Page 1

TERP

CONNECTING

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY

VOL. 1, NO. 3 SPRING 2004

What Do You Love About

Maryland? Help Us Count the Ways 8

SUMMER READING 6

I

STRAIGHT TALK FROM THE “FRIDGE” 22

I

CICADA-MANIA 13


TERP PUBLISHER

Brodie Remington Vice President, University Relations ADVISORY BOARD

J. Paul Carey ’82 M.B.A. CEO, Enumerate Terry Flannery ’83, ’87 M.Ed., ’95 Ph.D. Executive Director, University Marketing and Communications John Girouard ’81 President and CEO, Capital Asset Management Group Anil Gupta Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Strategy and Organization, Robert H. Smith School of Business Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations Vicki Rymer ’61, ’66 M.B.A., ’83 Ph.D. Teaching Professor, Robert H. Smith School of Business Keith Scroggins ’79 Bureau Head of General Services, City of Baltimore, Dept. of Public Works Lee Thornton Professor and Eaton Chair, Philip Merrill College of Journalism MAGAZINE STAFF

Dianne Burch Executive Editor Beth A. Morgen Managing Editor John T. Consoli ’86 Creative Director Jason Quick Art Director Monette A. Bailey ’89 Tom Ventsias Writers Michael Richman ’84, ’85 Pamela Stone ’95 M.A. Ellen Ternes ’68 Mark Walden ’96 Contributing Writers Mike D’Angelo Stacy L. Kaper Magazine Interns E-mail terp_alum@umail.umd.edu Terp magazine is published by the Division of University Relations. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Send correspondence to Beth Morgen, Managing Editor, Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or, send an email to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. The University of Maryland, College Park, is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. University policies, programs and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

Dear Alumni and Friends, AFTER A BITTER cold winter, I am

rejoicing at the approach of summer: the green leaves, the singing birds, the emerging cicadas—well, at least the leaves and birds. I know that I am not alone in my anticipation of the onceevery-17-year event. University professor Mike Raupp has become an in-demand spokesman for “cicadamania” (see page 13). We have spent plenty of time over the past nine months celebrating grand occasions at the University of Maryland. Last fall, we launched Terp—the alumni magazine that keeps you in touch with your alma mater.We welcomed back the Class of 1953 for Homecoming in October and cheered as the Terps crushed West Virginia at the Gator Bowl in January.The overwhelming response to our simple question, “Did you meet your spouse at Maryland?” (Terp, Fall 2003) prompted us to host our first-ever Alumni Valentine’s Day Party in February. March was complete madness with a men’s basketball victory over Duke in the ACC Tournament championship. In April, we celebrated Maryland’s shining stars at the 5th Annual Alumni Association Awards Gala and welcomed the surrounding community to campus for Maryland Day. May brought visits from Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi and Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge, this year’s commencement speaker. All of this took place in only nine months at Maryland. Just as a gourmet meal tastes better when shared with friends, the triumphs of the 2003–2004 academic year were even sweeter because we experienced them together as a Maryland family—a

group of alumni and friends committed to the university and to each other. Some 400 guests celebrated our alumni awardees’Terrapin spirit and the capacity crowd enriched the affair (meet the awardees on page 26). Maryland Day, the university’s sixthannual open house, arrived with blue skies, soft breezes and 70,000 guests (read more on page two). And Shirin Ebadi’s words bore more weight given the spectrum of cultures gathered in the Comcast Center to hear them. Though summer marks the end of the academic year, I anticipate many more triumphs in Maryland’s future. I hope you will experience them with us, in person and through our magazine— turn the page for more examples of the Maryland family’s integral role in this university’s continuing success.

Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations P.S. Keep up with theTerp! It’s our way of connecting the University of Maryland community.


2 BIG PICTURE Relive Maryland Day 2004; UM’s rise in Peace Corps ranks; How does our garden grow?; New flavors at The Dairy; Biosciences building takes shape; Notable women visit campus; Letters from readers 6 THE SOURCE Recommended reads for all ages 7 ASK ANNE Remembering riot duty and more 8 CLASS ACT What do you love about Maryland?; Alumna shares lessons from “Big Mama”; Entrepreneur offers hot stuff; Exercise your member benefits; Grad gives new meaning to pest control 12 M-FILE Cicada-mania is here; Taking the bite out of shark attacks; Helping ADHD parents; Digital watermarks improve security; New crime program in China 16 MARYLAND LIVE Celebrate July 4th on campus; Sign up for your class reunion and more 29 IN THE LOOP Building scholarships for future Terps 30 PLAY-BY-PLAY ACC run is one to remember 31 SPOTLIGHT Jazz studies director is back in the swing 32 INTERPRETATIONS Access to quality

departments page 30

features

22

18 ASSEMBLING OUR

Football coach and alumnus Ralph Friedgen ’70, M.A. ’72, a.k.a. the “Fridge,” assesses the past three seasons and sets his sights on a national championship.

EDUCATIONAL TOOLBOX The university is enriching kindergarten through 12th grade education by sharing applicable research with teachers, structuring engaging curricula and assessing results. BY MONETTE A. BAILEY

BY MICHAEL RICHMAN

26

AND THE ALUMNI AWARD GOES TO …

Like the Oscars, distinguished alumni awards are intended to call attention to individuals who have given master performances in their chosen fields. BY MARK WALDEN

COVER PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; SEE STORY ON PAGE 8

WHAT IT TAKES TO WIN—

THEN AND NOW


bigpicture

YOURwords

It All Adds Up to a Record-breaking Maryland Day SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2004: Take one bright blue sky, sprinkle

in some puffy white clouds and combine with air temperature in the low 70s. It doesn’t get any better for the sixth annual event that both the Washington Post and the Baltimore Sun trumpeted in advance as a “Best Bet,” for a family outing. Folks took it to heart. –DB

2

70,767

Mote Mobiles (for President Dan and First Lady Patsy) to take in the sights and sounds.

Maryland Rises in Peace Corps Ranks visitors made quite an attendance splash.

86

R-O-A-R competitors shout it out at the Fear the Turtle contest.

DID YOU KNOW?

3,176

scoops of Maryland-made ice cream dished out.

2,000 bobbing “rubber duckies” invite kids to fish for prizes.

presidential pup performing tricks for tykes from the Center for Young Children.

2

TERP SPRING

2004

400+

free events were spread across campus in six theme areas.

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Thank you for including a piece on the expansion of the campus [“Growth Spurt”, p. 4]. Several grads were responsible for the projects. The Chemistry Wing was designed and completed by Design Collective of Baltimore, which is owned by Dennis Jankiewicz, AIA ’73, Ed Kohls, AIA ’77 and Ed Jones ’80. Design Collective also designed the Chemistry SCUB and Atrium, the NMR addition to the College of Life Sciences, and the current South Campus Housing. —Ed Kohls, AIA ’77

THE STATE OF MARYLAND has approved $55.8 million in

6,000 faculty, staff and student volunteers were on hand for the day.

autographs signed by football and basketball players and coaches.

In 2001, President George Bush nominated alumna Jody Olsen ’79 as deputy director of the Peace Corps. From 1966–1968 Olsen was a Peace Corps volunteer living in Tunisia.

State Provides Funding for New Bioscience Research Building

1 60,000+

AT NUMBER 18, the University of Maryland is one of the top volunteer-producing colleges and universities for the Peace Corps.This year the university moved up two places for largesized universities.There are 58 alumni serving in the Peace Corps—an 18-percent increase over last year. All total, more than 855 alumni have served or are currently serving as Peace Corps volunteers. “We are getting the word out,” says Bill Varettoni, who joined the university as its Peace Corps recruiter last August. He served two years with the Peace Corps in the Ukraine. Varettoni says that the ideal candidate for the Peace Corps is someone who has a “sincere interest in living in and learning about other cultures.” Volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a two-year commitment. If you’re interested in serving, contact Varettoni at 301.405.9589 or peacecorps@umd.edu. –BAM

I saw in Danita Nias’ editorial that Boomer Esiason was elected into the Alumni Association Hall of Fame. I first met Boomer as a senior at Maryland when he presented our gymnastics team with the Academic All-American award. In the ensuing years, we have become good friends and colleagues at both CBS Sports and CBS/Westwood One radio. As a woman in a “man’s world,” I consider Boomer one of my biggest supporters. … He is in a rightful place of honor among Maryland’s all-time greats. —Bonnie Bernstein ’92, CBS Sports

capital funding for a new bioscience research facility at the University of Maryland, bolstering the university’s goal to provide regional leadership in education and research for the biosciences. “This will have a tremendous impact on our ability to recruit and retain outstanding faculty members, as well as offer outstanding academic programs in this enormously exciting area,” says Norma Allewell, dean of the College of Life Sciences. Bioscience programs at the university have already made significant contributions to the state’s important biotech industry, and the new research facility is crucial toward further progress. “Without a first-rate facility, you can’t be involved in the kind of current science that translates into the commercial sector,” says Dennis O’Connor, the university’s vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School. Currently, the university helps to educate a skilled work force necessary to keep the state’s biotech industry thriving. And, emerging startup companies regular-

ly turn to the university for its expertise and ideas through innovative programs like the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program and the Technology Advancement Program (TAP). Since 1984, TAP has graduated 25 bioscience-related companies, generating approximately $380 million in investments and more than 625 new jobs. —TV

TOP COURTESY OF THE PEACE CORPS, JODY OLSEN BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, ARCHITECTURAL MODEL IMAGE COURTESY OF BALLINGER

I was pleased to see a reference to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies in the Winter issue of Terp. We offer a 21-credit undergraduate certificate designed to complement a broad range of majors and to prepare students for advanced study in a variety of fields. The LGBT Studies program office is located in 1147 Tawes Fine Arts Building. For more information, visit www.lgbts.umd.edu. —Marilee Lindemann, director of LGBT Studies Send letters to Terp, University of Maryland Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu

TERP SPRING

2004

3


bigpicture

YOURwords

It All Adds Up to a Record-breaking Maryland Day SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2004: Take one bright blue sky, sprinkle

in some puffy white clouds and combine with air temperature in the low 70s. It doesn’t get any better for the sixth annual event that both the Washington Post and the Baltimore Sun trumpeted in advance as a “Best Bet,” for a family outing. Folks took it to heart. –DB

2

70,767

Mote Mobiles (for President Dan and First Lady Patsy) to take in the sights and sounds.

Maryland Rises in Peace Corps Ranks visitors made quite an attendance splash.

86

R-O-A-R competitors shout it out at the Fear the Turtle contest.

DID YOU KNOW?

3,176

scoops of Maryland-made ice cream dished out.

2,000 bobbing “rubber duckies” invite kids to fish for prizes.

presidential pup performing tricks for tykes from the Center for Young Children.

2

TERP SPRING

2004

400+

free events were spread across campus in six theme areas.

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Thank you for including a piece on the expansion of the campus [“Growth Spurt”, p. 4]. Several grads were responsible for the projects. The Chemistry Wing was designed and completed by Design Collective of Baltimore, which is owned by Dennis Jankiewicz, AIA ’73, Ed Kohls, AIA ’77 and Ed Jones ’80. Design Collective also designed the Chemistry SCUB and Atrium, the NMR addition to the College of Life Sciences, and the current South Campus Housing. —Ed Kohls, AIA ’77

THE STATE OF MARYLAND has approved $55.8 million in

6,000 faculty, staff and student volunteers were on hand for the day.

autographs signed by football and basketball players and coaches.

In 2001, President George Bush nominated alumna Jody Olsen ’79 as deputy director of the Peace Corps. From 1966–1968 Olsen was a Peace Corps volunteer living in Tunisia.

State Provides Funding for New Bioscience Research Building

1 60,000+

AT NUMBER 18, the University of Maryland is one of the top volunteer-producing colleges and universities for the Peace Corps.This year the university moved up two places for largesized universities.There are 58 alumni serving in the Peace Corps—an 18-percent increase over last year. All total, more than 855 alumni have served or are currently serving as Peace Corps volunteers. “We are getting the word out,” says Bill Varettoni, who joined the university as its Peace Corps recruiter last August. He served two years with the Peace Corps in the Ukraine. Varettoni says that the ideal candidate for the Peace Corps is someone who has a “sincere interest in living in and learning about other cultures.” Volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a two-year commitment. If you’re interested in serving, contact Varettoni at 301.405.9589 or peacecorps@umd.edu. –BAM

I saw in Danita Nias’ editorial that Boomer Esiason was elected into the Alumni Association Hall of Fame. I first met Boomer as a senior at Maryland when he presented our gymnastics team with the Academic All-American award. In the ensuing years, we have become good friends and colleagues at both CBS Sports and CBS/Westwood One radio. As a woman in a “man’s world,” I consider Boomer one of my biggest supporters. … He is in a rightful place of honor among Maryland’s all-time greats. —Bonnie Bernstein ’92, CBS Sports

capital funding for a new bioscience research facility at the University of Maryland, bolstering the university’s goal to provide regional leadership in education and research for the biosciences. “This will have a tremendous impact on our ability to recruit and retain outstanding faculty members, as well as offer outstanding academic programs in this enormously exciting area,” says Norma Allewell, dean of the College of Life Sciences. Bioscience programs at the university have already made significant contributions to the state’s important biotech industry, and the new research facility is crucial toward further progress. “Without a first-rate facility, you can’t be involved in the kind of current science that translates into the commercial sector,” says Dennis O’Connor, the university’s vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School. Currently, the university helps to educate a skilled work force necessary to keep the state’s biotech industry thriving. And, emerging startup companies regular-

ly turn to the university for its expertise and ideas through innovative programs like the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program and the Technology Advancement Program (TAP). Since 1984, TAP has graduated 25 bioscience-related companies, generating approximately $380 million in investments and more than 625 new jobs. —TV

TOP COURTESY OF THE PEACE CORPS, JODY OLSEN BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, ARCHITECTURAL MODEL IMAGE COURTESY OF BALLINGER

I was pleased to see a reference to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies in the Winter issue of Terp. We offer a 21-credit undergraduate certificate designed to complement a broad range of majors and to prepare students for advanced study in a variety of fields. The LGBT Studies program office is located in 1147 Tawes Fine Arts Building. For more information, visit www.lgbts.umd.edu. —Marilee Lindemann, director of LGBT Studies Send letters to Terp, University of Maryland Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu

TERP SPRING

2004

3


bigpicture

GROWTH spurt pring is the season when brilliant bursts of color beckon visitors to the 1,250-acre campus. Through the diligent efforts of the 42-person landscaping and grounds crew responsible for the designing, planting, pruning and weeding of our foliage, visitors and community members reap the benefits of Maryland in bloom.

S

Cherry Blossom Time History: Washington, D.C., has been the site of the National Cherry Blossom Festival since 1912 when 3,000 cherry trees were given by the city of Tokyo. Maryland can lay claim to having the same variety, Yoshino cherry, as those planted around the Tidal Basin. Where found: Visitors may be most familiar with the cherry trees by the Mitchell Building, home to undergraduate admissions, and the nearby Armory. However, the flowering trees are scattered throughout the campus. Newest spot: Look for Yoshino cherry trees on the north side of McKeldin Library, planted two years ago as a gift from Jack Baker, director of operations and maintenance, to honor his daughter’s graduation from Maryland.

A Festive Occasion The M Circle History: Created by the Department of Facilities Management in 1976 to commemorate the U.S. Bicentennial and planted seasonally ever since. Plant specifications: According to Kevin Brown, assistant director of landscape and grounds, it takes 1,400 petunias to fill the “M.” At other times of the year, pansies are the preferred choice. Begonias had been tried but were prone to developing a fungus and marigolds (which looked good) required laborintensive dead-heading. New this summer: The petunias were grown in the new Research Greenhouse Complex, from seeds donated by Ball Seed Company. The variety is “Red Wave,” which blooms longer and more productively than ordinary petunias, says Brown.

Notable, Quotable Women The University of Maryland was honored to have three distinguished guests address campus during the spring semester. Known throughout the world, these women covered issues ranging from American history to immigration policies to human rights.

Lynne Cheney

Mary Robinson

Shirin Ebadi

children’s history book author and wife of Vice President Dick Cheney

former president of Ireland and U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights

2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner

Featured guest at the Norman and Florence Brody Public Policy Forum, Feb. 29

Keynote speaker for the Sadat Lecture for Peace, March 17

Campus address, May 12

“I think what sometimes happens when we set out to tell the American story is that we tell it in a fashion that’s a lot darker, a lot more negative that it deserves to be told. It’s taken as a series of problems instead of a series of challenges overcome. Sometimes there is a lot of acrimony and difficulty, but nevertheless we have moved forward and we have become a better and better country.”

“[President Sadat] understood in reaching out to the people of Israel that he was reaching out not so much to a different nation or culture but to a shared human desire for acceptance, security and dignity. It is I believe that ability to acknowledge the equal dignity and rights of each person which is most lacking in our world today.”

“You who live in America cannot remain indifferent to violations of human rights in Afghanistan, Iraq, in Palestine, Iran or in other parts in the world. We are all on the same boat and we all sail toward a greater civilization. Any damage to any part of the vessel will disrupt or hinder its movement. The fate of humanity is so intertwined that one can no longer consider the blessings of this world one’s own and deprive others of them at the same time.”

The Dairy Dishes Out New Flavors

After 80 years, Maryland Ice Cream is still made on campus. The Dairy is located in the Turner Building, along Route 1 and just south of Campus Drive. Summer hours are 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday – Friday.

MOO-VE OVER BEN AND JERRY. The Dairy at the University of Maryland has introduced five flavors whose names and ingredients rival those produced by the famous ice cream makers. The new flavors made their debut on Maryland Day 2004 and have been added to the original lineup of 28 choices. Visitors to campus can stop by The Dairy for a taste of any of the flavors. Here’s the scoop on the new additions:

Simply M-arvelous Beds of Bulbs Trivia: Each year, the grounds crew plants approximately 12,000 bulbs, which include Holland tulips in shades of purple, white and— naturally—red as well as American-grown daffodil and crocus. Where found: Stately tulips are interspersed with pansies at the main entrance to the university. Combined with annuals, they can be found in several dozen landscape areas and pocket gardens throughout the campus. New focus: Brown says that a newly created position dedicated to landscape enhancement will concentrate on renovating old small-scale landscapes and installing new pocket gardens.

MIDNIGHT MADNESS Double chocolate ice cream with chocolate ganache and crème de cocoa

FRIDGE FEVER Vanilla ice cream, chocolate fudge, chocolate brownie, chocolate-covered cashews and Myer’s rum

FEAR THE TURTLE White chocolate ice cream swirled with caramel and pecans

FINAL EXAM CRAM Rich cappuccino ice cream with crushed chocolate cookies

SPRING BREAK Exotic tropical fruit ice cream splashed with Myer’s dark rum

Blooming Wonder 4

TERP SPRING

2004

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

CHENEY AND ROBINSON PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, EBADI PHOTO COURTESY OF THE EUROPEAN PRESS PHOTO AGENCY/ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH, BOTTOM ART BY MARGARET HALL

TERP SPRING

2004

5


bigpicture

GROWTH spurt pring is the season when brilliant bursts of color beckon visitors to the 1,250-acre campus. Through the diligent efforts of the 42-person landscaping and grounds crew responsible for the designing, planting, pruning and weeding of our foliage, visitors and community members reap the benefits of Maryland in bloom.

S

Cherry Blossom Time History: Washington, D.C., has been the site of the National Cherry Blossom Festival since 1912 when 3,000 cherry trees were given by the city of Tokyo. Maryland can lay claim to having the same variety, Yoshino cherry, as those planted around the Tidal Basin. Where found: Visitors may be most familiar with the cherry trees by the Mitchell Building, home to undergraduate admissions, and the nearby Armory. However, the flowering trees are scattered throughout the campus. Newest spot: Look for Yoshino cherry trees on the north side of McKeldin Library, planted two years ago as a gift from Jack Baker, director of operations and maintenance, to honor his daughter’s graduation from Maryland.

A Festive Occasion The M Circle History: Created by the Department of Facilities Management in 1976 to commemorate the U.S. Bicentennial and planted seasonally ever since. Plant specifications: According to Kevin Brown, assistant director of landscape and grounds, it takes 1,400 petunias to fill the “M.” At other times of the year, pansies are the preferred choice. Begonias had been tried but were prone to developing a fungus and marigolds (which looked good) required laborintensive dead-heading. New this summer: The petunias were grown in the new Research Greenhouse Complex, from seeds donated by Ball Seed Company. The variety is “Red Wave,” which blooms longer and more productively than ordinary petunias, says Brown.

Notable, Quotable Women The University of Maryland was honored to have three distinguished guests address campus during the spring semester. Known throughout the world, these women covered issues ranging from American history to immigration policies to human rights.

Lynne Cheney

Mary Robinson

Shirin Ebadi

children’s history book author and wife of Vice President Dick Cheney

former president of Ireland and U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights

2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner

Featured guest at the Norman and Florence Brody Public Policy Forum, Feb. 29

Keynote speaker for the Sadat Lecture for Peace, March 17

Campus address, May 12

“I think what sometimes happens when we set out to tell the American story is that we tell it in a fashion that’s a lot darker, a lot more negative that it deserves to be told. It’s taken as a series of problems instead of a series of challenges overcome. Sometimes there is a lot of acrimony and difficulty, but nevertheless we have moved forward and we have become a better and better country.”

“[President Sadat] understood in reaching out to the people of Israel that he was reaching out not so much to a different nation or culture but to a shared human desire for acceptance, security and dignity. It is I believe that ability to acknowledge the equal dignity and rights of each person which is most lacking in our world today.”

“You who live in America cannot remain indifferent to violations of human rights in Afghanistan, Iraq, in Palestine, Iran or in other parts in the world. We are all on the same boat and we all sail toward a greater civilization. Any damage to any part of the vessel will disrupt or hinder its movement. The fate of humanity is so intertwined that one can no longer consider the blessings of this world one’s own and deprive others of them at the same time.”

The Dairy Dishes Out New Flavors

After 80 years, Maryland Ice Cream is still made on campus. The Dairy is located in the Turner Building, along Route 1 and just south of Campus Drive. Summer hours are 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday – Friday.

MOO-VE OVER BEN AND JERRY. The Dairy at the University of Maryland has introduced five flavors whose names and ingredients rival those produced by the famous ice cream makers. The new flavors made their debut on Maryland Day 2004 and have been added to the original lineup of 28 choices. Visitors to campus can stop by The Dairy for a taste of any of the flavors. Here’s the scoop on the new additions:

Simply M-arvelous Beds of Bulbs Trivia: Each year, the grounds crew plants approximately 12,000 bulbs, which include Holland tulips in shades of purple, white and— naturally—red as well as American-grown daffodil and crocus. Where found: Stately tulips are interspersed with pansies at the main entrance to the university. Combined with annuals, they can be found in several dozen landscape areas and pocket gardens throughout the campus. New focus: Brown says that a newly created position dedicated to landscape enhancement will concentrate on renovating old small-scale landscapes and installing new pocket gardens.

MIDNIGHT MADNESS Double chocolate ice cream with chocolate ganache and crème de cocoa

FRIDGE FEVER Vanilla ice cream, chocolate fudge, chocolate brownie, chocolate-covered cashews and Myer’s rum

FEAR THE TURTLE White chocolate ice cream swirled with caramel and pecans

FINAL EXAM CRAM Rich cappuccino ice cream with crushed chocolate cookies

SPRING BREAK Exotic tropical fruit ice cream splashed with Myer’s dark rum

Blooming Wonder 4

TERP SPRING

2004

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

CHENEY AND ROBINSON PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, EBADI PHOTO COURTESY OF THE EUROPEAN PRESS PHOTO AGENCY/ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH, BOTTOM ART BY MARGARET HALL

TERP SPRING

2004

5


the Source

ask Anne Questions for Anne Turkos, University Archivist, may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

SO MANY BOOKS, SO LITTLE TIME? SUMMER MAY BE JUST YOUR CHANCE TO CATCH UP ON SOME OVERDUE READING. CHECK OUT THESE OTHER GREAT READS SUGGESTED BY SOME OF MARYLAND’S BRIGHTEST BOOKWORMS. football [soccer] team. It’s hilarious and touching and very real to all of us who go a bit overboard as sports fans ... You’ll laugh so much, you’ll cry.”

fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 is seen in terms of people there and the book reads like a novel.”

and what’s propelling the most progressive companies today, you’ll like this book.”

served in the National Guard while I was a student. In my

Q. I

History Taught by Hercules Suggested By: Norma Allewell, professor and dean, College of Life Sciences Book: The Masks of God, Vol.3: Occidental Mythology Author: Joseph Campbell Publisher: Viking Penguin 1991

senior year we got called up for riot duty on campus, and I had to miss a week of classes. Do you have any pictures of those days in your archives?

History with a fantastic twist:

Fiction for the Flight

“World history viewed through the lens of mythology. You will look at history in a whole new way.”

Suggested By: Lucy McFadden,

associate professor of astronomy Book: The Cheese Monkeys: A Novel in Two Semesters Publisher: Harper Trade 2002 Author: Chip Kidd A read you can relate to: “A narrative from students taking a graphic design class supposedly in the 1950s. It was hysterical and a great diversion for the plane ride home.”

—Rich Mannion ’72 Social Consciousness

Reporter’s Notebook Suggested By: George Majeska, associate professor emeritus, history Book: Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire Author: David Remnick Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group, 1994 A journalist’s eye on history: “If you can find out what actually happened, you can often figure out why it happened. The story of the

Practical Business

Suggested By: Christine Clark,

Suggested By: Bruce W. Dearstyne, professor and interim dean, College of Information Studies Book: What’s The Big Idea? Creating and Capitalizing on the Best Management Thinking Authors: Thomas H. Davenport, Laurence Prusak, with H. James Wilson Publisher: Harvard Business School Press 2003 Valuable prose for R&D: “If you’re interested in the power of ideas

director, Office of Human Relations Programs Book: Are Prisons Obsolete? Author: Angela Y. Davis Publisher: Seven Stories Press 2004 “Davis’s perspective is especially compelling for those politically and spiritually engaged on paths that seek viable alternatives to the mass caging of overwhelmingly poor, black and brown peoples in the United States.”

Pre-school How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long, illustrated by David Shannon (Harcourt, Inc, 2003)

Suggested By: Michael Olmert,

lecturer, English Book: Fever Pitch Author: Nick Hornby Publisher: Riverhead Trade 1992 Read before it becomes a movie:

“It’s a coming-of-age memory play about [Hornby’s] obsession with Arsenal, a North London

6

TERP SPRING

2004

Courage by Bernard Waber (Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002)

Elementary Duck for President by Dorseen Cronin, illustrated by Harry Bliss (Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing, 2004) The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein (Roaring Book Press, 2003)

must have been quite an interesting experience to be in the National Guard at that time and to have been called up to quell the violence on your own campus! The Vietnam War demonstrations are probably the most memorable occurrences during the 1966–1972 time period.

Penned by a former Black Panther:

AND FOR YOUNG READERS …

Sports Fans Score

A. It

Middle School The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick Press, 2003) Peter Afflerbach, director of the Reading Center, and Anne Daniel, assistant director of the Center for Young Children, recommended the reads above. For more choices, Daniel refers all who love to read to 100 Best Books for Children by Anita Silvey (Houghton Mifflin, 2004).

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Q. I have been wondering for several years what the inscription on the entranceway of Francis Scott Key Hall says. Also, why was it put there, and when? —Jason Waskey ’05 A. The Latin phrase from Hippocrates,

on the right as you enter the front door, translates to “The life so short, the craft so long to learn,” according to the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, third edition.The Greek phrase on the left, “There is no possession more valuable than knowledge,” comes from Menander. James Lesher, who was acting dean of Arts and Humanities for the 1988–89 academic year, commissioned the paintings in the hallway when he tired of looking at the messy bulletin boards that used to hang there. Laura Stowe, assistant professor of theater, an expert faux finisher, completed the paintings at Lesher’s request.

Revisiting Black History Month

In my last column, I was remiss in not recognizing the accomplishments of other early African American alumni of the university. Rose Shockley Wiseman (pictured at right and this year’s recipient of the College of Education Distinguished Alumnus Award), Myrtle Holmes Wake and John Francis Davis received master’s degrees in education at the June 9, 1951, College Park commencement after taking all of their classes off-campus through the College of Special and Continuation Studies.This college became University of Maryland University College, today one of the campuses of the University System of Maryland. Six years later, Selma Romaine Mason Toye also received a master’s degree in education.

RIOT IMAGE COURTESY OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, BOTTOM LEFT BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

TERP SPRING

2004

7


the Source

ask Anne Questions for Anne Turkos, University Archivist, may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

SO MANY BOOKS, SO LITTLE TIME? SUMMER MAY BE JUST YOUR CHANCE TO CATCH UP ON SOME OVERDUE READING. CHECK OUT THESE OTHER GREAT READS SUGGESTED BY SOME OF MARYLAND’S BRIGHTEST BOOKWORMS. football [soccer] team. It’s hilarious and touching and very real to all of us who go a bit overboard as sports fans ... You’ll laugh so much, you’ll cry.”

fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 is seen in terms of people there and the book reads like a novel.”

and what’s propelling the most progressive companies today, you’ll like this book.”

served in the National Guard while I was a student. In my

Q. I

History Taught by Hercules Suggested By: Norma Allewell, professor and dean, College of Life Sciences Book: The Masks of God, Vol.3: Occidental Mythology Author: Joseph Campbell Publisher: Viking Penguin 1991

senior year we got called up for riot duty on campus, and I had to miss a week of classes. Do you have any pictures of those days in your archives?

History with a fantastic twist:

Fiction for the Flight

“World history viewed through the lens of mythology. You will look at history in a whole new way.”

Suggested By: Lucy McFadden,

associate professor of astronomy Book: The Cheese Monkeys: A Novel in Two Semesters Publisher: Harper Trade 2002 Author: Chip Kidd A read you can relate to: “A narrative from students taking a graphic design class supposedly in the 1950s. It was hysterical and a great diversion for the plane ride home.”

—Rich Mannion ’72 Social Consciousness

Reporter’s Notebook Suggested By: George Majeska, associate professor emeritus, history Book: Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire Author: David Remnick Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group, 1994 A journalist’s eye on history: “If you can find out what actually happened, you can often figure out why it happened. The story of the

Practical Business

Suggested By: Christine Clark,

Suggested By: Bruce W. Dearstyne, professor and interim dean, College of Information Studies Book: What’s The Big Idea? Creating and Capitalizing on the Best Management Thinking Authors: Thomas H. Davenport, Laurence Prusak, with H. James Wilson Publisher: Harvard Business School Press 2003 Valuable prose for R&D: “If you’re interested in the power of ideas

director, Office of Human Relations Programs Book: Are Prisons Obsolete? Author: Angela Y. Davis Publisher: Seven Stories Press 2004 “Davis’s perspective is especially compelling for those politically and spiritually engaged on paths that seek viable alternatives to the mass caging of overwhelmingly poor, black and brown peoples in the United States.”

Pre-school How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long, illustrated by David Shannon (Harcourt, Inc, 2003)

Suggested By: Michael Olmert,

lecturer, English Book: Fever Pitch Author: Nick Hornby Publisher: Riverhead Trade 1992 Read before it becomes a movie:

“It’s a coming-of-age memory play about [Hornby’s] obsession with Arsenal, a North London

6

TERP SPRING

2004

Courage by Bernard Waber (Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002)

Elementary Duck for President by Dorseen Cronin, illustrated by Harry Bliss (Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing, 2004) The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein (Roaring Book Press, 2003)

must have been quite an interesting experience to be in the National Guard at that time and to have been called up to quell the violence on your own campus! The Vietnam War demonstrations are probably the most memorable occurrences during the 1966–1972 time period.

Penned by a former Black Panther:

AND FOR YOUNG READERS …

Sports Fans Score

A. It

Middle School The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick Press, 2003) Peter Afflerbach, director of the Reading Center, and Anne Daniel, assistant director of the Center for Young Children, recommended the reads above. For more choices, Daniel refers all who love to read to 100 Best Books for Children by Anita Silvey (Houghton Mifflin, 2004).

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Q. I have been wondering for several years what the inscription on the entranceway of Francis Scott Key Hall says. Also, why was it put there, and when? —Jason Waskey ’05 A. The Latin phrase from Hippocrates,

on the right as you enter the front door, translates to “The life so short, the craft so long to learn,” according to the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, third edition.The Greek phrase on the left, “There is no possession more valuable than knowledge,” comes from Menander. James Lesher, who was acting dean of Arts and Humanities for the 1988–89 academic year, commissioned the paintings in the hallway when he tired of looking at the messy bulletin boards that used to hang there. Laura Stowe, assistant professor of theater, an expert faux finisher, completed the paintings at Lesher’s request.

Revisiting Black History Month

In my last column, I was remiss in not recognizing the accomplishments of other early African American alumni of the university. Rose Shockley Wiseman (pictured at right and this year’s recipient of the College of Education Distinguished Alumnus Award), Myrtle Holmes Wake and John Francis Davis received master’s degrees in education at the June 9, 1951, College Park commencement after taking all of their classes off-campus through the College of Special and Continuation Studies.This college became University of Maryland University College, today one of the campuses of the University System of Maryland. Six years later, Selma Romaine Mason Toye also received a master’s degree in education.

RIOT IMAGE COURTESY OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, BOTTOM LEFT BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

TERP SPRING

2004

7


classact

alumniprofile

? Love

What

love about your alma mater. Help us count the

We want to know what you

ways. Maybe it’s a specific part of campus like

Do

You

McKeldin Mall in the springtime, the “M” Traffic circle illuminated in the evening or the Memorial Chapel at any time. Perhaps it’s Testudo—in all shapes and forms. Did a certain professor inspire you, a particular university program enrich you? What makes you hum the “Victory Song”: Gary Williams’ 2002 “dream team,” or the “Fridge” and his players, capping a win

“M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D”? Whether it’s eating ice cream at with

wax nostalgic.

We will publish many of your reflections in an upcoming issue of Terp magazine. –BAM

Nothing Bugs This Alum Need to get those pesky monkeys out of your back yard? Maybe you’re having trouble with cobras in the garden. Not a problem for Jay Nixon. Nixon, who got his master’s degree in entomology from Maryland in 1973, can handle just about any kind of pest you might encounter. And that’s just what he does as a contractor for the U.S. State Department. Nixon, president of American Pest Management Inc. in Takoma Park, Md., and his partners travel around the world helping staffs of American embassies and consulates deal with the local pests—roving packs of monkeys in India, poisonous snakes in southern Asia, scorpions in Uzbekistan, malaria-carrying mosquitoes in Africa. Nixon began his life as a bug expert in Hyattsville—mostly termites, some roaches, a spider here and there. But, in 1998, he and his partners bid on a A towering termite mound is State Department contract to train employees in foreign service outposts on no match for international exterminator Jay Nixon. how to keep the native species of insects and other wildlife at bay. They got the contract, and since then, Nixon has been to more than 30 countries. Whether it’s a fourlegged mammal or winged creature, “The principles are the same for any pest that lives outdoors and that we invite in,” Nixon says. “You try not to attract them, by securing your trash, managing your vegetation.” Getting rid of the critters once they’ve found their way in isn’t always easy in a foreign country. Pesticides used in U.S. government compounds have to meet EPA requirements. “But most local contractors in developing nations are way behind us here,” Nixon says, “They don’t always have the right stuff. It can be a problem.” —ET

Dream Wedding

The Dairy or partying along Fraternity Row, tell us what makes you

BYalumni

Send your remembrances to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu or to Terp, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Be sure to include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

See a list of the countries Nixon has visited for the U.S. State Department and photos of his travels at www.americanpestmgmt.com/international/.

University of Maryland Merchandise

Dive into Terp Pride THE MCCLAIR FAMILY of Huntingtown, Md., has a good way to annoy

their friends who graduated from Duke. They invite them to a pool party where the centerpiece is the Terp logo, built right into the bottom of their pool. “We’re huge Terp fans,” says Doug McClair, whose wife, Colleen (Raley), holds degrees from nearby University of Maryland University College, and son, Clifton, is an aspiring Terp. The McClairs consulted with the university’s marketing office before moving forward with their adaptation of Testudo: a two-by-two-ft. logo handmade from more than 300 individually cut pieces of tile. We say it works swimmingly. How do you show your school spirit? Send us your samples of Terp pride so that we can share them with fellow Maryland fans. Simply mail a photo and description to Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

8

TERP SPRING

2004

POOL IMAGE COURTESY OF THE MCCLAIR FAMILY

Stock up on exclusive Maryland Alumni Merchandise including caps, polos, pullovers, shirts, sweatshirts, t-shirts and our specially designed scarves and ties.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Alumni Association is reviewing applications for its dream-wedding contest. The association will host a wedding for a University of Maryland couple on June 25, 2005, as part of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center Dedication activities. The winning couple will be selected based on a variety of criteria, including an essay and interview. Watch the alumni Web site, www.alumni.umd.edu, where we will announce the winning couple. Then, come back to the site to vote on the bride’s gown, flowers and more.

The Maryland Alumni Association Official Online Store is open for business!

Get your favorite Terrapin Gear at your convenience!

OnlineStore Shop today online at www.alumni.umd.edu.

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY NIXON, BOOK PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

A resident of Newport, R.I., Anne-Marie Sutton ’65 has used her knowledge of the city and its fabulous Bellevue Avenue mansions to write Murder Stalks A Mansion: A Newport Mystery (1stBooks Library). The book has all the elements of a classic country house mystery, with red herrings, baffling clues, a spirited young heroine and a houseful of suspects. Richard R. Bradley III ’75 and Sarah Wernick have come up with Quick Fit: The Complete 15 Minute No-Sweat Workout (Atria Books) that combines 10 minutes of aerobic activity with four minutes of strengthening and toning exercises and one minute of stretches. Bradley, the head of the fitness program at the U.S. Department of Transportation, created a regimen for people (even couch potatoes!) engaged in every type of lifestyle and profession. Travel with James W. Gaines Jr. ’91 as he visits his mother’s beautiful homeland, Ghana. Unlike many African Americans whose connection to their African past was broken by the institution of slavery, he realized that he had a direct link to his African ancestry. 12 days in Ghana: Reunions, Revelations & Reflections (1stBooks Library) chronicles his experiences and how he reaches a new understanding of himself.

TERP SPRING

2004

9


classact

alumniprofile

? Love

What

love about your alma mater. Help us count the

We want to know what you

ways. Maybe it’s a specific part of campus like

Do

You

McKeldin Mall in the springtime, the “M” Traffic circle illuminated in the evening or the Memorial Chapel at any time. Perhaps it’s Testudo—in all shapes and forms. Did a certain professor inspire you, a particular university program enrich you? What makes you hum the “Victory Song”: Gary Williams’ 2002 “dream team,” or the “Fridge” and his players, capping a win

“M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D”? Whether it’s eating ice cream at with

wax nostalgic.

We will publish many of your reflections in an upcoming issue of Terp magazine. –BAM

Nothing Bugs This Alum Need to get those pesky monkeys out of your back yard? Maybe you’re having trouble with cobras in the garden. Not a problem for Jay Nixon. Nixon, who got his master’s degree in entomology from Maryland in 1973, can handle just about any kind of pest you might encounter. And that’s just what he does as a contractor for the U.S. State Department. Nixon, president of American Pest Management Inc. in Takoma Park, Md., and his partners travel around the world helping staffs of American embassies and consulates deal with the local pests—roving packs of monkeys in India, poisonous snakes in southern Asia, scorpions in Uzbekistan, malaria-carrying mosquitoes in Africa. Nixon began his life as a bug expert in Hyattsville—mostly termites, some roaches, a spider here and there. But, in 1998, he and his partners bid on a A towering termite mound is State Department contract to train employees in foreign service outposts on no match for international exterminator Jay Nixon. how to keep the native species of insects and other wildlife at bay. They got the contract, and since then, Nixon has been to more than 30 countries. Whether it’s a fourlegged mammal or winged creature, “The principles are the same for any pest that lives outdoors and that we invite in,” Nixon says. “You try not to attract them, by securing your trash, managing your vegetation.” Getting rid of the critters once they’ve found their way in isn’t always easy in a foreign country. Pesticides used in U.S. government compounds have to meet EPA requirements. “But most local contractors in developing nations are way behind us here,” Nixon says, “They don’t always have the right stuff. It can be a problem.” —ET

Dream Wedding

The Dairy or partying along Fraternity Row, tell us what makes you

BYalumni

Send your remembrances to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu or to Terp, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Be sure to include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

See a list of the countries Nixon has visited for the U.S. State Department and photos of his travels at www.americanpestmgmt.com/international/.

University of Maryland Merchandise

Dive into Terp Pride THE MCCLAIR FAMILY of Huntingtown, Md., has a good way to annoy

their friends who graduated from Duke. They invite them to a pool party where the centerpiece is the Terp logo, built right into the bottom of their pool. “We’re huge Terp fans,” says Doug McClair, whose wife, Colleen (Raley), holds degrees from nearby University of Maryland University College, and son, Clifton, is an aspiring Terp. The McClairs consulted with the university’s marketing office before moving forward with their adaptation of Testudo: a two-by-two-ft. logo handmade from more than 300 individually cut pieces of tile. We say it works swimmingly. How do you show your school spirit? Send us your samples of Terp pride so that we can share them with fellow Maryland fans. Simply mail a photo and description to Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

8

TERP SPRING

2004

POOL IMAGE COURTESY OF THE MCCLAIR FAMILY

Stock up on exclusive Maryland Alumni Merchandise including caps, polos, pullovers, shirts, sweatshirts, t-shirts and our specially designed scarves and ties.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Alumni Association is reviewing applications for its dream-wedding contest. The association will host a wedding for a University of Maryland couple on June 25, 2005, as part of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center Dedication activities. The winning couple will be selected based on a variety of criteria, including an essay and interview. Watch the alumni Web site, www.alumni.umd.edu, where we will announce the winning couple. Then, come back to the site to vote on the bride’s gown, flowers and more.

The Maryland Alumni Association Official Online Store is open for business!

Get your favorite Terrapin Gear at your convenience!

OnlineStore Shop today online at www.alumni.umd.edu.

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY NIXON, BOOK PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

A resident of Newport, R.I., Anne-Marie Sutton ’65 has used her knowledge of the city and its fabulous Bellevue Avenue mansions to write Murder Stalks A Mansion: A Newport Mystery (1stBooks Library). The book has all the elements of a classic country house mystery, with red herrings, baffling clues, a spirited young heroine and a houseful of suspects. Richard R. Bradley III ’75 and Sarah Wernick have come up with Quick Fit: The Complete 15 Minute No-Sweat Workout (Atria Books) that combines 10 minutes of aerobic activity with four minutes of strengthening and toning exercises and one minute of stretches. Bradley, the head of the fitness program at the U.S. Department of Transportation, created a regimen for people (even couch potatoes!) engaged in every type of lifestyle and profession. Travel with James W. Gaines Jr. ’91 as he visits his mother’s beautiful homeland, Ghana. Unlike many African Americans whose connection to their African past was broken by the institution of slavery, he realized that he had a direct link to his African ancestry. 12 days in Ghana: Reunions, Revelations & Reflections (1stBooks Library) chronicles his experiences and how he reaches a new understanding of himself.

TERP SPRING

2004

9


classact

alumniprofile

alumniprofile

Money Management, Big Mama Style

travel 2004 Village Life on the Dalmatian Coast, September 21–29 Discover the wonders of this islanddappled coast. At the crossroads of Europe, Roman, Venetian, Slavic and Eastern cultures converge and are celebrated in medieval walled towns.

What began as an idea for an earwarmer that wraps around the head (above) has become the cornerstone of Le Gette’s business, 180s.

Discovering Eastern Europe: Featuring Poland, Hungary, Austria & the Czech Republic, September 14–30

LITTLE KEVIN MAY NOT KNOW IT, or care, but his personalized birthday cake spent a month in the family’s freezer—after doing duty as part of dad’s birthday cake. Hey, figures mom, all the younger Kevin wanted was a cake with his name on it. She saved $14 or so; everyone’s happy. Cost-cutting, humorous measures such as these are what make mom, Michelle Singletary ’84, a financial columnist that many identify with and look to for sound advice. She writes a twice-weekly syndicated column for The Washington Post, “The Color of Money,” hosts a weekly Post Webcast and is a contributor for National Public Radio’s “Day to Day.” She also can be heard on the first Monday of each month on WHUR 96.3 FM’s “Insight.” She recently published 7 Money Mantras for a Richer Life (Random House). “It’s like the lecture you would get from Big Mama if she were alive,” she says of the book. Singletary maintains that her money management savvy came from her grandmother, Big Mama, who raised Singletary and four siblings single-handedly. Apparently the lessons were well received. Calling her

passionate about fiscal responsibility would be an understatement. Singletary buys generic products; involves her husband, Kevin McIntire ’84, in the strict monitoring of their three children’s exposure to commercialism; and looks visibly uncomfortable with the idea of spending versus saving. Singletary’s money management savvy “Don’t get me wrong; we go came from her grandmother, Big Moma. on vacations every year. We go to movies, but one of my mantras is priorities lead to prosperity. Allocate money for those important things first.” Above all, Singletary advises readers, friends and family to educate themselves. “I joke that handling money really is rocket science. Don’t beat yourself up if you don’t know, but you have to get the information.” —MAB

Discover somber Auschwitz, the snow-capped Tatra Mountains, Bucharest—the “Paris of the

Exercising Your Member Benefits

East”—and Prague. China’s Cultural

◗ To join: a Maryland Alumni Association

Triangle,

membership; lifetime association members can use the facilities for free.

October 11–28 Visit the amaz-

Le Gette Makes Hot Stuff

◗ Costs: $32.50 per month for a CRS mem-

ing expanse of the Great Wall, cruise the Yangtze River and explore Xi’an, home of the remarkable Terra Cotta Warriors. Germany’s Holiday Markets, November 29–December 6 Experience the European advent spirit on this incredible cruise to the legendary holiday markets of Germany.

Explore the Travel 2004 catalog at www.alumni.umd.edu, or contact 301.403.2728 ext.14 or 800.336.8627.

10

TERP SPRING

2004

The Details

bership; $45 a year for alumni association membership.

BRIAN LE GETTE, the gutsy and shrewd 1989 Maryland

electrical engineering alum, is living proof that fortitude and courage pay off. He is the co-founder and CEO of 180s, an innovative performance wear company that has been named the ninth fastest growing, privately held company by Inc. magazine. It also ranked first in the national Innercity 100, compiled by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Inc. What began as an idea for an ear-warmer that wraps around the back of the head has become the cornerstone of a $40 million-a-year business. But before Le Gette was a success, he sacrificed an entire year of his social life and scrambled back to the drawing board when his first test models fell apart. Initially Le Gette and co-founder, Ron L. Wilson’s business plan fell on deaf ears by skeptics who thought they were trying to reinvent the earmuff, but with a little perseverance they found friends in business school at Wharton to serve as their first investors. Today, the company has more than 120 patents and pending patents, including gloves that warm your hands with your breath. They also are known for making compact and durable sunglasses that are protecting the eyes of some U.S. Marine Corps troops in Afghanistan. In 2002, Le Gette was honored as Ernst & Young’s Maryland Entrepreneur of the Year for consumer products and was also awarded the Mayor’s Community Service Award for the City of Baltimore, in recognition of a high school student-mentoring program. In 1997 he was awarded Outstanding Alumnus of the Year by the University of Maryland Alumni Association. Le Gette’s advice for aspiring entrepreneurs: “Don’t dabble ... commit yourself one hundred percent. Be completely comfortable with failing … but never say die.” —SLK

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; TOP RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF 180S

◗ Some of the perks: sports clubs, weight and fitness orientations and reservations for racquetball and squash courts. For an additional fee, members also can participate in a weekend of rock climbing and camping—all equipment and transportation included; hire a personal trainer; or receive discounted rates for non-credit instruction courses such as swimming and tai chi.

If she wanted to, Jean Pirovic ’81 could walk from her home to the Campus Recreation Center, but that’s not the only reason why she feels her center membership is “wonderful.” “My kids take swim classes there; they’re very convenient,” she says. “My husband and I work out; running, swimming, everything.” Alumni association members receive access to three Campus Recreation Services facilities (the center, Ritchie Coliseum and the Outdoor Aquatic Center) and the programs provided in each. Specifically, it means members can learn to roll a kayak, take a cardio boxing course, master yoga techniques, cheaply rent camping equipment or even get a free, detailed wellness assessment. “It’s an excellent resource,” says Pirovic. —MAB

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

◗ What you need to do: To join the alumni association and for information on other benefits and services, go to www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 301.405.4678. Then, stop by the member services desk at the Campus Recreation Center for a recreation services membership. For more information on the CRC, go to www.crs.umd.edu, or contact member services coordinator Treeva Creek at 301. 226.4402 or tc102@umail.umd.edu.

TERP SPRING

2004

11


classact

alumniprofile

alumniprofile

Money Management, Big Mama Style

travel 2004 Village Life on the Dalmatian Coast, September 21–29 Discover the wonders of this islanddappled coast. At the crossroads of Europe, Roman, Venetian, Slavic and Eastern cultures converge and are celebrated in medieval walled towns.

What began as an idea for an earwarmer that wraps around the head (above) has become the cornerstone of Le Gette’s business, 180s.

Discovering Eastern Europe: Featuring Poland, Hungary, Austria & the Czech Republic, September 14–30

LITTLE KEVIN MAY NOT KNOW IT, or care, but his personalized birthday cake spent a month in the family’s freezer—after doing duty as part of dad’s birthday cake. Hey, figures mom, all the younger Kevin wanted was a cake with his name on it. She saved $14 or so; everyone’s happy. Cost-cutting, humorous measures such as these are what make mom, Michelle Singletary ’84, a financial columnist that many identify with and look to for sound advice. She writes a twice-weekly syndicated column for The Washington Post, “The Color of Money,” hosts a weekly Post Webcast and is a contributor for National Public Radio’s “Day to Day.” She also can be heard on the first Monday of each month on WHUR 96.3 FM’s “Insight.” She recently published 7 Money Mantras for a Richer Life (Random House). “It’s like the lecture you would get from Big Mama if she were alive,” she says of the book. Singletary maintains that her money management savvy came from her grandmother, Big Mama, who raised Singletary and four siblings single-handedly. Apparently the lessons were well received. Calling her

passionate about fiscal responsibility would be an understatement. Singletary buys generic products; involves her husband, Kevin McIntire ’84, in the strict monitoring of their three children’s exposure to commercialism; and looks visibly uncomfortable with the idea of spending versus saving. Singletary’s money management savvy “Don’t get me wrong; we go came from her grandmother, Big Moma. on vacations every year. We go to movies, but one of my mantras is priorities lead to prosperity. Allocate money for those important things first.” Above all, Singletary advises readers, friends and family to educate themselves. “I joke that handling money really is rocket science. Don’t beat yourself up if you don’t know, but you have to get the information.” —MAB

Discover somber Auschwitz, the snow-capped Tatra Mountains, Bucharest—the “Paris of the

Exercising Your Member Benefits

East”—and Prague. China’s Cultural

◗ To join: a Maryland Alumni Association

Triangle,

membership; lifetime association members can use the facilities for free.

October 11–28 Visit the amaz-

Le Gette Makes Hot Stuff

◗ Costs: $32.50 per month for a CRS mem-

ing expanse of the Great Wall, cruise the Yangtze River and explore Xi’an, home of the remarkable Terra Cotta Warriors. Germany’s Holiday Markets, November 29–December 6 Experience the European advent spirit on this incredible cruise to the legendary holiday markets of Germany.

Explore the Travel 2004 catalog at www.alumni.umd.edu, or contact 301.403.2728 ext.14 or 800.336.8627.

10

TERP SPRING

2004

The Details

bership; $45 a year for alumni association membership.

BRIAN LE GETTE, the gutsy and shrewd 1989 Maryland

electrical engineering alum, is living proof that fortitude and courage pay off. He is the co-founder and CEO of 180s, an innovative performance wear company that has been named the ninth fastest growing, privately held company by Inc. magazine. It also ranked first in the national Innercity 100, compiled by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Inc. What began as an idea for an ear-warmer that wraps around the back of the head has become the cornerstone of a $40 million-a-year business. But before Le Gette was a success, he sacrificed an entire year of his social life and scrambled back to the drawing board when his first test models fell apart. Initially Le Gette and co-founder, Ron L. Wilson’s business plan fell on deaf ears by skeptics who thought they were trying to reinvent the earmuff, but with a little perseverance they found friends in business school at Wharton to serve as their first investors. Today, the company has more than 120 patents and pending patents, including gloves that warm your hands with your breath. They also are known for making compact and durable sunglasses that are protecting the eyes of some U.S. Marine Corps troops in Afghanistan. In 2002, Le Gette was honored as Ernst & Young’s Maryland Entrepreneur of the Year for consumer products and was also awarded the Mayor’s Community Service Award for the City of Baltimore, in recognition of a high school student-mentoring program. In 1997 he was awarded Outstanding Alumnus of the Year by the University of Maryland Alumni Association. Le Gette’s advice for aspiring entrepreneurs: “Don’t dabble ... commit yourself one hundred percent. Be completely comfortable with failing … but never say die.” —SLK

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; TOP RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF 180S

◗ Some of the perks: sports clubs, weight and fitness orientations and reservations for racquetball and squash courts. For an additional fee, members also can participate in a weekend of rock climbing and camping—all equipment and transportation included; hire a personal trainer; or receive discounted rates for non-credit instruction courses such as swimming and tai chi.

If she wanted to, Jean Pirovic ’81 could walk from her home to the Campus Recreation Center, but that’s not the only reason why she feels her center membership is “wonderful.” “My kids take swim classes there; they’re very convenient,” she says. “My husband and I work out; running, swimming, everything.” Alumni association members receive access to three Campus Recreation Services facilities (the center, Ritchie Coliseum and the Outdoor Aquatic Center) and the programs provided in each. Specifically, it means members can learn to roll a kayak, take a cardio boxing course, master yoga techniques, cheaply rent camping equipment or even get a free, detailed wellness assessment. “It’s an excellent resource,” says Pirovic. —MAB

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

◗ What you need to do: To join the alumni association and for information on other benefits and services, go to www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 301.405.4678. Then, stop by the member services desk at the Campus Recreation Center for a recreation services membership. For more information on the CRC, go to www.crs.umd.edu, or contact member services coordinator Treeva Creek at 301. 226.4402 or tc102@umail.umd.edu.

TERP SPRING

2004

11


m-file NEWSdesk UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

“We’re working less, marrying later, having fewer children and retiring earlier …There’s a tendency for Americans to overstate how much they work now and [to] have a romantic vision of the past.”

“A good toy is an enabler. It helps a child express himself. It’s openended, not scripted, so that the action comes from the child, not from the toy.”

JOHN ROBINSON, SOCIOLOGY, ON AMERICANS FEELING

TOY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION’S PICKS FOR TOP 10 TOYS,

OVERWORKED, MIAMI HERALD, FEBRUARY 4

BOSTON GLOBE, FEBRUARY 26

“It is absolutely political theater… . These hearings are not going to result in any meaningful change in the kind of television that comes into our homes over the network airwaves.”

MICHAEL BRODY, AMERICAN STUDIES, QUESTIONING THE

“There’s this perception that somehow Maryland knowingly passed on damaged goods, and that’s not true.” THOMAS KUNKEL, JOURNALISM, ON FORMER NEW YORK TIMES JOURNALIST AND MARYLAND STUDENT JAYSON BLAIR, THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, FEBRUARY 29

DOUGLAS GOMERY, RESIDENT SCHOLAR AT THE AMERICAN

DISPROVING EINSTEIN’S THEORY OF RELATIVITY, LOS

“The decision by McDonald’s to phase out super-sizing drinks and French fries is reminiscent of the superpower decision in the bad old days of the Cold War. … do away with a few of their nuclear weapons while retaining the bulk of their stockpiles and simultaneously adding new, more powerful nuclear weapons.”

ANGELES TIMES, FEBRUARY 24

GEORGE RITZER, SOCIOLOGY, NEWSDAY.COM, MARCH 17

LIBRARY OF BROADCASTING (UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES) ON THE FCC’S REACTION TO JANET JACKSON’S “WARDROBE MALFUNCTION,” THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, FEBRUARY 11

“It would be a shock. But once they got over the shock, it would be the kind of thing that would prompt scientists to rub their hands with glee.” COLEMAN MILLER, ASTRONOMY, ON THE GRAVITY B PROBE

“Not long ago, talking about Maryland in the same breath as Berkeley and Michigan—let alone Virginia—would have been laughable. But no longer.” FROM A FEATURE STORY, “MOVE OVER, UVA!,” COMPARING VIRGINIA AND MARYLAND, JANUARY 2004, WASHINGTONIAN

COMINGS&

goings

Maggi Bridwell, the former director of the University Health Center, retired after 33 years of service. The women’s health unit has been named the Maggi Bridwell Center for Women’s Health in her honor. Bridwell was known for her reform efforts including establishing the woman’s health unit and encouraging safe sex. The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation will welcome a new dean who has built a career as a successful professional architect on the foundation of academia. Garth Rockcastle is the co-founder and principal of Minneapolisbased Meyer, Scherer and Rockcastle. He taught architecture at the University of Minnesota’s College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture for 25 years.

Cicada-Mania Is Here WHAT’S CRUNCHY ON THE OUTSIDE,

slimy on the inside, about an inch and a half long, and can sing as loud as a lawn mower? It’s millions of cicadas crawling up through the soil from their 17 years underground. They’ll swarm up in the trees and shrubs, around your home, and inevitably underfoot, in Maryland and 15 other states. And in their drive to find willing mates, the males will pierce the daytime air with a song so powerful it can make it difficult to carry on a conversation with someone standing next to you. They are the new adults of Brood X—as in 10—the periodical cicadas that make their above-ground visit every 17 years to lay eggs and start the cycle all over again. “We’re expecting that, in some locations, there may be as many as 100,000 of these things per acre,” says university entomology

professor Mike Raupp, pictured below. “There are literally going to be millions of cicadas here.” The University of Maryland Department of Entomology and Maryland Cooperative Extension have spent a good part of the spring helping Marylanders get ready for the onslaught. Raupp and his graduate students, the cicada-maniacs, have been going around the state talking to commercial growers and garden clubs about how to protect their trees and shrubs from the busy bugs. Entomology professor Earlene Armstrong and her undergraduate students are visiting schools to talk to youngsters about the loud critters that most of them will be seeing for the first time in their lives. And the Home and Garden Center of the Maryland Cooperative Extension has prepared a Web site and is answering calls and e-mails

from anxious growers and gardeners about what the millionbug march could mean to their greenery. Here’s basically what’s happening. These cicadas were just little nymphs 17 years ago. After they hatched from eggs laid on trees and shrubs, they dropped to the ground, burrowed two or three feet into the dirt and have been living off of tree root sap ever since. Now they’re emerging as adults, shedding their shells, sprouting wings and flying and crawling onto trees and shrubs. They’ll mate, the females will lay eggs, nymphs will hatch, and the cycle will begin again. The adults, in the most tragic of Shakespearean endings, will die after mating. Brood X’ers aren’t the only

cicadas on the block this year. The same annual species you see and hear every summer will be back as usual, vying for space and air time. It promises to be a season you encounter only once every, say, 17 years. —ET For more information on the cicada, including tips on protecting trees and shrubbery and other cool cicada Web sites, visit the University of Maryland Home and Garden Web site: www.hgic.umd.edu/

THE BUZZ ON CICADAS: ◗ The noise you hear from cicadas is the male singing to attract females. He makes the sound by vibrating membranes on the side of his body, underneath his wings. ◗ Cicadas are NOT locusts. Locusts are migratory insects related to grasshoppers. ◗ Periodical cicadas are smaller than the cicadas we see and hear every summer.

Jeffrey C. Huskamp has joined the Maryland community as vice president and chief information officer of information technology. As the first chief information officer at East Carolina University, he introduced a campus computational science computing facility. He was recently named the General Chair for SC2004, the international high performance computing, networking and storage conference. —SLK

◗ Cicadas don’t hurt people or pets. ◗ The brown casings you’ll find outside are the cuticles (called “exuviae”) adult cicadas shed after they emerge from the ground. ◗ Young trees with small branches are most susceptible to cicada damage. The best way to prevent cicada damage is to put nets around young trees. ◗ Cicadas are edible. You can look for recipes online.

12

TERP SPRING

2004

FAR LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DIAMONDBACK/PETER CASEY, ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY

TERP SPRING

2004

13


m-file NEWSdesk UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

“We’re working less, marrying later, having fewer children and retiring earlier …There’s a tendency for Americans to overstate how much they work now and [to] have a romantic vision of the past.”

“A good toy is an enabler. It helps a child express himself. It’s openended, not scripted, so that the action comes from the child, not from the toy.”

JOHN ROBINSON, SOCIOLOGY, ON AMERICANS FEELING

TOY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION’S PICKS FOR TOP 10 TOYS,

OVERWORKED, MIAMI HERALD, FEBRUARY 4

BOSTON GLOBE, FEBRUARY 26

“It is absolutely political theater… . These hearings are not going to result in any meaningful change in the kind of television that comes into our homes over the network airwaves.”

MICHAEL BRODY, AMERICAN STUDIES, QUESTIONING THE

“There’s this perception that somehow Maryland knowingly passed on damaged goods, and that’s not true.” THOMAS KUNKEL, JOURNALISM, ON FORMER NEW YORK TIMES JOURNALIST AND MARYLAND STUDENT JAYSON BLAIR, THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, FEBRUARY 29

DOUGLAS GOMERY, RESIDENT SCHOLAR AT THE AMERICAN

DISPROVING EINSTEIN’S THEORY OF RELATIVITY, LOS

“The decision by McDonald’s to phase out super-sizing drinks and French fries is reminiscent of the superpower decision in the bad old days of the Cold War. … do away with a few of their nuclear weapons while retaining the bulk of their stockpiles and simultaneously adding new, more powerful nuclear weapons.”

ANGELES TIMES, FEBRUARY 24

GEORGE RITZER, SOCIOLOGY, NEWSDAY.COM, MARCH 17

LIBRARY OF BROADCASTING (UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES) ON THE FCC’S REACTION TO JANET JACKSON’S “WARDROBE MALFUNCTION,” THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, FEBRUARY 11

“It would be a shock. But once they got over the shock, it would be the kind of thing that would prompt scientists to rub their hands with glee.” COLEMAN MILLER, ASTRONOMY, ON THE GRAVITY B PROBE

“Not long ago, talking about Maryland in the same breath as Berkeley and Michigan—let alone Virginia—would have been laughable. But no longer.” FROM A FEATURE STORY, “MOVE OVER, UVA!,” COMPARING VIRGINIA AND MARYLAND, JANUARY 2004, WASHINGTONIAN

COMINGS&

goings

Maggi Bridwell, the former director of the University Health Center, retired after 33 years of service. The women’s health unit has been named the Maggi Bridwell Center for Women’s Health in her honor. Bridwell was known for her reform efforts including establishing the woman’s health unit and encouraging safe sex. The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation will welcome a new dean who has built a career as a successful professional architect on the foundation of academia. Garth Rockcastle is the co-founder and principal of Minneapolisbased Meyer, Scherer and Rockcastle. He taught architecture at the University of Minnesota’s College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture for 25 years.

Cicada-Mania Is Here WHAT’S CRUNCHY ON THE OUTSIDE,

slimy on the inside, about an inch and a half long, and can sing as loud as a lawn mower? It’s millions of cicadas crawling up through the soil from their 17 years underground. They’ll swarm up in the trees and shrubs, around your home, and inevitably underfoot, in Maryland and 15 other states. And in their drive to find willing mates, the males will pierce the daytime air with a song so powerful it can make it difficult to carry on a conversation with someone standing next to you. They are the new adults of Brood X—as in 10—the periodical cicadas that make their above-ground visit every 17 years to lay eggs and start the cycle all over again. “We’re expecting that, in some locations, there may be as many as 100,000 of these things per acre,” says university entomology

professor Mike Raupp, pictured below. “There are literally going to be millions of cicadas here.” The University of Maryland Department of Entomology and Maryland Cooperative Extension have spent a good part of the spring helping Marylanders get ready for the onslaught. Raupp and his graduate students, the cicada-maniacs, have been going around the state talking to commercial growers and garden clubs about how to protect their trees and shrubs from the busy bugs. Entomology professor Earlene Armstrong and her undergraduate students are visiting schools to talk to youngsters about the loud critters that most of them will be seeing for the first time in their lives. And the Home and Garden Center of the Maryland Cooperative Extension has prepared a Web site and is answering calls and e-mails

from anxious growers and gardeners about what the millionbug march could mean to their greenery. Here’s basically what’s happening. These cicadas were just little nymphs 17 years ago. After they hatched from eggs laid on trees and shrubs, they dropped to the ground, burrowed two or three feet into the dirt and have been living off of tree root sap ever since. Now they’re emerging as adults, shedding their shells, sprouting wings and flying and crawling onto trees and shrubs. They’ll mate, the females will lay eggs, nymphs will hatch, and the cycle will begin again. The adults, in the most tragic of Shakespearean endings, will die after mating. Brood X’ers aren’t the only

cicadas on the block this year. The same annual species you see and hear every summer will be back as usual, vying for space and air time. It promises to be a season you encounter only once every, say, 17 years. —ET For more information on the cicada, including tips on protecting trees and shrubbery and other cool cicada Web sites, visit the University of Maryland Home and Garden Web site: www.hgic.umd.edu/

THE BUZZ ON CICADAS: ◗ The noise you hear from cicadas is the male singing to attract females. He makes the sound by vibrating membranes on the side of his body, underneath his wings. ◗ Cicadas are NOT locusts. Locusts are migratory insects related to grasshoppers. ◗ Periodical cicadas are smaller than the cicadas we see and hear every summer.

Jeffrey C. Huskamp has joined the Maryland community as vice president and chief information officer of information technology. As the first chief information officer at East Carolina University, he introduced a campus computational science computing facility. He was recently named the General Chair for SC2004, the international high performance computing, networking and storage conference. —SLK

◗ Cicadas don’t hurt people or pets. ◗ The brown casings you’ll find outside are the cuticles (called “exuviae”) adult cicadas shed after they emerge from the ground. ◗ Young trees with small branches are most susceptible to cicada damage. The best way to prevent cicada damage is to put nets around young trees. ◗ Cicadas are edible. You can look for recipes online.

12

TERP SPRING

2004

FAR LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DIAMONDBACK/PETER CASEY, ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY

TERP SPRING

2004

13


m-file Taking the Bite Out of Shark Attacks KNOWN AS THE SHARK LADY, Eugenie Clark, a senior research scientist and professor emeri-

ta in the Department of Biology, is among the leading experts in her field. Clark has been a faculty member at Maryland since 1968. Today she conducts research on tropical sand fish and deep sea sharks at the Mote Marine Lab in Sarasota, Fla., a leading research center for shark research. After so much media attention on sharks and shark attacks in the last few years, the Shark Lady sets the record straight: ◗ People do not run a higher risk of getting attacked by a shark in the summer. During this time of year there are more people in the water, not more sharks. ◗ Sharks do not want to attack people. They are simply looking for food, so don’t confuse them. Splashing violently, spearing fish or pouring blood from a fishing boat can attract them to investigate. If you see a shark in the water slowly swim away. ◗ There is a higher likelihood of being killed in a car accident, struck by lightning or winning the lottery than being attacked by a shark. ◗ The Great White is the most dangerous type of shark, but it is frequently confused with the much larger Basking Shark, which feeds off plankton. Besides, there are at least 370 types of sharks, so the odds of swimming with a Great White are not that great. ◗ There are usually around 30 reported shark incidents each year. Of those, a dozen result in minor or severe injuries to fatalities. However, many are not fatal and several prove to be false. In one instance, a diver who thought he had been attacked by a shark while scuba diving had actually been “attacked” by his camera imploding from the water pressure. —SLK

Helping ADHD Parents Help Themselves AN INABILITY TO FOCUS or restlessness may not seem unusual for some adults. However, if they are parents of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), those symptoms could signal that mom and dad need help, too. Andrea Chronis, a psychologist with the university, reported these results after completing a study of approximately 200 pre-school children with and without ADHD. Both the parents’ and children’s mental health and behavior were measured as part of an ongoing 10-year project sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health. The study found that parents of children with ADHD were 24 times more likely to have ADHD themselves. And when children with ADHD suffer from other serious behavioral problems, their parents are two to five more times likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and drug addictions. Chronis admits that parents suffering from ADHD will need to be “super parents” in order to both manage their child’s treatment and their own. She says that parenting a child with ADHD calls for a level of discipline not often found in adults with ADHD. An important first step is for those in the medical profession to consider more than just the children. “We may need to assess and treat the parents so that the whole family functions at their best,” she says. —MAB

For New Crime Program, East Meets West CHINESE OFFICIALS, wrestling with unprecedented levels of crime, have turned to the University of Maryland for help.The university has launched what is believed to be China’s first criminal justice degree program for mid-level and young professionals. The goal is to improve understanding of criminal justice systems in other industrialized countries. “As China becomes a more urbanized economic power, we can help them learn to cope with the new patterns of crime that frequently accompany that kind of development,” says Charles Wellford, director of the exchange program and chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. “Chinese officials recognize the problem and want to become more aware

MILLIONS OF PEOPLE now enjoy the convenience of digital signature pads, which

let you electronically “sign” for purchases at stores nationwide. But along with the added convenience, consumers want assurances that digital signatures aren’t easily snatched by cyber thieves while in transit, who could then make unauthorized purchases and cause other mayhem via identity theft. Min Wu, (pictured, left) an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is developing new technologies that allow for the embedding of a secondary “hidden” image—called a digital watermark—within an original electronic image or piece of line art. These digital watermarks carry hidden information that retailers send to verification centers, which will authenticate a customer’s identity and what it is they are purchasing. “This is a core technology that can be used in many applications,” Wu says. Digital watermarks also have become a valuable tool for copyright protection in movies and music. One particular challenge that Wu found in her research concerned annotated data embedded in binary (two-color) images, the format typically used in electronic signatures. Until recently, watermarking data added to a binary image was fairly noticeable to the naked eye. New algorithms, or flow charts, that Wu is perfecting for binary images will leave almost no visible trace, yet still allow for digital annotations that carry consumer protection information. —TV

Ask a spouse or close friend to talk with you about symptomatic behavior such as difficulty organizing, or routinely impulsive behavior. Talk with your parents. Symptoms need to be present most of a person’s life to be ADHD. Then what do you do? * Talk with the physician treating your child. * Talk with your physician, or a mental health professional. * Set an example by taking any prescribed medication, or following other treatment, as directed.

TERP SPRING

2004

FAR LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES

been going to Nanjing to teach a two-week course segment.The 38 students are working toward master of criminal justice degrees. Also, the University of Maryland recently signed a memorandum of agreement with the Chinese Ministry of Justice to consider expanding the relationship to include faculty exchanges, joint research efforts and co-hosted conferences. —NT

Digital Watermarks Offer Added Security for Buyers

How Do You Know?

14

of techniques that have worked in Europe and the United States.” Among the concerns: new levels of violent crime, illegal drug use and property crime. Wellford went to Nanjing last September to launch the oneand-a-half year program. The courses, taught in English, will focus on police techniques, Western court systems, corrections, police planning, theories of crime and evaluation research techniques. One Maryland faculty member at a time has

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP SPRING

2004

15


m-file Taking the Bite Out of Shark Attacks KNOWN AS THE SHARK LADY, Eugenie Clark, a senior research scientist and professor emeri-

ta in the Department of Biology, is among the leading experts in her field. Clark has been a faculty member at Maryland since 1968. Today she conducts research on tropical sand fish and deep sea sharks at the Mote Marine Lab in Sarasota, Fla., a leading research center for shark research. After so much media attention on sharks and shark attacks in the last few years, the Shark Lady sets the record straight: ◗ People do not run a higher risk of getting attacked by a shark in the summer. During this time of year there are more people in the water, not more sharks. ◗ Sharks do not want to attack people. They are simply looking for food, so don’t confuse them. Splashing violently, spearing fish or pouring blood from a fishing boat can attract them to investigate. If you see a shark in the water slowly swim away. ◗ There is a higher likelihood of being killed in a car accident, struck by lightning or winning the lottery than being attacked by a shark. ◗ The Great White is the most dangerous type of shark, but it is frequently confused with the much larger Basking Shark, which feeds off plankton. Besides, there are at least 370 types of sharks, so the odds of swimming with a Great White are not that great. ◗ There are usually around 30 reported shark incidents each year. Of those, a dozen result in minor or severe injuries to fatalities. However, many are not fatal and several prove to be false. In one instance, a diver who thought he had been attacked by a shark while scuba diving had actually been “attacked” by his camera imploding from the water pressure. —SLK

Helping ADHD Parents Help Themselves AN INABILITY TO FOCUS or restlessness may not seem unusual for some adults. However, if they are parents of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), those symptoms could signal that mom and dad need help, too. Andrea Chronis, a psychologist with the university, reported these results after completing a study of approximately 200 pre-school children with and without ADHD. Both the parents’ and children’s mental health and behavior were measured as part of an ongoing 10-year project sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health. The study found that parents of children with ADHD were 24 times more likely to have ADHD themselves. And when children with ADHD suffer from other serious behavioral problems, their parents are two to five more times likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and drug addictions. Chronis admits that parents suffering from ADHD will need to be “super parents” in order to both manage their child’s treatment and their own. She says that parenting a child with ADHD calls for a level of discipline not often found in adults with ADHD. An important first step is for those in the medical profession to consider more than just the children. “We may need to assess and treat the parents so that the whole family functions at their best,” she says. —MAB

For New Crime Program, East Meets West CHINESE OFFICIALS, wrestling with unprecedented levels of crime, have turned to the University of Maryland for help.The university has launched what is believed to be China’s first criminal justice degree program for mid-level and young professionals. The goal is to improve understanding of criminal justice systems in other industrialized countries. “As China becomes a more urbanized economic power, we can help them learn to cope with the new patterns of crime that frequently accompany that kind of development,” says Charles Wellford, director of the exchange program and chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. “Chinese officials recognize the problem and want to become more aware

MILLIONS OF PEOPLE now enjoy the convenience of digital signature pads, which

let you electronically “sign” for purchases at stores nationwide. But along with the added convenience, consumers want assurances that digital signatures aren’t easily snatched by cyber thieves while in transit, who could then make unauthorized purchases and cause other mayhem via identity theft. Min Wu, (pictured, left) an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is developing new technologies that allow for the embedding of a secondary “hidden” image—called a digital watermark—within an original electronic image or piece of line art. These digital watermarks carry hidden information that retailers send to verification centers, which will authenticate a customer’s identity and what it is they are purchasing. “This is a core technology that can be used in many applications,” Wu says. Digital watermarks also have become a valuable tool for copyright protection in movies and music. One particular challenge that Wu found in her research concerned annotated data embedded in binary (two-color) images, the format typically used in electronic signatures. Until recently, watermarking data added to a binary image was fairly noticeable to the naked eye. New algorithms, or flow charts, that Wu is perfecting for binary images will leave almost no visible trace, yet still allow for digital annotations that carry consumer protection information. —TV

Ask a spouse or close friend to talk with you about symptomatic behavior such as difficulty organizing, or routinely impulsive behavior. Talk with your parents. Symptoms need to be present most of a person’s life to be ADHD. Then what do you do? * Talk with the physician treating your child. * Talk with your physician, or a mental health professional. * Set an example by taking any prescribed medication, or following other treatment, as directed.

TERP SPRING

2004

FAR LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES

been going to Nanjing to teach a two-week course segment.The 38 students are working toward master of criminal justice degrees. Also, the University of Maryland recently signed a memorandum of agreement with the Chinese Ministry of Justice to consider expanding the relationship to include faculty exchanges, joint research efforts and co-hosted conferences. —NT

Digital Watermarks Offer Added Security for Buyers

How Do You Know?

14

of techniques that have worked in Europe and the United States.” Among the concerns: new levels of violent crime, illegal drug use and property crime. Wellford went to Nanjing last September to launch the oneand-a-half year program. The courses, taught in English, will focus on police techniques, Western court systems, corrections, police planning, theories of crime and evaluation research techniques. One Maryland faculty member at a time has

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP SPRING

2004

15


The curtain rises. The roll of a die decides what happens next. A game of chance onstage will determine the dance and your journey. “Split Sides” is set to the music of Radiohead and Sigur Ros in this area premiere. “Ground Level Overlay,” a dance work inspired by a computer program, juxtaposes dancers performing alone or together in precise rhythms to the layered sound of trombones recorded underground.

Home Schedule Sept. 4, Northern Illinois Sept. 11, Temple Oct. 9, Georgia Tech

Oct. 16, N.C. State Oct. 30, Florida State Nov. 27, Wake Forest

Maryland Football: Are You In? Season Tickets on Sale Now

Enjoy free food, live music and visits from Testudo and the Mighty Sound of Maryland at the alumni association’s Annual Homecoming Festival. Then head into Byrd Stadium to watch the Terps tackle the Wolfpack of N.C. State!

SAVE THE DATE: OCTOBER 16 Homecoming

8 p.m. Kay Theatre

SEPTEMBER 8–10 Merce Cunningham Dance Company Split Sides and Ground Level Overlay

Campus, Lot 1 near Tawes Theatre 7 p.m. Live music 9(ish) p.m. Fireworks Co-sponsored with the City of College Park What better way to celebrate America’s birthday than with fellow Terp fans! Pack your favorite picnic fare, Frisbees and more and tailgate with friends and family. Enjoy a live band as you await the grand finale—a fantastic fireworks display. (Limited refreshments available on site.)

JULY 4 Independence Day Celebration

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES; TOP RIGHT ART BY MIRA AZARM; CENTER LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; CENTER RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; BOTTOM BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Office of Special Events,301.405.4638

SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT

Office of Special Events, 301.405.4638

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION

301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office), www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

www.umterps.com

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office),

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

H OT L I N E

Campus The 1954, 1964 and 1979 Class Reunion Committees and the alumni association invite you to return to campus to celebrate with your alma mater. See firsthand the changes on campus, cheer for the Terps as they take on NC State and tour the old haunts. Most importantly, meet up with old friends and discover new ones. Register today with the alumni association.

OCTOBER 14–16 1954, 1964 and 1979 Class Reunions Can You Believe It Has Been 25 Years? 40 Years? 50 Years?

6 p.m.–midnight Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Join the University of Maryland for an evening of entertainment, elegance and infinite possibilities! Please your palate with the zest of exotic spices. Swing to the strains of a saucy island beat. And thrill to the talents of our gifted students—all to benefit our scholarships. Help us inspire worthy students to one day set the world on fire! Hot, hot, hot!

SEPTEMBER 18 Feel the Sizzle! Scholarship Benefit

Summer brings a fantastic fireworks display to campus. Is your class hosting a reunion? Sign up now! As the season wanes, look to your alma mater for fall activities: save the date for one hot scholarship benefit, Homecoming, a high-tech dance performance and more!


The curtain rises. The roll of a die decides what happens next. A game of chance onstage will determine the dance and your journey. “Split Sides” is set to the music of Radiohead and Sigur Ros in this area premiere. “Ground Level Overlay,” a dance work inspired by a computer program, juxtaposes dancers performing alone or together in precise rhythms to the layered sound of trombones recorded underground.

Home Schedule Sept. 4, Northern Illinois Sept. 11, Temple Oct. 9, Georgia Tech

Oct. 16, N.C. State Oct. 30, Florida State Nov. 27, Wake Forest

Maryland Football: Are You In? Season Tickets on Sale Now

Enjoy free food, live music and visits from Testudo and the Mighty Sound of Maryland at the alumni association’s Annual Homecoming Festival. Then head into Byrd Stadium to watch the Terps tackle the Wolfpack of N.C. State!

SAVE THE DATE: OCTOBER 16 Homecoming

8 p.m. Kay Theatre

SEPTEMBER 8–10 Merce Cunningham Dance Company Split Sides and Ground Level Overlay

Campus, Lot 1 near Tawes Theatre 7 p.m. Live music 9(ish) p.m. Fireworks Co-sponsored with the City of College Park What better way to celebrate America’s birthday than with fellow Terp fans! Pack your favorite picnic fare, Frisbees and more and tailgate with friends and family. Enjoy a live band as you await the grand finale—a fantastic fireworks display. (Limited refreshments available on site.)

JULY 4 Independence Day Celebration

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES; TOP RIGHT ART BY MIRA AZARM; CENTER LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; CENTER RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; BOTTOM BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Office of Special Events,301.405.4638

SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT

Office of Special Events, 301.405.4638

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION

301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office), www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

www.umterps.com

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office),

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

H OT L I N E

Campus The 1954, 1964 and 1979 Class Reunion Committees and the alumni association invite you to return to campus to celebrate with your alma mater. See firsthand the changes on campus, cheer for the Terps as they take on NC State and tour the old haunts. Most importantly, meet up with old friends and discover new ones. Register today with the alumni association.

OCTOBER 14–16 1954, 1964 and 1979 Class Reunions Can You Believe It Has Been 25 Years? 40 Years? 50 Years?

6 p.m.–midnight Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Join the University of Maryland for an evening of entertainment, elegance and infinite possibilities! Please your palate with the zest of exotic spices. Swing to the strains of a saucy island beat. And thrill to the talents of our gifted students—all to benefit our scholarships. Help us inspire worthy students to one day set the world on fire! Hot, hot, hot!

SEPTEMBER 18 Feel the Sizzle! Scholarship Benefit

Summer brings a fantastic fireworks display to campus. Is your class hosting a reunion? Sign up now! As the season wanes, look to your alma mater for fall activities: save the date for one hot scholarship benefit, Homecoming, a high-tech dance performance and more!


As a public research university, Maryland should gauge a measure of its success by how enriched the surrounding community is by its presence. How are faculty members sharing what they are discovering? What applicable research is being offered to teachers? In the area of kindergarten through 12th grade education, the university answers these questions in a myriad of ways. While preparing new teachers to take on classroom challenges, it also works with those already in the field by providing valuable research data to improve teaching and learning, to structure inclusive and engaging curricula and to develop tools for assessment. “We’re continually looking for synergies … and developing new knowledge that fulfills the university’s research mission,” says Edna Szymanski, dean of the College of Education. “The real challenge is finding the right balance between the expertise of the faculty and the needs of the community.” Story By Monette A. Bailey Illustrations By Joseph Daniel Fiedler

18

TERP SPRING

2004

TERP SPRING

2004

19


As a public research university, Maryland should gauge a measure of its success by how enriched the surrounding community is by its presence. How are faculty members sharing what they are discovering? What applicable research is being offered to teachers? In the area of kindergarten through 12th grade education, the university answers these questions in a myriad of ways. While preparing new teachers to take on classroom challenges, it also works with those already in the field by providing valuable research data to improve teaching and learning, to structure inclusive and engaging curricula and to develop tools for assessment. “We’re continually looking for synergies … and developing new knowledge that fulfills the university’s research mission,” says Edna Szymanski, dean of the College of Education. “The real challenge is finding the right balance between the expertise of the faculty and the needs of the community.” Story By Monette A. Bailey Illustrations By Joseph Daniel Fiedler

18

TERP SPRING

2004

TERP SPRING

2004

19


Stimulate Teachers’ Creativity The community needs well-trained teachers in all subject areas. Nariman Farvardin, dean of the Clark School of Engineering, would add “passion” to what is required of teachers, especially for those in the sciences. “It’s not good enough to tell people how exciting these fields are…. We need to show them the role engineering plays in our everyday life,” he says. This summer, in conjunction with the College of Education, the School of Engineering will launch a program, funded by the GE Foundation, designed to generate enthusiasm about careers in engineering and technology.Teachers Integrating Mathematics and Engineering (TIME) brings a variety of programs such as ongoing teacher education and a two-week summer program to middle and high school teachers and guidance counselors from Maryland, starting with Prince George’s County. “Our objective is to ultimately influence the mindset of mathematics and science teachers and guidance counselors about engineering and technology-related fields,” says Farvardin, with the goal of inspiring young people to enter these fields. Patricia Campbell, associate professor with the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, echoes Farvardin’s emphasis on teachers’ importance. She believes that “you’re not going to change what students learn unless you change what teachers are teaching.”To prove this point, she and her research team set about helping math teachers in Baltimore City elementary schools revamp the entire mathematics curriculum.“It became a systemic project that worked with curriculum, instruction, professional development, assessment and policymakers.” The six-year Mathematics Applications and Reasoning Skills (MARS) project empowered teachers whose students responded with increased achievement. Median scores on standardized tests jumped 16 to 23 percentile points after three years, even as about two-thirds of the elementary teachers attended the professional development sessions, says Campell. “We learned that a teacher affects a student’s mathematics achievement for at least two years.” Campbell’s team also began to understand more about how learning occurs, which can help teachers be more effective in planning engaging instruction. John Guthrie concurs. Director of the university-based Maryland Literacy Research Center, Guthrie and his colleagues 20

TERP SPRING

2004

explore how students construct meaning from text. Just knowing how to say a word isn’t enough. “My research is on children’s reading comprehension … in grades 3 through 5,” says Guthrie, who has won a Board of Regents Research Award for his work. “After word recognition, what’s next?” Using a $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, his team is working in several schools in Frederick County over the next five years, specifically on science comprehension. His team offers eight strategies that when applied have proven beneficial to reading comprehension, motivation and science knowledge. One of his strategies, for example, encourages students to literally draw connections between pieces of information. “It helps them to think constructively while they’re reading,” he says, adding that any of the strategies his team is showing teachers how to use can be practiced in other disciplines.

Foster a Nurturing Environment Melanie Killen, a professor with the college’s Department of Human Development, looks at how school environments foster or inhibit children’s perceptions of inclusion or exclusion, specifically around issues of race and ethnicity. How can a student be expected to be excited about, even interested in, learning when he or she is combating feelings of isolation? Teachers, she confirmed, play a pivotal role in the way schools foster tolerance and mutual respect. “Just like with girls and science. A lot of times, good teachers are unaware of implicit biases, implied messages,” she says. With grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institute of Child Health and Development, Killen’s team interviewed 4th, 7th and 10th grade classrooms, of both heterogeneously and homogeneously populated schools, to discern how the social context of schools figures into student perceptions of inclusion and exclusion. Kids in homogeneous schools were less likely to talk about the negative consequences of exclusion than were kids in heterogeneous schools.“They are puzzled by all of this … and they’re falling back on stereotypes and don’t even realize it,” says Killen.“Kids in mixed environments, from both majority and minority backgrounds, found exclusion wrong and gave very elaborate answers why.” A large part of the inclusion equation is accessibility. Martin Johnson, director of the Maryland Institute for Minority

Achievement and Urban Education, and Margaret McLaughlin, associate director of the university’s Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children, spend their time helping educators make sure no child really is left behind. “I believe that as many things as we don’t like about the No Child Left Behind Act, it is forcing schools to look at subgroups of kids and be responsible for them,” says McLaughlin. She is referring to President George Bush’s 2001 legislation that requires greater accountability and calls on states to close the achievement gap. Working on a five-year Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs project, McLaughlin explores accountability as it relates to the programs and policies for children with disabilities. She is examining eight districts in four states and finding that it works best when whole schools take responsibility for children with disabilities. “At the district level it’s much more difficult to find a strong statement of commitment, but you can find it in individual schools,” says McLaughlin, who summarizes the features.They include a clear understanding that the top cares about what happens to kids with disabilities, a clear expectation that these kids can and will achieve, and a clear and clearly written curriculum, created by collaboration between teachers and parents. And as with education in general, “Teacher preparation and development is important,” she says. Johnson and his institute colleagues agree. In order to help kids achieve at a higher level, teachers must be better prepared. He talks of being “intensely concerned” about how teachers affect the performance of minority students, especially. But any efforts by the institute are a result of careful planning done with the schools. Jim Greenberg, director of the K-16 Partnership Development Center,

makes it clear that each project has to do two things: meet the needs of the schools as identified by those in it and provide benefits for both the school and the university. Johnson and Greenberg point to the Bladensburg Project as an example of this kind of genuine collaboration. Begun four years ago to address achievement gaps in a high-poverty, low-performing cluster of Prince George’s County schools, the project includes Bladensburg High School,William Wirt Middle School and Rogers Heights and Templeton elementary schools. It is a model of purposeful, planned collaborations with Maryland faculty members from curriculum and instruction, mathematics, and counseling and personnel services. “We can’t do everything everyone wants, but we can do what feels right to everybody,” says Greenberg. “We don’t go to them and tell them what to do … it’s what we can do together.”

Assess the Results

Once synergistic relationships begin to affect change in student performance, it is time to put the results to the test. Educators across the country are trying to create accurate assessment tools, in part, to comply with President Bush’s No Child requirements. Peter Afflerbach, with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, focuses on the assessment of educational programs for the National Center for Education Statistics’ National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) project. It is also known more pointedly as the Nation’s Report Card. As part of the reading committee, he reviews test passages “to make sure they are high quality.The committee’s particular task is to make sure the passages and items [that comprise the questions] are valid,” he says. “Careful test development takes a number of years.” As evidence, Afflerbach is also on NAEP’s WHAT’S IN A 2009 framework committee,“working on While there are many questions that could be asked by parents looking for good schools, revising … what reading is and how it’s College of Education Dean Edna Syzmanski suggests a handful that are essential: done” in order shape future curriculum and testing materials. He is especially interested in how students construct meaning from text. ✔ What is the classroom ratio of teacher to students? Dean Szymanski says nationally impor✔ Are the teachers highly qualified? tant work such as Afflerbach’s, as well as ✔ What resources are available for teachers and students? transformative local projects, reflect “the ✔ What provisions are made for students with special needs? overall excellence of the school.” ✔ How has the school done on standardized tests? How do teachers prepare for these tests? Greenberg would add that it demonstrates what can happen when quality colAnswers to these questions can be found, for many schools, on county Web sites. For laboration occurs. TERP

Parent’s Toolbox?

others, a call to the school or district office should work.

TERP SPRING

2004

21


Stimulate Teachers’ Creativity The community needs well-trained teachers in all subject areas. Nariman Farvardin, dean of the Clark School of Engineering, would add “passion” to what is required of teachers, especially for those in the sciences. “It’s not good enough to tell people how exciting these fields are…. We need to show them the role engineering plays in our everyday life,” he says. This summer, in conjunction with the College of Education, the School of Engineering will launch a program, funded by the GE Foundation, designed to generate enthusiasm about careers in engineering and technology.Teachers Integrating Mathematics and Engineering (TIME) brings a variety of programs such as ongoing teacher education and a two-week summer program to middle and high school teachers and guidance counselors from Maryland, starting with Prince George’s County. “Our objective is to ultimately influence the mindset of mathematics and science teachers and guidance counselors about engineering and technology-related fields,” says Farvardin, with the goal of inspiring young people to enter these fields. Patricia Campbell, associate professor with the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, echoes Farvardin’s emphasis on teachers’ importance. She believes that “you’re not going to change what students learn unless you change what teachers are teaching.”To prove this point, she and her research team set about helping math teachers in Baltimore City elementary schools revamp the entire mathematics curriculum.“It became a systemic project that worked with curriculum, instruction, professional development, assessment and policymakers.” The six-year Mathematics Applications and Reasoning Skills (MARS) project empowered teachers whose students responded with increased achievement. Median scores on standardized tests jumped 16 to 23 percentile points after three years, even as about two-thirds of the elementary teachers attended the professional development sessions, says Campell. “We learned that a teacher affects a student’s mathematics achievement for at least two years.” Campbell’s team also began to understand more about how learning occurs, which can help teachers be more effective in planning engaging instruction. John Guthrie concurs. Director of the university-based Maryland Literacy Research Center, Guthrie and his colleagues 20

TERP SPRING

2004

explore how students construct meaning from text. Just knowing how to say a word isn’t enough. “My research is on children’s reading comprehension … in grades 3 through 5,” says Guthrie, who has won a Board of Regents Research Award for his work. “After word recognition, what’s next?” Using a $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, his team is working in several schools in Frederick County over the next five years, specifically on science comprehension. His team offers eight strategies that when applied have proven beneficial to reading comprehension, motivation and science knowledge. One of his strategies, for example, encourages students to literally draw connections between pieces of information. “It helps them to think constructively while they’re reading,” he says, adding that any of the strategies his team is showing teachers how to use can be practiced in other disciplines.

Foster a Nurturing Environment Melanie Killen, a professor with the college’s Department of Human Development, looks at how school environments foster or inhibit children’s perceptions of inclusion or exclusion, specifically around issues of race and ethnicity. How can a student be expected to be excited about, even interested in, learning when he or she is combating feelings of isolation? Teachers, she confirmed, play a pivotal role in the way schools foster tolerance and mutual respect. “Just like with girls and science. A lot of times, good teachers are unaware of implicit biases, implied messages,” she says. With grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institute of Child Health and Development, Killen’s team interviewed 4th, 7th and 10th grade classrooms, of both heterogeneously and homogeneously populated schools, to discern how the social context of schools figures into student perceptions of inclusion and exclusion. Kids in homogeneous schools were less likely to talk about the negative consequences of exclusion than were kids in heterogeneous schools.“They are puzzled by all of this … and they’re falling back on stereotypes and don’t even realize it,” says Killen.“Kids in mixed environments, from both majority and minority backgrounds, found exclusion wrong and gave very elaborate answers why.” A large part of the inclusion equation is accessibility. Martin Johnson, director of the Maryland Institute for Minority

Achievement and Urban Education, and Margaret McLaughlin, associate director of the university’s Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children, spend their time helping educators make sure no child really is left behind. “I believe that as many things as we don’t like about the No Child Left Behind Act, it is forcing schools to look at subgroups of kids and be responsible for them,” says McLaughlin. She is referring to President George Bush’s 2001 legislation that requires greater accountability and calls on states to close the achievement gap. Working on a five-year Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs project, McLaughlin explores accountability as it relates to the programs and policies for children with disabilities. She is examining eight districts in four states and finding that it works best when whole schools take responsibility for children with disabilities. “At the district level it’s much more difficult to find a strong statement of commitment, but you can find it in individual schools,” says McLaughlin, who summarizes the features.They include a clear understanding that the top cares about what happens to kids with disabilities, a clear expectation that these kids can and will achieve, and a clear and clearly written curriculum, created by collaboration between teachers and parents. And as with education in general, “Teacher preparation and development is important,” she says. Johnson and his institute colleagues agree. In order to help kids achieve at a higher level, teachers must be better prepared. He talks of being “intensely concerned” about how teachers affect the performance of minority students, especially. But any efforts by the institute are a result of careful planning done with the schools. Jim Greenberg, director of the K-16 Partnership Development Center,

makes it clear that each project has to do two things: meet the needs of the schools as identified by those in it and provide benefits for both the school and the university. Johnson and Greenberg point to the Bladensburg Project as an example of this kind of genuine collaboration. Begun four years ago to address achievement gaps in a high-poverty, low-performing cluster of Prince George’s County schools, the project includes Bladensburg High School,William Wirt Middle School and Rogers Heights and Templeton elementary schools. It is a model of purposeful, planned collaborations with Maryland faculty members from curriculum and instruction, mathematics, and counseling and personnel services. “We can’t do everything everyone wants, but we can do what feels right to everybody,” says Greenberg. “We don’t go to them and tell them what to do … it’s what we can do together.”

Assess the Results

Once synergistic relationships begin to affect change in student performance, it is time to put the results to the test. Educators across the country are trying to create accurate assessment tools, in part, to comply with President Bush’s No Child requirements. Peter Afflerbach, with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, focuses on the assessment of educational programs for the National Center for Education Statistics’ National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) project. It is also known more pointedly as the Nation’s Report Card. As part of the reading committee, he reviews test passages “to make sure they are high quality.The committee’s particular task is to make sure the passages and items [that comprise the questions] are valid,” he says. “Careful test development takes a number of years.” As evidence, Afflerbach is also on NAEP’s WHAT’S IN A 2009 framework committee,“working on While there are many questions that could be asked by parents looking for good schools, revising … what reading is and how it’s College of Education Dean Edna Syzmanski suggests a handful that are essential: done” in order shape future curriculum and testing materials. He is especially interested in how students construct meaning from text. ✔ What is the classroom ratio of teacher to students? Dean Szymanski says nationally impor✔ Are the teachers highly qualified? tant work such as Afflerbach’s, as well as ✔ What resources are available for teachers and students? transformative local projects, reflect “the ✔ What provisions are made for students with special needs? overall excellence of the school.” ✔ How has the school done on standardized tests? How do teachers prepare for these tests? Greenberg would add that it demonstrates what can happen when quality colAnswers to these questions can be found, for many schools, on county Web sites. For laboration occurs. TERP

Parent’s Toolbox?

others, a call to the school or district office should work.

TERP SPRING

2004

21


What Takes to Win it

—Then and Now

Straight Talk From the “Fridge” t wasn’t long ago that the Maryland football program was reeling, having endured a decade-long absence from the bowl circuit and five straight losing seasons. There were lots of long faces in College Park. Ralph Friedgen wasted little time injecting his squad with a winning hunger after becoming the Terps’ coach three years ago—using a clever motivational approach at that. Previously the offensive coordinator for a Georgia Tech team that had won two straight Gator Bowls, Friedgen sported a Yellow Jackets shirt with the Gator Bowl emblem. One player, thinking Friedgen was a traitor, asked him why he was pumping up a Maryland rival. The coach said it had nothing to do with the school, but instead the Gator Bowl. He then hit a nerve with the player, saying, “You wouldn’t know what that is.” Maryland’s players do now. The Terps are coming off a 41–7 trouncing of West Virginia in the Gator Bowl, no less, on New Year’s Day 2004. The sweet victory marked Maryland’s second straight bowl win and third straight appearance in a prominent postseason game. The bowl streak exemplifies Friedgen’s transformation of the Terps into one of the hottest teams in the nation. They posted a 10–3 record last season, their third straight 10-win campaign. Only Texas, Oklahoma, Miami and Washington State can boast of a similar three-year stretch. Maryland, 31–8 during that span, has also been in the final Top-25 rankings in each of the three years, last season placing No. 17 in the Associated Press poll and No. 20 in the ESPN/USA Today poll.

I

Story By Michael Richman Photograph By Peter Gregoire

22

TERP SPRING

2004

TERP SPRING

2004

23


What Takes to Win it

—Then and Now

Straight Talk From the “Fridge” t wasn’t long ago that the Maryland football program was reeling, having endured a decade-long absence from the bowl circuit and five straight losing seasons. There were lots of long faces in College Park. Ralph Friedgen wasted little time injecting his squad with a winning hunger after becoming the Terps’ coach three years ago—using a clever motivational approach at that. Previously the offensive coordinator for a Georgia Tech team that had won two straight Gator Bowls, Friedgen sported a Yellow Jackets shirt with the Gator Bowl emblem. One player, thinking Friedgen was a traitor, asked him why he was pumping up a Maryland rival. The coach said it had nothing to do with the school, but instead the Gator Bowl. He then hit a nerve with the player, saying, “You wouldn’t know what that is.” Maryland’s players do now. The Terps are coming off a 41–7 trouncing of West Virginia in the Gator Bowl, no less, on New Year’s Day 2004. The sweet victory marked Maryland’s second straight bowl win and third straight appearance in a prominent postseason game. The bowl streak exemplifies Friedgen’s transformation of the Terps into one of the hottest teams in the nation. They posted a 10–3 record last season, their third straight 10-win campaign. Only Texas, Oklahoma, Miami and Washington State can boast of a similar three-year stretch. Maryland, 31–8 during that span, has also been in the final Top-25 rankings in each of the three years, last season placing No. 17 in the Associated Press poll and No. 20 in the ESPN/USA Today poll.

I

Story By Michael Richman Photograph By Peter Gregoire

22

TERP SPRING

2004

TERP SPRING

2004

23


Ralph Friedgen played guard at Maryland from 1965–69 (left). When Friedgen became head coach at his alma mater in 2001 (below), success came quickly—he led the Terps to the Orange Bowl in his first season and was named NCAA Coach of the Year. Friedgen also began the tradition of singing the “Victory Song” after each win (right).

THE FRIDGE FILE AGE: 57 GRADUATION YEAR: 1970, 1972 M.A. RESIDENCE: Olney, Md. CAREER: Football Coach, 1969–present

How Things Have Come Full Circle on the Maryland Gridiron “The kids really didn’t understand what comes along with winning,” Friedgen says. “Now they do.You go to bowl games, and you get honored.That’s all part of it.The fact that I had been there before helped give credibility to some of the things I was trying to get across to them.” The Terps’ outstanding wide receiverkick returner, Steve Suter, remembers the aura that surrounded Friedgen when he arrived in 2001. “We knew he was a winner,” says Suter, who will be a senior this season. “It was like, if we can’t win with this guy, then we’re not going to win.We fed off his winning vibes.” Suter and his teammates are now aiming for something Friedgen sports from his days as offensive coordinator of the 1990 Georgia Tech squad—a national championship ring.The coach points to recruiting as the key for the program to elevate another notch and contend for the national title, saying the Terps’ last two recruiting classes have been excellent.The 2004 recruiting class, in fact, is one of the best in the nation and in school history. But the coach adds, “We’re probably another recruiting class away from being there.” “I’m always going to push the envelope to be the best we can be,” Friedgen says.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

“But as good as we’ve been, I still think we can be better.” The entry of Miami and Virginia Tech into the ACC this season is also likely to impact Maryland’s chances of ascending to the national elite. Miami, a perennial power and winner of the national championship in 2001, finished No. 5 in both major polls last season.Virginia Tech was unranked last season but has played in bowl games 11 of the past 12 years. Friedgen says Maryland is on par with if not better than Virginia Tech, pointing out that the Terps have been ranked higher than the Hokies in the major season-ending polls for the past three seasons. Maryland plays Virginia Tech in

Blacksburg this season but does not face Miami, who Friedgen admits has had a more lofty football tradition. But he touts how Maryland destroyed West Virginia twice last season by a total score of 75–14, while the Hurricanes needed a late surge to squeak past their then-Big East opponent. According to Friedgen, Miami and Virginia Tech will fortify what he calls a “pretty strong conference” that already features Florida State and Clemson—both ranked at season’s end—as well as alwaystough Georgia Tech,Virginia and NC State.The ACC finished 5–1 in bowl games last season. “The ACC is a very powerful conference not only from a talent standpoint but

Ones to Watch

24

Steve Suter

Josh Allen

Domonique Foxworth

Shawne Merriman

Vernon Davis

Wesley Jefferson

Senior WR-Kick Returner, 5’10”, 192 lbs.: One of the most exciting players in the nation in recent seasons, he should be completely healed in 2004 after playing last year with a torn meniscus. He’s one touchdown on a punt return from tying the NCAA career record.

Junior RB, 5’11”, 207 lbs.: He’ll enter the season as the starter after sharing time last season with Bruce Perry. Strong, with breakaway speed, he gained 957 yards rushing in 2003.

Senior CB, 5’11”, 177 lbs.: Will be looked upon for providing stability in a secondary that lost three key seniors last season. He intercepted three passes last year, returning one for a touchdown.

Junior LB, 6’4”, 253 lbs.: A super-athletic player who was quietly one of the ACC’s leaders in sacks and tackles-forloss last season. This season will be his first as a definitive full-time starter.

Sophomore TE, 6’3”, 231 lbs.: His physical gifts suggest that some day he will be a star. He caught one pass for 28 yards in the Gator Bowl, but his role will likely increase in 2004.

Redshirt Freshman LB, 6’1”, 233 lbs.: The toprated prep linebacker in the country in 2002, he redshirted last season to get stronger. He’ll compete at the weakside linebacker position, and his nose for the ball makes him an interesting player to watch.

TERP SPRING

2004

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION

from a media standpoint,” Friedgen says. “I don’t think there’s a better place to be than the ACC right now.” The coach says he plans to shoot for another 10-win season in 2004 but acknowledges that he must do so with a very young and inexperienced squad. He says he faces serious challenges in replacing such stars as quarterback Scott McBrien,

who was 21–6 as a starter and earned most valuable player honors in Maryland’s Peach Bowl and Gator Bowl wins the last two seasons. The Terps also lost running back Bruce Perry, the ACC Offensive Player of the Year in 2001, and three-quarters of a top-notch defensive backfield in Curome Cox, Madieu Williams and Dennard Wilson. “We’ve got a lot of players who will be

31–8 record in three seasons as Maryland head coach

Has coached Terps to three 10-win seasons; Maryland is one of only five teams in the country to do so over the threeyear span.

Winner of the Peach Bowl and Gator Bowl as coach at Maryland; his Terps lost in the Orange Bowl in the 2001 season

Consensus NCAA National Coach of the Year in 2001

32 seasons as an assistant football coach, 27 in college football

Won the Frank Broyles Award as the top assistant coach in the country in 1999

Offensive coordinator for Georgia Tech teams that won the Gator Bowl in the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

Offensive coordinator of the 1990 NCAA co-champions, Georgia Tech

Offensive coordinator of a Maryland team that appeared in four straight bowl games in the 1980s and won the Sun Bowl in 1984 and Cherry Bowl in 1985

Five seasons as an assistant coach for the San Diego Chargers (1992-1996)

Offensive coordinator of the Chargers team that played in Super Bowl XXIX in January 1995

Alumni Get in the Game Maryland football has gone high-tech thanks to the ingenuity of two former players: Kevin Plank ’97 and Jess Atkinson ’85. Plank, a former Maryland football player, is the founder and president of Under Armour, the new exclusive outfitter of Maryland football. The company makes gear using an original microfiber, moisturewicking fabric that is designed to keep athOn Maryland Day, the Terps wore uniforms made by letes cool, dry and quick in the heat of Under Armour, a company founded by alumnus Kevin competition. Plank (pictured second from right). Under Armour advertises prominently on a revolutionary television Web site called FridgeTV.com, the brainchild of Atkinson, a kicker for Maryland from 1982 to 1984. Atkinson, a television sports anchor for a dozen years, shoots a lot of the footage using a digital camera. Fridge TV, which debuted last season, is perhaps the most advanced example of a college coach communicating directly with fans through the Internet. Those on the site witness Webcasts of home games and game highlights, pre-game and post-game news conferences, team meetings and locker room exchanges between Friedgen and his players.

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF WASHINGTON POST; BOTTOM PHOTO BY LISA HELFERT

first-year players, so we’ll see how they accept their role,” Suter says. “The seniors really need to step up and take control of the younger kids and make sure everybody’s doing what they’re supposed to do.” Winning a national championship, Suter adds, is something the team would love to accomplish, but “who knows if we can do it this year.Winning the ACC title is definitely on our minds because that would take us to a BCS [Bowl Championship Series] game.We’re not settling for anything less.” TERP TERP SPRING

2004

25


Ralph Friedgen played guard at Maryland from 1965–69 (left). When Friedgen became head coach at his alma mater in 2001 (below), success came quickly—he led the Terps to the Orange Bowl in his first season and was named NCAA Coach of the Year. Friedgen also began the tradition of singing the “Victory Song” after each win (right).

THE FRIDGE FILE AGE: 57 GRADUATION YEAR: 1970, 1972 M.A. RESIDENCE: Olney, Md. CAREER: Football Coach, 1969–present

How Things Have Come Full Circle on the Maryland Gridiron “The kids really didn’t understand what comes along with winning,” Friedgen says. “Now they do.You go to bowl games, and you get honored.That’s all part of it.The fact that I had been there before helped give credibility to some of the things I was trying to get across to them.” The Terps’ outstanding wide receiverkick returner, Steve Suter, remembers the aura that surrounded Friedgen when he arrived in 2001. “We knew he was a winner,” says Suter, who will be a senior this season. “It was like, if we can’t win with this guy, then we’re not going to win.We fed off his winning vibes.” Suter and his teammates are now aiming for something Friedgen sports from his days as offensive coordinator of the 1990 Georgia Tech squad—a national championship ring.The coach points to recruiting as the key for the program to elevate another notch and contend for the national title, saying the Terps’ last two recruiting classes have been excellent.The 2004 recruiting class, in fact, is one of the best in the nation and in school history. But the coach adds, “We’re probably another recruiting class away from being there.” “I’m always going to push the envelope to be the best we can be,” Friedgen says.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

“But as good as we’ve been, I still think we can be better.” The entry of Miami and Virginia Tech into the ACC this season is also likely to impact Maryland’s chances of ascending to the national elite. Miami, a perennial power and winner of the national championship in 2001, finished No. 5 in both major polls last season.Virginia Tech was unranked last season but has played in bowl games 11 of the past 12 years. Friedgen says Maryland is on par with if not better than Virginia Tech, pointing out that the Terps have been ranked higher than the Hokies in the major season-ending polls for the past three seasons. Maryland plays Virginia Tech in

Blacksburg this season but does not face Miami, who Friedgen admits has had a more lofty football tradition. But he touts how Maryland destroyed West Virginia twice last season by a total score of 75–14, while the Hurricanes needed a late surge to squeak past their then-Big East opponent. According to Friedgen, Miami and Virginia Tech will fortify what he calls a “pretty strong conference” that already features Florida State and Clemson—both ranked at season’s end—as well as alwaystough Georgia Tech,Virginia and NC State.The ACC finished 5–1 in bowl games last season. “The ACC is a very powerful conference not only from a talent standpoint but

Ones to Watch

24

Steve Suter

Josh Allen

Domonique Foxworth

Shawne Merriman

Vernon Davis

Wesley Jefferson

Senior WR-Kick Returner, 5’10”, 192 lbs.: One of the most exciting players in the nation in recent seasons, he should be completely healed in 2004 after playing last year with a torn meniscus. He’s one touchdown on a punt return from tying the NCAA career record.

Junior RB, 5’11”, 207 lbs.: He’ll enter the season as the starter after sharing time last season with Bruce Perry. Strong, with breakaway speed, he gained 957 yards rushing in 2003.

Senior CB, 5’11”, 177 lbs.: Will be looked upon for providing stability in a secondary that lost three key seniors last season. He intercepted three passes last year, returning one for a touchdown.

Junior LB, 6’4”, 253 lbs.: A super-athletic player who was quietly one of the ACC’s leaders in sacks and tackles-forloss last season. This season will be his first as a definitive full-time starter.

Sophomore TE, 6’3”, 231 lbs.: His physical gifts suggest that some day he will be a star. He caught one pass for 28 yards in the Gator Bowl, but his role will likely increase in 2004.

Redshirt Freshman LB, 6’1”, 233 lbs.: The toprated prep linebacker in the country in 2002, he redshirted last season to get stronger. He’ll compete at the weakside linebacker position, and his nose for the ball makes him an interesting player to watch.

TERP SPRING

2004

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION

from a media standpoint,” Friedgen says. “I don’t think there’s a better place to be than the ACC right now.” The coach says he plans to shoot for another 10-win season in 2004 but acknowledges that he must do so with a very young and inexperienced squad. He says he faces serious challenges in replacing such stars as quarterback Scott McBrien,

who was 21–6 as a starter and earned most valuable player honors in Maryland’s Peach Bowl and Gator Bowl wins the last two seasons. The Terps also lost running back Bruce Perry, the ACC Offensive Player of the Year in 2001, and three-quarters of a top-notch defensive backfield in Curome Cox, Madieu Williams and Dennard Wilson. “We’ve got a lot of players who will be

31–8 record in three seasons as Maryland head coach

Has coached Terps to three 10-win seasons; Maryland is one of only five teams in the country to do so over the threeyear span.

Winner of the Peach Bowl and Gator Bowl as coach at Maryland; his Terps lost in the Orange Bowl in the 2001 season

Consensus NCAA National Coach of the Year in 2001

32 seasons as an assistant football coach, 27 in college football

Won the Frank Broyles Award as the top assistant coach in the country in 1999

Offensive coordinator for Georgia Tech teams that won the Gator Bowl in the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

Offensive coordinator of the 1990 NCAA co-champions, Georgia Tech

Offensive coordinator of a Maryland team that appeared in four straight bowl games in the 1980s and won the Sun Bowl in 1984 and Cherry Bowl in 1985

Five seasons as an assistant coach for the San Diego Chargers (1992-1996)

Offensive coordinator of the Chargers team that played in Super Bowl XXIX in January 1995

Alumni Get in the Game Maryland football has gone high-tech thanks to the ingenuity of two former players: Kevin Plank ’97 and Jess Atkinson ’85. Plank, a former Maryland football player, is the founder and president of Under Armour, the new exclusive outfitter of Maryland football. The company makes gear using an original microfiber, moisturewicking fabric that is designed to keep athOn Maryland Day, the Terps wore uniforms made by letes cool, dry and quick in the heat of Under Armour, a company founded by alumnus Kevin competition. Plank (pictured second from right). Under Armour advertises prominently on a revolutionary television Web site called FridgeTV.com, the brainchild of Atkinson, a kicker for Maryland from 1982 to 1984. Atkinson, a television sports anchor for a dozen years, shoots a lot of the footage using a digital camera. Fridge TV, which debuted last season, is perhaps the most advanced example of a college coach communicating directly with fans through the Internet. Those on the site witness Webcasts of home games and game highlights, pre-game and post-game news conferences, team meetings and locker room exchanges between Friedgen and his players.

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF WASHINGTON POST; BOTTOM PHOTO BY LISA HELFERT

first-year players, so we’ll see how they accept their role,” Suter says. “The seniors really need to step up and take control of the younger kids and make sure everybody’s doing what they’re supposed to do.” Winning a national championship, Suter adds, is something the team would love to accomplish, but “who knows if we can do it this year.Winning the ACC title is definitely on our minds because that would take us to a BCS [Bowl Championship Series] game.We’re not settling for anything less.” TERP TERP SPRING

2004

25


And the Alumni Award Goes to... Before becoming a Hollywood icon, Marion Morrison changed his name to John Wayne, and who could blame him? On the small screen, no one remembers Mendel Berlinger but Milton Berle will always be Mr.TV. A name change might be necessary to win an Oscar or an Emmy but achievement alone, not appellation, determines who will win one of the University of Maryland Alumni Association’s distinguished alumni awards. STORY BY MARK WALDEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CLARK VANDERGRIFT

26

TERP SPRING

2004

LEFT TO RIGHT THIS SPREAD: John Brooks ’70, Visionary Veterinarian; Ruth Davis ’52 M.A., ’55 Ph.D., Pioneering Scientist; Jeffrey and Lily Chen, Science Supporters; Kevin Plank ’97, Sports Apparel Entrepreneur; Linda Alexander ’88 Ph.D., Women’s Health Advocate; Charles Fefferman ’66, ’79 Honorary Ph.D., Fields Medal Winner; Jane McCarl ’52, Devoted Terp; Gina Kolata ’69, ’73 M.A., Award-Winning Author; Norris Krone Jr. ’55, ’74 Ph.D., Aviation Innovator; Susan Fifer Canby ’74 M.L.S., High-Tech Information Manager; Peter Shapiro ’94, Public Service Leader; Richard Stimpson, University Student Advocate. NEXT PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: DeWayne Wickham ’74, Nationally Syndicated Columnist; Kori Schake ’87 M.P.M., ’89 M.A., ’96 Ph.D., White House Advisor; R. Paul Butler ’93 Ph.D., Far-Reaching Astronomer; David Goldfarb ’79, Fortune 500 Executive; Gail BermanMasters ’78, FOX Network President; Edward Downey ’52, Consummate Entrepreneur. Not pictured: Rose Wiseman ’51 M.Ed., Lifelong Educator

TERP SPRING

2004

27


And the Alumni Award Goes to... Before becoming a Hollywood icon, Marion Morrison changed his name to John Wayne, and who could blame him? On the small screen, no one remembers Mendel Berlinger but Milton Berle will always be Mr.TV. A name change might be necessary to win an Oscar or an Emmy but achievement alone, not appellation, determines who will win one of the University of Maryland Alumni Association’s distinguished alumni awards. STORY BY MARK WALDEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CLARK VANDERGRIFT

26

TERP SPRING

2004

LEFT TO RIGHT THIS SPREAD: John Brooks ’70, Visionary Veterinarian; Ruth Davis ’52 M.A., ’55 Ph.D., Pioneering Scientist; Jeffrey and Lily Chen, Science Supporters; Kevin Plank ’97, Sports Apparel Entrepreneur; Linda Alexander ’88 Ph.D., Women’s Health Advocate; Charles Fefferman ’66, ’79 Honorary Ph.D., Fields Medal Winner; Jane McCarl ’52, Devoted Terp; Gina Kolata ’69, ’73 M.A., Award-Winning Author; Norris Krone Jr. ’55, ’74 Ph.D., Aviation Innovator; Susan Fifer Canby ’74 M.L.S., High-Tech Information Manager; Peter Shapiro ’94, Public Service Leader; Richard Stimpson, University Student Advocate. NEXT PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: DeWayne Wickham ’74, Nationally Syndicated Columnist; Kori Schake ’87 M.P.M., ’89 M.A., ’96 Ph.D., White House Advisor; R. Paul Butler ’93 Ph.D., Far-Reaching Astronomer; David Goldfarb ’79, Fortune 500 Executive; Gail BermanMasters ’78, FOX Network President; Edward Downey ’52, Consummate Entrepreneur. Not pictured: Rose Wiseman ’51 M.Ed., Lifelong Educator

TERP SPRING

2004

27


POINT OUT A SHINING STAR Catch shining moments from the 5th Annual Alumni Association Awards Gala on TerpTV.com from the alumni association’s Web site, www.alumni.umd.edu. While there, learn more about this year’s awardees and nominate deserving graduates for 2005 alumni association and college/school distinguished alumni awards. For more information on the nomination process, call 301.403.2728 ext. 17 or 800.336.8627. –MW

28

TERP SPRING

2004

On April 17, 2004, the alumni association recognized six award recipients and 12 college/school distinguished alumni on the fifth anniversary of its annual awards gala. Twenty extraordinary awardees, including journalists, scientists, educators, policy-makers and business leaders, received the praise of a proud alma mater at the sold-out event. Like the Oscars and the Emmys, distinguished alumni awards are presented to individuals who have given master performances in their fields. And like Hollywood’s award ceremonies, the association gala dazzles. Until five years ago, the University of Maryland Alumni Association honored its distinguished alumni in separate ceremonies.The result was a series of small gatherings, rather than the grand commemoration that each awardee deserved. “Television and film each honor their own on a single magnificent night.We needed one outstanding event bringing together Maryland’s shining stars and celebrating their Terrapin spirit,” says Danita Nias ’81, executive director of alumni relations. TERP


in

theloop Building Scholarships for Future Terps NEXT YEAR, Shawn Fickes, an engineering major, will graduate. Family and friends will be cheering; so will his creditors. Fickes, pictured below, has seized every opportunity to finance a top-tier education, working for Shuttle UM and taking out loans. He’s not alone. Maryland’s graduating seniors hold an average debt of more than $20,000. With this fact in mind, the university is hosting a night of entertainment, elegance and infinite possibilities on Sept. 18, 2004. Its purpose: to encourage Maryland family members to support scholarships across campus while swinging to an island beat. Statistics show that the further students progress toward graduation, the harder it is for them to pay for their Maryland education. Average financial aid packages received

by freshmen and juniors are roughly equivalent—around $5,700—but their form shifts over time from majority-scholarship to majority-loan. Fickes has experienced this phenomenon firsthand and has chosen to work more while taking fewer credits—delaying his future and driving down Maryland’s graduation rate. Others in the same position have withdrawn completely, choosing not to take on more debt but diminishing their opportunities and dreams. The scholarship benefit, sponsored by individuals and corporations, will launch initiatives aimed at bolstering the university’s financial aid resources. Current chair of the University of Maryland

Feel the Sizzle: The University of Maryland will host a benefit on Sept. 18, 2004, to encourage scholarship support across campus.

College Park Foundation Board of Trustees Barry Gossett ’58 and future chair John M. Brophy ’71, along with ACS, have each pledged $50,000 to sponsor the Scholarship Benefit. “I feel like I’m giving something back to the community, an opportunity for people … to become better equipped to meet the challenges they will face [after graduation],” says Gossett. Shawn Fickes looks forward to those challenges as he registers for his final classes and signs those last loan forms. —MW

specialGIFTS An alumna who has chosen to remain anonymous has pledged an $8 million planned gift to provide funding for the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, music scholarships, the Art Gallery, and performance and residence funds in the performing arts. Gershon Kekst '56, benefactor of the CIVICUS living-learning program and the Kekst Professor in Civil Society, made a new $300,000 gift in support of the Democracy Collaborative, a multi-campus initiative that promotes civic engagement and democratic practices. A $250,000 pledge from the Green Fund has established the Frances Kelley Green Baltimore Incentive Awards Fund. This endowment will provide perpetual scholarship support for students in the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program.

TOP AND RIGHT PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI, ILLUSTRATION BY MIRA AZARM

Phillip H. Horvitz ’75 established the Phillip H. and Catherine C. Horvitz Professorship in Computer Science, while General Data Systems, which just purchased Horvitz’s own company, pledged $150,000 over the next three years to support the Phillip H. Horvitz Research Fellowship for graduate students in computer science. —PS

On Maryland Day, President Dan Mote welcomed the new class of Baltimore Incentive Award Scholars who will enter Fall 2004.

TERP SPRING

2004

29


play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard Cindy Timchal, the winningest coach in women’s lacrosse history, reaped her 300th career victory as Maryland defeated Quinnipiac, 25–3, at the Lacrosse Complex. Timchal has coached lacrosse for 23 seasons. During her 14 seasons with Maryland, she led the Terps to eight national titles.

ACC Run Is One to Remember

Terrapin players anxiously await a clutch free throw shot during their 95–87 overtime victory against Duke.

How does a team go from sitting on the bubble for an NCAA Tournament bid, to earning an automatic berth and being named a No. 4 seed to the Big Dance—all in the course of a weekend? The answer: go out and win the 51st annual Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament title, knocking off the tournament’s three top-seeded teams along the way. In an exhilarating three days of ACC basketball that will be cherished by Maryland sports fans for years to come, the sixth-seeded Terrapins won their first ACC Tournament title since 1984, capped by a 95–87 overtime victory against top-seeded Duke. Sophomore point guard John Gilchrist led the NET GAINS way in the Terps’ hard-earned wins over Wake Forest, ◗ The Terps overcame a 21-point deficit in their 87–86; N.C. State, 85–82; and the finals victory over semi-final victory over N.C. State, the largest Duke.The 6’3”, 199-lb. Gilchrist—voted the tournacome-from-behind win in ACC Tournament history. ment’s Most Valuable Player—put together a threegame effort that included 72 points, 19 assists, 16 ◗ The men’s team earned a No.4 seed in the NCAA rebounds and six steals. Tournament and advanced to the second round This was the first ACC Tournament champibefore losing to Syracuse, 72-70. onship for Maryland head coach Gary Williams, ◗ The women’s team, under second-year coach who coached the Terps to a national championship Brenda Frese, won an NCAA tournament game in 2002 and an ACC regular-season title in 1995 for the first time in 12 years, advancing to the and 2001. “We worked really hard all year.We lost second round with an upset win over Miami some games, but we never quit,”Williams said in (Fla.) before losing to LSU. post-game ceremonies. “We were getting better as time went on. It showed the last week of the [reg◗ Women’s team freshman Shay Doron set an ular] season with the two wins we had, and [also] NCAA record with 23 completed free throws when we came here and beat the top seeds. It is a during a regular-season game. tremendous accomplishment for the players.” –TV 30

TERP SPRING

2004

A total of 263 Maryland student-athletes representing the university’s 27 varsity sports were named to the Intercollegiate Athletics Honor Roll for the 2003 fall semester. Student-athletes must earn a 3.0 grade-point average or better in a semester to be eligible for the list. The women’s swimming and water polo teams had the most representatives with 35. Freshman Gigi deToll (Culpeper, Va.) won the 100yard butterfly, claiming Maryland’s first individual ACC title of the February meet. Her time of 53.66 is a new school record, surpassing Bridget Mallon’s previous mark of 54.01 set in 2002. The time also automatically qualified her for the NCAA Championship. Mr. Peanut, the iconic legume in top hat and cane, cavorts with a cartoon version of Testudo courtside in advertisements designed to give the aging nut’s products more appeal. The ad campaign also calls for casting votes for the “nuttiest fans” at NCAA schools.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARYLAND ATHLETICS/BRUCE L. SCHWARTZMAN

Back in the Swing He’s a cool cat, with a shock of jet black hair and a black mustache, in black pants and a black leather jacket, as he swings his arm, snaps his fingers and taps his foot, be-bopping rhythmically to the tune of “Happy Blues” at the Jazz Alumni Band rehearsal. Jazz studies director Chris Vadala is just as jazzed to lead this big band as he would be about any other “gig,” as they say in the music biz. Highlighting 1940’s blues and swing hits, this big band is a group of about 20 Maryland jazz band alumni who are able to make it for one afternoon rehearsal to prepare for an annual performance in front of hundreds at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Just as prominent a player in the professional jazz world as he is in the academic one,Vadala was instrumental in adding a master’s in music to the jazz studies program.The specialized degree has grown 10-fold since it began three years ago. Most well-known as a standout woodwind artist with the internationally recognized, Grammy- and Emmy Award-winning jazz group, Chuck Mangione Quartet,Vadala has also performed or recorded with such greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles, Natalie Cole and Henry Mancini. In addition to creating the jazz master’s degree, in the last three years Vadala has made the Jazz Alumni Band performance an annual event. Many of the former students who make it back for the performance (as well as many of those who are unable to) have found professional music careers, directing high school bands, playing in military bands, teaching music and other in performing outlets. “Chris is great—he’s super positive. He’s got a tremendous

amount of energy,” says Brett “Cool cat” Chris Vadala (shown below) is director of the university’s jazz studies Lemley, who graduated with program. He conducts and organizes an a master’s in jazz studies last annual Jazz Alumni Band performance. year. Lemley teaches trumpet lessons and performs in two bands, Blue Sky Five and SingCo. Rhythm Orchestra. Another jazz studies graduate, Leigh Pilzer ’01, who also played with the Jazz Alumni Band this March, first encountered Vadala through their mutual association in the International Association of Jazz Educators. “I think it is really exceptional to have someone like Chris as the head of the jazz studies program,” says Pilzer who performs nationally with a women’s jazz concert ensemble, the Diva Jazz Orchestra. Jazz studies graduates say the program has a strong academic foundation, but is very professionally oriented.“There is a lot of encouragement and educational opportunities,” says Lemley of the program.“It’s very geared toward finding you work.” Despite his busy schedule,Vadala makes his students and former students a high priority. “They are like my musical children,” says Vadala. “It’s a real thrill to have them come back and play. I still feel rather connected.” —SLK

ALL THAT JAZZ The jazz studies program offers two jazz majors. The undergraduate program is a bachelor of arts in music with a jazz emphasis. The graduate degree is a master of music in (instrumental) jazz performance. In addition to participating in performance ensembles, jazz studies students study jazz theory, history and improvisation. Areas of study include jazz piano, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, bass, guitar and jazz drum set.To find out more information about the jazz studies program contact the School of Music Office of Admissions at 301.405.1313. Or go to www.music.umd.edu/jazzstudies/

LEFT PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, TOP BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP SPRING

2004

31


play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard Cindy Timchal, the winningest coach in women’s lacrosse history, reaped her 300th career victory as Maryland defeated Quinnipiac, 25–3, at the Lacrosse Complex. Timchal has coached lacrosse for 23 seasons. During her 14 seasons with Maryland, she led the Terps to eight national titles.

ACC Run Is One to Remember

Terrapin players anxiously await a clutch free throw shot during their 95–87 overtime victory against Duke.

How does a team go from sitting on the bubble for an NCAA Tournament bid, to earning an automatic berth and being named a No. 4 seed to the Big Dance—all in the course of a weekend? The answer: go out and win the 51st annual Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament title, knocking off the tournament’s three top-seeded teams along the way. In an exhilarating three days of ACC basketball that will be cherished by Maryland sports fans for years to come, the sixth-seeded Terrapins won their first ACC Tournament title since 1984, capped by a 95–87 overtime victory against top-seeded Duke. Sophomore point guard John Gilchrist led the NET GAINS way in the Terps’ hard-earned wins over Wake Forest, ◗ The Terps overcame a 21-point deficit in their 87–86; N.C. State, 85–82; and the finals victory over semi-final victory over N.C. State, the largest Duke.The 6’3”, 199-lb. Gilchrist—voted the tournacome-from-behind win in ACC Tournament history. ment’s Most Valuable Player—put together a threegame effort that included 72 points, 19 assists, 16 ◗ The men’s team earned a No.4 seed in the NCAA rebounds and six steals. Tournament and advanced to the second round This was the first ACC Tournament champibefore losing to Syracuse, 72-70. onship for Maryland head coach Gary Williams, ◗ The women’s team, under second-year coach who coached the Terps to a national championship Brenda Frese, won an NCAA tournament game in 2002 and an ACC regular-season title in 1995 for the first time in 12 years, advancing to the and 2001. “We worked really hard all year.We lost second round with an upset win over Miami some games, but we never quit,”Williams said in (Fla.) before losing to LSU. post-game ceremonies. “We were getting better as time went on. It showed the last week of the [reg◗ Women’s team freshman Shay Doron set an ular] season with the two wins we had, and [also] NCAA record with 23 completed free throws when we came here and beat the top seeds. It is a during a regular-season game. tremendous accomplishment for the players.” –TV 30

TERP SPRING

2004

A total of 263 Maryland student-athletes representing the university’s 27 varsity sports were named to the Intercollegiate Athletics Honor Roll for the 2003 fall semester. Student-athletes must earn a 3.0 grade-point average or better in a semester to be eligible for the list. The women’s swimming and water polo teams had the most representatives with 35. Freshman Gigi deToll (Culpeper, Va.) won the 100yard butterfly, claiming Maryland’s first individual ACC title of the February meet. Her time of 53.66 is a new school record, surpassing Bridget Mallon’s previous mark of 54.01 set in 2002. The time also automatically qualified her for the NCAA Championship. Mr. Peanut, the iconic legume in top hat and cane, cavorts with a cartoon version of Testudo courtside in advertisements designed to give the aging nut’s products more appeal. The ad campaign also calls for casting votes for the “nuttiest fans” at NCAA schools.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARYLAND ATHLETICS/BRUCE L. SCHWARTZMAN

Back in the Swing He’s a cool cat, with a shock of jet black hair and a black mustache, in black pants and a black leather jacket, as he swings his arm, snaps his fingers and taps his foot, be-bopping rhythmically to the tune of “Happy Blues” at the Jazz Alumni Band rehearsal. Jazz studies director Chris Vadala is just as jazzed to lead this big band as he would be about any other “gig,” as they say in the music biz. Highlighting 1940’s blues and swing hits, this big band is a group of about 20 Maryland jazz band alumni who are able to make it for one afternoon rehearsal to prepare for an annual performance in front of hundreds at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Just as prominent a player in the professional jazz world as he is in the academic one,Vadala was instrumental in adding a master’s in music to the jazz studies program.The specialized degree has grown 10-fold since it began three years ago. Most well-known as a standout woodwind artist with the internationally recognized, Grammy- and Emmy Award-winning jazz group, Chuck Mangione Quartet,Vadala has also performed or recorded with such greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles, Natalie Cole and Henry Mancini. In addition to creating the jazz master’s degree, in the last three years Vadala has made the Jazz Alumni Band performance an annual event. Many of the former students who make it back for the performance (as well as many of those who are unable to) have found professional music careers, directing high school bands, playing in military bands, teaching music and other in performing outlets. “Chris is great—he’s super positive. He’s got a tremendous

amount of energy,” says Brett “Cool cat” Chris Vadala (shown below) is director of the university’s jazz studies Lemley, who graduated with program. He conducts and organizes an a master’s in jazz studies last annual Jazz Alumni Band performance. year. Lemley teaches trumpet lessons and performs in two bands, Blue Sky Five and SingCo. Rhythm Orchestra. Another jazz studies graduate, Leigh Pilzer ’01, who also played with the Jazz Alumni Band this March, first encountered Vadala through their mutual association in the International Association of Jazz Educators. “I think it is really exceptional to have someone like Chris as the head of the jazz studies program,” says Pilzer who performs nationally with a women’s jazz concert ensemble, the Diva Jazz Orchestra. Jazz studies graduates say the program has a strong academic foundation, but is very professionally oriented.“There is a lot of encouragement and educational opportunities,” says Lemley of the program.“It’s very geared toward finding you work.” Despite his busy schedule,Vadala makes his students and former students a high priority. “They are like my musical children,” says Vadala. “It’s a real thrill to have them come back and play. I still feel rather connected.” —SLK

ALL THAT JAZZ The jazz studies program offers two jazz majors. The undergraduate program is a bachelor of arts in music with a jazz emphasis. The graduate degree is a master of music in (instrumental) jazz performance. In addition to participating in performance ensembles, jazz studies students study jazz theory, history and improvisation. Areas of study include jazz piano, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, bass, guitar and jazz drum set.To find out more information about the jazz studies program contact the School of Music Office of Admissions at 301.405.1313. Or go to www.music.umd.edu/jazzstudies/

LEFT PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, TOP BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP SPRING

2004

31


Interpretations Access to Quality:The Key to the Future

You can find the full reports of the six President’s Task Groups on the Web. ◗ Academic Incentives, Efficiencies and Effectiveness ◗ Administration: Incentives, Efficiencies and Effectiveness ◗ Undergraduate Rates/Success Rates ◗ Financial Planning ◗ Fundraising ◗ Graduate Student Success www.senate.umd.edu/ CampusCrier/PresidentTask GroupsRepts.htm.

32

TERP SPRING

2004

IN MY LAST COLUMN, I urged you to become advocates for this great institution with our state legislators, and many of you responded. The legislators listened, and the university was spared major budget cuts this year. I am pleased to report that the Governor and Maryland General Assembly accelerated full construction funds for a new biosciences research building— our top priority. Our drive to build a great university in partnership with the state, our alumni, and friends continues unabated. This spring has brought us good news, and we have cheered many honors by our faculty. To cite just a few: five faculty in Arts and Humanities won National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, more than from any other institution; our faculty in the Earth Sciences will partner with researchers from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in a new world-class weather prediction center to be built in our research park; and faculty in the Department of Aerospace Engineering won a major NASA award for development of futuristic micro hovering air vehicles. When it comes to the future of our university, each one of us has a critical role to play. State appropriations are a vital component, and faculty productivity keeps our research programs at the forefront. Achieving true leadership will require sustained support by our alumni, friends, the business community, faculty, staff and students—those who care about what the university does and its value to this region and the nation.That is the only way that an institution ever succeeds. The involvement of all stakeholders is more important than ever as universities face a continuing decline in public funding for higher education generally.We are responding to this

national trend by a rigorous examination of the way we do business. Last fall I appointed six task forces to review our effectiveness in building a great university in these times.Their overarching goal was to maximize use of our resources to enhance quality while assuring access for talented students, regardless of their financial means. I am pleased with the scope of the inquiries and the speed and thoroughness with which these task forces responded.They made thoughtful and creative recommendations that have been widely supported across the campus about university financing, undergraduate success, graduate studies, administrative functions, fundraising and academic structure. We have found ways to use technology to process 35 percent more applications without additional staff; we are enacting policies that encourage more students to complete their degrees in four years; and we are exploring tuition models that will allow us to lock in tuition rates for four years for incoming students. Ultimately, whatever changes are implemented, access to a top-flight university will drive our decision-making.We will soon be embarking on a major fundraising campaign to bring our need-based scholarship support to a level appropriate for the University of Maryland in today’s economic climate. The first step in this undertaking will be a Scholarship Benefit this September 18 at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, with a goal of raising more than $1 million. It will be a festive, fun-filled night that showcases our talented students. I urge you to mark your calendar for one “hot, hot, hot” event.

Dan Mote, President

PHOTO BY JEREMY GREENE


Student Loan Rates Plummet! Consolidate today and lock in an incredibly low rate!

To help borrowers take advantage of the falling interest rates on student loans, the University of Maryland Alumni Association has teamed with Nelnet to offer student loan consolidation. Qualifying borrowers who choose to consolidate can lock in a very low rate for the entire life of the loan and dramatically reduce their monthly payment.

Today, eligible borrowers may be able to lock in a fixed interest rate as low as 2.875%.1 Nelnet also offers incentives that reduce the rate even further. By completing and electronically signing a loan application online, borrowers can earn a 1.0% interest rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments.2 In addition, borrowers can get a .25% rate reduction

Consolidate PLUS loans at 4.125%.

for direct debit payments. Together, these benefits can reduce the consolidation loan’s interest rate by another 1.25%!

Nelnet, a national leader in education finance, brings you over two decades

Parent loans for students

of experience funding education. For more information on how you can

are also eligible for

consolidate your student loans, call 1.866.4CONSOL (426.6765) or visit

consolidation. Call

our Web site at www.alumniconsolidation.nelnet.net to learn more.

1.866.4CONSOL to learn more.

1The

consolidation loan interest rate is calculated by taking the weighted average of the rates on the federal loans you are consolidating, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth percent. 2Applicants who complete and electronically sign the loan application online are eligible for the 1% rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments. Borrowers completing applications through the mail are eligible to earn a 1% interest rate reduction after 48 initial, regular, on-time payments. Nelnet reserves the right to modify or terminate the interest rate reduction programs at its discretion without prior notice. Terms described above are in effect as of July 1, 2003. Student loan interest rates adjust every July 1 and remain in effect through June 30 of the following year. Other conditions including the length of repayment are as important as the interest rate when considering whether consolidation is right for you. Your borrower’s rights may change when you consolidate your student loans; please refer to your Borrower Rights and Responsibilities statement or contact a Nelnet Loan Advisor for more information. Nelnet is a trademark of Nelnet, Inc. All rights reserved. To qualify, borrowers must be in repayment or in the grace period with a combined total of at least $7,500 in qualified student loan debt, and less than 90 days delinquent.


Scholarship Benefit SEPTEMBER

18, 2004

Hot,

Hot, Hot!

Can you feel the sizzle? Can you hear the steel drums? Join the University of Maryland family for an evening of entertainment, elegance and infinite possibilities! Please your palate with the zest of exotic spices. Swing to the strains of a saucy island beat. And thrill to the talents of our gifted students—all to benefit our scholarships. If you would like to sponsor a scholarship and join us for this event, please call the Office of Special Events, 301.405.4638.

Division of University Relations College Park, Maryland 20742-8724 Change Service Requested

Printed on Recycled Paper

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 10 College Park, MD

Terp Spring, 2004  

Terp Magazine, University of Maryland

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you