB425: A Unique Opioid Analgesic with Reduced Tolerance

Maryland Technology Development Corp.

$100,000

Steven Fletcher Associate Professor

Optimization of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the BRD4 Protein

Convergence LLC

$22,697

Steven Fletcher Associate Professor

Lead Optimization of a Bromodomain Inhibitor

Maryland Industrial Partnerships $68,631

Young Ah Goo Research Assistant Professor

A Clinical Study of Biomarker Identification for Efficacy Assessment on Latent Metabolic Syndrome Subjects

Chonbuk National University

$30,000

Young Ah Goo Research Assistant Professor

Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Novel Molecule Post-Translational Modification Analysis

Medimmune Inc.

$150,000

Professor and Associate Dean

PROJECT TOTAL

wint e r 2 0 1 7

49


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

David Goodlett Professor

Type VI Secretion Effectors and Their Role in Fitness During Polymicrobial Infection

University of Washington

$50,000

Geoffrey Heinzl Graduate Student

Designing Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Bacterial Heme Oxygenase as Novel Antivirulants

American Chemical Society

$26,000

Geoffrey Heinzl Graduate Student

Discovery and Design of Antivirulants Targeting the Heme Uptake System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education

$6,500

Stephen Hoag Professor

Risk Assessment of Abuse-Deterrent Technologies

National Institute of Pharmaceutical $110,189 Technology and Education

Jing Huang Postdoctoral Fellow

Development and Testing of Novel Empirical Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations that Includes Multipoles and Polarizability

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

$30,000

Maureen Kane Associate Professor

Molecular Determinants of Retinoid Metabolism in Embryonic Tissues

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc.

$143,331

Maureen Kane Associate Professor

Interactive Effect of Environmental Exposures and Alcohol in the Navajo Birth Cohort

University of New Mexico

$29,579

Justin Lemkul Postdoctoral Fellow

Exploring RNA Folding and Dynamics Using a Polarizable Force Field

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$54,194

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Professor

Program for Therapeutic Targeting of Transcriptional Repression

Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University

$40,000

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Professor

Structural Biology of BCL-6 Small- Molecule Inhibitors

Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University

$118,000

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Professor

Restoration of Tumor Suppression Activity in Malignant Melanoma

National Cancer Institute

$74,710

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Carbohydrate Force Fields for Professor Structure, Dynamics, and Molecular Recognition

National Institutes of Health

$313,308

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Professor

SilcsBio, LLC

$54,701

Pre-Computed Free Energy Maps for Rapid Structure-Based Ligand Design

Sarah Michel Professor Evaluation of Iron Species in Healthy Food & Drug Administration $595,371 Subjects Treated with Generic and Reference Sodium Ferric Gluconate 50

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Sarah Michel

Professor

Non-Classical Zinc Finger Proteins

National Science Foundation

$120,000

James Polli Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair

University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI)

University of Maryland, College Park

$82,227

Paul Shapiro Professor and Chair

Determining Structural Interactions Between ERK2 and BVD-523

Biomed Valley Discoveries, Inc.

$76,951

Jana Shen Associate Professor

Electrostatic Modulation of Protein Stability and Folding

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$291,650

Jana Shen Associate Professor

CAREER: Electrostatic Mechanisms in Protein Stability and Folding

National Science Foundation

$164,411

Jana Shen Associate Professor

Thin Film Biofabrication for Integrated Bio-Electronics

University of Maryland, College Park

$80,000

Yan Shu Associate Professor

Xenobiotic Transporter Regulation and IRIP Function

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$315,200

Wanli Smith Assistant Professor Synphilin-1 and Obesity

National Institute of Diabetes $316,766 and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Audra Stinchcomb Professor

Heat Effect on Generic Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems

Food & Drug Administration

Audra Stinchcomb Professor

Efficacy Study of a Nicotine Barrier Cream

University of North Texas Health $2,978 Science Center, Fort Worth

Audra Stinchcomb Professor

Bioequivalence of Topical Drug Products: in vitro - in vivo Correlations

Food & Drug Administration

$499,998

Audra Stinchcomb Professor

Absolute Bioavailability/Pharmacokinetic National Institute of and Residual Drug Analysis of Oxybutynin, Pharmaceutical Technology Scopolamine, and Fentanyl Transdermal and Education Systems in Healthy Adults

$385,663

Peter Swaan

Molecular Organization of the University of Arizona Organic Cation-Proton Exchanger, MATE1

$25,040

Peter Swaan Professor and Associate Dean

MRP4 Substrate/Inhibitor Structural Features and Polymorphisms in Drug-Induced Liver Injury

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

$26,407

Peter Swaan

Altered Hepatic Disposition of Anionic Drugs-Mechanisms

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

$78,191

Professor and Associate Dean

Professor and Associate Dean

$1,199,99

wint e r 2 0 1 7

51


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Hongbing Wang Professor Regulation of CYP2B6 in Human Liver

National Institute of Diabetes $333,863 and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Hongbing Wang Professor

Role of Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Cyclophosphamide- Based Chemotherapy

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Jia Bei Wang Professor

Development of I-THP as New Medication for Drug Addiction

National Institute on Drug Abuse $765,149

$291,650

Angela Wilks Professor MEACO XIII International Congress

Middle East Africa Council of Ophthalmology

$45,000

Angela Wilks Professor

Heme Utilization and Homeostasis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

$383,750

Angela Wilks Professor

Bacterial Heme Oxygenase Protein and Biological Assay Development

The Research Network, Ltd.

$7,375

Partrick Wintrode Associate Professor

Modeling Misfolded Z Alpha 1- Antitrypsin for in silico Drug Design

Alpha-1 Foundation

$100,000

Fengtian Xue Assistant Professor

Small Molecule BCL6 Inhibitors for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Leukemia Research Foundation

$100,000

Rakta Therapeutics, Inc.

$52,672

Total PSC

$7,782,151

Fengtian Xue Assistant Professor Selective Inhibitors of Heme Transporters as Antiparasitic Agents

52

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Total PHSR

$4,417,070

Total PPS

$14,932,598

Total PSC

$7,782,151

Grand Total

$27,131,820


July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Loyal donors provide the foundation for the School of Pharmacy’s success. Thank you to everyone—our alumni, faculty, staff, and friends—who has invested in the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. LEGACY COUNCIL The Legacy Council of the University of Maryland acknowledges those who have made generous contributions to the School of Pharmacy through their estate plans. Anyone who has made such a gift is eligible for membership in the Legacy Council. To qualify, simply provide the School of Pharmacy’s Office of Development and Alumni Affairs with documentation of the gift or a copy of the relevant document in which the School is named as a beneficiary (www.umbfplannedgiving.org). For additional information about membership in the Legacy Council and estate planning, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893 or email ggriffith@rx.umaryland.edu. Members of the Legacy Council are: John H. Balch, BSP ’68 Kristine W. Ellinger, BSP ’77= Barry M. Bress, BSP ’79 Estate of Evelyn Grollman Glick Theresa A. Bress Nancy Rose Harmon= Phyllis Brill Wingrat, BSP ’50= Ilene Harris, BSP ’81, PharmD ’83 Billie Chappelear Gwynne L. Horwits Harold E. Chappelear, DSc ’98 Leonard Horwits, BSP ’60 Gerald I. Cohen, BSP ’58= George H. Huber, BSP ’61 Irwin R. Cohen= Sophia Kallelis=

Theodore S. Kallelis, PhD ’57= Bernhard Lamy Gregory J. Lukaszczyk, BSP ’84 Estate of Bertha J. Manchey Estate of Helen Mendelsohn David G. Miller, BSP ’85 Joseph H. Morton, BSP ’60= Paul A. Pumpian, BSP ’50=

Michael B. Rodell, BSP ’58 Chris A. Rodowskas, PhG ’29= Estate of Lillian K. Slama Allen Spak, BSP ’63= James M. Trattner, PhD ’28= Clayton L. Warrington, BSP ’58 Elizabeth Warrington William J. Zimmerman, BSP ’70 = Signifies Deceased

DAVID STEWART ASSOCIATES In the mid-1980s, several dedicated alumni and friends established a premier giving society, the David Stewart Associates (DSA), to fund Schoolwide initiatives that would propel the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy nationally as a leader in pharmacy education. This leadership giving society honors David Stewart, America’s first professor of pharmacy and a founder of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, who symbolized a passion for excellence and commitment to pharmacy education. The founding members of the DSA are: Elwin Alpern, BSP ’51= Mayer Handelman, BSP ’54 Leon R. Catlett, BSP ’65 William M. Heller, MS ’51, Melvin S. Cohen= PhD ’55, DSC ’87 James P. Cragg Jr., BSP ’43= H. Elinor Hens= Leonard J. DeMino= Leon Jablon= Donald O. Fedder, BSP ’50= William J. Kinnard Jr. Michaeline R. Fedder Dorothy Levi, BSP ’70 Robert Foer, BSP ’51= Mark A. Levi, PD, BSP ’70 Henry J. Glaser Jr.= Samuel Lichter, BSP ’60 Evelyn Grollman Glick= Nicholas C. Lykos, BSP ’52=

Martin B. Mintz, PD, BSP ’65 Benjamin S. Mulitz Elizabeth Newcomb, BSP ’68 John R. Newcomb Jr., BSP ’67 Anthony G. Padussis, BSP ’44= David Pearlman, BSP ’52 William L. Pearlman, BSP ’48= Thomas S. Petr, BSP ’74 Stephen J. Provenza, PhG ’29= Lawrence R. Rachuba=

Arthur N. Riley, BSP ’70, MS ’72 Gerald M. Rosen David M. Russo, BSP ’79 Ralph A. Small Jr., BSP ’74 Arnold Smolen Bernard A. Weisman, BSP ’70= Kenneth P. Whittemore Jr., BSP ’76 Leonard Winkleman = Signifies Deceased

This core group of philanthropists has inspired other donors to follow their lead. Today DSA membership has grown to create a solid base of private support for the School’s efforts to advance pharmaceutical education, practice, and science. To join this prestigious group of alumni and friends, or for more information on giving to the School, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs, at 410-706-5893 or email ggriffith@rx.umaryland.edu.

wint e r 2 0 1 7

53


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy appreciates the financial support of the following individuals and organizations during the period July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. GIVING BY INDIVIDUALS

William M. Heller, MS ’51, PhD ’55,

James M. Crable, BSP ’82

Apothecary Club

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89~

$250 - $499

DSc ’87+

David Stewart Associates

Robert W. Henderson, PD ’63*

Mark D. Gately

Marsha E. Alvarez, BSP ’71,

$100,000 - $499,999

David H. Jones, BSP ’70~

Michael Grabner

Dolores H. Kinnard

Karen M. Kabat, MS ’83~

Stuart T. Haines*

Janice Batzold~

William J. Kinnard Jr.

Michael Luzuriaga, BSP ’70*

Ilene Harris, PharmD ’83~

Howard K. Besner, BSP ’78,

PharmD ’96*

Daniel Z. Mansour, PharmD ’06~

Alice H. Hill, PharmD ‘93*

$10,000 - $24,999

Amanda Oglesby-Sherrouse

John T. Horney

Charles R. Bonapace,

Andrew Coop~

Francis B. Palumbo

Brian M. Hose, PharmD ’06~

Beverly L. Crovo

Thomas S. Petr, BSP ’74~+

Walter J. Hryszko, BSP ’74*

Barbara S. Chong, PharmD ’97~

Thomas L. Crovo

Patrick Tim Rocafort

Susan Hu, PhD ‘01

Arnold E. Clayman, BSP ’73

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner,

Lisa T. Kloch, BSP ’80~

Terry L. Davis, BSP ’83,

$5,000 - $9,999

Stephen C. Kloch, BSP ’80~

Susan C. dosReis, PhD ’99~

Gaytrice K. Rucker, BSP ’83

Kan Chan Ku, PharmD ’01

Colleen Day~

Xingyue Huang, PhD ’01

Marilyn Shangraw*

Suneel Kudaravalli, PharmD ’00

Lily Chua Eng, BSP ’76~

David A. Knapp*

Jeffrey B. Sherr, BSP ’78~

Lt. Jerome P. H. Lee, PharmD ’03

Steven P. George, BSP ’82

Deanne E. Knapp*

Joanne H. Sherr, BSP ’78~

Yoo-Jin Lee, PharmD ’04

Martin Jagers, PharmD ’85

Cherokee L. Layson-Wolf,

Linda Simoni-Wastila~

Kimberley A. Lentz, PhD ’01

Charise S. Kasser, BSP ’83~

PharmD ’00

PharmD ’83~

PharmD ’02~ PharmD ’97~

PharmD ’98*

Julia F. Slejko

Lisa M. Matson, BSP ’88*

Mary Lynn Lanham, BSP ’88,

Alexander D. MacKerell Jr.~

Larry E. Small, MS ’76, PhD ’80

Thomas E. Menighan

Jill A. Morgan~

Sarah Tom

Karen Morales

Jonathan N. Latham,

C. Daniel Mullins

Angelo C. Voxakis, BSP ’71~

Jason M. Noel~

PharmD ’96 PharmD ’98~

George C. Voxakis, BSP ’58,

Robin L. Paluskievicz,

Dixie D. Leikach, BSP ’92~

$1,000 - $4,999

Neil B. Leikach, BSP ’92~

Alfred Abramson, BSP ’56

Angela Wilks

Sharon K. Park, PharmD ’04

Bonnie Levin, BSP ’78~

Stephen J. Allen, MS ’78

Carol Ann Williams~

Doris M. Peng, MS ’78

Frederick J. Mack, BSP ‘79*

Wendy Allen

Wanda Williams~

Keith S. Pozanek, BSP ’86~

Alice L. Martin, PharmD ’98

Andrew Bartilucci, PhD ’53~

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP ’73,

Jerome Schwartz, BSP ’49*

Brian R. Martin, PharmD ’98

Kenneth Boyden

Leah C. Sera, PharmD ’10

John M. Motsko Jr., BSP ’69~

Fadia T. Shaya

Maura P. Murphy, PhD ’99~

PharmD ’96*

PharmD ’96*

Barry M. Bress, BSP ’79

PharmD ’98~

Suzanne J. Caplan, BSP ’65*

Dean’s Club

Louis Silverstein, BSP ’76

Bruce O’Heir

Yale H. Caplan, PhD ’68*

$500 - $999

Frances Spaven, PhD ’86~

Thomas J. Pfaff, BSP ’85*

Betty W. Cohen, BSP ’49~

Bruce Anderson

Kerry Spaven~

Bonnie L. Pitt, BSP ’74

Mary W. Connelly, BSP ’51

Richard P. Barth

Nina H. Spiller, PharmD ’88~

Raghu R. Prabhu~

William J. Cooper~

Sherry N. Berlin, BSP ’74*

George W. Swope Jr., BSP ’70~

Francoise G. Pradel

J. Philip Fink, BSP ’79*

Thomas S. Brenner, BSP ’72*

Joella Trenchard

James R. Ritchie, BSP ’63*

Julian M. Friedman, BSP ’56*

James L. Bresette, PharmD ’97*

Hoai-An Truong, PharmD ’05~

Michael B. Rodell, BSP ’58*

David R. Fulton Jr., BSP ’81

Laci L. Brown, PharmD ’01~

Loreen A. Wutoh, BSP ’86~

James R. Salmons, BSP ’89,

Jogarao Gobburu

Rebecca Ceraul~

Kathleen Gondek, PhD ’93

David D. Christ, BSP ’79

Sorell L. Schwartz, BSP ’59

Barry D. Hecht, BSP ’73

Nicholas Cornias, BSP ’92*

Daniel S. Shaner, BSP ’63

54

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

PharmD ’00~

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Paul Shapiro

Thomas V. Bolling, BSP ’69~

Pankaj B. Gala, PhD ’90

Nhat H. Le, PharmD ’02

Suzanne K. Simala, BSP ’84*

John E. Braaten, BSP ’79

Florence F. K. Gee, BSP ’74~

Lisa Lebovitz

Amar Trivedi

Jeffrey M. Brewer, PharmD ’98

Donald J. Glenn, BSP ’83~

Michael Ledley

John F. Van Wie, BSP ’84

Elaine L. Brogan, BSP ’78~

Brian J. Goetz, PharmD ’94

Eugene Lee

Jia-Bei Wang, PhD ’92

Margaret C. Brophy, BSP ’77

Theresia E.L. Gonzalez

Jung E. Lee, BSP ’93~

Jay A. Wenig, BSP ’78

Gerald N. Brunson, BSP ’57

Frances A. Gray, PharmD ’13

Lisa C. LeGette, BSP ’92~

Irene L. Winters, BSP ’54*

Michael A. Buchanan,

Deborah F. Groleau

Colleen C. Lehmann, BSP ’78

Barbara D. Wirth, BSP ’72,

George E. Groleau, BSP ‘76~

Henry M. Levi, BSP ’63~

Jennifer T. Bui, PharmD ’89

Vandana R. Gupta, PharmD ’08

Walter P. Mackay, BSP ’62*

Gary J. Wirth, BSP ’79~

Alvin H. Burwell, PharmD ’99

Mary Therese Gyi, BSP ’83,

Daniel F. Mackley, BSP ’76

Bay-Mao B. Wu, PharmD ’01

Gary S. Carson, BSP ’80

Harry E. Macks, BSP ’59

Richard L. Wynn, BSP ’64,

Stewart Wesley Carter, BSP ’76,

Ann Harris

Phillip L. Marsiglia, BSP ’76

Diana P. Henzel, BSP ’93~

Anne R. Mayne

Marian L. Cascio, BSP ’77*

David Hoffberger

Edward T. McCagh Jr., BSP ’75

Jason F. Chancey, PharmD ’00~

Marta Hoffman, BSP ’60~

Lisa McDaniel, BSP ’84

Century Club

Jennie T. Chang, PharmD ’96

Gwynne L. Horwits

Judy S. McKay, BSP ’87

$100 - $249

Julian Arnold N. Chun,

Leonard Horwits, BSP ’60

Barry Meyer, BSP ’66

Walter H. Abel, BSP ’63

Forest S. Howell, BSP ’87~

Steven J. Miller, MS ’87

Marie V. Adams

Kimberly A. Compton, BSP ’94

Gayle C. Howell, BSP ’91~

Mindy Mintz-Lipowitz, BSP ’86

Robert W. Adams, BSP ’68

David A. Custer, BSP ’73

Helen Hsiao, PharmD ’06~

Robert K. Moler, BSP ’50

Janet D. Allan

John Cweiber

Cindy Q. Jiang, BSP ’90

Yvonne K. Molotsi, PharmD ’02~

Barbara Alving

Hedy J. Cylus Gleiman, BSP ’73~

Hao Jiang, PhD ’94

Peter Murray

Carl Alving

Brett L. Dabruzzo, PharmD ’97

Ping Jin, PhD ’06

Gloria J. Nichols-English,

R. Hugh Andrew

Mavis N. Darkwah, PharmD ’10

Tali M. Johnson, PharmD ’02

Clarence L. Anstine, BSP ’58

Joseph Davison

Aaron C. Kadish, BSP ’63*

John J. Novak, BSP ’72

Daniel Ashby

Louis Diamond, BSP ’61, MS ’64,

Angela M. Kaitis, BSP ’75,

Ojimi Okome, PharmD ’03

Larry L. Augsburger, BSP ’62,

Joseph Pariser, BSP ’63*

MS ’76~

PhD ’70~

William Yeboah, PharmD ’00~

MS ’65, PhD ’67

PharmD ’01

PharmD ’05~

PharmD ’02

PhD ’67

PharmD ’06

PharmD ’06

PhD ’95

David T. Diwa, PharmD ’97

Patrick Y. Kamara, PharmD ’98

Angela M. Parker, BSP ’95~

Janice Babus

Michelle L. Eby, PharmD ’99~

Erika L. Kammer, PharmD ’08

Kinjal A. Patel, PharmD ’09

Scott David Babus

Ubong D. Edet, PharmD ’04

Susan A. Katz, BSP ’88

Leonard N. Patras, BSP ’74*

Raymond D. Bahr, BSP ’57

James D. Edwards, BSP ’57

Diane L. Kaufman

Lynn M. Perry

Dov E. Banks~

Donald B. Elliott Jr., BSP ’57~

Thomas H. Keller Jr., BSP ’63~

Philip M. Perry, BSP ’74*

Freddy E. Banks, BSP ’92

Susan M. Evans, BSP ’91

Hee S. Kim, BSP ’90

Anthony J. Petralia, Sr., BSP ’52*

Marshal Banks~

Theodore J. Evans, BSP ’83~

Lawrence J. Kotey, PharmD ’03~

Carolyn Petralia, PharmD ’03~

Rochelle Banks~

Naa Amarteokor A. Evans-

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP ’84~

Kathleen M. Phelan, BSP ’93~

Laurine A. Barrow-Wilson,

Kathrin C. Kucharski,

Dennis R. Reaver, BSP ’72

Joseph S. Fannella, BSP ‘73

Budne C. Reinke, BSP ’63~

William H. Batt, BSP ’63~

Daniel A. Farney, PharmD ‘01

Thomas P. LaMartina, BSP ’87*

Mark A. Reynolds

Mary Baxter

Fran Favin-Weiskopf,

Kaysha R. Lancaster,

Carolyn M. Rivers, BSP ’92,

Barbara B. Bedell, BSP ’82

William P. Beierschmitt, PhD ’86

Madeline V. Feinberg, BSP ’79,

Theresa M. Langeheine,

Howard L. Robinson Jr.,

George R. Benson

Anita Bercovitz

Faith A. Fisk, BSP ’92

Amy W. Law, PharmD ’01

David M. Rombro, BSP ’54

Phyllis A. Bernard, BSP ’88*

William T. Foley Jr., BSP ’58~

Ronald E. Lay, BSP ’78*

Melvin N. Rubin, BSP ’55~

Asome Bide, PharmD ’01

Denise Fu, PharmD ’10

Dan Le

Phyllis S. Rubin~

BSP ’89

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

Anfom, PharmD ‘06

PharmD ’88* PharmD ’93

PharmD ’87~

PharmD ’00 PharmD ’01

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

PharmD ’06 PharmD ’00

wint e r 2 0 1 7

55


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Michael Rubino

Steven Yang, PharmD ’99

David G. Danziger, BSP ’51

Jane M. Kirschling

Charlene S. Sampson, BSP ’82

Irvin Yospa, BSP ’61

Hope S. DeCederfelt, BSP ’82~

Kathryn Kiser

Laura E. Sampson, BSP ’87~

Roxanne W. Zaghab

Deborah DeWitt~

Judith L. Kistler, MS ’59

Denise Schleckser

Lane P. Zangwill, BSP ’78*

Jeremy Doggett

Stephen C. Klebrowski, BSP ’69

Brian L. Schumer, BSP ’81~

William V. Zappa, BSP ’74

Catherine G. Dormarunno,

Ronald P. Kleiman, BSP ’82

Florence Scrupski

Gene G. Zepp, BSP ’48

Linda C. Klein, BSP ’72~

Christopher L. Shawyer, BSP ’76~

Reid A. Zimmer, BSP ’63*

Charles R. Downs, BSP ’73,

Wendy Klein-Schwartz,

Thomas S. Shelor, BSP ’74~

Julie Magno Zito

Gisele M. Sidbury, PharmD ’97

PharmD ’00 PharmD ’99*

PharmD ’77~

Norman DuBois, BSP ’53*

Charles J. Kokoski, BSP ’51,

Harriet Silverstein~

Contributions up to $99

Noel E. Durm, BSP ’55

Morton I. Silverstein, BSP ’54~

Janet M. Abramowitz, BSP ’81

Jerald Enslein

Sylvia Kolodner

Kara J. Sink, BSP ’92

Lawrence M. Abrams, BSP ’55

Neil E. Esterson, BSP ’51

Carol Kornmehl

Ellwood A. Sinsky

Dennis M. Ackerman, BSP ’70

Dennis E. Ferguson, BSP ’79*

Albert W. Kossler, MS ’53*

John C. Smith, BSP ’76

Moses A. Adejumo, PharmD ’98

Arbere Franklin

Christopher G. Kruft, BSP ’84

Judith Wenzel Smith, BSP ’77

Cathy Alpert

Paul Freiman, BSP ’53

Helen Krulik

Larry A. Snyder, BSP ’60*

Jeffrey S. Alpert

Phyllis Freiman

Stephen Krulik

Rona S. Snyder*


Caroline T. Bader, BSP ’81*

Betsy R. Gates

Vincent A. Lacroce, PharmD ’84

Carol M. Sobon, BSP ’78

Marvin R. Bader*

Charlotte Gaylin

Angela Lamy~

Neil Sosland

Janice Baer

Herbert Gendason, BSP ’71~

Stephen L. Lauer, BSP ’62*

Molrat Sripinyo, BSP ’83~

Marc Baer

Roxana Gomez

Julia A. Lauless, BSP ’84

Charles H. Steg Jr., BSP ’78,

Ghorashi Bahareh

Martin D. Grebow, BSP ’60*

Susan W. Layos

Harriette L. Bannister, BSP ’72

William J. Grimm, Jr., BSP ’78~

Willard J. Lennox, BS ’54

Michael J. Steinberg, PharmD ’00

Jason A. Barocas

Anthony A. Guerra, PharmD ’97

Melvin Lessing, BSP ’66*

Carol E. Stevenson, PharmD ’02

Gerald E. Beachy, BSP ’72

Andrew D. Haines, PharmD ’13

Steven Levin

Alan R. Stoff, BSP ’70~

Robin L. Becker, BSP ’84

Joan A. Hoffmann

Michael P. Long, BSP ’77

Abigail M. Strawberry, BSP ’93

Vahram Bedrossian, BSP ’79*

Dorothy Holniker

Daniel C. Lyons, PharmD ’07

Jodi M. Sullivan, BSP ’95

Thomas J. Biles, PharmD ’89

Jane S. Hulko, BSP ’83

John G. Magiros, BSP ’48

Craig K. Svensson, BSP ’81~

Ralph N. Blomster

Trang H. Huynh, BSP ’91~

Betty Maiden

Donald W. Taylor, BSP ’69~

Barry L. Bloom, BSP ’66*

Richard Iannotta

Charles Mann

Nancy L. Taylor, BSP ’62*

Eileen Bloom-Prinkey, BSP ’94

Nigel Roger Isaacs, PharmD ’93

Susan B. Mann

J. Bradley Thomas, BSP ’82

Barbara M. Blue, BSP ’55

Anthony M. Ishak, PharmD ’02

Ajeh A. Mbonu, PharmD ’06

Cecelia H. Tillman, BSP ’78

Dianne Borghese, BSP ’93

Mary Jo Ivins

Rachel L. Melnick, PharmD ’11

Francis J. Tinney, PhD ’66*

Curtis A. Bowen, BSP ’56~

Clarence A. Jeffers, III, BSP ’75

Stanley J. Merwitz, BSP ’54

Toyin Tofade

Ashley J. Burns, PharmD ’10

Karen M. Jensen, PharmD ’99

Albert T. Meyers, BSP ’51~

Thanh T. Tran, BSP ’90

Gayle R. Caldwell, BSP ’83

Julie S. Johnson, BSP ’94~

Harris L. Miller, BSP ’65*

Kenneth C. Ullman, BSP ’63

Sue E. Cherry-Myers, BSP ’87

Lisa M. Johnson-Pope,

Philip B. Miller, BSP ’71

Donna E. VanWie, BSP ’87

Marvin J. Chertkoff, MS ’54

Randi Miller

Wayne D. VanWie, BSP ’88

James N. Cianos Jr., BSP ’79

Michael E. Jones, BSP ’72*

Megan J. Moorefield

Marguerite M. VillaSanta

Judy S. Cohen

Carl Kaiser, MS ’52, BSP ’52,

Thomas L. Morgan, BSP ’93

Lucille P. Wallshein

Michael J. Cohen, BSP ’66*

Jeffrey S. Mrowczynski,

James B. Walter Jr., BSP ’51~

Robert F. Cohen

Bernard S. Karpers Jr.

Kenneth M. Weems

Susan Cohen-Pessah, BSP ’78

Kathleen S. Karpers

Robert J. Murray

Hal J. Weinstock, BSP ’74*

John J. Creamer, BSP ’53

Daniel D. Kenea, PharmD ’09

Nicole Musgrave-Burdette

Monica L. White, PharmD ’95

Casey B. Crouse

Robert L. Kestler, BSP ’69

Mary E. Ortiz, BSP ’87

Donna M. Wilson, PharmD ’07

Pamela M. Crowe

Iris Keyser

Anna Palka, BSP ’92

56

PharmD ’00~

MS ’53, PhD ’56*

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

PharmD ’99

PhD ’55*

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

PharmD ’13

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Suzanne J. Paxton Pierson,

Donald R. Young, BSP ’57*

Morton I. Silverstein, BSP

Class of 1961

Christian A. Zang

Irene L. Winters, BSP

Louis Diamond, BSP

PharmD ’90

David Pearlman, BSP ’52+

Irvin Yospa, BSP

Percy J. Phillips, BSP ’81

Donors By Class Year

Class of 1955

Cristina V. Platon, BSP ’83~

Class of 1948

Lawrence M. Abrams, BSP

Class of 1962

Marvin S. Platt, BSP ’51~

John G. Magiros, BSP

Barbara M. Blue, BSP

Larry L. Augsburger, BSP

Sangeeta V. Raje, PhD ’02~

Gene G. Zepp, BSP

Noel E. Durm, BSP

Stephen L. Lauer, BSP

Carl Reason

William M. Heller, PhD

Walter P. Mackay, BSP

James W. Rhodes, BSP ’77

Class of 1949

Carl Kaiser, PhD

Leon Rosen, BSP

Trudy Robinson

Betty W. Cohen, BSP

Melvin N. Rubin, BSP

Nancy L. Taylor, BSP

Lauren M. Robust, PharmD ’11

Jerome Schwartz, BSP

David J. Seff, BSP

Leon Rosen, BSP ’62

Milton F. Toelle, BSP

Robert F. Royce, BSP ’51~

Class of 1950

Barbara Sachs

Robert K. Moler, BSP

Herbert A. Sachs

Class of 1963 Walter H. Abel, BSP

Class of 1956

William H. Batt, BSP

Alfred Abramson, BSP

John F. Fader II, BSP

Charles J. Schutz, BSP ’65

Class of 1951

Curtis A. Bowen, BSP

Robert W. Henderson, PD

David J. Seff, BSP ’55

Mary W. Connelly, BSP

Julian M. Friedman, BSP

Aaron C. Kadish, BSP

Laura Seipp

David G. Danziger, BSP

Charles J. Kokoski, PhD

Thomas H. Keller Jr., BSP

Kelly L. Shaner, BSP ’92

Neil E. Esterson, BSP

Lionel M. Shapiro, BSP ’52*

William M. Heller, MS

Class of 1957

Joseph Pariser, BSP

Liza N. Sharma, PharmD ’97

Charles J. Kokoski, BSP

Raymond D. Bahr, BSP

Budne C. Reinke, BSP

Norman Shillman

Albert T. Meyers, BSP

Gerald N. Brunson, BSP

James R. Ritchie, BSP

Lawrence P. Siegel, PharmD ’02~

Marvin S. Platt, BSP

James D. Edwards, BSP

Daniel S. Shaner, BSP

Ethel I. Speert

Robert F. Royce, BSP

Donald B. Elliott Jr., BSP

Kenneth C. Ullman, BSP

Donald R. Steele Jr., BSP ’90

James B. Walter Jr., BSP

Donald R. Young, BSP

Reid A. Zimmer, BSP

Patricia Stewart

Class of 1952

Class of 1958

Class of 1964

Marc R. Summerfield, MS ’76

Carl Kaiser, MS, BSP

Clarence L. Anstine, BSP

Louis Diamond, MS

Charles D. Taylor Jr., PharmD ’00

David Pearlman, BSP

William T. Foley Jr., BSP

Richard L. Wynn, BSP

Milton F. Toelle, BSP ’55

Anthony J. Petralia, Sr., BSP

Michael B. Rodell, BSP

Elliot S. Tokar, BSP ’60~

Lionel M. Shapiro, BSP

George C. Voxakis, BSP

Richard E. Townsend,

Class of 1953

Class of 1959

Suzanne J. Caplan, BSP

Henry M. Levi, BSP

Todd H. Stephens, BSP ’93

Mary J. Tooey PharmD ’97

Class of 1965 Larry L. Augsburger, MS

Andrew Bartilucci, PhD

Judith L. Kistler, MS

Harris L. Miller, BSP

Deanna Tran, PharmD ’11

John J. Creamer, BSP

Harry E. Macks, BSP

Martin B. Mintz, BSP

Charles H. Tregoe, BSP ’59*

Norman DuBois, BSP

Herbert A. Sachs, BSP

Charles J. Schutz, BSP

Bradley Tubesing

Paul Freiman, BSP

Sorell L. Schwartz, BSP

Thuyanh T. Vu, BSP ’94

Charles J. Kokoski, MS

Charles H. Tregoe, BSP

James B. Walter Jr., BSP ’51~

Albert W. Kossler, MS

Class of 1966 Barry L. Bloom, BSP

Class of 1960

Michael J. Cohen, BSP

Brenda K. Weller, BSP ’92*

Class of 1954

Martin D. Grebow, BSP

Melvin Lessing, BSP

Mark S. Wienecke, BSP ’77*

Marvin J. Chertkoff, MS

Marta Hoffman, BSP

Barry Meyer, BSP

Joan P. Williams, BSP ’70

Willard J. Lennox, BS

Leonard Horwits, BSP

Francis J. Tinney, PhD

Su K. Yi, BSP ’93

Stanley J. Merwitz, BSP

Larry A. Snyder, BSP

Norman R. Yockelson, BSP ’71

David M. Rombro, BSP

Elliot S. Tokar, BSP

Laura D. Weiss, BSP ’93

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

wint e r 2 0 1 7

57


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Class of 1967

Hedy J. Cylus Gleiman, BSP

Class of 1978

Class of 1982

Larry L. Augsburger, PhD

Charles R. Downs, BSP

Stephen J. Allen, MS

Barbara B. Bedell, BSP

Louis Diamond, PhD

Joseph S. Fannella, BSP

Howard K. Besner, BSP

James M. Crable, BSP

Barry D. Hecht, BSP

Elaine L. Brogan, BSP

Hope S. DeCederfelt, BSP

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP

Susan Cohen-Pessah, BSP

Steven P. George, BSP

Class of 1968 Robert W. Adams, BSP

William J. Grimm Jr., BSP

Ronald P. Kleiman, BSP

John H. Balch, BSP

Class of 1974

Ronald E. Lay, BSP

Charlene S. Sampson, BSP

Yale H. Caplan, PhD

Sherry N. Berlin, BSP

Colleen C. Lehmann, BSP

J. Bradley Thomas, BSP

Florence F. K. Gee, BSP

Bonnie Levin, BSP

Class of 1969

Walter J. Hryszko, BSP

Doris M. Peng, MS

Class of 1983

Thomas V. Bolling, BSP

Leonard N. Patras, BSP

Jeffrey B. Sherr, BSP

Gayle R. Caldwell, BSP

Robert L. Kestler, BSP

Philip M. Perry, BSP

Joanne H. Sherr, BSP

Terry L. Davis, BSP

Stephen C. Klebrowski, BSP

Thomas S. Petr, BSP

Carol M. Sobon

Theodore J. Evans, BSP

John M. Motsko Jr., BSP

Bonnie L. Pitt, BSP

Charles H. Steg Jr., BSP

Donald J. Glenn, BSP

Donald W. Taylor, BSP

Thomas S. Shelor, BSP

Cecelia H. Tillman, BSP

Mary Therese Gyi, BSP

Hal J. Weinstock, BSP

Jay A. Wenig, BSP

Ilene Harris, PharmD

William V. Zappa, BSP

Lane P. Zangwill, BSP

Jane S. Hulko, BSP

David H. Jones, BSP

Class of 1975

Class of 1979

Charise S. Kasser, BSP

Michael Luzuriaga, BSP

Clarence A. Jeffers III, BSP

Vahram Bedrossian, BSP

Cristina V. Platon, BSP

Alan R. Stoff, BSP

Angela M. Kaitis, BSP

John E. Braaten, BSP

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner,

George W. Swope Jr., BSP

Edward T. McCagh Jr., BSP

Barry M. Bress, BSP

PharmD

David D. Christ, BSP

Gaytrice K. Rucker, BSP

Class of 1976

James N. Cianos Jr., BSP

Molrat Sripinyo, BSP

Stewart Wesley Carter, BSP

Madeline V. Feinberg, BSP

Class of 1971

Lily Chua Eng, BSP

Dennis E. Ferguson, BSP

Class of 1984

Marsha E. Alvarez, BSP

George E. Groleau, BSP

J. Philip Fink, BSP

Robin L. Becker, BSP

Herbert Gendason, BSP

Daniel F. Mackley, BSP

Frederick J. Mack, BSP

Christopher G. Kruft, BSP

Philip B. Miller, BSP

Phillip L. Marsiglia, BSP

Gary J. Wirth, BSP

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP

Angelo C. Voxakis, BSP

Christopher L. Shawyer, BSP

Norman R. Yockelson, BSP

Louis Silverstein, BSP

Class of 1980

Julia A. Lauless, BSP

Class of 1970 Dennis M. Ackerman, BSP

Karen M. Kabat, MS

Joan P. Williams, BSP Richard L. Wynn, PhD

Vincent A. Lacroce, PharmD

Larry E. Small, MS

Gary S. Carson, BSP

Lisa McDaniel, BSP

Class of 1972

John C. Smith, BSP

Lisa T. Kloch, BSP

Matthew G. Shimoda, PharmD

Harriette L. Bannister, BSP

Marc R. Summerfield, MS

Stephen C. Kloch, BSP

Suzanne K. Simala, BSP

Gerald E. Beachy, BSP

Barbara D. Wirth, MS

Larry E. Small, PhD

John F. Van Wie, BSP

Michael E. Jones, BSP

Class of 1977

Class of 1981

Class of 1985

Linda C. Klein, BSP

Margaret C. Brophy, BSP

Janet M. Abramowitz, BSP

Martin Jagers, PharmD

John J. Novak, BSP

Marian L. Cascio, BSP

Caroline T. Bader, BSP

Thomas J. Pfaff, BSP

Dennis R. Reaver, BSP

Wendy Klein-Schwartz, PharmD

David R. Fulton Jr., BSP

Barbara D. Wirth, BSP

Michael P. Long, BSP

Jill Molofsky, BSP

Class of 1986

Thomas S. Brenner, BSP

Raymond C. Love, PharmD

Percy J. Phillips, BSP

William P. Beierschmitt, PhD

Class of 1973

James W. Rhodes, BSP

Brian L. Schumer, BSP

Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD

Arnold E. Clayman, BSP

Judith Wenzel Smith, BSP

Craig K. Svensson, BSP

Mindy Mintz-Lipowitz, BSP

David A. Custer, BSP

Mark S. Wienecke, BSP

58

c a p su l e

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Keith S. Pozanek, BSP


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Frances Spaven, PhD

Class of 1992

Cynthia J. Boyle, PharmD

Kaysha R. Lancaster, PharmD

James T. Walter, PhD

Freddy E. Banks, BSP

Jennie T. Chang, PharmD

Cherokee L. Layson-Wolf,

Loreen A. Wutoh, BSP

Nicholas Cornias, BSP

Mary Lynn Lanham, PharmD

PharmD

Faith A. Fisk, BSP

George C. Voxakis, PharmD

Howard L. Robinson Jr., PharmD

Class of 1987

Lisa C. LeGette, BSP

Ellen H. Yankellow, PharmD

James R. Salmons, PharmD

Sue E. Cherry-Myers, BSP

Dixie D. Leikach, BSP

William M. Heller, DSc

Neil B. Leikach, BSP

Class of 1997

Michael J. Steinberg, PharmD

Forest S. Howell, BSP

Anna Palka, BSP

Charles R. Bonapace, PharmD

Charles D. Taylor Jr., PharmD

Kathrin C. Kucharski, PharmD

Carolyn M. Rivers, BSP

James L. Bresette, PharmD

William Yeboah, PharmD

Thomas P. LaMartina, BSP

Kelly L. Shaner, BSP

Barbara S. Chong, PharmD

Judy S. McKay, BSP

Kara J. Sink, BSP

Brett L. Dabruzzo, PharmD

Class of 2001

Steven J. Miller, MS

Jia-Bei Wang, PhD

David T. Diwa, PharmD

Asome Bide, PharmD

Mary E. Ortiz, BSP

Brenda K. Weller, BSP

Anthony A. Guerra, PharmD

Laci L. Brown, PharmD

Laura E. Sampson, BSP Donna E. VanWie, BSP

Charles H. Steg Jr., PharmD

Liza N. Sharma, PharmD

Michael A. Buchanan, PharmD

Class of 1993

Gisele M. Sidbury, PharmD

Daniel A. Farney, PharmD

Dianne Borghese, BSP

JoAnn M. Spearmon, PharmD

Susan Hu, PhD

Class of 1988

Madeline V. Feinberg, PharmD

Rodney H. Taylor, PharmD

Xingyue Huang, PhD

Phyllis A. Bernard, BSP

Kathleen Gondek, PhD

Richard E. Townsend, PharmD

Kan Chan Ku, PharmD

Fran Favin-Weiskopf, PharmD

Diana P. Henzel, BSP

Susan A. Katz, BSP

Alice H. Hill, PharmD

Class of 1998

Amy W. Law, PharmD

Mary Lynn Lanham, BSP

Nigel Roger Isaacs, PharmD

Moses A. Adejumo, PharmD

Kimberley A. Lentz, PhD

Lisa M. Matson, BSP

Jung E. Lee, BSP

Thomas J. Biles, PharmD

Bay-Mao B. Wu, PharmD

Nina H. Spiller, PharmD

Thomas L. Morgan, BSP

Jeffrey M. Brewer, PharmD

Wayne D. VanWie, BSP

Kathleen M. Phelan, BSP

Terry L. Davis, PharmD

Class of 2002

Todd H. Stephens, BSP

Patrick Y. Kamara, PharmD

Howard K. Besner, PharmD

Class of 1989

Abigail M. Strawberry, BSP

Jonathan N. Latham, PharmD

Julian Arnold N. Chun, PharmD

Laurine A. Barrow-Wilson, BSP

Laura D. Weiss, BSP

Alice L. Martin, PharmD

Anthony M. Ishak, PharmD

Thomas J. Biles, PharmD

Su K. Yi, BSP

Brian R. Martin, PharmD

Tali M. Johnson, PharmD

Robin L. Paluskievicz, PharmD

Nhat H. Le, PharmD

Jennifer T. Bui, PharmD

Theresa M. Langeheine, PharmD

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD

Class of 1994

James R. Salmons, BSP

Eileen Bloom-Prinkey, BSP

Class of 1999

Sangeeta V. Raje, PhD

Yvonne K. Molotsi, PharmD

Kimberly A. Compton, BSP

Alvin H. Burwell, PharmD

Lawrence P. Siegel, PharmD

Class of 1990

Brian J. Goetz, PharmD

Susan C. dosReis, PhD

Carol E. Stevenson, PharmD

Pankaj B. Gala, PhD

Hao Jiang, PhD

Charles R. Downs, PharmD

Cindy Q. Jiang, BSP

Julie S. Johnson, BSP

Michelle L. Eby, PharmD

Class of 2003

Hee S. Kim, BSP

Thuyanh T. Vu, BSP

Karen M. Jensen, PharmD

Lawrence J. Kotey, PharmD

Lisa M. Johnson-Pope, PharmD

Lt. Jerome P. H. Lee, PharmD

Suzanne J. Paxton Pierson, PharmD

Class of 1995

Maura P. Murphy, PhD

Ojimi Okome, PharmD

Donald R. Steele Jr., BSP

Gloria J. Nichols-English, PhD

Steven Yang, PharmD

Carolyn Petralia, PharmD

Thanh T. Tran, BSP

Angela M. Parker, BSP Jodi M. Sullivan, BSP

Class of 2000

Class of 2004

Monica L. White, PharmD

Jason F. Chancey, PharmD

Ubong D. Edet, PharmD

Catherine G. Dormarunno,

Yoo-Jin Lee, PharmD Sharon K. Park, PharmD

Class of 1991 Susan M. Evans, BSP Gayle C. Howell, BSP

Class of 1996

PharmD

Trang H. Huynh, BSP

Marsha E. Alvarez, PharmD

Suneel Kudaravalli, PharmD

wint e r 2 0 1 7

59


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Class of 2005

Class of 2013

CVS Charitable Trust, Inc.

The Pfizer Foundation, Inc.

Stewart Wesley Carter, PharmD

Frances A. Gray, PharmD

Exxon Mobil Foundation

T. Rowe Price Foundation, Inc.

Hoai-An Truong, PharmD

Andrew D. Haines, PharmD

Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund

Jeffrey S. Mrowczynski, PharmD

Fink’s Pharmacy

Gifts of Tribute

Nutramax Laboratories, Inc.

The School of Pharmacy

Class of 2006 Naa Amarteokor A. Evans-

GIVING BY CORPORATIONS

Pharmaceutical Education

received the following gifts of

AND FOUNDATIONS

tribute for the individuals listed

Anfom, PharmD

Mary Therese Gyi, PharmD

Consultants, Inc. (PharmCon)

Safeway, Inc.

below:

Brian M. Hose, PharmD

Patrons

UMSOP Class of 2015

In Honor Of:

Helen Hsiao, PharmD

$100,000 +

Walmart Health and Wellness

Gerhard Levy

Ping Jin, PhD

Certara, L.P.

Angela M. Kaitis, PharmD

Leukemia Research Foundation

Contributors Up To $999

Daniel Z. Mansour, PharmD

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.

Academic Radiation

In Memory Of:

Ajeh A. Mbonu, PharmD

Patient-Centered Outcomes

Yvette A. Beakes, PharmD ’00

Carolyn M. Rivers, PharmD

Ahold Financial Services

James P. Cragg Jr., BSP ’43

Thomas G. Williams Jr., PharmD

PhRMA Foundation

Ambulatory Care Pharmacy

Chester Eddington

American Association of

Daniel B. Harris Sandra Horowitz

Research Institute (PCORI)

Edwin Oak

Oncology PC

Class of 2007

Benefactors

Daniel C. Lyons, PharmD

$50,000-$99,999

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Norman Levin

Donna M. Wilson, PharmD

Springer Science + Business

Foundation

Thomas G. Williams Sr., BSP ’80

Brookneal Drug Co.

Media LLC-N.J.

Class of 2008

Colleges of Pharmacy

Cape Apothecary Pharmacy

Vandana R. Gupta, PharmD

Associates

Catonsville Pharmacy, LLC

Erika L. Kammer, PharmD

$25,000-$49,999

CNA Foundation

American Foundation for

Eli Lilly and Co. Foundation

This is a listing of gifts received

Class of 2009

Good Shepherd Preschool

from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015.

Daniel D. Kenea, PharmD

Pharmaceutical Research and

Harris Teeter, Inc.

We have made every effort to

Kinjal A. Patel, PharmD

IMPAQ International, LLC

provide a complete and accurate

International Society for

listing of donors and gifts. If we

Pharmaceutical Education Manufacturers of America

Class of 2010

Affiliates

Pharmacoeconomics &

have made an error or omission,

Ashley J. Burns, PharmD

$10,000-$24,999

Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

please accept our sincere

Mavis N. Darkwah, PharmD

AstraZeneca

Johnson Family Pharmacy LLC

apology and contact the

Denise Fu, PharmD

Merck Grant Program

Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical

Office of Development and

Leah C. Sera, PharmD

Pfizer, Inc.

Fraternity

Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893

Sanofi-Aventis U.S., LLC

Kenneth C. Ullman, MD, PC

or ggriffith@rx.umaryland.edu so

Class of 2011

UCB Pharma, Inc.

Maryland Charity Campaign

that we may correct our records.

Rachel L. Melnick, PharmD

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Network

Maryland Pharmacists

Lauren M. Robust, PharmD

Walgreens

Deanna Tran, PharmD

Waters Corp.

Pharmaceutical Education &

Class of 2012

Sponsors

Preston Pharmacy Inc.

Alice A. Williams, PharmD

$1,000-$9,999

South Baltimore Pharmacy

Albertsons Stores Charitable

Superior Tours, Inc.

SuperValu

60

c a p su l e

Foundation, Inc.

Association (MPhA) Research Institute

Correct Rx Pharmacy

The Annapolitan Shop, Inc.

Services, Inc.

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


MESSAGE FROM DEVELOPMENT 2016 has been a tremendous year for the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. A top 10 U.S.News & World Report ranking, a milestone birthday celebration, and the largest alumni giving rate in School history. We continue to be impressed by and proud of the accomplishments of our many alums and are extremely thankful to those who continue to give to the School both in time and in money. Our students greatly benefit from your generous contributions and look to you for guidance on how to be engaged alumni upon their graduation. In June, we challenged each and every one of our alumni to help us attain a $25,000 anonymous donation by making 272 gifts — one in honor of each member of the graduating Class of 2016. We are pleased to report that, although we did not reach our goal of 272 gifts, we now lead the other schools on campus in alumni participation! Through your wonderful support and participation, you have set the bar high for our future fundraising efforts. The School of Pharmacy is proud to have such supportive, engaged, and enthusiastic alumni!

“I expect to pass through life but once. If, therefore, there be any kindness I can show, or any good thing I can do to any fellow being, let me do it now, and not defer or neglect it, as I shall not pass this way again.” — WILLIAM PENN

WHAT TO DO WITH ‘OBSOLETE’ INSURANCE Do you have a life insurance policy you purchased years ago to provide financial protection — and no longer need it? If so, it may be a great asset to gift to the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Consider the benefits when you irrevocably name the University of Maryland Baltimore Foundation, Inc./School of Pharmacy as both the owner and beneficiary of the policy: 1. You receive an income tax deduction. When you fill out your itemized tax return, you can claim a charitable deduction for the cost basis of the Ken Boyden policy or an amount approximately equal to the cash surrender value. For deduction purposes, the gift is treated as though it were cash. This means you can deduct the gift up to 50 percent of your adjusted gross income. And if you can’t use the full deduction in the first year, you can carry forward the unused portion up to five additional years. 2. You reduce the size of your estate. At death, the face value of most life insurance policies is typically includable in the taxable estate of the deceased. For some estates, this can mean a significant increase in estate taxes. However, transferring the policy during life will remove this “hidden” asset and reduce the size of your estate and any applicable taxes. 3. You leave your current income undisturbed. Many people desire to give more to the School of Pharmacy, but are concerned about their own cash flow and any unforeseen emergencies. They are reluctant to reduce investment assets. We at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy do not want any of our friends to jeopardize their security in making charitable gifts. At the same time, it’s quite possible that you have either forgotten about an “obsolete” life insurance policy or consider it an unneeded asset. In any case, the beauty of giving such a policy is that it doesn’t affect your current income stream. It’s easy to do! Making a gift of life insurance is easier than you might think. Your life insurance professional can help you obtain a transfer form from the insurance company or you can contact the company directly. Of course, we are happy to assist you, as well. You can reach me by calling 410-706-3816 or by emailing me at kboyden@rx.umaryland.edu. Thank you for your ongoing support! Very truly,

Ken Boyden, JD, EdD Associate Dean Office of Development and Alumni Affairs


Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

PAID Permit No. 4695 Baltimore, Maryland

20 N. Pine Street Baltimore, MD 21201-1180

Thank you

to our alumni, faculty, staff, and students for attending Homecoming

Reunion 2016!

and All Alumni

Capsule (Winter 2017)  

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Magazine for Alumni and Friends-- In this issue: Celebrating 175 Years of Distinguished Alumni, Gr...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you