Page 1

c

br ele

ate

TERP

CONNECTING

there’s no better time to be a terp!

THE UNIVERSITY

nn

ec

OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY

t

VOL. 1, NO. 1 FALL 2003

discover our newly hatched magazine. Terp will be your source for connecting with the University of Maryland community three times a year. It’s the place to turn for news about the people, programs and alumni that are relevant to you.

YOU ARE HOLDING

play

homecoming weekend 2003 class of 1953 reunion

Just hatched!

DID YOU KNOW?

OCTOBER 30 – NOVEMBER 1

• On average, there are 13 eggs

Call 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or visit www.alumni.umd.edu. See page 16 for activities!

per clutch (nest), with as many as three clutches per season. • Most nests in Maryland are deposited June through mid-July. • Eggs require 60 to 100 days of warm temperatures to mature. • Sand areas along the tidewater,

Division of University Relations College Park, Maryland 20742-8724 Forwarding Service Requested

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 10 College Park, MD

above the high-tide line, are ideal nesting habitats. However, the persistent terrapin is known to make use of driveways and lawn areas for nesting. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Fear the Turtle merchandise goes to the Fear the Turtle Fund for terrapin conservation.

Please turn flap to see just how Maryland is leading the way.

Keep up with the Terp!

co


S C H O L A R S F U L B R I G H T O F ■ S C O R E S

P H Y S I C S I N

17th among public universities —up from 30th in 1998 68 programs in the Top 25 among public universities 50 programs in the Top 15

Class Act ■ Applications for freshman admission soared from 17,000 in 1998 to 25,000—an amazing 47% increase. In fact, six students applied for every spot in the Fall 2003 entering class.

N O B E L ■ O N E

W I N N E R S P R I Z E

Brodie Remington Vice President, University Relations

J. Paul Carey ’82 MBA CEO, Enumerate Terry Flannery ’83, ’87 M.Ed., ’95 Ph.D. Executive Director, University Marketing and Communications John Girouard ’81 President and CEO, Capital Asset Management Group Anil Gupta Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Strategy and Organization, Robert H. Smith School of Business Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations Vicki Rymer ’61, ’66 MBA, ’83 Ph.D. Teaching Professor, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Lee Thornton Professor and Eaton Chair, Philip Merrill College of Journalism MAGAZINE STAFF

Dianne Burch Executive Editor

Jennifer Paul ’93 Art Director

Research Matters

Jason Quick Senior Designer

■ Federally supported research revenue

rose 61.5% from $140M in FY98 to $225M in FY03. Total sponsored research and outreach revenue for FY03: $315 million.

61.5% $225M

$140M FY ’98

FY ’03

Rising Terp Pride ■ Membership in the Maryland Alumni

Association has grown by 35 percent in the past five years.

FY ’98

23,000 FY ’03

31,000

Annual donors nearly doubled in the past five years.

FY ’98

FY ’03

21,000

41,000

Consolidate today and lock in an incredibly low rate!

ADVISORY BOARD

John T. Consoli ’86 Creative Director

M

Student Loan Rates Plummet!

PUBLISHER

Beth A. Morgen Managing Editor

P U L I T Z E R S I X

Stellar Faculty

TERP

Keith Scroggins ’79 Bureau Head of General Services, City of Baltimore, Dept. of Public Works

P R I Z E

W I N N E R

The University of Maryland is on the path to meet its destiny.We’re drawing top-notch faculty, attracting the brightest students around and investing in the quality of our academic programs.There’s no question, we are now a collegiate force to reckon with on a national basis. But if you think that’s all we’re destined to accomplish, then you don’t know your Terrapins. Fear the Turtle.

Tom Ventsias Writer Daniel Cusick Sofia Kosmetatos Michael Richman ’84, ’85 Beth Workman Contributing Writers Mike D’Angelo Stacy L. Kaper Robin Lundberg Magazine Interns E-mail terp_alum@umail.umd.edu Terp magazine is published by the Division of University Relations. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Send correspondence to Beth Morgen, Managing Editor, Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or, send an email to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. The University of Maryland, College Park, is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. University policies, programs and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

To help borrowers take advantage of the falling interest rates on student loans,

Dear Alumni and Friends,

the University of Maryland Alumni Association has teamed with Nelnet to offer student loan consolidation. Qualifying borrowers who choose to consolidate

WELCOME TO THE FIRST ISSUE of

Terp. Before we moved forward with this new magazine, we carefully considered what people like in publications today and tried to build that into Terp. The result is a magazine that is all about connecting you to the Maryland community while keeping your needs—and your busy lives—in mind. We strove to keep articles shorter, to direct you to information quickly and to cover topics that are relevant to you and your family. For instance, the information in “The Source” on page 6 focuses on university resources that you can tap. I highly recommend the Suzuki violin lessons featured in this department. As working parents, my husband, Michael, and I are always looking for engaging and convenient activities for our threeyear-old.These lessons, taught just across campus from the alumni association headquarters, give us quality time with our son, James.We learn something new since parents are asked to participate. Plus, students in the School of Music teach the classes. In addition to “The Source,” Terp highlights faculty research, alumni news and programs, Maryland history and much more. In “M-File,” starting on page 12, meet Maryland faculty who are leading research on voter technology, building a digital library of children’s books and preparing to visit a comet. Learn about the achievements of fellow alumni—from an architect turned furniture designer to a football player turned clothing designer—in

can lock in a very low rate for the entire life of the loan and dramatically reduce their monthly payment.

Today, eligible borrowers may be able to lock in a fixed interest rate as low as 2.875%.1 Nelnet also offers incentives that reduce the rate even further. By completing and electronically signing a loan application online, “Class Act” on page 8. Do you know when the first football game was played at Maryland? See “Ask Anne” on page 7 to test your knowledge of university history. The features in Terp offer readers insight into the university’s role in homeland security, the changing face of philanthropy and an equestrian program that is just out of the starting gate. For a snapshot of upcoming events on campus, look no further than “Maryland Live” in the magazine’s center. I hope that Terp becomes one of your favorite magazines and that it will reinforce your pride in the University of Maryland.There is truly “no better time to be a Terp.” This new magazine is one of the reasons why.

Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations

borrowers can earn a 1.0% interest rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments.2 In addition, borrowers can get a .25% rate reduction

Consolidate PLUS loans at 4.125%.

for direct debit payments. Together, these benefits can reduce the consolidation loan’s interest rate by another 1.25%!

Nelnet, a national leader in education finance, brings you over two decades

Parent loans for students

of experience funding education. For more information on how you can

are also eligible for

consolidate your student loans, call 1.866.4CONSOL (426.6765) or visit

consolidation. Call

our Web site at www.alumniconsolidation.nelnet.net to learn more.

1.866.4CONSOL to learn more.

1The consolidation loan interest rate is calculated by taking the weighted average of the rates on the federal loans you are consolidating, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth percent. 2Applicants who complete and electronically sign the loan application online are eligible for the 1% rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments. Borrowers completing applications through the mail are eligible to earn a 1% interest rate reduction after 48 initial, regular, on-time payments. Nelnet reserves the right to modify or terminate the interest rate reduction programs at its discretion without prior notice. Terms described above are in effect as of July 1, 2003. Student loan interest rates adjust every July 1 and remain in effect through June 30 of the following year. Other conditions including the length of repayment are as important as the interest rate when considering whether consolidation is right for you. Your borrower’s rights may change when you consolidate your student loans; please refer to your Borrower Rights and Responsibilities statement or contact a Nelnet Loan Advisor for more information. Nelnet is a trademark of Nelnet, Inc. All rights reserved.

To qualify, borrowers must be in repayment or in the grace period with a combined total of at least $7,500 in qualified student loan debt, and less than 90 days delinquent.


2 BIG PICTURE Scholarships count; Maryland’s been Googled; we’re having a growth spurt; Mote marks five years; M-Square is coming; and more 6 THE SOURCE Perks for Terps 7 ASK ANNE Our archivist knows the origins of the Victory Song and so much more 8 CLASS ACT Alumnus is a pro at keeping cool; McCarthy’s secret sessions revealed; architecture grad is winning designer; and more 12 M-FILE Largest children’s digital library; multicultural matters; don’t worry be happy; send your name to space; vote for a better ballot; and more 16 MARYLAND LIVE Homecoming excitement, First Year Book Program; Kaleidoscope of Bands and more 29 IN THE LOOP Special gifts and elections to boards 30 PLAY-BY-PLAY Straight talk from Yow; Scorecard for fans 31 SPOTLGHT The National Symphony Orchestra and School of Music make beautiful music together 32 INTERPRETATIONS President Mote discusses the university at a crossroads

departments

features18

22 IT’S NOT JUST HORSIN’ AROUND

Modern science meets Maryland’s agrarian roots in a new equine studies program. BY TOM VENTSIAS

MEET THE ENGAGED PHILANTHROPIST

An emerging type of higher education donor is driven by a belief that philanthropy is not so much about gift-giving as it is about solving problems. BY DANIEL CUSICK

26

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: A FRONT LINE FOR

HOMELAND SECURITY

Maryland’s researchers are addressing homeland security through a bevy of prestigious programs in public affairs, the sciences and technology. BY MICHAEL RICHMAN COVER PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; PHOTOS THESE PAGES BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP


bigpicture We’ve Been “

Searching for a recap of the latest Terp victory? Need information on continuing education programs? Looking for directions to campus? Look no further than the university’s new home page. The revamped page proudly features the Google Search Appliance. The university is the first academic institution to incorporate the appliance.

Googled”

HAVE YOU GOOGLED lately? Now it’s Maryland’s turn, as the first university to be officially Googled. Sergey Brin ’93, Google™ co-founder and Maryland alumnus, has granted a gift that keeps on giving—or searching—namely, a free Google Search Appliance for use on the university’s Web site. The two-year gift valued at $28,000 is certain to make Maryland’s new home page even more user friendly for the more than 60,000 visitors who click on the site daily. The new home page launched this fall supports far more information than the old home page and includes 700,000 Web pages. “Google is certainly far and away the best search engine in the world,” says Stephen Halperin, dean of the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences (CMPS). While the Google Search Appliance will continue many of the applications of the previous search engine, a signifi-

cant distinction is in the ordering of the search results. “Google tends to sort the search results in a way that places the most relevant documents at the top of the list better than many other search engines,” says David Henry, director of technical architecture at Maryland. Maintaining tight-knit ties to his alma mater, Brin is on the CMPS Board of Visitors and is the son of Maryland math professor, Michael Brin. —SLK

BY THE Numbers SUPERIOR STUDENTS, a growing academic reputation and the work of the university’s fouryear-old National Scholarships Office (NSO) are putting more prestigious national and international scholarships in the hands of Maryland students than ever before. Consider the numbers. In 1999, with no NSO, there were 11 winners of six scholarships. In 2003, with help from the NSO, there was almost a five-time jump—more than 50 Maryland winners and finalists for 28 top-ranked awards. But it’s not just about quantity.The quality of the scholarships is rising to the top, too: THE NSO IS LOOKING FOR

“We expect to teach everything that is taught in the best Universities and in addition to those branches we shall require every student to learn Scientific and practical agriculture and mechanics which of course will require him to engage at certain hours in all the outdoor operations of the farm and work shops.”

EXCERPT:

Rare Letter Outlines Founder’s Vision ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS OF CHARLES BENEDICT CALVERT are uncommon, so when this correspon-

dence written by Maryland’s founder in 1858 came to the attention of the University of Maryland Libraries, the libraries wasted no time in authenticating and acquiring it. The letter was purchased from a manuscripts dealer, using monies from the R. Lee and Evelyn Y. Hornbake Fund. The fund was established in 1998 by the late Lee Hornbake—university professor of industrial education, dean of the faculty and vice president for academic affairs—and portions of the fund go toward special collections purchases. In the letter to Mr. J.C. Nicholson Esq., Calvert describes his vision for “an institution superior to any other,” an institution that by 1859 would become the Maryland Agricultural College, the original name of the University of Maryland, College Park, campus.

2

TERP FALL

2003

PAINTING COURTESY OF RIVERSDALE MANSION; LETTER COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

$50,000

Jack Kent Cooke Scholarships — worth $50,000 each Four Maryland seniors won this year. Only 43 given in entire country.

2

Fulbright Student Grant—two, plus one alternate

2 out of 300

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship—two Maryland winners out of only 300 nationwide

2 finalists

Rhodes Scholarship—a national and a regional finalist

1 finalist

Truman Scholarship—one national finalist

MARYLAND ALUMNI to mentor scholarship applicants, including conducting mock interviews, serving on selection panels and sharing their own scholarship experiences.

To volunteer as a scholarship mentor, contact Camille Stillwell at cstillwe@deans. umd.edu or 301.314.1289. For a list of the 2003 University of Maryland scholarship winners, visit the NSO Web site at www.umd.edu/nso

NSO coordinator Camille Stillwell says her office’s goal is to “cultivate a campus culture where applying for and winning national scholarships becomes the thing to do. “We’ve got all the ingredients to establish a winning tradition in the national scholarship race,” says Stillwell.“Outstanding students, dedicated faculty mentors and world-class programs.” —ET

TERP FALL

2003

3


bigpicture We’ve Been “

Searching for a recap of the latest Terp victory? Need information on continuing education programs? Looking for directions to campus? Look no further than the university’s new home page. The revamped page proudly features the Google Search Appliance. The university is the first academic institution to incorporate the appliance.

Googled”

HAVE YOU GOOGLED lately? Now it’s Maryland’s turn, as the first university to be officially Googled. Sergey Brin ’93, Google™ co-founder and Maryland alumnus, has granted a gift that keeps on giving—or searching—namely, a free Google Search Appliance for use on the university’s Web site. The two-year gift valued at $28,000 is certain to make Maryland’s new home page even more user friendly for the more than 60,000 visitors who click on the site daily. The new home page launched this fall supports far more information than the old home page and includes 700,000 Web pages. “Google is certainly far and away the best search engine in the world,” says Stephen Halperin, dean of the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences (CMPS). While the Google Search Appliance will continue many of the applications of the previous search engine, a signifi-

cant distinction is in the ordering of the search results. “Google tends to sort the search results in a way that places the most relevant documents at the top of the list better than many other search engines,” says David Henry, director of technical architecture at Maryland. Maintaining tight-knit ties to his alma mater, Brin is on the CMPS Board of Visitors and is the son of Maryland math professor, Michael Brin. —SLK

BY THE Numbers SUPERIOR STUDENTS, a growing academic reputation and the work of the university’s fouryear-old National Scholarships Office (NSO) are putting more prestigious national and international scholarships in the hands of Maryland students than ever before. Consider the numbers. In 1999, with no NSO, there were 11 winners of six scholarships. In 2003, with help from the NSO, there was almost a five-time jump—more than 50 Maryland winners and finalists for 28 top-ranked awards. But it’s not just about quantity.The quality of the scholarships is rising to the top, too: THE NSO IS LOOKING FOR

“We expect to teach everything that is taught in the best Universities and in addition to those branches we shall require every student to learn Scientific and practical agriculture and mechanics which of course will require him to engage at certain hours in all the outdoor operations of the farm and work shops.”

EXCERPT:

Rare Letter Outlines Founder’s Vision ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS OF CHARLES BENEDICT CALVERT are uncommon, so when this correspon-

dence written by Maryland’s founder in 1858 came to the attention of the University of Maryland Libraries, the libraries wasted no time in authenticating and acquiring it. The letter was purchased from a manuscripts dealer, using monies from the R. Lee and Evelyn Y. Hornbake Fund. The fund was established in 1998 by the late Lee Hornbake—university professor of industrial education, dean of the faculty and vice president for academic affairs—and portions of the fund go toward special collections purchases. In the letter to Mr. J.C. Nicholson Esq., Calvert describes his vision for “an institution superior to any other,” an institution that by 1859 would become the Maryland Agricultural College, the original name of the University of Maryland, College Park, campus.

2

TERP FALL

2003

PAINTING COURTESY OF RIVERSDALE MANSION; LETTER COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

$50,000

Jack Kent Cooke Scholarships — worth $50,000 each Four Maryland seniors won this year. Only 43 given in entire country.

2

Fulbright Student Grant—two, plus one alternate

2 out of 300

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship—two Maryland winners out of only 300 nationwide

2 finalists

Rhodes Scholarship—a national and a regional finalist

1 finalist

Truman Scholarship—one national finalist

MARYLAND ALUMNI to mentor scholarship applicants, including conducting mock interviews, serving on selection panels and sharing their own scholarship experiences.

To volunteer as a scholarship mentor, contact Camille Stillwell at cstillwe@deans. umd.edu or 301.314.1289. For a list of the 2003 University of Maryland scholarship winners, visit the NSO Web site at www.umd.edu/nso

NSO coordinator Camille Stillwell says her office’s goal is to “cultivate a campus culture where applying for and winning national scholarships becomes the thing to do. “We’ve got all the ingredients to establish a winning tradition in the national scholarship race,” says Stillwell.“Outstanding students, dedicated faculty mentors and world-class programs.” —ET

TERP FALL

2003

3


bigpicture

GROWTH spurt

I

5

magine being able to water plants from your PDA. How about a building whose window glass will actually teach students about heat transfer. Or an alumni center that will sit at the hub of university activities. The projects below are ways the Maryland campus is growing to stand tall among its peers.

Mote Marks Five Years

IN 1998, C.D. (DAN) MOTE JR. assumed leader-

Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Status: Breaking ground. Where: Across from Byrd Stadium and the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Size: 69,000 sq. ft. Focus: Gathering place for visiting alumni; alumni association headquarters. Features: 500-seat Alumni Hall, Maryland Club, Moxley Gardens, Rever Alumni Hall of Fame. Funding: Leadership gift from the late Samuel Riggs IV ’50. Additional private support still needed. Contact: Brian Shook, Alumni Programs, 301.405.3375

breaking ground

ship at the University of Maryland. He arrived with a mission in mind: to raise Maryland into the uppermost tier of public research universities. Today, the state’s flagship university is indeed in the national spotlight. Under President Mote’s leadership, the university has attracted talented students—the incoming freshman class average GPA jumped from 3.5 in 1998 to 3.9 in 2003. The Maryland community has supported the university’s achievements with the number of annual donors increasing from 21,000 to 41,000 in the past five years. Opportunities like Maryland Day showcase the university’s excellence. Dan, and his wife, Patsy, are the inspiration behind Maryland’s annual open house, which they have hosted each spring since their arrival to campus. Save the date, Saturday, April 24, for Maryland Day 2004.

Dan Mote greets some of the 60,000 visitors at Maryland Day 2002 to “explore our world.”

Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building

Status: Under construction. Where: North campus near the A.V. Williams and Potomac buildings. Size: 160,000 sq. ft. Focus: Multidisciplinary research and education Features: The building itself will be an “engineering laboratory.” Funding: Endowment from Jeong H. Kim ’91 Ph.D. Public funding from state of Maryland. Additional private support still needed. Contact: Dennis McClellan, A. James Clark School of Engineering, 301.405.0317

growing

Research Greenhouse Complex

HIGH FIVE

Whether in the classroom, the research laboratory, or on the playing field, success has become synonymous with being a Terrapin. The results are measurable. In the past five years:

Status: Completed in September 2003. Where: Just north of the Comcast Center. Size: 74,000 sq. ft. Focus: Research in plant science. Features: Remote control of greenhouse functions, fully equipped laboratory space, weather station supplied with computerized control of environmental conditions. Funding: Primarily from a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant. Additional funding from state of Maryland. Contact: John Korns, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, 301.405.6913

U.S. News & World Report now places the university as the 17th best public university in the nation, up from 30th five years ago.

Maryland boasts 50 academic programs ranked in the top 15, up from 14 in 1998.

Some 40 percent of first-year students take advantage of living-learning programs that combine Ivy League quality with the advantages of a big research university.

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center is the best facility of its kind on a college campus, and the Comcast Center is the premiere college basketball venue in the nation.

The university completed its largest ever fundraising campaign, Bold Vision • Bright Future, in June 2002 with $476 million, 30 percent above the goal.

New and expanded facilities include the Robert H. Smith School of Business’ high-tech wing in Van Munching Hall and the Computer Science Instructional Center in the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

The athletics program, ranked among the top 25 in the Sears Cup, captured the 2002 NCAA national men’s basketball championship and the 2001 ACC football title. In the 2002–03 academic year, 280 student athletes earned Intercollegiate Honor Roll status.

For more on Maryland’s momentum, see the inside flap of the magazine’s cover.

M Square Moves Forward

T

he long-anticipated University of Maryland Enterprise Campus, a new research park known as M Square, is closer to reality since Gov. Robert Ehrlich’s approval this past summer of $5 million in state funding to assist n n in its development. Advantages to the research park’s future S Q UA R E tenants abound:

M

◗ Enhanced Synergy— Opportunities for the university to connect faculty and students with large and small in the private and S Qcompanies UARE public sectors to facilitate a growing knowledge economy ◗ Prime Location—A 115-acre research park adjacent to the University of Maryland/College Park Metro ◗ Good Neighbors—American Center for Physics, NASA Goddard Flight Space Center, National Institutes of Health, Riggs Bank Technology Center and U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant and Animal Sciences (to name just a few) ◗ Ongoing Research—An example: Maryland researchers are leading NASA’s Deep Impact Project that will punch a crater deep into a speeding comet. ◗ Sound Investment—Nearly 5,000 new jobs, nearly 3 million square feet of development potential, more than $500 million in construction contracts For more information, contact the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at 301.405.4175, or visit www.umresearch.umd.edu.

completed 4

TERP FALL

2003

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING PROVIDED BY HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN, ARCHITECT; PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2003

5


bigpicture

GROWTH spurt

I

5

magine being able to water plants from your PDA. How about a building whose window glass will actually teach students about heat transfer. Or an alumni center that will sit at the hub of university activities. The projects below are ways the Maryland campus is growing to stand tall among its peers.

Mote Marks Five Years

IN 1998, C.D. (DAN) MOTE JR. assumed leader-

Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Status: Breaking ground. Where: Across from Byrd Stadium and the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Size: 69,000 sq. ft. Focus: Gathering place for visiting alumni; alumni association headquarters. Features: 500-seat Alumni Hall, Maryland Club, Moxley Gardens, Rever Alumni Hall of Fame. Funding: Leadership gift from the late Samuel Riggs IV ’50. Additional private support still needed. Contact: Brian Shook, Alumni Programs, 301.405.3375

breaking ground

ship at the University of Maryland. He arrived with a mission in mind: to raise Maryland into the uppermost tier of public research universities. Today, the state’s flagship university is indeed in the national spotlight. Under President Mote’s leadership, the university has attracted talented students—the incoming freshman class average GPA jumped from 3.5 in 1998 to 3.9 in 2003. The Maryland community has supported the university’s achievements with the number of annual donors increasing from 21,000 to 41,000 in the past five years. Opportunities like Maryland Day showcase the university’s excellence. Dan, and his wife, Patsy, are the inspiration behind Maryland’s annual open house, which they have hosted each spring since their arrival to campus. Save the date, Saturday, April 24, for Maryland Day 2004.

Dan Mote greets some of the 60,000 visitors at Maryland Day 2002 to “explore our world.”

Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building

Status: Under construction. Where: North campus near the A.V. Williams and Potomac buildings. Size: 160,000 sq. ft. Focus: Multidisciplinary research and education Features: The building itself will be an “engineering laboratory.” Funding: Endowment from Jeong H. Kim ’91 Ph.D. Public funding from state of Maryland. Additional private support still needed. Contact: Dennis McClellan, A. James Clark School of Engineering, 301.405.0317

growing

Research Greenhouse Complex

HIGH FIVE

Whether in the classroom, the research laboratory, or on the playing field, success has become synonymous with being a Terrapin. The results are measurable. In the past five years:

Status: Completed in September 2003. Where: Just north of the Comcast Center. Size: 74,000 sq. ft. Focus: Research in plant science. Features: Remote control of greenhouse functions, fully equipped laboratory space, weather station supplied with computerized control of environmental conditions. Funding: Primarily from a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant. Additional funding from state of Maryland. Contact: John Korns, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, 301.405.6913

U.S. News & World Report now places the university as the 17th best public university in the nation, up from 30th five years ago.

Maryland boasts 50 academic programs ranked in the top 15, up from 14 in 1998.

Some 40 percent of first-year students take advantage of living-learning programs that combine Ivy League quality with the advantages of a big research university.

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center is the best facility of its kind on a college campus, and the Comcast Center is the premiere college basketball venue in the nation.

The university completed its largest ever fundraising campaign, Bold Vision • Bright Future, in June 2002 with $476 million, 30 percent above the goal.

New and expanded facilities include the Robert H. Smith School of Business’ high-tech wing in Van Munching Hall and the Computer Science Instructional Center in the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

The athletics program, ranked among the top 25 in the Sears Cup, captured the 2002 NCAA national men’s basketball championship and the 2001 ACC football title. In the 2002–03 academic year, 280 student athletes earned Intercollegiate Honor Roll status.

For more on Maryland’s momentum, see the inside flap of the magazine’s cover.

M Square Moves Forward

T

he long-anticipated University of Maryland Enterprise Campus, a new research park known as M Square, is closer to reality since Gov. Robert Ehrlich’s approval this past summer of $5 million in state funding to assist n n in its development. Advantages to the research park’s future S Q UA R E tenants abound:

M

◗ Enhanced Synergy— Opportunities for the university to connect faculty and students with large and small in the private and S Qcompanies UARE public sectors to facilitate a growing knowledge economy ◗ Prime Location—A 115-acre research park adjacent to the University of Maryland/College Park Metro ◗ Good Neighbors—American Center for Physics, NASA Goddard Flight Space Center, National Institutes of Health, Riggs Bank Technology Center and U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant and Animal Sciences (to name just a few) ◗ Ongoing Research—An example: Maryland researchers are leading NASA’s Deep Impact Project that will punch a crater deep into a speeding comet. ◗ Sound Investment—Nearly 5,000 new jobs, nearly 3 million square feet of development potential, more than $500 million in construction contracts For more information, contact the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at 301.405.4175, or visit www.umresearch.umd.edu.

completed 4

TERP FALL

2003

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING PROVIDED BY HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN, ARCHITECT; PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2003

5


the Source

ask Anne

MORE THAN CURRENT STUDENTS CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ALL THAT THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY HAS TO OFFER. MARYLAND HAS PLENTY OF RESOURCES FOR TERPS YOUNG AND OLD.

cannon shot when Maryland scores at a football game? Q. Why is a

Anne Turkos came to the University of Maryland in 1985, and

Be Fit, Have Fun

Learn the Language of Music What’s offered: Suzuki violin lessons to youngsters provided through the School of Music. The method is taken from the work of Shinichi Suzuki, a master violin teacher and founder of the Talent Education Movement in Japan. Who it benefits: Children ages 3 to 7. Perks: Parents learn, too, since at least one parent must attend the lessons.

What’s offered: Fitness classes, personal trainers, weights, cardiovascular equipment, indoor and outdoor pools, a 60-foot climbing wall and more. Who it benefits: Members of the alumni association are eligible to join the Campus Recreation Center and enjoy full membership benefits for $390 per year. Perks: Saunas, Sneakers Café, racquetball and squash courts, and outdoor rental equipment including canoes, kayaks and tents.

A. The cannon shot is a 43-year-old tradition, according to Leland (Twink) Starr, an 83-year-old Naval Ordnance Lab retiree. He has been involved with this activity since 1960, when the football coaches wanted a dramatic signal that the game was about to begin. The cannon, actually called a “Lyle gun,” weighs 300 pounds and shoots a .32 caliber blank cartridge which ignites three ounces of black powder. A crew of six mans the gun, to ensure that all safety precautions are followed for each scoring celebration.

Master’s Degrees from your PC What’s offered: From the College of Life Sciences, an online, content-based master’s program for high school sci-

Better than Spell Check

ence teachers. The program

What’s offered: Maryland’s

provides an education in cur-

Grammar Hotline answers

rent research in biological, bio-

punctuation, style, word choice

chemical and biomedical sci-

and other writing-related ques-

ences. An online chemistry pro-

tions. Past callers have includ-

gram also began this fall.

ed business professionals, doc-

Who it benefits: Those with

tors, attorneys and even

suitable biology or chemistry

employees at the State House

backgrounds who wish to

in Annapolis.

extend their education.

Who it benefits: Those with a

Perks: Coursework can be com-

grammar quandary.

pleted in less than three years.

Perks: Trained tutors equipped with on-hand resources provide grammar support and logical reasoning that spelling and grammar check tools lack.

HOT LINE SUZUKI VIOLIN 301.405.8347 www.arhu.umd.edu/outreach/programs/pre-k.html CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES 301.226.4500 www.crs.umd.edu

since 1993 she has been the university’s archivist. An “adopted Terp,” she takes pride in wearing Terp accessories every day and her office is filled with literally hundreds of Terp paraphernalia. A native of Maryland, Turkos enjoys getting the “common person interested in the state and its flagship univer-

Q. Who wrote the “Victory Song?”

Q. When was football first played at Maryland?

sity.” Questions for Anne Turkos may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

A. Thornton W. Allen wrote

the words and music for the Maryland “Victory Song.” Allen, a nationally known composer of college songs, received a commission to write a football tune for the university in 1928, and “Victory Song” was the result. The chorus, which begins “Maryland, we’re all behind you/Raise high the black and gold,” is the most familiar part of this composition. The full text may be found in a small pamphlet titled “Songs and Cheers,” published by Allen in the late 1920s, and is available in Hornbake Library’s Maryland Room.

A. Maryland fielded its first football team in

1892. Under head coach Will Skinner, the cadets unfortunately did not score a single point in their three games that season, losing to St. John’s College (50-0), Johns Hopkins University (62-0) and even to Episcopal High School (16-0).

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP 301.405.4678 800.336.8627 www.alumni.umd.edu MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCE DEGREE www.life.umd.edu/grad/mlfsc GRAMMAR HOTLINE 301.405.3787 M-Th, 9 a.m–4 p.m; F., 9 a.m.–2 p.m., eve. hours M., 5 p.m.–8 p.m.

6

TERP FALL

2003

LEFT PHOTO BY PHOTODISK; INSIDE PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TOP RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; LEFT AND BOTTOM PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

TERP FALL

2003

7


the Source

ask Anne

MORE THAN CURRENT STUDENTS CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ALL THAT THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY HAS TO OFFER. MARYLAND HAS PLENTY OF RESOURCES FOR TERPS YOUNG AND OLD.

cannon shot when Maryland scores at a football game? Q. Why is a

Anne Turkos came to the University of Maryland in 1985, and

Be Fit, Have Fun

Learn the Language of Music What’s offered: Suzuki violin lessons to youngsters provided through the School of Music. The method is taken from the work of Shinichi Suzuki, a master violin teacher and founder of the Talent Education Movement in Japan. Who it benefits: Children ages 3 to 7. Perks: Parents learn, too, since at least one parent must attend the lessons.

What’s offered: Fitness classes, personal trainers, weights, cardiovascular equipment, indoor and outdoor pools, a 60-foot climbing wall and more. Who it benefits: Members of the alumni association are eligible to join the Campus Recreation Center and enjoy full membership benefits for $390 per year. Perks: Saunas, Sneakers Café, racquetball and squash courts, and outdoor rental equipment including canoes, kayaks and tents.

A. The cannon shot is a 43-year-old tradition, according to Leland (Twink) Starr, an 83-year-old Naval Ordnance Lab retiree. He has been involved with this activity since 1960, when the football coaches wanted a dramatic signal that the game was about to begin. The cannon, actually called a “Lyle gun,” weighs 300 pounds and shoots a .32 caliber blank cartridge which ignites three ounces of black powder. A crew of six mans the gun, to ensure that all safety precautions are followed for each scoring celebration.

Master’s Degrees from your PC What’s offered: From the College of Life Sciences, an online, content-based master’s program for high school sci-

Better than Spell Check

ence teachers. The program

What’s offered: Maryland’s

provides an education in cur-

Grammar Hotline answers

rent research in biological, bio-

punctuation, style, word choice

chemical and biomedical sci-

and other writing-related ques-

ences. An online chemistry pro-

tions. Past callers have includ-

gram also began this fall.

ed business professionals, doc-

Who it benefits: Those with

tors, attorneys and even

suitable biology or chemistry

employees at the State House

backgrounds who wish to

in Annapolis.

extend their education.

Who it benefits: Those with a

Perks: Coursework can be com-

grammar quandary.

pleted in less than three years.

Perks: Trained tutors equipped with on-hand resources provide grammar support and logical reasoning that spelling and grammar check tools lack.

HOT LINE SUZUKI VIOLIN 301.405.8347 www.arhu.umd.edu/outreach/programs/pre-k.html CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES 301.226.4500 www.crs.umd.edu

since 1993 she has been the university’s archivist. An “adopted Terp,” she takes pride in wearing Terp accessories every day and her office is filled with literally hundreds of Terp paraphernalia. A native of Maryland, Turkos enjoys getting the “common person interested in the state and its flagship univer-

Q. Who wrote the “Victory Song?”

Q. When was football first played at Maryland?

sity.” Questions for Anne Turkos may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

A. Thornton W. Allen wrote

the words and music for the Maryland “Victory Song.” Allen, a nationally known composer of college songs, received a commission to write a football tune for the university in 1928, and “Victory Song” was the result. The chorus, which begins “Maryland, we’re all behind you/Raise high the black and gold,” is the most familiar part of this composition. The full text may be found in a small pamphlet titled “Songs and Cheers,” published by Allen in the late 1920s, and is available in Hornbake Library’s Maryland Room.

A. Maryland fielded its first football team in

1892. Under head coach Will Skinner, the cadets unfortunately did not score a single point in their three games that season, losing to St. John’s College (50-0), Johns Hopkins University (62-0) and even to Episcopal High School (16-0).

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP 301.405.4678 800.336.8627 www.alumni.umd.edu MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCE DEGREE www.life.umd.edu/grad/mlfsc GRAMMAR HOTLINE 301.405.3787 M-Th, 9 a.m–4 p.m; F., 9 a.m.–2 p.m., eve. hours M., 5 p.m.–8 p.m.

6

TERP FALL

2003

LEFT PHOTO BY PHOTODISK; INSIDE PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TOP RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; LEFT AND BOTTOM PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

TERP FALL

2003

7


classact

alumniprofile

Going to the Chapel

Plank Is One Cool Entrepreneur

MEMORIAL CHAPEL was constructed in 1952 to honor the men and women from the university who lost their lives during the country’s wars.

FORMER MARYLAND FOOTBALL special teams captain Kevin Plank ’97 (left),

travel 2004 Alumni College in Provence February 17–25

1 The Class of 1951 donated all of

Immerse yourself in the rich cul-

the chapel’s brass, including altarpieces, candelabra and candlesticks, bookstands and vases. The Nairn family funded the restoration of the brass in 2001. Roland “Lefty” Nairn Jr. ’51 (former head football manager) and his wife, Ann, were married in the chapel in 1953.

tural ambiance of sun-drenched Provence—an enchanting land of dazzling light, olive groves and vineyards.

2 Since 1953, Memorial Chapel has been the setting for close to 8,000 weddings, most of them for couples who met at Maryland.

Cruise the Amazon February 21–29 In this prime “high water” season, experience the comfort and adven-

3 The chimes and the clock face

ture aboard an Amazonian expedi-

were restored, thanks to a gift from the Class of 1992. The Class of 1997’s gift was work on the courtyard on the west side of the chapel.

tion-style ship. Alumni College in Greece

is the entrepreneur behind Under Armour, the hot sports apparel company that produces gear designed to keep athletes cool. Plank came up with the idea for the clothing during his senior year at Maryland when he grew tired of repeatedly changing out of Jason Taylor his sweat-drenched clothing during games. from the Miami Dolphins After spending a year testing out fabrics on former footsports Under ball teammates, Plank began producing a lightweight, tightArmour gear. fitting, synthetic undershirt that pulls moisture off the skin and evaporates quickly from the material’s surface, keeping the player cooler and less weighed down. Initially operating his business from his grandmother’s basement in Washington, today Plank has six different product lines established for particular seasons and sports. He was named the Small Business Administration’s 2001 Young Entrepreneur of the Year for the state of Maryland and the mid-Atlantic region. Baltimore-based Under Armour has become the official supplier of performance apparel to Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, the U.S. Ski Team and the National Hockey League. —SLK

May 14–23 Poros, with its terra cotta-topped white buildings, is the perfect

4 According to Julie Luce, chapel

art, architecture and culture of ancient Greece. Alumni College in Chianti in a Tuscan Villa May 30–June 6 With its vineyards, hilltop castles and cypress trees, Chianti is

5 The playing of the Alma Mater every hour by the chapel’s chimes can be heard throughout campus. For complete information on scheduling the chapel for a wedding, visit www.umd.edu/weddings. For other events, call 301.314.9866.

8

TERP FALL

2003

Can You Spare 60 Seconds?

base from which to explore the

coordinator, the chapel was the venue for some 2,000 events last year, including university events, commencement for colleges, many student and religious activities and private ceremonies.

Italy’s most famous wine district.

Alumni, Chapel Celebrate Golden Anniversary

Stay in Marcialla, a small Tuscan village overlooking the breathtak-

THE MARYLAND ALUMNI FAMILY wishes a belated happy anniversary to Julia (Martin) ’53 and Seth Harter ’55,

ing Elsa Valley.

who celebrated their 50th on August 1. The Harters, pictured here, were one of the first couples to walk down the aisle of the University of Maryland Memorial Chapel. The couple met outside of Anne Arundel Hall. Memorial Chapel’s 50-year anniversary celebration will culminate this fall during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend, October 30–November 1. Did you meet your spouse at Maryland? Let us know by sending an e-mail to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu

For upcoming tours in 2004, visit www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 301.403.2728 ext. 14, 800.336.8627.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIA AND SETH HARTER

ONE MINUTE is all it takes to provide current information for the 2004

University of Maryland Alumni Directory. The alumni association has partnered with Harris Publishing to produce the directory. Harris representatives began contacting alumni for their updates in July and will continue to reach out to them through mail, phone and e-mail through the end of the year. “The directory will be a veritable ‘who’s who’ of Maryland alumni,” says Sonia Huntley ’92, director of membership and marketing for the alumni association. The biographical section of the directory will include name, home address, preferred e-mail address and professional information. Names will be listed in the directory by class year and geographical location. Print and CD-ROM versions of the directory are expected to be available in summer 2004 and may be purchased in advance. Alumni association members receive a special discount. For more information, contact the alumni association at 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. —BAM

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; TOP RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNDER ARMOUR

TERP FALL

2003

9


classact

alumniprofile

Going to the Chapel

Plank Is One Cool Entrepreneur

MEMORIAL CHAPEL was constructed in 1952 to honor the men and women from the university who lost their lives during the country’s wars.

FORMER MARYLAND FOOTBALL special teams captain Kevin Plank ’97 (left),

travel 2004 Alumni College in Provence February 17–25

1 The Class of 1951 donated all of

Immerse yourself in the rich cul-

the chapel’s brass, including altarpieces, candelabra and candlesticks, bookstands and vases. The Nairn family funded the restoration of the brass in 2001. Roland “Lefty” Nairn Jr. ’51 (former head football manager) and his wife, Ann, were married in the chapel in 1953.

tural ambiance of sun-drenched Provence—an enchanting land of dazzling light, olive groves and vineyards.

2 Since 1953, Memorial Chapel has been the setting for close to 8,000 weddings, most of them for couples who met at Maryland.

Cruise the Amazon February 21–29 In this prime “high water” season, experience the comfort and adven-

3 The chimes and the clock face

ture aboard an Amazonian expedi-

were restored, thanks to a gift from the Class of 1992. The Class of 1997’s gift was work on the courtyard on the west side of the chapel.

tion-style ship. Alumni College in Greece

is the entrepreneur behind Under Armour, the hot sports apparel company that produces gear designed to keep athletes cool. Plank came up with the idea for the clothing during his senior year at Maryland when he grew tired of repeatedly changing out of Jason Taylor his sweat-drenched clothing during games. from the Miami Dolphins After spending a year testing out fabrics on former footsports Under ball teammates, Plank began producing a lightweight, tightArmour gear. fitting, synthetic undershirt that pulls moisture off the skin and evaporates quickly from the material’s surface, keeping the player cooler and less weighed down. Initially operating his business from his grandmother’s basement in Washington, today Plank has six different product lines established for particular seasons and sports. He was named the Small Business Administration’s 2001 Young Entrepreneur of the Year for the state of Maryland and the mid-Atlantic region. Baltimore-based Under Armour has become the official supplier of performance apparel to Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, the U.S. Ski Team and the National Hockey League. —SLK

May 14–23 Poros, with its terra cotta-topped white buildings, is the perfect

4 According to Julie Luce, chapel

art, architecture and culture of ancient Greece. Alumni College in Chianti in a Tuscan Villa May 30–June 6 With its vineyards, hilltop castles and cypress trees, Chianti is

5 The playing of the Alma Mater every hour by the chapel’s chimes can be heard throughout campus. For complete information on scheduling the chapel for a wedding, visit www.umd.edu/weddings. For other events, call 301.314.9866.

8

TERP FALL

2003

Can You Spare 60 Seconds?

base from which to explore the

coordinator, the chapel was the venue for some 2,000 events last year, including university events, commencement for colleges, many student and religious activities and private ceremonies.

Italy’s most famous wine district.

Alumni, Chapel Celebrate Golden Anniversary

Stay in Marcialla, a small Tuscan village overlooking the breathtak-

THE MARYLAND ALUMNI FAMILY wishes a belated happy anniversary to Julia (Martin) ’53 and Seth Harter ’55,

ing Elsa Valley.

who celebrated their 50th on August 1. The Harters, pictured here, were one of the first couples to walk down the aisle of the University of Maryland Memorial Chapel. The couple met outside of Anne Arundel Hall. Memorial Chapel’s 50-year anniversary celebration will culminate this fall during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend, October 30–November 1. Did you meet your spouse at Maryland? Let us know by sending an e-mail to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu

For upcoming tours in 2004, visit www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 301.403.2728 ext. 14, 800.336.8627.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIA AND SETH HARTER

ONE MINUTE is all it takes to provide current information for the 2004

University of Maryland Alumni Directory. The alumni association has partnered with Harris Publishing to produce the directory. Harris representatives began contacting alumni for their updates in July and will continue to reach out to them through mail, phone and e-mail through the end of the year. “The directory will be a veritable ‘who’s who’ of Maryland alumni,” says Sonia Huntley ’92, director of membership and marketing for the alumni association. The biographical section of the directory will include name, home address, preferred e-mail address and professional information. Names will be listed in the directory by class year and geographical location. Print and CD-ROM versions of the directory are expected to be available in summer 2004 and may be purchased in advance. Alumni association members receive a special discount. For more information, contact the alumni association at 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. —BAM

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; TOP RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNDER ARMOUR

TERP FALL

2003

9


classact

alumniprofile

BYalumni Alumni Help Reveal McCarthy’s Secret Sessions

lots to chat about

Nancy THE 50-YEAR-OLD transcripts

of the secret sessions carried out by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s were brought into the public domain due in large part to the efforts of Maryland alumni. Donald Ritchie ’69 M.A., Ph.D. ’75, associate historian of the U.S. Senate, prepared these volumes for publication, assisted by U.S. Senate historian Richard Baker Ph.D. ’82. It took more than two years for the material to be edited Sen. Joseph McCarthy down for public consumption, and Ritchie says that readying it for publication was not without major obstacles: Scanning the onionskin paper transcripts into computer files for editing often produced garbled text that required manual correction. The original transcription was a professional job, but included misspelled names, misplaced punctuation and misinterpreted words. Then, the 2001 anthrax attack forced Ritchie and Baker from their offices in the Hart Senate Office Building for three months. Their persistence produced five volumes of transcripts containing 161 closed hearings and testimony from almost 500 witnesses, including composer Aaron Copland and poet Langston Hughes. Most importantly, the public has greater insight into the McCarthy era. The executive sessions are available online at www.senate.gov. —RL

10

TERP FALL

2003

Kevin Rob

Introducing Class e-Notes, a new feature of the Terp Alumni Network, your online alumni community.

Separated at Graduation 5 marriages 10 births 3 careers

Register for the Terp Alumni Network for FREE at www.alumni.umd.edu and • Submit your e-note • Sign up for a Terp e-mail forwarding address • Update your profile and search for fellow classmates in the Alumni Directory The Terp Alumni Network is available only to University of Maryland, College Park, graduates and to members of the alumni association. Questions? Contact 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627.

Douglas Fanning has made it in New York with distinct designs like the Cross 1 table.

A New Way to Toast Terrapin Pride Hip Creations from Architecture Grad

RAISE A GLASS to the latest offering from the alumni associ-

SPINDLY STEEL LEGS, crouched like a spider’s, taper to four

elegant points where they touch the floor. A clear rectangular box mounted below—not above—the steel legs is small in proportion to the legs, and provides little space for resting a glass or book. This arachnid table is the creation of burgeoning designer and Maryland alumnus Douglas Fanning ’90. Pictured above, “Cross 1,” as the table is known, won Fanning a prestigious design award in 2001 and catapulted him into the spotlight as one of the hottest new designers in New York City. Fanning, 35, creates unique furniture, modern dance sets and chic apartments. The School of Architecture grad gained experience designing stores for high-end retailers such as Gucci and Donna Karan. He draws his experience from Frank Lloyd Wright, the American designer and father of Prairie style architecture, and Eero Saarinen, the Finnish designer whose masterpieces include the Trans World Airlines terminal at JFK airport. Fanning also draws inspiration from his background in rural Maryland. He grew up in Frederick County near Gettysburg, Pa., which he describes as a “beautifully built” old town. “It gives me a sense of place that I enjoy and fall back on,” he says. Fanning debuted his studio, DYAD, and his newest table, “Ori,” last year to high acclaim. “Ori,” which loosely means “folded cloth” in Japanese, looks like a floating blanket, with its dropped corners and nearly invisible center support. Further evidence of Fanning’s success is now apparent in one of New York’s top, ultra-modern furniture stores. Troy features Fanning’s furniture as one of its few American lines. —SK

ABOVE PHOTOS COURTESY OF DOUGLAS FANNING

ation—a collection of fine wines with a custom designed private label. Members of the Prince George’s Alumni Club selected the wines based on the results from a blind tasting during the club’s Annual Wine Tasting held last spring. The portfolio includes chardonnay, merlot, cabernet sauvignon and sparkling wines that represent several awardwinning vineyards in California. The private label portrays a rendering of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center and is the first in an annual commemorative series that will depict images from the Maryland campus.(See Riggs rendering on page four.) The alumni association works with Signature Wine Cellars in Hayward, Calif., to distribute the wines, which are available in four-bottle gift sets and 12-bottle cases. Alumni association members receive a 10 percent discount on their purchase. For more on the portfolio and to order online, visit www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 888.YOUR.WINE. Wines will also be available at local retail stores. For a store list, call 301.405.2728, ext. 22. —BAM

PHOTO COURTESY OF SIGNATURE WINE CELLARS

Ron Menchine ’56, former “voice” of the Washington Senators, baseball historian and postcard enthusiast combines all of his expertise in his series of books. Baseball Team Collectibles, A Picture Postcard History of Baseball, and Tuff Stuff’s Baseball Postcard Collection explore baseball history through pictures, descriptions and memorabilia, while Propaganda Postcards of World War II is aimed at the history buff. Menchine is offering a 20 percent discount on his books to members of the alumni association. For more information contact him at 410.592.7152 or at PO Box 1, Long Green, MD 21092. David Kushner ’89 explores the minds of John Carmack and John Romero, the creators of “Doom” and “Quake,” two of the most successful and controversial videogame franchises of all time, in Masters of Doom. The book chronicles the journey the creators underwent to create a cultural phenomenon and how the process eventually destroyed their friendship. In Tales of the Maryland Terrapins, Dave Ungrady ’81 looks at the history of athletics at the University of Maryland. The book explores more than 100 years of rich athletic tradition, starting with the university’s first athletic event in 1888.

TERP FALL

2003

11


classact

alumniprofile

BYalumni Alumni Help Reveal McCarthy’s Secret Sessions

lots to chat about

Nancy THE 50-YEAR-OLD transcripts

of the secret sessions carried out by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s were brought into the public domain due in large part to the efforts of Maryland alumni. Donald Ritchie ’69 M.A., Ph.D. ’75, associate historian of the U.S. Senate, prepared these volumes for publication, assisted by U.S. Senate historian Richard Baker Ph.D. ’82. It took more than two years for the material to be edited Sen. Joseph McCarthy down for public consumption, and Ritchie says that readying it for publication was not without major obstacles: Scanning the onionskin paper transcripts into computer files for editing often produced garbled text that required manual correction. The original transcription was a professional job, but included misspelled names, misplaced punctuation and misinterpreted words. Then, the 2001 anthrax attack forced Ritchie and Baker from their offices in the Hart Senate Office Building for three months. Their persistence produced five volumes of transcripts containing 161 closed hearings and testimony from almost 500 witnesses, including composer Aaron Copland and poet Langston Hughes. Most importantly, the public has greater insight into the McCarthy era. The executive sessions are available online at www.senate.gov. —RL

10

TERP FALL

2003

Kevin Rob

Introducing Class e-Notes, a new feature of the Terp Alumni Network, your online alumni community.

Separated at Graduation 5 marriages 10 births 3 careers

Register for the Terp Alumni Network for FREE at www.alumni.umd.edu and • Submit your e-note • Sign up for a Terp e-mail forwarding address • Update your profile and search for fellow classmates in the Alumni Directory The Terp Alumni Network is available only to University of Maryland, College Park, graduates and to members of the alumni association. Questions? Contact 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627.

Douglas Fanning has made it in New York with distinct designs like the Cross 1 table.

A New Way to Toast Terrapin Pride Hip Creations from Architecture Grad

RAISE A GLASS to the latest offering from the alumni associ-

SPINDLY STEEL LEGS, crouched like a spider’s, taper to four

elegant points where they touch the floor. A clear rectangular box mounted below—not above—the steel legs is small in proportion to the legs, and provides little space for resting a glass or book. This arachnid table is the creation of burgeoning designer and Maryland alumnus Douglas Fanning ’90. Pictured above, “Cross 1,” as the table is known, won Fanning a prestigious design award in 2001 and catapulted him into the spotlight as one of the hottest new designers in New York City. Fanning, 35, creates unique furniture, modern dance sets and chic apartments. The School of Architecture grad gained experience designing stores for high-end retailers such as Gucci and Donna Karan. He draws his experience from Frank Lloyd Wright, the American designer and father of Prairie style architecture, and Eero Saarinen, the Finnish designer whose masterpieces include the Trans World Airlines terminal at JFK airport. Fanning also draws inspiration from his background in rural Maryland. He grew up in Frederick County near Gettysburg, Pa., which he describes as a “beautifully built” old town. “It gives me a sense of place that I enjoy and fall back on,” he says. Fanning debuted his studio, DYAD, and his newest table, “Ori,” last year to high acclaim. “Ori,” which loosely means “folded cloth” in Japanese, looks like a floating blanket, with its dropped corners and nearly invisible center support. Further evidence of Fanning’s success is now apparent in one of New York’s top, ultra-modern furniture stores. Troy features Fanning’s furniture as one of its few American lines. —SK

ABOVE PHOTOS COURTESY OF DOUGLAS FANNING

ation—a collection of fine wines with a custom designed private label. Members of the Prince George’s Alumni Club selected the wines based on the results from a blind tasting during the club’s Annual Wine Tasting held last spring. The portfolio includes chardonnay, merlot, cabernet sauvignon and sparkling wines that represent several awardwinning vineyards in California. The private label portrays a rendering of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center and is the first in an annual commemorative series that will depict images from the Maryland campus.(See Riggs rendering on page four.) The alumni association works with Signature Wine Cellars in Hayward, Calif., to distribute the wines, which are available in four-bottle gift sets and 12-bottle cases. Alumni association members receive a 10 percent discount on their purchase. For more on the portfolio and to order online, visit www.alumni.umd.edu, or call 888.YOUR.WINE. Wines will also be available at local retail stores. For a store list, call 301.405.2728, ext. 22. —BAM

PHOTO COURTESY OF SIGNATURE WINE CELLARS

Ron Menchine ’56, former “voice” of the Washington Senators, baseball historian and postcard enthusiast combines all of his expertise in his series of books. Baseball Team Collectibles, A Picture Postcard History of Baseball, and Tuff Stuff’s Baseball Postcard Collection explore baseball history through pictures, descriptions and memorabilia, while Propaganda Postcards of World War II is aimed at the history buff. Menchine is offering a 20 percent discount on his books to members of the alumni association. For more information contact him at 410.592.7152 or at PO Box 1, Long Green, MD 21092. David Kushner ’89 explores the minds of John Carmack and John Romero, the creators of “Doom” and “Quake,” two of the most successful and controversial videogame franchises of all time, in Masters of Doom. The book chronicles the journey the creators underwent to create a cultural phenomenon and how the process eventually destroyed their friendship. In Tales of the Maryland Terrapins, Dave Ungrady ’81 looks at the history of athletics at the University of Maryland. The book explores more than 100 years of rich athletic tradition, starting with the university’s first athletic event in 1888.

TERP FALL

2003

11


m-file NEWSdesk

Montgomery Named BSOS Dean

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

“I don’t know a word of Hindi … but my systems do, and using these I have become pretty good at reading English translations of Hindi documents.”

“It’s almost as competitive to get a good internship as it is to get a job.” —LEILA COLLINS, MARKETING, ON WHY MARKETING STUDENTS SHOULD NOT DELAY IN GETTING AN INTERNSHIP, WASHINGTON POST, JULY 21

—DOUGLAS OARD, ADVANCED COMPUTER STUDIES, JULY 14, INDIA EXPRESS

“Dads who work long hours tend to spend less time with their kids. This may seem obvious, but the same effect doesn’t show up for mothers.” —SANDRA HOFFERTH, FAMILY STUDIES, ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE (REPRINTED FROM A WALL

“But I am on the side of the people who claim there’s a justice issue in terms of the land. You can’t escape the racial dynamic, and you can’t escape the political history.” —RONALD WALTERS, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE, NEW YORK TIMES, JULY 7

STREET JOURNAL STORY), JULY 13

“Now a male can do little more than watch and wait. If he’s built a good bower, then he’ll succeed in life’s ultimate contest and win the top prize: a female who chooses him as a mate. … So you wonder sometimes when you see poorly built bowers … you want to say to the guy: ‘Hey! This is about your reproductive success! Get moving! Straighten those straws! Find some more bones! Why be a C student?’” —GERALD BORGIA, BIOLOGY, ON AUSTRALIA’S PLAYBOY BOWERBIRDS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, JULY 2003

THE COLLEGE of

Behavioral and Social Sciences welcomed Edward B. Montgomery as its dean this past summer. Previously, he was the senior associate dean for the college and has been a professor in its Department of Economics since 1990. He follows Irwin L. Goldstein as dean of the college. “Over the past 12 years, Dean Goldstein has built the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences into one of the strongest behavioral and social sciences colleges in the country,” says Montgomery “I look forward to working with the staff and faculty to continue the college’s ascent as a national leader in teaching and research on the critical issues of greatest importance to our society.” As a labor economist Montgomery has published papers on a range of topics including pensions, local economic development, Medicare, smoking regulations and savings behavior. While on a leave of absence from the University of Maryland, he held a variety of research, management and policy positions, including deputy secretary, assistant secretary for policy and chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor. Prior to coming to Maryland, Montgomery was a faculty member at Michigan State and Carnegie Mellon universities. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Penn State and holds master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard.

A World of Kids’ Books Now at Hand THE WORLD’S LARGEST digital library for children gives kids with Internet connections free access to 262 books representing 23 languages as diverse as Arabic, Croation, Spanish and Chinese. Since the library’s launch last fall, the site has received more than 382,000 visitors from 190 different countries. The International Children’s Digital Library, or ICDL, is a collaboration between researchers from the university’s Human-Computer Interaction Lab and the Internet Archive, a SanFrancisco-based nonprofit that preserves Web sites. The idea grew from research into new electronic interfaces for children by information studies professors Allison Druin and Ann Weeks, and Ben Bederson, a professor of computer science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Unlike other online children’s libraries, the ICDL uses new graphic interface tools designed

to help children to access and read the books alone. “Children can construct their own paths to knowledge,” Druin says. To create these tools, Druin’s 18-member interdisciplinary team enlisted the help of the experts—namely, seven children, ages 7 to 11 who spent two afternoons per week at the Human-Computer Interaction Lab helping researchers refine the interface. A prototype of the library was also tested with some 300 children, 3 to 13 years old, in the United States and Canada. The library’s most popular books? Axle the Freeway Cat followed by Alice in Wonderland. In five years, library creators plan to grow ICDL to 10,000 books representing 100 cultures. —SK The ICDL offers basic (HTML) and enhanced versions at www.icdlbooks.org/.

KID-FRIENDLY LIBRARY FEATURES ◗ A point-and-click globe to find books by the geographic area where the stories are set. ◗ A visual interface to search for books by categories that are easily understood by children, such as happy or sad, and true or make-believe. ◗ Three book readers: a “traditional reader” shows the book one page at a time; a “comic strip” reader provides an overview of the book pages arranged in horizontal strips; and the “spiral” reader is similar to flipping through the pages of the book to quickly examine its content.

—BW

12

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ILLUSTRATION BY MADELEINE FLOYD; PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2003

13


m-file NEWSdesk

Montgomery Named BSOS Dean

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

“I don’t know a word of Hindi … but my systems do, and using these I have become pretty good at reading English translations of Hindi documents.”

“It’s almost as competitive to get a good internship as it is to get a job.” —LEILA COLLINS, MARKETING, ON WHY MARKETING STUDENTS SHOULD NOT DELAY IN GETTING AN INTERNSHIP, WASHINGTON POST, JULY 21

—DOUGLAS OARD, ADVANCED COMPUTER STUDIES, JULY 14, INDIA EXPRESS

“Dads who work long hours tend to spend less time with their kids. This may seem obvious, but the same effect doesn’t show up for mothers.” —SANDRA HOFFERTH, FAMILY STUDIES, ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE (REPRINTED FROM A WALL

“But I am on the side of the people who claim there’s a justice issue in terms of the land. You can’t escape the racial dynamic, and you can’t escape the political history.” —RONALD WALTERS, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE, NEW YORK TIMES, JULY 7

STREET JOURNAL STORY), JULY 13

“Now a male can do little more than watch and wait. If he’s built a good bower, then he’ll succeed in life’s ultimate contest and win the top prize: a female who chooses him as a mate. … So you wonder sometimes when you see poorly built bowers … you want to say to the guy: ‘Hey! This is about your reproductive success! Get moving! Straighten those straws! Find some more bones! Why be a C student?’” —GERALD BORGIA, BIOLOGY, ON AUSTRALIA’S PLAYBOY BOWERBIRDS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, JULY 2003

THE COLLEGE of

Behavioral and Social Sciences welcomed Edward B. Montgomery as its dean this past summer. Previously, he was the senior associate dean for the college and has been a professor in its Department of Economics since 1990. He follows Irwin L. Goldstein as dean of the college. “Over the past 12 years, Dean Goldstein has built the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences into one of the strongest behavioral and social sciences colleges in the country,” says Montgomery “I look forward to working with the staff and faculty to continue the college’s ascent as a national leader in teaching and research on the critical issues of greatest importance to our society.” As a labor economist Montgomery has published papers on a range of topics including pensions, local economic development, Medicare, smoking regulations and savings behavior. While on a leave of absence from the University of Maryland, he held a variety of research, management and policy positions, including deputy secretary, assistant secretary for policy and chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor. Prior to coming to Maryland, Montgomery was a faculty member at Michigan State and Carnegie Mellon universities. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Penn State and holds master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard.

A World of Kids’ Books Now at Hand THE WORLD’S LARGEST digital library for children gives kids with Internet connections free access to 262 books representing 23 languages as diverse as Arabic, Croation, Spanish and Chinese. Since the library’s launch last fall, the site has received more than 382,000 visitors from 190 different countries. The International Children’s Digital Library, or ICDL, is a collaboration between researchers from the university’s Human-Computer Interaction Lab and the Internet Archive, a SanFrancisco-based nonprofit that preserves Web sites. The idea grew from research into new electronic interfaces for children by information studies professors Allison Druin and Ann Weeks, and Ben Bederson, a professor of computer science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Unlike other online children’s libraries, the ICDL uses new graphic interface tools designed

to help children to access and read the books alone. “Children can construct their own paths to knowledge,” Druin says. To create these tools, Druin’s 18-member interdisciplinary team enlisted the help of the experts—namely, seven children, ages 7 to 11 who spent two afternoons per week at the Human-Computer Interaction Lab helping researchers refine the interface. A prototype of the library was also tested with some 300 children, 3 to 13 years old, in the United States and Canada. The library’s most popular books? Axle the Freeway Cat followed by Alice in Wonderland. In five years, library creators plan to grow ICDL to 10,000 books representing 100 cultures. —SK The ICDL offers basic (HTML) and enhanced versions at www.icdlbooks.org/.

KID-FRIENDLY LIBRARY FEATURES ◗ A point-and-click globe to find books by the geographic area where the stories are set. ◗ A visual interface to search for books by categories that are easily understood by children, such as happy or sad, and true or make-believe. ◗ Three book readers: a “traditional reader” shows the book one page at a time; a “comic strip” reader provides an overview of the book pages arranged in horizontal strips; and the “spiral” reader is similar to flipping through the pages of the book to quickly examine its content.

—BW

12

TERP FALL

2003

ILLUSTRATION BY MADELEINE FLOYD; PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2003

13


m-file

DEAL WITH STRESS BY SCHEDULING FUN

Study Shows Value of Early Multicultural Experiences DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGIST and professor of human development

Melanie Killen is the principal investigator for a three-year, multi-site $918,000 grant by the National Institutes of Health. Killen is also the associate director of the university’s Center for Children, Relationships and Culture. Her NIH-sponsored research has a particular focus on children’s development of social reasoning of exclusion based on gender, race and ethnicity. Killen’s research has found that parents frequently do not talk openly with their children about gender and race issues until a problem arises. She says parents and teachers should discuss these topics with children in a general way. Asking a child to talk about a time they were excluded from a group is an easier opener. “Exclusion is something everyone can relate to. We’ve all been excluded at one time or another,” Killen says. She also suggests exposing children to as many multicultural experiences as possible from an early age, since by the time children reach early adolescence, their number of friends from different ethnic and racial groups drops off dramatically. While many factors contribute to this phenomenon, Killen says some children fear a friend from a different cultural background may not feel comfortable at their home. Killen says the research has particular value for teachers, parents, as well as for adults who are faced with fairness and justice issues in increasingly multicultural work settings. —SLK

HITCH ALONG FOR THE RIDE

WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT a top-selling introduction

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of

to business textbook author would purport that scheduling time for fun is just as important as work? “You have to be a rebel to teach this stuff,” says associate professor of business and marketing, William Nickels, who in addition to writing textbooks, wrote Win the Happiness Game, and is the only faculty member in the Robert H. Smith School of Business who routinely hosts what has come to be known as “happiness lectures.” For 20 years Nickels has been holding seminars on stress and life management geared to students, faculty, major businesses and small groups of individuals who worry about stress and success, like doctors and yes, even Indian chiefs! “Stress isn’t caused by your work, but by the

people’s names stored on a compact disc will head to a comet 83 million miles from Earth. The $250 million, six-year National Aeronautics and Space Administration Deep Impact mission will send an unmanned spacecraft inside Tempel 1, a comet considered close by space standards, to uncover clues to the formation of our solar system.

3.

1.

Fully appreciate who you are

2.

Give up the “I’ll be happy when … game”

Enjoy life the way it is now with all of its imperfections

strategies that we set out to be successful,” says Nickels, who continued by saying our culture, in particular, makes a habit of setting unrealistic expectations, which adds to stress and discontent. “We lose balance. We run out of time for fun, family and friends,” he says, pointing out that happy individuals who embrace life are ultimately the most successful. In order to maintain balance in one’s life, Nickels recommends scheduling two hours of fun per day, most preferably with someone else, even if it requires marking it in a day planner or logging it into your PDA. “The thing with workaholics is they are going to get their work finished no matter what. If they also schedule time to have fun they will still get their work done, but they will just accomplish a lot more,” he says. Nickels believes even activities as ordinary as washing or waxing a car, grooming animals or gardening can be valuable since they offer an escape from stress and worry by consuming the mind. —SLK

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

“The comet is running into the spacecraft,” she explains, pointing out that most space experiments passively observe a subject in space, rather than altering its structure. In this case, Deep Impact will actually create a hole in the comet, but hopefully fill in some gaps in our understanding of the solar system. —SLK Send names to: http://deepimpact. umd.edu/sendyourname/

No Votes for Chads and Butterfly Ballots THE INFAMOUS 2000 election

Nickels’ Three Steps to Happiness:

The name gathering is part of an effort designed to satisfy another NASA mission—generating public interest in the project that is slated to reach the comet on July 4, 2005. NASA has already

gathered the names of more than 250,000 people and hopes to have millions. An orbiting probe will collect data on the composition of the comet and radio the findings to Earth. “This is unusual because it is an active experiment,” says Lucy McFadden, a research scientist in the Department of Astronomy and a member of the Deep Impact science team, which is led by astronomy professor Michael A’Hearn.

that left Florida voters feeling disenfranchised has resulted in university research to pinpoint the characteristics of the most effective and easy-to-use voting machines. The National Science Foundation awarded Maryland, along with the University of

Michigan and the University of Rochester, a three-year grant of $900,000. This new grant builds upon a previous study by the university that examined the usability of touch-screen voting machines. Ben Bederson, assistant professor of computer science and director of the HumanComputer Interaction Lab, and Paul Herrnson, government and politics professor and director of the Center for American Politics and Citizenship, are leading Maryland’s research effort. A field study will place voting systems in public settings, such as malls and grocery stores, to test the average users’ ability to operate the technology. Finally, an intense review of previous and future elections will compare the results by counties and types of machines. Though results from last year’s study found that 90 percent of voters interviewed preferred the touch-screen

TOP ANIMATION STILL COURTESY OF JPL NASA; ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX NABAUM

voting system to the previous punch card method, Bederson says that the computer interface design was far from perfect. “We found a number of design issues and room for improvement,” Bederson says.

University of Maryland Merchandise

“It’s a challenge. For most computer systems, 90 percent is great, but for a voting system, 100 percent [of voters] have to be able to use it effectively.” —SLK

The Maryland Alumni Association Official Online Store is open for business! Stock up on exclusive Maryland Alumni Merchandise including caps, polos, pullovers, shirts, sweatshirts, t-shirts and our specially designed scarves and ties.

Get your favorite Terrapin Gear at your convenience!

OnlineStore Shop today online at www.alumni.umd.edu. TERP FALL

2003

15


m-file

DEAL WITH STRESS BY SCHEDULING FUN

Study Shows Value of Early Multicultural Experiences DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGIST and professor of human development

Melanie Killen is the principal investigator for a three-year, multi-site $918,000 grant by the National Institutes of Health. Killen is also the associate director of the university’s Center for Children, Relationships and Culture. Her NIH-sponsored research has a particular focus on children’s development of social reasoning of exclusion based on gender, race and ethnicity. Killen’s research has found that parents frequently do not talk openly with their children about gender and race issues until a problem arises. She says parents and teachers should discuss these topics with children in a general way. Asking a child to talk about a time they were excluded from a group is an easier opener. “Exclusion is something everyone can relate to. We’ve all been excluded at one time or another,” Killen says. She also suggests exposing children to as many multicultural experiences as possible from an early age, since by the time children reach early adolescence, their number of friends from different ethnic and racial groups drops off dramatically. While many factors contribute to this phenomenon, Killen says some children fear a friend from a different cultural background may not feel comfortable at their home. Killen says the research has particular value for teachers, parents, as well as for adults who are faced with fairness and justice issues in increasingly multicultural work settings. —SLK

HITCH ALONG FOR THE RIDE

WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT a top-selling introduction

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of

to business textbook author would purport that scheduling time for fun is just as important as work? “You have to be a rebel to teach this stuff,” says associate professor of business and marketing, William Nickels, who in addition to writing textbooks, wrote Win the Happiness Game, and is the only faculty member in the Robert H. Smith School of Business who routinely hosts what has come to be known as “happiness lectures.” For 20 years Nickels has been holding seminars on stress and life management geared to students, faculty, major businesses and small groups of individuals who worry about stress and success, like doctors and yes, even Indian chiefs! “Stress isn’t caused by your work, but by the

people’s names stored on a compact disc will head to a comet 83 million miles from Earth. The $250 million, six-year National Aeronautics and Space Administration Deep Impact mission will send an unmanned spacecraft inside Tempel 1, a comet considered close by space standards, to uncover clues to the formation of our solar system.

3.

1.

Fully appreciate who you are

2.

Give up the “I’ll be happy when … game”

Enjoy life the way it is now with all of its imperfections

strategies that we set out to be successful,” says Nickels, who continued by saying our culture, in particular, makes a habit of setting unrealistic expectations, which adds to stress and discontent. “We lose balance. We run out of time for fun, family and friends,” he says, pointing out that happy individuals who embrace life are ultimately the most successful. In order to maintain balance in one’s life, Nickels recommends scheduling two hours of fun per day, most preferably with someone else, even if it requires marking it in a day planner or logging it into your PDA. “The thing with workaholics is they are going to get their work finished no matter what. If they also schedule time to have fun they will still get their work done, but they will just accomplish a lot more,” he says. Nickels believes even activities as ordinary as washing or waxing a car, grooming animals or gardening can be valuable since they offer an escape from stress and worry by consuming the mind. —SLK

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

“The comet is running into the spacecraft,” she explains, pointing out that most space experiments passively observe a subject in space, rather than altering its structure. In this case, Deep Impact will actually create a hole in the comet, but hopefully fill in some gaps in our understanding of the solar system. —SLK Send names to: http://deepimpact. umd.edu/sendyourname/

No Votes for Chads and Butterfly Ballots THE INFAMOUS 2000 election

Nickels’ Three Steps to Happiness:

The name gathering is part of an effort designed to satisfy another NASA mission—generating public interest in the project that is slated to reach the comet on July 4, 2005. NASA has already

gathered the names of more than 250,000 people and hopes to have millions. An orbiting probe will collect data on the composition of the comet and radio the findings to Earth. “This is unusual because it is an active experiment,” says Lucy McFadden, a research scientist in the Department of Astronomy and a member of the Deep Impact science team, which is led by astronomy professor Michael A’Hearn.

that left Florida voters feeling disenfranchised has resulted in university research to pinpoint the characteristics of the most effective and easy-to-use voting machines. The National Science Foundation awarded Maryland, along with the University of

Michigan and the University of Rochester, a three-year grant of $900,000. This new grant builds upon a previous study by the university that examined the usability of touch-screen voting machines. Ben Bederson, assistant professor of computer science and director of the HumanComputer Interaction Lab, and Paul Herrnson, government and politics professor and director of the Center for American Politics and Citizenship, are leading Maryland’s research effort. A field study will place voting systems in public settings, such as malls and grocery stores, to test the average users’ ability to operate the technology. Finally, an intense review of previous and future elections will compare the results by counties and types of machines. Though results from last year’s study found that 90 percent of voters interviewed preferred the touch-screen

TOP ANIMATION STILL COURTESY OF JPL NASA; ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX NABAUM

voting system to the previous punch card method, Bederson says that the computer interface design was far from perfect. “We found a number of design issues and room for improvement,” Bederson says.

University of Maryland Merchandise

“It’s a challenge. For most computer systems, 90 percent is great, but for a voting system, 100 percent [of voters] have to be able to use it effectively.” —SLK

The Maryland Alumni Association Official Online Store is open for business! Stock up on exclusive Maryland Alumni Merchandise including caps, polos, pullovers, shirts, sweatshirts, t-shirts and our specially designed scarves and ties.

Get your favorite Terrapin Gear at your convenience!

OnlineStore Shop today online at www.alumni.umd.edu. TERP FALL

2003

15


H OT L I N E

8 p.m. $15 single/$12 subscription Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Music lovers and sports fans will enjoy this rousing showcase for the Maryland Bands program, including holiday selections and half-time highlights from the 2003 Terrapin Football Season.

DECEMBER 12 Annual Kaleidoscope of Bands Featuring the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Concert Band and Marching Band

The Art Gallery The first comprehensive survey of artist Clarice Smith’s paintings is on view at The Art Gallery through Dec. 13, 2003. It includes more than 40 works, displaying a wide range of subject matter and genre: still life, portraiture, landscape, and floral and equestrian scenes. The work shown is Karen’s Hat, oil on canvas (40x30”). In the artist’s own words: “I compose paintings from the patterns I see in people, places and things; striving to paint the moods they inspire.”

THROUGH DECEMBER 13 Clarice Smith: ReCollection 1978–2003

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION; BOTTOM CENTER PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

OFFICE OF THE DEAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 301.405.9363, www.ugst.umd.edu

www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office),

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office), www.umterps.com

ART GALLERY 301.405.2763, www.artgallery.umd.edu/

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

Sister Helen Prejean, author of the critically acclaimed book, Dead Man Walking, will visit campus as part of the First Year Book Program. In her book, Prejean shares her experiences visiting a death row inmate and advocates against capital punishment. The First Year Book Program provides opportunities for students, faculty and staff to participate in a shared reading experience. Each year a campuswide committee solicits nominations and selects a First Year Book that is given to all incoming freshmen.

Time: Noon Tawes Theatre Sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies

Emeritus Luncheon: 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m., $35 alumni association members/$45 non-members Campus Bus Tour: 2–3 p.m. “Taking Care of Your Health and Wealth”: 2 p.m.–3:30 p.m., free Homecoming Parade: 4–5 p.m., free Reunion Dinner and Dancing: 6 p.m., $45 alumni association members/ $55 non-members UMUC Inn and Conference Center Reunite with classmates and rekindle friendships during the Class of 1953 Reunion. The reunion features the Emeritus Luncheon where class members are awarded their 50th reunion medallions. Other activities include a bus tour of campus, financial planning program, dinner and dancing, and the Homecoming festivities on November 1 .

OCTOBER 31 Class of 1953 Reunion

Time: TBA Byrd Stadium Get your tickets and cheer on the Maryland Terrapins, 2002 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl Champions, as they tackle the Tarheels of North Carolina.

Homecoming Football Game—Maryland Terrapins vs. North Carolina Tarheels

Time: 3 hours before game time Ludwig Field Enjoy live music, free snacks and visits by Testudo and the Maryland Marching Band. Take part in interactive programs with the university’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Health and Human Performance, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Department of Physics. Visit the terrapin exhibit sponsored by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Show your alumni association membership card to enter a members-only hospitality tent featuring special seating and a sample of the association’s private label wine.

Alumni Association Annual Homecoming Festival

HOMECOMING!

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 13 First Year Book Program Lecture by author Sister Helen Prejean

6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. University of Maryland University College, Inn and Conference Center (ICC) $10 alumni association members, $15 non-members For years, Mark Ciardi ’83 was busy striking out batters. Then, one day, he stepped up to the plate and hit a Hollywood home run. A pitcher at Maryland from 1979-1983, Ciardi was a producer of the blockbuster Disney movie, The Rookie. Join him in a candid discussion as he describes the movie-making process from financing to life on the set. Learn from Ciardi what it takes to be successful in the film industry and his plans for producing his next big hit.

OCTOBER 30 Alumni College: Making it in the Big League

For starters, Homecoming promises to deliver excitement, both on and off the field.And following the action at Byrd this season, December offers a rousing musical recap. To march to your own beat, check out the “Hot Line” for the array of activities you can choose from.


H OT L I N E

8 p.m. $15 single/$12 subscription Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Music lovers and sports fans will enjoy this rousing showcase for the Maryland Bands program, including holiday selections and half-time highlights from the 2003 Terrapin Football Season.

DECEMBER 12 Annual Kaleidoscope of Bands Featuring the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Concert Band and Marching Band

The Art Gallery The first comprehensive survey of artist Clarice Smith’s paintings is on view at The Art Gallery through Dec. 13, 2003. It includes more than 40 works, displaying a wide range of subject matter and genre: still life, portraiture, landscape, and floral and equestrian scenes. The work shown is Karen’s Hat, oil on canvas (40x30”). In the artist’s own words: “I compose paintings from the patterns I see in people, places and things; striving to paint the moods they inspire.”

THROUGH DECEMBER 13 Clarice Smith: ReCollection 1978–2003

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION; BOTTOM CENTER PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

OFFICE OF THE DEAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 301.405.9363, www.ugst.umd.edu

www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office),

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office), www.umterps.com

ART GALLERY 301.405.2763, www.artgallery.umd.edu/

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

Sister Helen Prejean, author of the critically acclaimed book, Dead Man Walking, will visit campus as part of the First Year Book Program. In her book, Prejean shares her experiences visiting a death row inmate and advocates against capital punishment. The First Year Book Program provides opportunities for students, faculty and staff to participate in a shared reading experience. Each year a campuswide committee solicits nominations and selects a First Year Book that is given to all incoming freshmen.

Time: Noon Tawes Theatre Sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies

Emeritus Luncheon: 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m., $35 alumni association members/$45 non-members Campus Bus Tour: 2–3 p.m. “Taking Care of Your Health and Wealth”: 2 p.m.–3:30 p.m., free Homecoming Parade: 4–5 p.m., free Reunion Dinner and Dancing: 6 p.m., $45 alumni association members/ $55 non-members UMUC Inn and Conference Center Reunite with classmates and rekindle friendships during the Class of 1953 Reunion. The reunion features the Emeritus Luncheon where class members are awarded their 50th reunion medallions. Other activities include a bus tour of campus, financial planning program, dinner and dancing, and the Homecoming festivities on November 1 .

OCTOBER 31 Class of 1953 Reunion

Time: TBA Byrd Stadium Get your tickets and cheer on the Maryland Terrapins, 2002 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl Champions, as they tackle the Tarheels of North Carolina.

Homecoming Football Game—Maryland Terrapins vs. North Carolina Tarheels

Time: 3 hours before game time Ludwig Field Enjoy live music, free snacks and visits by Testudo and the Maryland Marching Band. Take part in interactive programs with the university’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Health and Human Performance, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Department of Physics. Visit the terrapin exhibit sponsored by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Show your alumni association membership card to enter a members-only hospitality tent featuring special seating and a sample of the association’s private label wine.

Alumni Association Annual Homecoming Festival

HOMECOMING!

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 13 First Year Book Program Lecture by author Sister Helen Prejean

6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. University of Maryland University College, Inn and Conference Center (ICC) $10 alumni association members, $15 non-members For years, Mark Ciardi ’83 was busy striking out batters. Then, one day, he stepped up to the plate and hit a Hollywood home run. A pitcher at Maryland from 1979-1983, Ciardi was a producer of the blockbuster Disney movie, The Rookie. Join him in a candid discussion as he describes the movie-making process from financing to life on the set. Learn from Ciardi what it takes to be successful in the film industry and his plans for producing his next big hit.

OCTOBER 30 Alumni College: Making it in the Big League

For starters, Homecoming promises to deliver excitement, both on and off the field.And following the action at Byrd this season, December offers a rousing musical recap. To march to your own beat, check out the “Hot Line” for the array of activities you can choose from.


Meet the

Engaged

Philanthropist Higher education faces a new reality about giving. Philanthropists want feedback. They want involvement. Most of all, they want a seat at the table.

B

y her own admission, Jane Brown was until five years ago a disengaged University of Maryland alum. More than 25 years had passed since she left College Park with a bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy. The university had given her a solid, marketable education, one she used to build a career in journalism and later foundation management. But as far as personal connectedness to Maryland, well, let’s just say Jane Brown didn’t always bleed Terp red. Like others who attended Maryland in the ’60s and ’70s, Brown’s impression of her alma mater could be summed up in a few words: Big. Impersonal. Impenetrable. Yet from the day she graduated in 1972, Brown combined her writing and editing skills with an endless curiosity to focus on the world of business and the “movers and shakers” around which it revolved. After a stint as editor of Maryland’s first business newspaper, Brown became managing editor of the newly independent Baltimore Magazine and later was recruited to The Baltimore Sun to oversee special features and the wholesale modernization of the The Sunday Sun. Story by DANIEL CUSICK Photography by JOHN T. CONSOLI

18

TERP FALL

2003

THE JANE BROW N FILE AGE: 52 GRADUATION YEAR: 1972 RESIDENCE: Baltimore POSITION: Vice president and executive director of the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, established by and named for her technology entrepreneur father to fund techrelated projects in Maryland colleges and universities. Jane Brown represents an emerging type of higher education donor, one who is driven by a belief that philanthropy is not so much about gift-giving as it is about solving problems. UNIVERSITY BENEFICIARIES:

MITH: $150,000 grant to secure the technical expertise to support the humanities-driven program for the next three years. Baltimore Incentive Awards: $50,000 grant to support scholarships. Recently, Brown gave an additional $50,000 as a personal gift to encourage more participation by donors in the Baltimore area. Human-Computer Interaction Lab: $50,000 grant to help fund administrative improvements. SAYS BROWN: “Complex problems

require more than one point of view, especially tough social problems that are most successfully addressed by a diverse team whose members bring different perspectives and ideas to the table.”

TERP FALL

2003

19


Meet the

Engaged

Philanthropist Higher education faces a new reality about giving. Philanthropists want feedback. They want involvement. Most of all, they want a seat at the table.

B

y her own admission, Jane Brown was until five years ago a disengaged University of Maryland alum. More than 25 years had passed since she left College Park with a bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy. The university had given her a solid, marketable education, one she used to build a career in journalism and later foundation management. But as far as personal connectedness to Maryland, well, let’s just say Jane Brown didn’t always bleed Terp red. Like others who attended Maryland in the ’60s and ’70s, Brown’s impression of her alma mater could be summed up in a few words: Big. Impersonal. Impenetrable. Yet from the day she graduated in 1972, Brown combined her writing and editing skills with an endless curiosity to focus on the world of business and the “movers and shakers” around which it revolved. After a stint as editor of Maryland’s first business newspaper, Brown became managing editor of the newly independent Baltimore Magazine and later was recruited to The Baltimore Sun to oversee special features and the wholesale modernization of the The Sunday Sun. Story by DANIEL CUSICK Photography by JOHN T. CONSOLI

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THE JANE BROW N FILE AGE: 52 GRADUATION YEAR: 1972 RESIDENCE: Baltimore POSITION: Vice president and executive director of the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, established by and named for her technology entrepreneur father to fund techrelated projects in Maryland colleges and universities. Jane Brown represents an emerging type of higher education donor, one who is driven by a belief that philanthropy is not so much about gift-giving as it is about solving problems. UNIVERSITY BENEFICIARIES:

MITH: $150,000 grant to secure the technical expertise to support the humanities-driven program for the next three years. Baltimore Incentive Awards: $50,000 grant to support scholarships. Recently, Brown gave an additional $50,000 as a personal gift to encourage more participation by donors in the Baltimore area. Human-Computer Interaction Lab: $50,000 grant to help fund administrative improvements. SAYS BROWN: “Complex problems

require more than one point of view, especially tough social problems that are most successfully addressed by a diverse team whose members bring different perspectives and ideas to the table.”

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But the grueling schedule of the 24/7 news cycle, coupled with the birth of her son, prompted Brown to leave the news business in search of more fulfilling work. She gravitated toward the world of philanthropy, where Baltimore’s stressed inner-city neighborhoods, struggling schools and shrinking industrial economy presented challenges that continue to inform and shape her priorities. Today, at age 52, Brown’s passion for solving social and economic problems remains strong as ever. But her means of solving them certainly has changed. So, too, has her relationship with Maryland, where she is now one of the university’s most influential alumni, coordinating gifts of hundreds of thousands of dollars in key areas and serving on boards and advisory panels that are increasingly shaping the direction of university programs and policies. Brown’s investment approach has translated into four gifts totaling $300,000 for projects ranging from the development of new technology applications driven by the needs of humanities scholars to the funding of the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program

that supports students from nine Baltimore City high schools to attend the University of Maryland. In many ways, Brown’s rekindled connection to the university, dating only to President C.D. Mote Jr.’s inauguration in 1998—her first return visit to the campus since her graduation—follows the same trajectory as the institution she once considered too big and impersonal for her hands-on style of philanthropy. Both alumna and institution had to change before they could appreciate what a major state university and a small, highly specialized private foundation could do for each other. “At first the scale seemed impossible,” Brown says. “Logically, a huge research institution and a small foundation could produce at best a small drop in a large bucket.” Much to her surprise, what Brown found when she returned to Maryland in the late 1990s was a highly receptive leadership, a strong spirit of innovation, and a wholesale dismantling of the old school mentality that keeps new ideas, and especially ideas about educational reform, at bay. For its part, the university found in Brown a refreshingly different kind of donor. If there’s a difference between Jane Brown’s style of philanthropy and the style of generations past, it’s that she rarely leaves her

“Money in and of itself is not always the answer,” says Brown. “Sometimes advocacy, or engaging other interested parties, can be far more valuable.”

money at the doorstep of the institution. Rather, she prefers to come inside, take a look around, and most important, engage the people who stand to benefit by the gift. “Money in and of itself is not always the answer,” says Brown. “Sometimes advocacy, or engaging other interested parties, can be far more valuable.”

RISKS AND REWARDS

Of Mutual Benefit A prime example of Jane Brown’s “engagement philanthropy” approach involves the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, or MITH. Launched in 1999 by English Professor Martha Nell Smith with a $2 million grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, MITH aims to apply the tools of technology—such as digital libraries and online art galleries— to research initiatives in literature, the arts and the humanities. When Brown, who holds a master’s degree in literary criticism from the State University of New York at Stonybrook, learned about the small interdisciplinary institute with big ideas, she enthusiastically embraced MITH, its mission and its visionJane Brown, left, talks ary leader. The donor and professor talk on a regular basis, share ideas and opportunities for advancing with Martha Nell Smith, MITH’s work, and invest in each other’s professional lives. It’s a kind of relationship that redefines how director of MITH. donors and faculty members can work together and what they can expect from one another. Brown was also drawn to MITH because it appealed to her interests in social and economic equity, especially in bridging the gap between the “haves” and “have-nots” by making technology-enabled resources for teaching and learning more widely available. Drawing upon those same values and interests, the Deutsch Foundation gave two grants of $50,000 each to help fund administrative improvements in the university’s Human Computer Interaction Lab and to support scholarships for the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program. The scholarship program, begun in 2001 by President C.D. Mote Jr. to support students from nine Baltimore City high schools, once again spoke to Brown’s interests as a social reformer. In a letter to Mote accompanying the foundation’s $50,000 gift, Brown referred to the program as “a beacon of light against the darkness of urban despair.” Only recently Brown gave an additional $50,000 to the program as a personal gift to encourage more participation by donors in the Baltimore area. —DC

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By most accounts, the contributions of donors like Brown and the Deutsch Foundation, who see their philanthropy as investments rather than gifts, are having a positive influence on the institutions where money has been given. The collaborations are lending new direction, energy and expertise to the research process that will almost certainly lead to new discoveries in important fields of inquiry. But the approach doesn’t always wear easily at first, especially among university faculty steeped in the traditions of academic freedom and autonomy. While there’s nothing novel about research having to meet certain criteria to be funded—whether by a government agency, nonprofit foundation or private corporation—there is definitely something that feels different about engagement philanthropy. Perhaps it’s the close contact investors seek with the users of their money, or the demand for measurable outcomes that such donors want included in their funding agreements. John Taylor, vice president for research at the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, a national organization dedicated to issues of education fundraising and university external relations, says the rise of engagement philanthropy in higher education may reflect broader trends in private giving. For one, he says, people are more discerning about all charitable giving, especially in light of recent accounts of mismanagement and exorbitant executive salaries at some very large nonprofit organizations. Second, he says, universities facing cutbacks in general revenue from state legislatures or other supporting institutions are exploring ways to increase private investment beyond annual campaign

giving by appealing to individuals This September, the nine students above became the third class of with more directed interests and Baltimore Incentive Award scholars investment priorities. drawn from nine Baltimore City high So the question at Maryland, schools. The goals of the program meshed with Brown’s philosophy of just as at other institutions philanthropy. around the country, becomes one of balance. How do fundraisers maximize appeal for engagement philanthropists without compromising the solid values that make American colleges and universities a model for research, teaching and scholarship worldwide? Maryland administrators like Brodie Remington, vice president for university relations, say such balance is critical, and he judges all private gifts—whether from an individual, corporation or foundation—in terms of their “transparency.” Any and all rules or expectations are aired before a gift is accepted. That way the university can judge whether the donor’s interests are compatible with the university’s mission. Remington adds that especially with socially minded donors like Jane Brown and the Deutsch Foundation, the pros clearly outweigh the cons. “It is challenging, but it’s also energizing,” he says. “not just for people like me, but for the faculty members who are the beneficiaries of this kind of support.” Martha Nell Smith, director of the Maryland Institute for the Humanities, concurs with that view, yet she acknowledges the fear that some academics have about allowing donors to get too close to their research. “This is new, the partnerships, but the kinds of reporting these people are asking for aren’t really different from what we’ve been doing before. It may feel a little different because you’re reporting back to an individual donor. But Jane has never come to me and said ‘You have to do X.’ She’s come to me and said, ‘We have a mutual goal. Let’s see how we can work together to achieve some things.’ I personally think it’s great.” TERP TERP FALL

2003

21


But the grueling schedule of the 24/7 news cycle, coupled with the birth of her son, prompted Brown to leave the news business in search of more fulfilling work. She gravitated toward the world of philanthropy, where Baltimore’s stressed inner-city neighborhoods, struggling schools and shrinking industrial economy presented challenges that continue to inform and shape her priorities. Today, at age 52, Brown’s passion for solving social and economic problems remains strong as ever. But her means of solving them certainly has changed. So, too, has her relationship with Maryland, where she is now one of the university’s most influential alumni, coordinating gifts of hundreds of thousands of dollars in key areas and serving on boards and advisory panels that are increasingly shaping the direction of university programs and policies. Brown’s investment approach has translated into four gifts totaling $300,000 for projects ranging from the development of new technology applications driven by the needs of humanities scholars to the funding of the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program

that supports students from nine Baltimore City high schools to attend the University of Maryland. In many ways, Brown’s rekindled connection to the university, dating only to President C.D. Mote Jr.’s inauguration in 1998—her first return visit to the campus since her graduation—follows the same trajectory as the institution she once considered too big and impersonal for her hands-on style of philanthropy. Both alumna and institution had to change before they could appreciate what a major state university and a small, highly specialized private foundation could do for each other. “At first the scale seemed impossible,” Brown says. “Logically, a huge research institution and a small foundation could produce at best a small drop in a large bucket.” Much to her surprise, what Brown found when she returned to Maryland in the late 1990s was a highly receptive leadership, a strong spirit of innovation, and a wholesale dismantling of the old school mentality that keeps new ideas, and especially ideas about educational reform, at bay. For its part, the university found in Brown a refreshingly different kind of donor. If there’s a difference between Jane Brown’s style of philanthropy and the style of generations past, it’s that she rarely leaves her

“Money in and of itself is not always the answer,” says Brown. “Sometimes advocacy, or engaging other interested parties, can be far more valuable.”

money at the doorstep of the institution. Rather, she prefers to come inside, take a look around, and most important, engage the people who stand to benefit by the gift. “Money in and of itself is not always the answer,” says Brown. “Sometimes advocacy, or engaging other interested parties, can be far more valuable.”

RISKS AND REWARDS

Of Mutual Benefit A prime example of Jane Brown’s “engagement philanthropy” approach involves the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, or MITH. Launched in 1999 by English Professor Martha Nell Smith with a $2 million grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, MITH aims to apply the tools of technology—such as digital libraries and online art galleries— to research initiatives in literature, the arts and the humanities. When Brown, who holds a master’s degree in literary criticism from the State University of New York at Stonybrook, learned about the small interdisciplinary institute with big ideas, she enthusiastically embraced MITH, its mission and its visionJane Brown, left, talks ary leader. The donor and professor talk on a regular basis, share ideas and opportunities for advancing with Martha Nell Smith, MITH’s work, and invest in each other’s professional lives. It’s a kind of relationship that redefines how director of MITH. donors and faculty members can work together and what they can expect from one another. Brown was also drawn to MITH because it appealed to her interests in social and economic equity, especially in bridging the gap between the “haves” and “have-nots” by making technology-enabled resources for teaching and learning more widely available. Drawing upon those same values and interests, the Deutsch Foundation gave two grants of $50,000 each to help fund administrative improvements in the university’s Human Computer Interaction Lab and to support scholarships for the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program. The scholarship program, begun in 2001 by President C.D. Mote Jr. to support students from nine Baltimore City high schools, once again spoke to Brown’s interests as a social reformer. In a letter to Mote accompanying the foundation’s $50,000 gift, Brown referred to the program as “a beacon of light against the darkness of urban despair.” Only recently Brown gave an additional $50,000 to the program as a personal gift to encourage more participation by donors in the Baltimore area. —DC

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2003

By most accounts, the contributions of donors like Brown and the Deutsch Foundation, who see their philanthropy as investments rather than gifts, are having a positive influence on the institutions where money has been given. The collaborations are lending new direction, energy and expertise to the research process that will almost certainly lead to new discoveries in important fields of inquiry. But the approach doesn’t always wear easily at first, especially among university faculty steeped in the traditions of academic freedom and autonomy. While there’s nothing novel about research having to meet certain criteria to be funded—whether by a government agency, nonprofit foundation or private corporation—there is definitely something that feels different about engagement philanthropy. Perhaps it’s the close contact investors seek with the users of their money, or the demand for measurable outcomes that such donors want included in their funding agreements. John Taylor, vice president for research at the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, a national organization dedicated to issues of education fundraising and university external relations, says the rise of engagement philanthropy in higher education may reflect broader trends in private giving. For one, he says, people are more discerning about all charitable giving, especially in light of recent accounts of mismanagement and exorbitant executive salaries at some very large nonprofit organizations. Second, he says, universities facing cutbacks in general revenue from state legislatures or other supporting institutions are exploring ways to increase private investment beyond annual campaign

giving by appealing to individuals This September, the nine students above became the third class of with more directed interests and Baltimore Incentive Award scholars investment priorities. drawn from nine Baltimore City high So the question at Maryland, schools. The goals of the program meshed with Brown’s philosophy of just as at other institutions philanthropy. around the country, becomes one of balance. How do fundraisers maximize appeal for engagement philanthropists without compromising the solid values that make American colleges and universities a model for research, teaching and scholarship worldwide? Maryland administrators like Brodie Remington, vice president for university relations, say such balance is critical, and he judges all private gifts—whether from an individual, corporation or foundation—in terms of their “transparency.” Any and all rules or expectations are aired before a gift is accepted. That way the university can judge whether the donor’s interests are compatible with the university’s mission. Remington adds that especially with socially minded donors like Jane Brown and the Deutsch Foundation, the pros clearly outweigh the cons. “It is challenging, but it’s also energizing,” he says. “not just for people like me, but for the faculty members who are the beneficiaries of this kind of support.” Martha Nell Smith, director of the Maryland Institute for the Humanities, concurs with that view, yet she acknowledges the fear that some academics have about allowing donors to get too close to their research. “This is new, the partnerships, but the kinds of reporting these people are asking for aren’t really different from what we’ve been doing before. It may feel a little different because you’re reporting back to an individual donor. But Jane has never come to me and said ‘You have to do X.’ She’s come to me and said, ‘We have a mutual goal. Let’s see how we can work together to achieve some things.’ I personally think it’s great.” TERP TERP FALL

2003

21


IT’S NOT JUST HORSIN’ AROUND Down on the campus farm, modern science meets up with Maryland’s agrarian roots in a new equine studies program STORY BY PHOTO BY

T

Tom Ventsias John T. Consoli

he fact that a small working farm still exists on the University of Maryland campus shouldn’t seem that unusual. After all, the university was first established in 1856 as the Maryland Agricultural College, and it has a rich history as a land-grant institution dedicated to helping the state’s agricultural interests. Even so, faculty who currently teach at the farm requested a small sign, Campus Farm, be sited in front of a horse barn—mainly to remind visitors and passers-by that within the heart of a bustling research university, there is still a place to stop and smell the hay. Students enrolled in Maryland’s new equine studies program can certainly stop and savor the sweet smell of Timothy hay, orchard grass and bran oats emanating from the campus farm. They will also analyze the nutritional value of the hay and oats while gaining a comprehensive understanding of equine health, anatomy and exercise physiology, says Amy Ordakowski, a lecturer and horse extension specialist who helps lead the new equine program. The equine studies program is part of an effort by the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources to expand its academic, research and outreach components that directly benefit the state of Maryland’s large and economically important horse industry. “This state has an extremely strong horse industry with a lot of history behind it,” Ordakowski says. “So Erin Petersen (left) and Amy Ordakowski, two new faculty we want to educate [our members with Maryland’s students] to be the future equine studies program, leaders in the horse industry, stand with “Dublin” (far left), a 12-year-old gray Oldenburg and then help them to find gelding, and “Kahlua,” a 6a job in Maryland.” year-old Tovero paint mare. 22

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IT’S NOT JUST HORSIN’ AROUND Down on the campus farm, modern science meets up with Maryland’s agrarian roots in a new equine studies program STORY BY PHOTO BY

T

Tom Ventsias John T. Consoli

he fact that a small working farm still exists on the University of Maryland campus shouldn’t seem that unusual. After all, the university was first established in 1856 as the Maryland Agricultural College, and it has a rich history as a land-grant institution dedicated to helping the state’s agricultural interests. Even so, faculty who currently teach at the farm requested a small sign, Campus Farm, be sited in front of a horse barn—mainly to remind visitors and passers-by that within the heart of a bustling research university, there is still a place to stop and smell the hay. Students enrolled in Maryland’s new equine studies program can certainly stop and savor the sweet smell of Timothy hay, orchard grass and bran oats emanating from the campus farm. They will also analyze the nutritional value of the hay and oats while gaining a comprehensive understanding of equine health, anatomy and exercise physiology, says Amy Ordakowski, a lecturer and horse extension specialist who helps lead the new equine program. The equine studies program is part of an effort by the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources to expand its academic, research and outreach components that directly benefit the state of Maryland’s large and economically important horse industry. “This state has an extremely strong horse industry with a lot of history behind it,” Ordakowski says. “So Erin Petersen (left) and Amy Ordakowski, two new faculty we want to educate [our members with Maryland’s students] to be the future equine studies program, leaders in the horse industry, stand with “Dublin” (far left), a 12-year-old gray Oldenburg and then help them to find gelding, and “Kahlua,” a 6a job in Maryland.” year-old Tovero paint mare. 22

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The combined enrollment has jumped from an initial cohort of about 30 students in 2002 to almost 200 students enrolled this fall. The four-year equine curriculum at Maryland culminates with a bachelor’s degree in animal science, with some of the upper-level equine science courses especially well suited for undergraduates planning to continue on to veterinary school. Along the way, students learn about small business bookkeeping and pasture management, and there is even a classroom visit by an attorney who talks about equine law. The level of horse knowledge of students entering the program varies, Ordakowski says. Within a typical class of 30 students, about a third have no knowledge whatsoever of horses, with most others having had some experience with the equine species. And then there are a few, Ordakowski acknowledges, “who may have owned and ridden horses for years, and who think that we won’t be able to teach them anything they already don’t know about horses. But we always prove them wrong.” In addition to the four-year program, the university’s Institute of Applied Agriculture, or IAA, now offers an equine business management certificate. The two-year certificate is geared toward those wanting to learn about the horse boarding business or how to maintain and operate a riding stable. It provides a strong background in business skills as well as hands-on knowledge of working around horses, says Erin Petersen, a lecturer and horse extension specialist who coordinates the new certificate program. “A lot of our students are older adults who are interested in either a second career, or are semi-retired and now want to do something fun that involves horses,” Petersen says. “They have a dream of working with horses and this is one way to get there.” Basic animal science and pasture management courses are required for the IAA certificate, with students also learning practical skills like how to load a horse on a horse trailer, or what to look for—and when to call—a blacksmith or a veterinarian should 24

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a problem arise. Students Students in the equine studies program gain a thorough understanding of must complete a 320-hour equine nutrition and physiology. internship in some aspect of Outside of the classroom, many also the Maryland horse industry, participate in extracurricular activities like the student-run Equestrian Club. Petersen says, with the range of internships so far being quite varied. They include one student helping to import rare Friesen horses, another assisting with farm operations on a thoroughbred breeding farm, and still another working at an equine arena that promotes three-day riding and dressage events. Both the two-year certificate and four-year degree programs have seen significant increases in students interested in learning all about horses. The combined enrollment has jumped from an initial cohort of about 30 students in 2002 to almost 200 students enrolled this fall.

Reaching Out to Grow

O

rdakowski and Petersen both arrived at the university in the fall of 2001, recruited specifically for the new program in equine studies. In talking horses with the two young faculty members, one quickly senses they are passionate about what they teach as well as where they teach. “I think horses are a lot of fun, but they are also a lot of responsibility and you have to know what you are doing,” Ordakowski says. “So Erin and I certainly challenge our students academically—we teach them the hard science behind taking care of a horse.” Petersen explains the importance of having the campus farm within walking distance of the classrooms. “Within the first two weeks of class, we are going over [to the barn] and giving students

PHOTOS BY EDWIN REMSBERG

hands-on learning of how to take an equine pulse or measure their respiration,” she says. “You just can’t get that kind of experience unless you have the animals right here.” Both faculty members spend half their time teaching and the other half serving as statewide equine extension specialists. Much of Ordakowski’s extension work is in providing educational leadership to the state’s large and active 4-H horse program for young adults. Petersen, as a state equine extension specialist, is regularly called upon by county extension educators to speak with farmers or farm managers on topics ranging from general equine nutrition to properly maintaining a horse pasture. “We’ve been here 18 months,” she says, “and the word is just now getting out that we have the kind of [academic and outreach] programs at the university that we do.” Maryland’s horse industry is starting to get the message loud and clear. “This program can be a vital part of the horse industry in this state—we need this, without question,” says Tim Capps, executive vice president with the Maryland Jockey Club, owner of the state’s two major thoroughbred racetracks. In the past, Capps says, Maryland horse owners and breeders would immediately look toward equine research and extension programs in Kentucky or Pennsylvania when seeking expert

advice on breeding, foaling or nutrition. Now, he says, there is an air of expectancy among the Maryland horse community that the equine program at the state’s flagship university will take hold and prosper. “We all want to see it evolve … where we will immediately think of [the University of] Maryland when we need to tap into expert advice or initiate equine research.” Horse owners and breeders are starting to lend their support financially, as well. University equine economist Malcolm Commer says that recent private support includes thoroughbred breeders from Maryland, Kentucky and Pennsylvania who have donated the value of stallion seasons, or stud fees, totaling almost $16,000 toward the equine studies program at Maryland. “It’s going to take money to grow this program,” Commer says. “We are making the industry aware, that if they want this program to flourish, that at least to a certain degree they are going to have to help support it.” TERP For more information on the equine studies program at the University of Maryland, go to www. equinestudies.umd.edu

Equine Studies Is Big Business, Too

A

recent study by the state’s Department of Agriculture has identified the horse industry as one of Maryland’s top three agricultural interests, the other two being poultry and turf grass/horticulture. An equine census released last December determined that Maryland’s 87,100 horses, along with 206,000 acres of land statewide used primarily for equine purposes—combined with farm equipment and all other horse-related supplies—has a total value in excess of $5.2 billion. Malcolm Commer, an associate professor in the Institute of Applied Agriculture and an extension equine economist, had previously conducted a detailed study that looked primarily at the economic impact of the state’s thoroughbred industry. It was Commer’s earlier assessment in 1992 that first opened some eyes among Maryland horse owners and breeders as well as the state legislature. “The more data we got [in the 1990s], the more it underlined the fact that the horse industry was a major business player in this state,” Commer says. While Commer wasn’t directly involved in gathering data for the 2002 equine census, as a member of the Maryland Horse Industry Board he has looked at all of the figures and has verified them. One figure that the equine census doesn’t show, he explains, is that horses are more environmentally friendly and more compatible with high-density populations than other agricultural interests. “People will pay a premium to live next to a horse farm,” he says, “whereas they will discount living next to most other types of agricultural operations.” —TV

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF ELLEN BLACKWELL PONS, COUNTRY LIFE FARM; BOTTOM PHOTO BY LYDIA A. WILLIAMS

The state’s horse industry includes thoroughbred breeding farms (top) as well as racing conducted by the Maryland Jockey Club, founded in 1743, making it the oldest sporting organization in the country.

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The combined enrollment has jumped from an initial cohort of about 30 students in 2002 to almost 200 students enrolled this fall. The four-year equine curriculum at Maryland culminates with a bachelor’s degree in animal science, with some of the upper-level equine science courses especially well suited for undergraduates planning to continue on to veterinary school. Along the way, students learn about small business bookkeeping and pasture management, and there is even a classroom visit by an attorney who talks about equine law. The level of horse knowledge of students entering the program varies, Ordakowski says. Within a typical class of 30 students, about a third have no knowledge whatsoever of horses, with most others having had some experience with the equine species. And then there are a few, Ordakowski acknowledges, “who may have owned and ridden horses for years, and who think that we won’t be able to teach them anything they already don’t know about horses. But we always prove them wrong.” In addition to the four-year program, the university’s Institute of Applied Agriculture, or IAA, now offers an equine business management certificate. The two-year certificate is geared toward those wanting to learn about the horse boarding business or how to maintain and operate a riding stable. It provides a strong background in business skills as well as hands-on knowledge of working around horses, says Erin Petersen, a lecturer and horse extension specialist who coordinates the new certificate program. “A lot of our students are older adults who are interested in either a second career, or are semi-retired and now want to do something fun that involves horses,” Petersen says. “They have a dream of working with horses and this is one way to get there.” Basic animal science and pasture management courses are required for the IAA certificate, with students also learning practical skills like how to load a horse on a horse trailer, or what to look for—and when to call—a blacksmith or a veterinarian should 24

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2003

a problem arise. Students Students in the equine studies program gain a thorough understanding of must complete a 320-hour equine nutrition and physiology. internship in some aspect of Outside of the classroom, many also the Maryland horse industry, participate in extracurricular activities like the student-run Equestrian Club. Petersen says, with the range of internships so far being quite varied. They include one student helping to import rare Friesen horses, another assisting with farm operations on a thoroughbred breeding farm, and still another working at an equine arena that promotes three-day riding and dressage events. Both the two-year certificate and four-year degree programs have seen significant increases in students interested in learning all about horses. The combined enrollment has jumped from an initial cohort of about 30 students in 2002 to almost 200 students enrolled this fall.

Reaching Out to Grow

O

rdakowski and Petersen both arrived at the university in the fall of 2001, recruited specifically for the new program in equine studies. In talking horses with the two young faculty members, one quickly senses they are passionate about what they teach as well as where they teach. “I think horses are a lot of fun, but they are also a lot of responsibility and you have to know what you are doing,” Ordakowski says. “So Erin and I certainly challenge our students academically—we teach them the hard science behind taking care of a horse.” Petersen explains the importance of having the campus farm within walking distance of the classrooms. “Within the first two weeks of class, we are going over [to the barn] and giving students

PHOTOS BY EDWIN REMSBERG

hands-on learning of how to take an equine pulse or measure their respiration,” she says. “You just can’t get that kind of experience unless you have the animals right here.” Both faculty members spend half their time teaching and the other half serving as statewide equine extension specialists. Much of Ordakowski’s extension work is in providing educational leadership to the state’s large and active 4-H horse program for young adults. Petersen, as a state equine extension specialist, is regularly called upon by county extension educators to speak with farmers or farm managers on topics ranging from general equine nutrition to properly maintaining a horse pasture. “We’ve been here 18 months,” she says, “and the word is just now getting out that we have the kind of [academic and outreach] programs at the university that we do.” Maryland’s horse industry is starting to get the message loud and clear. “This program can be a vital part of the horse industry in this state—we need this, without question,” says Tim Capps, executive vice president with the Maryland Jockey Club, owner of the state’s two major thoroughbred racetracks. In the past, Capps says, Maryland horse owners and breeders would immediately look toward equine research and extension programs in Kentucky or Pennsylvania when seeking expert

advice on breeding, foaling or nutrition. Now, he says, there is an air of expectancy among the Maryland horse community that the equine program at the state’s flagship university will take hold and prosper. “We all want to see it evolve … where we will immediately think of [the University of] Maryland when we need to tap into expert advice or initiate equine research.” Horse owners and breeders are starting to lend their support financially, as well. University equine economist Malcolm Commer says that recent private support includes thoroughbred breeders from Maryland, Kentucky and Pennsylvania who have donated the value of stallion seasons, or stud fees, totaling almost $16,000 toward the equine studies program at Maryland. “It’s going to take money to grow this program,” Commer says. “We are making the industry aware, that if they want this program to flourish, that at least to a certain degree they are going to have to help support it.” TERP For more information on the equine studies program at the University of Maryland, go to www. equinestudies.umd.edu

Equine Studies Is Big Business, Too

A

recent study by the state’s Department of Agriculture has identified the horse industry as one of Maryland’s top three agricultural interests, the other two being poultry and turf grass/horticulture. An equine census released last December determined that Maryland’s 87,100 horses, along with 206,000 acres of land statewide used primarily for equine purposes—combined with farm equipment and all other horse-related supplies—has a total value in excess of $5.2 billion. Malcolm Commer, an associate professor in the Institute of Applied Agriculture and an extension equine economist, had previously conducted a detailed study that looked primarily at the economic impact of the state’s thoroughbred industry. It was Commer’s earlier assessment in 1992 that first opened some eyes among Maryland horse owners and breeders as well as the state legislature. “The more data we got [in the 1990s], the more it underlined the fact that the horse industry was a major business player in this state,” Commer says. While Commer wasn’t directly involved in gathering data for the 2002 equine census, as a member of the Maryland Horse Industry Board he has looked at all of the figures and has verified them. One figure that the equine census doesn’t show, he explains, is that horses are more environmentally friendly and more compatible with high-density populations than other agricultural interests. “People will pay a premium to live next to a horse farm,” he says, “whereas they will discount living next to most other types of agricultural operations.” —TV

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF ELLEN BLACKWELL PONS, COUNTRY LIFE FARM; BOTTOM PHOTO BY LYDIA A. WILLIAMS

The state’s horse industry includes thoroughbred breeding farms (top) as well as racing conducted by the Maryland Jockey Club, founded in 1743, making it the oldest sporting organization in the country.

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BY MICHAEL RICHMAN

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND:

HOMELAND SECURITY. The horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, catapulted that

phrase into the American lexicon as a metaphor for protecting the nation from terrorists and guarding against an attack involving weapons of mass destruction. Federal, state and local governments are working feverishly to address the issue. But their resources are limited, thus creating the need for extraordinary contributions from corporations, foundations and the academic community.

A FRONT

LINE FOR

HOMELAND

SECURITY

Enter the University of Maryland, which is positioned strongly on the front lines of the homeland security issue. Whether directly or peripherally, Maryland’s researchers are addressing the issue through a bevy of prestigious programs in public affairs, the sciences and technology. Experts dot the College Park campus with proven expertise in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons; emergency response and training; and assessing the potential of animals, food, drinking water and pesticides as terror targets. “The homeland security problem requires an approach that integrates issues of policy, social science and technology,” says University of Maryland President C.D. Mote Jr. “And there are no organizations in our society other than universities that bring those elements together under one roof for collaborations on the key problems. The solutions to homeland security issues call for the special role that universities can play in this country. That’s where we fit in, particularly well.” Because of its broad research expertise and proximity to Washington, the University of Maryland maintains strong ties to government agencies and research labs. Federal agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Agriculture and the National Institutes of Health, along with private companies and foundations, comprise the bulk of contracts and grants awarded to Maryland in the realm of homeland security. Those projects active as of 9-11 and since have amounted to more than $100 million in awards to the university, says Erica Kropp, director of the Office of Research Administration and Advancement. She says the university expects to be successful in winning grants from the

RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Department of Homeland Security, noting that the new agency is expected to become one of the nation’s major sources for research and development. Even though the university was undertaking many activities before 9-11 that were relevant to homeland security, the university has launched programs in recent months that have magnified its visibility several-fold in this realm. One of them is the Center for Advanced Study of Language, an unprecedented research facility that is supporting the nation’s critical need for increased language capabilities. The center, funded by the Department of Defense, is a think-tank that studies languages that intelligence and defense personnel must know in order to successfully understand and defeat terrorism. The director, Richard Brecht, an expert in language study and national security, says the center will be vital for providing information, expertise and tools to the

ALUMNI LEADERSHIP IN HOME DEFENSE Two Maryland alumni are handling distinguished roles at the Department of Homeland Security. Gordon England ’61, (right) an electrical engineering graduate, was appointed the first DHS deputy secretary in January. Penrose “Parney” Albright M.S. ’82 and Ph.D ’85 in physics, is the department’s assistant secretary for plans, programs and budgets.

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27


BY MICHAEL RICHMAN

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND:

HOMELAND SECURITY. The horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, catapulted that

phrase into the American lexicon as a metaphor for protecting the nation from terrorists and guarding against an attack involving weapons of mass destruction. Federal, state and local governments are working feverishly to address the issue. But their resources are limited, thus creating the need for extraordinary contributions from corporations, foundations and the academic community.

A FRONT

LINE FOR

HOMELAND

SECURITY

Enter the University of Maryland, which is positioned strongly on the front lines of the homeland security issue. Whether directly or peripherally, Maryland’s researchers are addressing the issue through a bevy of prestigious programs in public affairs, the sciences and technology. Experts dot the College Park campus with proven expertise in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons; emergency response and training; and assessing the potential of animals, food, drinking water and pesticides as terror targets. “The homeland security problem requires an approach that integrates issues of policy, social science and technology,” says University of Maryland President C.D. Mote Jr. “And there are no organizations in our society other than universities that bring those elements together under one roof for collaborations on the key problems. The solutions to homeland security issues call for the special role that universities can play in this country. That’s where we fit in, particularly well.” Because of its broad research expertise and proximity to Washington, the University of Maryland maintains strong ties to government agencies and research labs. Federal agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Agriculture and the National Institutes of Health, along with private companies and foundations, comprise the bulk of contracts and grants awarded to Maryland in the realm of homeland security. Those projects active as of 9-11 and since have amounted to more than $100 million in awards to the university, says Erica Kropp, director of the Office of Research Administration and Advancement. She says the university expects to be successful in winning grants from the

RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Department of Homeland Security, noting that the new agency is expected to become one of the nation’s major sources for research and development. Even though the university was undertaking many activities before 9-11 that were relevant to homeland security, the university has launched programs in recent months that have magnified its visibility several-fold in this realm. One of them is the Center for Advanced Study of Language, an unprecedented research facility that is supporting the nation’s critical need for increased language capabilities. The center, funded by the Department of Defense, is a think-tank that studies languages that intelligence and defense personnel must know in order to successfully understand and defeat terrorism. The director, Richard Brecht, an expert in language study and national security, says the center will be vital for providing information, expertise and tools to the

ALUMNI LEADERSHIP IN HOME DEFENSE Two Maryland alumni are handling distinguished roles at the Department of Homeland Security. Gordon England ’61, (right) an electrical engineering graduate, was appointed the first DHS deputy secretary in January. Penrose “Parney” Albright M.S. ’82 and Ph.D ’85 in physics, is the department’s assistant secretary for plans, programs and budgets.

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27


in

theloop LAFREE DIGS FOR CRITICAL DATA WHAT DO archeology and terror-

ism research have in common? Ask Gary LaFree. The criminology and criminal justice professor is leading efforts to computerize a log of 74,000 cases of terrorism from 1970 to 1997. He says the information on where and when the terrorist acts occurred is straightforward, but that learning the motives behind the attacks is much trickier. That’s where the digging begins. “I feel like an archeologist,” LaFree says. “We hope to tap into the reasons why these groups are committing terrorist acts. But, we’re doing it in a way where you don’t get the entire plot, but a shard here and a shard there, and you try to reconstruct it.” LaFree launched the project about two years ago after learning of files owned by the Pinkerton Corp., a risk assessment firm in Alexandria, Va., citing every purported terrorist act from 1970 to 1997. Pinkerton, which has since left the risk assessment business, offered to give the files to LaFree, who envisioned a gold mine for a research project. The professor, a colleague of his at Maryland, and up to 60 students have since been coding the 74,000 cases into a computerized system. LaFree calls it groundbreaking work. The Pinkerton files are 10 times larger than any other terrorist database managed by the State Department or the CIA. He hopes to complete the database by year’s end and eventually make it available on a computer-friendly package to academic and government researchers, as well as students working on dissertations. LaFree’s goal is three-fold. He wants to input every bit of information from Pinkerton, then validate it against other databases to see how it compares. The third and perhaps most important step, he says, is to merge his data with other databases to answer such questions as how terrorism affects tourism, foreign direct investment and the stock market. He says the database will also allow researchers to create profiles of the terrorist groups and shed light on where they may strike next. —MR

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almost 90 government offices and agencies with foreign language requirements. There’s an alarming need, says Brecht, for U.S. officials to learn the languages spoken by terrorist groups, noting there are more than 75 countries where al-Quaida is operating, and where hundreds of languages and thousands of dialects exist. But he says the intelligence community is sorely understaffed in language expertise, citing a recent finding by the House Select Committee on Intelligence identifying language as the No. 1 human resource deficit in intelligence in the United States. Another new program is the Chesapeake Series, a set of panel discussions on homeland security led by the university and co-sponsored by the nine-member Mid-Atlantic Universities Consortium for Homeland Security, of which Maryland is a member. The series is a tool for the university to position itself to key people, for it features public policy experts and faculty researchers from across the region who offer insight into policymaking decisions. The briefings, to be held on a quarterly basis through the school year on Capitol Hill, began in May with a panel discussion on the possible consequences of a weapons of mass destruction attack on a major American city. An issue sure to be discussed in the workshops is whether the nation is prepared to handle another terrorist attack. From the standpoint of emergency response, the Council on Foreign Relations says “no.” The independent research group released a non-partisan report over the summer citing a need for $98 billion more in federal funding for first responders—fire, police and rescue personnel. Steve Edwards, director of the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute, an education and training center just off campus, agrees there is a dearth of funding. He says the institute has submitted a $7.5 million proposal to the Department of Homeland Security to help finance a collaborative effort MFRI has with three programs at the university: the Department of Fire Protection Engineering, the Small Smart Systems Center in the Clark School of Engineering, and the MIND Lab in the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. The goal is to create more sophisticated equipment for rescue teams in all types of emergencies—not only terrorist attacks. Specifically, researchers will develop an innovative system allowing the command post on an emergency scene to know the location of every rescue worker in a burning building, for example, by putting sensors and television cameras on firefighters’ gear. The command post will also be able to measure the respiration and heart rate of every firefighter, as well as smoke velocity, density, chemical composition and temperature in the building. Plus, the endeavor involves enhancing systems to detect the vibrations of a building and its possible collapse. The programs above offer only a glimpse of the university’s commitment to homeland security, but by tackling the homeland security issue with such vigor, Maryland is merely following through on its responsibility as a public research university with such a wealth of assets. TERP

PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY LaFREE

Foundation, Alumni Board Add Members

Alan Cason ’83 (top) is the Alumni Association Board of Governors president for 2003–2004. Barry Gossett ’58 serves as chair of the University of Maryland College Park Foundation Board of Trustees.

BOTH the University of Maryland College Park Foundation Board of Trustees and the Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors elected new members. The following were elected to the board during the board’s June meeting: J. Paul Carey ’82 MBA, CEO of Enumerate and past president of the Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors; Ilene Knable Gotts ’80, antitrust law attorney in the New York firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen and Katz; Wayne Hockmeyer, former CEO and current chairman of the board of MedImmune Inc.; and Neil Moskowitz ’80, managing director of Credit Suisse First Boston Corporation in New York. The University of Maryland

College Park Foundation Board of Trustees assist and advise the university president, govern the investments and distribution of private funds for the foundation, serve as advocates and help increase the level of philanthropic support for the university. The chair of the board of trustees is Barry P. Gossett ’58, partner with Pascal Turner Partners. The Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors elected Alan Cason as its president during the board’s May meeting. Cason, who has been a board member since fall 2000, began serving his oneyear term as president on July 1. A 1983 graduate of the Robert H. Smith School of Business, Cason is a managing partner at McGuire Woods LLP, a

Baltimore law firm. The board also welcomed several new members: Chris Brown ’79 president of KLT Inc.; Dean Coulopoulos M.B.A. ’86, financial consultant (retired); the Rev. Kerry Hill ’87; Christena Kirwan ’85, M.A. ’87, curator of visual resources, School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation; Leland Weinstein ’84, president of Syscom Services; and Charles “Buck” Williams ’88, managing director of Centech. Alumni association board members typically serve two two-year terms. The current board will focus on increasing membership in the alumni association and on developing the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center.

specialGIFTS Ruth Davis ’52 M.S., ’55 Ph.D. (right) made a generous gift of $500,000 to establish the Ruth M. Davis Professorship in Mathematics in the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Davis—one of the first women to receive a doctorate in mathematics at Maryland—is a member of the Maryland Alumni Association Hall of Fame.

President C.D. Mote Jr. presents Sergey Brin ’93 with the Outstanding Young Alumnus Award at the 2003 Alumni Association Awards Gala. Brin will share his experiences as a technology leader when he delivers the Winter Commencement address to graduates on Saturday, December 20.

The Samuel J. & Ethel LeFrak Charitable Foundation has pledged $1 million to establish the Samuel J. LeFrak Scholars Fund. The gift will fund annual LeFrak Scholars in men’s basketball, football and men’s track. The late Samuel LeFrak graduated from the university in 1940. Known for his commitment to affordable housing and responsible community development, LeFrak was chairman of The LeFrak Organization, a private building firm. Thanks to the generosity of Google co-founder and Maryland alumnus Sergey Brin ’93, Google Technology, Inc. has donated the Google search appliance for use on the university’s Web site, www.umd.edu. The two-year gift is valued at $28,000. (Read more on page 3.)

TOP PHOTO BY SCOTT SUCHMAN; MIDDLE PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF RUTH DAVIS

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29


in

theloop LAFREE DIGS FOR CRITICAL DATA WHAT DO archeology and terror-

ism research have in common? Ask Gary LaFree. The criminology and criminal justice professor is leading efforts to computerize a log of 74,000 cases of terrorism from 1970 to 1997. He says the information on where and when the terrorist acts occurred is straightforward, but that learning the motives behind the attacks is much trickier. That’s where the digging begins. “I feel like an archeologist,” LaFree says. “We hope to tap into the reasons why these groups are committing terrorist acts. But, we’re doing it in a way where you don’t get the entire plot, but a shard here and a shard there, and you try to reconstruct it.” LaFree launched the project about two years ago after learning of files owned by the Pinkerton Corp., a risk assessment firm in Alexandria, Va., citing every purported terrorist act from 1970 to 1997. Pinkerton, which has since left the risk assessment business, offered to give the files to LaFree, who envisioned a gold mine for a research project. The professor, a colleague of his at Maryland, and up to 60 students have since been coding the 74,000 cases into a computerized system. LaFree calls it groundbreaking work. The Pinkerton files are 10 times larger than any other terrorist database managed by the State Department or the CIA. He hopes to complete the database by year’s end and eventually make it available on a computer-friendly package to academic and government researchers, as well as students working on dissertations. LaFree’s goal is three-fold. He wants to input every bit of information from Pinkerton, then validate it against other databases to see how it compares. The third and perhaps most important step, he says, is to merge his data with other databases to answer such questions as how terrorism affects tourism, foreign direct investment and the stock market. He says the database will also allow researchers to create profiles of the terrorist groups and shed light on where they may strike next. —MR

28

TERP FALL

2003

almost 90 government offices and agencies with foreign language requirements. There’s an alarming need, says Brecht, for U.S. officials to learn the languages spoken by terrorist groups, noting there are more than 75 countries where al-Quaida is operating, and where hundreds of languages and thousands of dialects exist. But he says the intelligence community is sorely understaffed in language expertise, citing a recent finding by the House Select Committee on Intelligence identifying language as the No. 1 human resource deficit in intelligence in the United States. Another new program is the Chesapeake Series, a set of panel discussions on homeland security led by the university and co-sponsored by the nine-member Mid-Atlantic Universities Consortium for Homeland Security, of which Maryland is a member. The series is a tool for the university to position itself to key people, for it features public policy experts and faculty researchers from across the region who offer insight into policymaking decisions. The briefings, to be held on a quarterly basis through the school year on Capitol Hill, began in May with a panel discussion on the possible consequences of a weapons of mass destruction attack on a major American city. An issue sure to be discussed in the workshops is whether the nation is prepared to handle another terrorist attack. From the standpoint of emergency response, the Council on Foreign Relations says “no.” The independent research group released a non-partisan report over the summer citing a need for $98 billion more in federal funding for first responders—fire, police and rescue personnel. Steve Edwards, director of the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute, an education and training center just off campus, agrees there is a dearth of funding. He says the institute has submitted a $7.5 million proposal to the Department of Homeland Security to help finance a collaborative effort MFRI has with three programs at the university: the Department of Fire Protection Engineering, the Small Smart Systems Center in the Clark School of Engineering, and the MIND Lab in the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. The goal is to create more sophisticated equipment for rescue teams in all types of emergencies—not only terrorist attacks. Specifically, researchers will develop an innovative system allowing the command post on an emergency scene to know the location of every rescue worker in a burning building, for example, by putting sensors and television cameras on firefighters’ gear. The command post will also be able to measure the respiration and heart rate of every firefighter, as well as smoke velocity, density, chemical composition and temperature in the building. Plus, the endeavor involves enhancing systems to detect the vibrations of a building and its possible collapse. The programs above offer only a glimpse of the university’s commitment to homeland security, but by tackling the homeland security issue with such vigor, Maryland is merely following through on its responsibility as a public research university with such a wealth of assets. TERP

PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY LaFREE

Foundation, Alumni Board Add Members

Alan Cason ’83 (top) is the Alumni Association Board of Governors president for 2003–2004. Barry Gossett ’58 serves as chair of the University of Maryland College Park Foundation Board of Trustees.

BOTH the University of Maryland College Park Foundation Board of Trustees and the Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors elected new members. The following were elected to the board during the board’s June meeting: J. Paul Carey ’82 MBA, CEO of Enumerate and past president of the Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors; Ilene Knable Gotts ’80, antitrust law attorney in the New York firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen and Katz; Wayne Hockmeyer, former CEO and current chairman of the board of MedImmune Inc.; and Neil Moskowitz ’80, managing director of Credit Suisse First Boston Corporation in New York. The University of Maryland

College Park Foundation Board of Trustees assist and advise the university president, govern the investments and distribution of private funds for the foundation, serve as advocates and help increase the level of philanthropic support for the university. The chair of the board of trustees is Barry P. Gossett ’58, partner with Pascal Turner Partners. The Maryland Alumni Association Board of Governors elected Alan Cason as its president during the board’s May meeting. Cason, who has been a board member since fall 2000, began serving his oneyear term as president on July 1. A 1983 graduate of the Robert H. Smith School of Business, Cason is a managing partner at McGuire Woods LLP, a

Baltimore law firm. The board also welcomed several new members: Chris Brown ’79 president of KLT Inc.; Dean Coulopoulos M.B.A. ’86, financial consultant (retired); the Rev. Kerry Hill ’87; Christena Kirwan ’85, M.A. ’87, curator of visual resources, School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation; Leland Weinstein ’84, president of Syscom Services; and Charles “Buck” Williams ’88, managing director of Centech. Alumni association board members typically serve two two-year terms. The current board will focus on increasing membership in the alumni association and on developing the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center.

specialGIFTS Ruth Davis ’52 M.S., ’55 Ph.D. (right) made a generous gift of $500,000 to establish the Ruth M. Davis Professorship in Mathematics in the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Davis—one of the first women to receive a doctorate in mathematics at Maryland—is a member of the Maryland Alumni Association Hall of Fame.

President C.D. Mote Jr. presents Sergey Brin ’93 with the Outstanding Young Alumnus Award at the 2003 Alumni Association Awards Gala. Brin will share his experiences as a technology leader when he delivers the Winter Commencement address to graduates on Saturday, December 20.

The Samuel J. & Ethel LeFrak Charitable Foundation has pledged $1 million to establish the Samuel J. LeFrak Scholars Fund. The gift will fund annual LeFrak Scholars in men’s basketball, football and men’s track. The late Samuel LeFrak graduated from the university in 1940. Known for his commitment to affordable housing and responsible community development, LeFrak was chairman of The LeFrak Organization, a private building firm. Thanks to the generosity of Google co-founder and Maryland alumnus Sergey Brin ’93, Google Technology, Inc. has donated the Google search appliance for use on the university’s Web site, www.umd.edu. The two-year gift is valued at $28,000. (Read more on page 3.)

TOP PHOTO BY SCOTT SUCHMAN; MIDDLE PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF RUTH DAVIS

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play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard THE WASHINGTON WIZARDS

Straight Talk from Yow ATHLETICS DIRECTOR ADDRESSES ACC EXPANSION

In a move that surprised many in intercollege athletics, the Atlantic Coast Conference expanded to 11 teams this past summer, adding perennial football powerhouses Miami and Virginia Tech. Reporter Robin Lundberg ’04 had a chance to talk to Maryland athletics director Deborah Yow about the ramifications of the expansion. TERP: What are your thoughts on the two schools joining the ACC and the controversy that ensued? YOW: We have been a proponent of a threeteam expansion to take the ACC to 12 teams. When it became obvious that the seven votes for this to occur could not be secured, we wanted to get as close as possible—two teams now, one later. [In order to expand, seven of the nine current ACC teams needed to vote in favor of expansion.] Academically, Dr. Charles Wellford, faculty athletics representative, was involved in checking into the academic profiles of the institutions. He and [Maryland] President Mote feel that both schools will be good additions to the ACC. TERP: Both Miami and Virginia Tech are known for their football programs. What kind of effect will the expansion have on Maryland football? YOW: It will make it much more challenging to

win the ACC. It makes the conference more competitive from top to bottom. TERP: Some feel that the expansion could affect basketball traditions and scheduling. How do you address these concerns? YOW: There will be virtually no competitive effect. Scheduling has not been worked out yet. There are several options: continuing the double round-robin conference play as it is

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now and eliminating some non-conference games or dividing the conference into two divisions with each division playing a double round-robin schedule and then playing the teams from the other division once each.

selected Maryland all-time assist leader Steve Blake with the 38th pick in the NBA Draft. Blake joins fellow Terp, and former teammate, Juan Dixon in the Wizards backcourt. FORMER OLYMPIAN Andrew

Valmon was named the new head coach of Maryland track. JACK ZANE ’60, executive director of Maryland’s Walk of Fame, is retiring from fulltime duties after 43 years with the university. THE MINNESOTA VIKINGS

TERP: What are the greatest benefits of the expansion? What are the biggest drawbacks? YOW: President Mote and I believe the biggest benefit is an intangible one. We can now reposition the conference and expand its footprint by adding more votes in NCAA legislation, giving the ACC strength in numbers. We also picked up a significant market in south Florida and a respected program. The drawbacks could be financial if a 12th team or an ACC championship football game is not added. We were disappointed when we didn’t wind up with 12 teams. [NCAA rules state that there must be 12 teams in order for a conference championship game to be played.] TERP: Overall, how will the expansion affect Maryland sports? YOW: It is going to raise the bar for our sports

teams and make recruiting more challenging than ever, but on the whole it should be very positive. However, it may take five or 10 years to see exactly how big an effect the expansion will have on Maryland athletics.

selected All American linebacker E.J. Henderson ’03 with the 40th pick in the NFL Draft. GOLF PRO Jack Nicklaus chose Maryland alumnus and former golf coach Fred Funk ’80 for the U.S. team that will compete for the President’s Cup in November.

Side by Side THE CLOSE RELATIONSHIP enjoyed

between the School of Music and the National Symphony Orchestra is about to become even closer. For one week in November, the NSO will take up residency in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, an unprecedented move by any orchestra in the country. The NSO at Maryland project is not entirely unexpected, however, says Christopher Kendall, director of the university’s School of Music. Indeed, 17 NSO members, including 12 who are principal players, teach at the school. Throughout the week of November 10, the entire orchestra will participate in a gamut of activities that are crucial experiences for young musicians and future orchestral players, says Kendall. They will coach students, teach master classes, join in orchestral section rehearsals, hold mock auditions and perform Young Persons Concerts for area schoolchildren. The week will culminate with two performances in which members of the University of Maryland Symphony Orchestra and the NSO sit side-byside on stage for a concert in the Dekelboum Concert Hall in the

TOM MILLER ’92, a former

All American, was named the new head coach of Maryland Wrestling, replacing the recently retired John McHugh ’59.

The National Symphony Orchestra and the School of Music will perform together in the Dekelboum Concert Hall in November.

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on November 14 at 7 p.m., under the baton of NSO Associate Conductor Emile de Cou and UMSO Music Director James Ross. “This is a fabulous opportunity for our students to sit in close proximity to outstanding professionals in the field, making music together,” says Kendall. Since the combined orchestras number some 180 musicians, all of the students will have a chance to play in some portion of the program, which includes works by Felix Mendelssohn, Richard Strauss and Maurice Ravel. The program will be repeated at the Kennedy Center on November 15 at 6 p.m. Both performances are free and open to the public, but tickets are required. “It will be an extraordinary chance for our students to play in these two venues on successive nights because the acoustical experience is such a big part of playing. These are very different halls,” says Kendall, who describes the 2,400-seat Kennedy Center’s acoustics as “clear,” and those of the more intimate 1,000-seat Dekelboum as “visceral.” In December, the University of Maryland Chamber Choir, led by Professor Edward McClary, will join the NSO at the Kennedy Center for four performances of Handel’s “Messiah.” —DB

HIGH OCTANE Six performance spaces are home to more than 1,000 performances —by students to internationally recognized luminaries—annually in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Last year, some 210,000 visitors attended events. More than half of its shows have reached 90 percent of seating capacity. On any given day, you might encounter a dance premiere, listen to a conversation with a playwright or spend an evening with a jazz legend.

FORMER TERP baseball standouts Steve Schmoll and Kyle George were selected in the Major League Baseball Draft. Schmoll was selected by the Los Angeles Dodgers, while George was chosen by the Baltimore Orioles.

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TOP PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

TERP FALL

2003

31


play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard THE WASHINGTON WIZARDS

Straight Talk from Yow ATHLETICS DIRECTOR ADDRESSES ACC EXPANSION

In a move that surprised many in intercollege athletics, the Atlantic Coast Conference expanded to 11 teams this past summer, adding perennial football powerhouses Miami and Virginia Tech. Reporter Robin Lundberg ’04 had a chance to talk to Maryland athletics director Deborah Yow about the ramifications of the expansion. TERP: What are your thoughts on the two schools joining the ACC and the controversy that ensued? YOW: We have been a proponent of a threeteam expansion to take the ACC to 12 teams. When it became obvious that the seven votes for this to occur could not be secured, we wanted to get as close as possible—two teams now, one later. [In order to expand, seven of the nine current ACC teams needed to vote in favor of expansion.] Academically, Dr. Charles Wellford, faculty athletics representative, was involved in checking into the academic profiles of the institutions. He and [Maryland] President Mote feel that both schools will be good additions to the ACC. TERP: Both Miami and Virginia Tech are known for their football programs. What kind of effect will the expansion have on Maryland football? YOW: It will make it much more challenging to

win the ACC. It makes the conference more competitive from top to bottom. TERP: Some feel that the expansion could affect basketball traditions and scheduling. How do you address these concerns? YOW: There will be virtually no competitive effect. Scheduling has not been worked out yet. There are several options: continuing the double round-robin conference play as it is

30

TERP FALL

2003

now and eliminating some non-conference games or dividing the conference into two divisions with each division playing a double round-robin schedule and then playing the teams from the other division once each.

selected Maryland all-time assist leader Steve Blake with the 38th pick in the NBA Draft. Blake joins fellow Terp, and former teammate, Juan Dixon in the Wizards backcourt. FORMER OLYMPIAN Andrew

Valmon was named the new head coach of Maryland track. JACK ZANE ’60, executive director of Maryland’s Walk of Fame, is retiring from fulltime duties after 43 years with the university. THE MINNESOTA VIKINGS

TERP: What are the greatest benefits of the expansion? What are the biggest drawbacks? YOW: President Mote and I believe the biggest benefit is an intangible one. We can now reposition the conference and expand its footprint by adding more votes in NCAA legislation, giving the ACC strength in numbers. We also picked up a significant market in south Florida and a respected program. The drawbacks could be financial if a 12th team or an ACC championship football game is not added. We were disappointed when we didn’t wind up with 12 teams. [NCAA rules state that there must be 12 teams in order for a conference championship game to be played.] TERP: Overall, how will the expansion affect Maryland sports? YOW: It is going to raise the bar for our sports

teams and make recruiting more challenging than ever, but on the whole it should be very positive. However, it may take five or 10 years to see exactly how big an effect the expansion will have on Maryland athletics.

selected All American linebacker E.J. Henderson ’03 with the 40th pick in the NFL Draft. GOLF PRO Jack Nicklaus chose Maryland alumnus and former golf coach Fred Funk ’80 for the U.S. team that will compete for the President’s Cup in November.

Side by Side THE CLOSE RELATIONSHIP enjoyed

between the School of Music and the National Symphony Orchestra is about to become even closer. For one week in November, the NSO will take up residency in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, an unprecedented move by any orchestra in the country. The NSO at Maryland project is not entirely unexpected, however, says Christopher Kendall, director of the university’s School of Music. Indeed, 17 NSO members, including 12 who are principal players, teach at the school. Throughout the week of November 10, the entire orchestra will participate in a gamut of activities that are crucial experiences for young musicians and future orchestral players, says Kendall. They will coach students, teach master classes, join in orchestral section rehearsals, hold mock auditions and perform Young Persons Concerts for area schoolchildren. The week will culminate with two performances in which members of the University of Maryland Symphony Orchestra and the NSO sit side-byside on stage for a concert in the Dekelboum Concert Hall in the

TOM MILLER ’92, a former

All American, was named the new head coach of Maryland Wrestling, replacing the recently retired John McHugh ’59.

The National Symphony Orchestra and the School of Music will perform together in the Dekelboum Concert Hall in November.

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on November 14 at 7 p.m., under the baton of NSO Associate Conductor Emile de Cou and UMSO Music Director James Ross. “This is a fabulous opportunity for our students to sit in close proximity to outstanding professionals in the field, making music together,” says Kendall. Since the combined orchestras number some 180 musicians, all of the students will have a chance to play in some portion of the program, which includes works by Felix Mendelssohn, Richard Strauss and Maurice Ravel. The program will be repeated at the Kennedy Center on November 15 at 6 p.m. Both performances are free and open to the public, but tickets are required. “It will be an extraordinary chance for our students to play in these two venues on successive nights because the acoustical experience is such a big part of playing. These are very different halls,” says Kendall, who describes the 2,400-seat Kennedy Center’s acoustics as “clear,” and those of the more intimate 1,000-seat Dekelboum as “visceral.” In December, the University of Maryland Chamber Choir, led by Professor Edward McClary, will join the NSO at the Kennedy Center for four performances of Handel’s “Messiah.” —DB

HIGH OCTANE Six performance spaces are home to more than 1,000 performances —by students to internationally recognized luminaries—annually in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Last year, some 210,000 visitors attended events. More than half of its shows have reached 90 percent of seating capacity. On any given day, you might encounter a dance premiere, listen to a conversation with a playwright or spend an evening with a jazz legend.

FORMER TERP baseball standouts Steve Schmoll and Kyle George were selected in the Major League Baseball Draft. Schmoll was selected by the Los Angeles Dodgers, while George was chosen by the Baltimore Orioles.

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TOP PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

TERP FALL

2003

31


Interpretations

At a Crossroads YOGI BERRA ADVISED, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” The University of Maryland is at a fork and which road we take will have a profound impact on our capacity to reach the highest echelon of research universities, serve the best high school graduates in Maryland, and lead economic development in the state and region. The university’s rise in quality and reputation during the past decade has been extraordinary. The qualifications of incoming freshmen have risen every year and are now competitive with the best. Our federally supported research has risen more than 61 percent in the past five-year period—now topping $225 million. The university moved to 17th place among public universities in this year’s U.S. News & World Report rankings, with 50 programs ranked in the top 15, up from 14 five years ago. These achievements are at risk, however. The recent economic downturn in state support has spotlighted a long-term problem in university funding that has prevailed in both good times and bad. Our funding level per student (derived from tuition revenue plus state appropriations) has consistently been low in comparison to other universities with our mandate. We estimate that in 2004, funding per student will be over $4,000 less than the average of funding at our peers. Without bold action, the gap in funding between Maryland and the nation’s other top public universities will widen. During the past year I have consulted literally hundreds of the university’s stakeholders, including faculty, students, legislators, alumni and members of the College Park Foundation Board of Trustees. No one I have talked to wants us to let our quality slide. The pride in what Maryland has accomplished is palpable. We have the responsibility for shaping our future. The state’s support of public higher education has dropped precipitously during the last year: two years ago the state appropriation was $360 million, but we begin this year with $306 million. We will do everything we can to convince our public officials of the impor-

32

TERP FALL

2003

tance of investing in higher education, but in all likelihood we will have to rely more on tuition revenue and private funds to support academic excellence. We must also raise major philanthropic support for scholarships to ensure that the university remains accessible to talented students. In 1988, the citizens of Maryland decided that they wanted their state university to be among the nation’s best, and the General Assembly put into law this mandate. Our campus took this charge to heart. We will not back away from the goal now. Over the coming months, we will be developing a new financial model to bring the university to its mandated standard while serving the students and state of Maryland. I look forward to sharing our thoughts and plans with you and gaining your input and support. Only by working together can the Maryland family move our great university forward. Dan Mote, President

Betwixt and Between Maryland is not well supported by the state, like the University of North Carolina, nor does it have a high tuition practice such as the University of Michigan.

COMBINED TUITION AND STATE SUPPORT COMPARED TO PEERS

CHART REFLECTS THE AVERAGE TUITION AND ACADEMIC FEES AND STATE GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION PER FULL-TIME STUDENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002. * In FY’03, Illinois increased tuition by 30% over FY’02

PHOTO BY JEREMY GREENE


S C H O L A R S F U L B R I G H T O F ■ S C O R E S

P H Y S I C S I N

17th among public universities —up from 30th in 1998 68 programs in the Top 25 among public universities 50 programs in the Top 15

Class Act ■ Applications for freshman admission soared from 17,000 in 1998 to 25,000—an amazing 47% increase. In fact, six students applied for every spot in the Fall 2003 entering class.

N O B E L ■ O N E

W I N N E R S P R I Z E

Brodie Remington Vice President, University Relations

J. Paul Carey ’82 MBA CEO, Enumerate Terry Flannery ’83, ’87 M.Ed., ’95 Ph.D. Executive Director, University Marketing and Communications John Girouard ’81 President and CEO, Capital Asset Management Group Anil Gupta Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Strategy and Organization, Robert H. Smith School of Business Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations Vicki Rymer ’61, ’66 MBA, ’83 Ph.D. Teaching Professor, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Lee Thornton Professor and Eaton Chair, Philip Merrill College of Journalism MAGAZINE STAFF

Dianne Burch Executive Editor

Jennifer Paul ’93 Art Director

Research Matters

Jason Quick Senior Designer

■ Federally supported research revenue

rose 61.5% from $140M in FY98 to $225M in FY03. Total sponsored research and outreach revenue for FY03: $315 million.

61.5% $225M

$140M FY ’98

FY ’03

Rising Terp Pride ■ Membership in the Maryland Alumni

Association has grown by 35 percent in the past five years.

FY ’98

23,000 FY ’03

31,000

Annual donors nearly doubled in the past five years.

FY ’98

FY ’03

21,000

41,000

Consolidate today and lock in an incredibly low rate!

ADVISORY BOARD

John T. Consoli ’86 Creative Director

M

Student Loan Rates Plummet!

PUBLISHER

Beth A. Morgen Managing Editor

P U L I T Z E R S I X

Stellar Faculty

TERP

Keith Scroggins ’79 Bureau Head of General Services, City of Baltimore, Dept. of Public Works

P R I Z E

W I N N E R

The University of Maryland is on the path to meet its destiny.We’re drawing top-notch faculty, attracting the brightest students around and investing in the quality of our academic programs.There’s no question, we are now a collegiate force to reckon with on a national basis. But if you think that’s all we’re destined to accomplish, then you don’t know your Terrapins. Fear the Turtle.

Tom Ventsias Writer Daniel Cusick Sofia Kosmetatos Michael Richman ’84, ’85 Beth Workman Contributing Writers Mike D’Angelo Stacy L. Kaper Robin Lundberg Magazine Interns E-mail terp_alum@umail.umd.edu Terp magazine is published by the Division of University Relations. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Send correspondence to Beth Morgen, Managing Editor, Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or, send an email to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. The University of Maryland, College Park, is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. University policies, programs and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

To help borrowers take advantage of the falling interest rates on student loans,

Dear Alumni and Friends,

the University of Maryland Alumni Association has teamed with Nelnet to offer student loan consolidation. Qualifying borrowers who choose to consolidate

WELCOME TO THE FIRST ISSUE of

Terp. Before we moved forward with this new magazine, we carefully considered what people like in publications today and tried to build that into Terp. The result is a magazine that is all about connecting you to the Maryland community while keeping your needs—and your busy lives—in mind. We strove to keep articles shorter, to direct you to information quickly and to cover topics that are relevant to you and your family. For instance, the information in “The Source” on page 6 focuses on university resources that you can tap. I highly recommend the Suzuki violin lessons featured in this department. As working parents, my husband, Michael, and I are always looking for engaging and convenient activities for our threeyear-old.These lessons, taught just across campus from the alumni association headquarters, give us quality time with our son, James.We learn something new since parents are asked to participate. Plus, students in the School of Music teach the classes. In addition to “The Source,” Terp highlights faculty research, alumni news and programs, Maryland history and much more. In “M-File,” starting on page 12, meet Maryland faculty who are leading research on voter technology, building a digital library of children’s books and preparing to visit a comet. Learn about the achievements of fellow alumni—from an architect turned furniture designer to a football player turned clothing designer—in

can lock in a very low rate for the entire life of the loan and dramatically reduce their monthly payment.

Today, eligible borrowers may be able to lock in a fixed interest rate as low as 2.875%.1 Nelnet also offers incentives that reduce the rate even further. By completing and electronically signing a loan application online, “Class Act” on page 8. Do you know when the first football game was played at Maryland? See “Ask Anne” on page 7 to test your knowledge of university history. The features in Terp offer readers insight into the university’s role in homeland security, the changing face of philanthropy and an equestrian program that is just out of the starting gate. For a snapshot of upcoming events on campus, look no further than “Maryland Live” in the magazine’s center. I hope that Terp becomes one of your favorite magazines and that it will reinforce your pride in the University of Maryland.There is truly “no better time to be a Terp.” This new magazine is one of the reasons why.

Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations

borrowers can earn a 1.0% interest rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments.2 In addition, borrowers can get a .25% rate reduction

Consolidate PLUS loans at 4.125%.

for direct debit payments. Together, these benefits can reduce the consolidation loan’s interest rate by another 1.25%!

Nelnet, a national leader in education finance, brings you over two decades

Parent loans for students

of experience funding education. For more information on how you can

are also eligible for

consolidate your student loans, call 1.866.4CONSOL (426.6765) or visit

consolidation. Call

our Web site at www.alumniconsolidation.nelnet.net to learn more.

1.866.4CONSOL to learn more.

1The consolidation loan interest rate is calculated by taking the weighted average of the rates on the federal loans you are consolidating, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth percent. 2Applicants who complete and electronically sign the loan application online are eligible for the 1% rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments. Borrowers completing applications through the mail are eligible to earn a 1% interest rate reduction after 48 initial, regular, on-time payments. Nelnet reserves the right to modify or terminate the interest rate reduction programs at its discretion without prior notice. Terms described above are in effect as of July 1, 2003. Student loan interest rates adjust every July 1 and remain in effect through June 30 of the following year. Other conditions including the length of repayment are as important as the interest rate when considering whether consolidation is right for you. Your borrower’s rights may change when you consolidate your student loans; please refer to your Borrower Rights and Responsibilities statement or contact a Nelnet Loan Advisor for more information. Nelnet is a trademark of Nelnet, Inc. All rights reserved.

To qualify, borrowers must be in repayment or in the grace period with a combined total of at least $7,500 in qualified student loan debt, and less than 90 days delinquent.


c

br ele

ate

TERP

CONNECTING

there’s no better time to be a terp!

THE UNIVERSITY

nn

ec

OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY

t

VOL. 1, NO. 1 FALL 2003

discover our newly hatched magazine. Terp will be your source for connecting with the University of Maryland community three times a year. It’s the place to turn for news about the people, programs and alumni that are relevant to you.

YOU ARE HOLDING

play

homecoming weekend 2003 class of 1953 reunion

Just hatched!

DID YOU KNOW?

OCTOBER 30 – NOVEMBER 1

• On average, there are 13 eggs

Call 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or visit www.alumni.umd.edu. See page 16 for activities!

per clutch (nest), with as many as three clutches per season. • Most nests in Maryland are deposited June through mid-July. • Eggs require 60 to 100 days of warm temperatures to mature. • Sand areas along the tidewater,

Division of University Relations College Park, Maryland 20742-8724 Forwarding Service Requested

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 10 College Park, MD

above the high-tide line, are ideal nesting habitats. However, the persistent terrapin is known to make use of driveways and lawn areas for nesting. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Fear the Turtle merchandise goes to the Fear the Turtle Fund for terrapin conservation.

Please turn flap to see just how Maryland is leading the way.

Keep up with the Terp!

co

Terp Fall, 2003  

Terp Magazine, University of Maryland

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