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in this issue HONORING MCNAIR PG. 2 / MAP TO SUCCESS  PG. 2 MARYLAND TODAY  PG. 2 / DOWNTIME DECISIONS  PG. 3 COMMUNITY SEEDS PG. 8 / ACCOLADES  PG. 9 BOOKSHELF  PG. 9 / TAPPING SCIENCE PG. 10  

between the columns a newsletter for faculty & staff of the university of maryland SEPTEMBER 2018

A GREATER VIEW YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING NEW AND COMING TO GREATER COLLEGE PARK PG. 4


University, Team to Honor McNair TEAMMATES OF UMD STUDENT-ATHLETE JORDAN MCNAIR, who died after suffering heatstroke during

a May 29 football training session, are honoring the player they called a “gentle giant” this season and beyond. “We plan to have his legacy live on forever,” said offensive lineman Ellis McKennie. “Every play we make, every snap we take will be in Jordan’s honor.” McNair, 19, a 6-foot-4, 325-pound Randallstown, Md., native, was a four-star recruit out of the McDonogh School. He appeared in one game as a Terrapin, making his collegiate debut against Towson last season. University President Wallace D. Loh took “legal and moral responsibility” for the mistakes that led to the tragedy and has pledged to implement recommended reforms to protect Terp student-athletes. The University of Maryland System Board of Regents is overseeing an investigation into the circumstances of McNair’s death and a separate broader review of the football program. In August, McNair’s teammates announced that moments of silence would be held before the Sept. 1 game versus Texas at FedEx Field in Landover, and before a Sept. 15 game versus Temple at Maryland Stadium. Other plans include: • Wearing helmet stickers with McNair’s number, 79. •E  ndowing a scholarship with McNair’s name for a Maryland student-athlete. •H  onoring McNair on his scheduled senior day in 2020, and allowing a new player to wear 79 only after he would have graduated. •N  aming the new Cole Field House offensive line room for McNair. •E  nclosing McNair’s locker in a glass case and moving it to Cole when it is complete. Offensive lineman Johnny Jordan called him “one of the best friends, teammates and roommates anyone could ever ask for” and thanked fans for their words of support. “It is now more than ever that we need your support,” he said. “We are all in this together.”

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INTRODUCING MARYLAND TODAY A New Information Source Connecting the Campus Community Every Day With the university’s newly launched daily e-newsletter and website, Maryland Today, Between the Columns bids adieu. Now you can find more campus news and features about faculty, staff and students at today.umd.edu. We’ve enjoyed reporting on the university in BTC and are committed to delivering the same quality of information and storytelling to readers at Maryland Today.

MAP TO SUCCESS looking for new ideas to support and engage umd employees? The Thriving Workplace Initiative has created a new “Thriver Map” to provide a crowd-sourced collection of tips and tools to get everyone on campus looking forward to their morning commute. The map is available at go.umd.edu/thrivermap. There you can find interviews, updated every month, with people finding success in creating thriving workplaces. Advice includes delegating more projects to allow a team to take ownership; taking 10 minutes a day to talk to everyone in the office; and ensuring that staff aren’t taxed with doing the same tasks with fewer resources. For more information on the Thriving Workplace Initiative, visit president.umd.edu/thrive.


DOWNTIME DECISIONS NSF, NIH Fund Study of How Childhood Naps Affect Memory BY CHRIS CARROLL what’s best for a preschooler: a two-hour nap, one hour napping and one hour learning a foreign language, or no midday shuteye and nonstop learning? While your grandma and most Type-A friend might clash on this point, there’s no simple answer, says Tracy Riggins, an associate professor of psychology who studies brain development and memory formation in young children. Riggins is leading a three-year study aimed at understanding how sleep affects brain development and memory in preschool-age children. Funded by $1 million from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, the study could help form the basis for new formal guidelines for childhood napping. Previous studies conducted by Rebecca Spencer, a sleep researcher at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and collaborator on the current study, have shown that midday sleep helps young children retain memories. Meanwhile, parents, teachers and caregivers also know that most children grow out of daily naps between ages 3 and 5. What’s lacking is knowledge about where the balance lies, which would help preschools better assess who needs a nap and who doesn’t.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MAT T LAUMANN

“There are educational benefits in having 3-, 4- and 5-year olds together in the same room, but is it worth it making the older ones who have dropped the nap just stare up at the ceiling during naptime—when they could be having more learning opportunities?” she says. The transition out of napping may be based on the development of the hippocampus, a part of the brain vital to memory formation, Riggins says. She hypothesizes that as the hippocampus develops, children no longer need sleep to retain things they’ve just learned. The flip side is that ending naps before children’s brains are sufficiently developed could temporarily impair their learning. Her study will use MRI to examine the development of participants’ brains, as well as assess children’s ability to retain memories after they’ve either taken a nap or been kept awake. For each child, the study will take place in multiple sessions over the course of a year, and they’ll be rewarded with a 3-D model of their brain, printed in McKeldin Library’s MakerSpace, as well as a T-shirt personalized with an MRI of their brain. To learn more about enrolling your child, contact KidBrainStudy@umd.edu.

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A GREATER VIEW YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING NEW AND COMING TO GREATER COLLEGE PARK BY LAUREN BROWN

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ould you swear that such-and-such corner along Baltimore Avenue did not look like that on your last pass by? Are you thinking there are too many new restaurants that you haven’t yet tried? Have you wondered what exactly IS that building going up across the street? This is life in Greater College Park, where a dizzying amount of development is reshaping the community into a bustling hub for tech, startups, research, new housing and retail, and arts and culture. It stretches along Baltimore Avenue, along the tracks of the coming Purple light-rail line, and around the College Park Metro Station—supported by more than $2 billion in investments from private and city, state and federal partners with the university. Greater partners. Greater talent. Greater location. Here’s what’s here, and what’s on the way in Greater College Park. Find more information at greatercollegepark.umd.edu.

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THE HOTEL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 7777 BALTIMORE AVE.

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Two hundred seventy apartments developed by Wood Partners, featuring an in-ground pool, fitness center and tech lounge workspace. Opening: Spring 2019

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A 38,000-square-foot grocery store by the growing German company will replace a Clarion Inn. Opening: TBD

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A 150-room hotel from Choice Hotels opened in August, replacing a long-vacant auto dealership. Developed by Southern Management, it also includes a new restaurant, College Park Grill, and Orange Theory Fitness will arrive soon.

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BRENDAN IRIBE CENTER FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INNOVATION NORTHWEST CORNER OF CAMPUS DRIVE AND BALTIMORE AVE.

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A striking six-floor building will bring together the university’s Department of Computer Science and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies with specialized labs that support research, collaboration and innovation in virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, robotics, computer vision, algorithms, programming languages and systems. Opening: January 2019

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UNIV ER S I T Y O F MARY L AN D

Ranked the No. 1 coffee in Maryland by Food & Wine Magazine, this specialty roaster headquartered in Hyattsville features single-origin coffees in a hip café setting.

Colorful, artistic lighting created by Imaginex, founded by former UMD student Eric Mintzer, was installed this summer on the bridge connecting campus to midtown to enhance the area’s visibility and vibrancy.

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This 300-room luxury hotel and conference center also features an Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon & Spa, four restaurants, a lobby bar and abundant meeting space.

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TERRAPIN ROW 4300 HARTWICK ROAD

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On the ground floor of the Hotel at the University of Maryland, facing Diamondback Drive, 20,000 square feet of dedicated office space will feature the Capital One Tech Center, Adobe, data-management platform Immuta and university entrepreneurship and innovation programs UM Ventures, Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship and the Do Good Accelerator. Opening: Fall 2018

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WE WORK UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 7761 DIAMONDBACK DR.

In partnership with UMD, Baltimore development firm War Horse Cities, founded by Scott Plank ’88, will repurpose a vacant garage across from Diamondback Garage for a food, arts and entertainment experience. Opening: Early 2019

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Colorful sculptures, green space and food trucks await visitors to a park-like area.

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The global co-working brand will open its first location in the state in a renovated university building. It will offer more than 300 desks for lease with amenities such as front-desk service, private offices and stadium seating. Opening: Fall 2018

TARGET EXPRESS 7501 BALTIMORE AVE. LANDMARK 4500 COLLEGE AVE.

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DISCOVERY DISTRICT EAST A burst of development around the College Park Metro Station will include residential and commercial spaces:

20 5801 UNIVERSITY RESEARCH COURT Corporate Office Properties Trust partnered with UMD on a 75,000-square-foot building housing the Division of Information Technology and other research-focused entities. A café will also be on the first floor, just steps from a new Purple Line station. Opening: September 2018 21 5600 AND 5650 RIVERTECH COURT 11,000 square feet of flex and research and development space across two buildings, within walking distance to Riverdale Park Station and Metro station. Tenants will include geospatial consulting firm IIC, among others. Opening: September 2018

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College Park’s first Target stands under 267 units of student apartments and extras such as a private garden and a student lounge with theater.

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Student housing features a pool, park, exercise station and other perks—including Dunkin Donuts and an Amazon pickup location.

MILKBOY ARTHOUSE 7416 BALTIMORE AVE.

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CO L L EGE PAR K SOUTHERN GATEWAY 7200 BALTIMORE AVE.

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12 This restaurant, bar and performance venue is a partnership between the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center and Philadelphia restaurant and entertainment company MilkBoy.

CAVA 7350 BALTIMORE AVE.

15 The Prince Goerge’s Countybased Bozzuto Group will redevelop the former Quality Inn into a mixed-use community featuring restaurants, retail and residences geared to faculty and staff. Groundbreaking: 2019

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A new pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular bridge connects housing at Riverdale Park Station to the Discovery District and Kenilworth Avenue.

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RIVERDALE PARK STATION 6621 BALTIMORE AVE.

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N TS D RIVE R EG E COLLEGE PARK ACADEMY 5751 RIVERTECH COURT

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16 Whole Foods Market anchors this development that also includes 119 townhouses and a variety of restaurants and retail options, including Burton’s Grill, District Taco, Starbucks, Gold’s Gym and Denizens Brewing Co. It will soon add 850 apartments and additional retail amenities.

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This public charter middle and high school launched in collaboration with the university combines the flexibility of online studies with the support of traditional classrooms.

22 SURFACE PARKING LOT AT METRO STATION A mixed-use development by Gilbane will include a 431-unit community with a central village green, designed to be pedestrian- and bike-friendly.

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The fast-expanding Mediterranean eatery led by Brett Schulman ’95 is coming to the College Park Shopping Center. Opening: Fall 2018

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Two hundred seventy apartments developed by Wood Partners, featuring an in-ground pool, fitness center and tech lounge workspace. Opening: Spring 2019

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A 150-room hotel from Choice Hotels opened in August, replacing a long-vacant auto dealership. Developed by Southern Management, it also includes a new restaurant, College Park Grill, and Orange Theory Fitness will arrive soon.

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A striking six-floor building will bring together the university’s Department of Computer Science and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies with specialized labs that support research, collaboration and innovation in virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, robotics, computer vision, algorithms, programming languages and systems. Opening: January 2019

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Ranked the No. 1 coffee in Maryland by Food & Wine Magazine, this specialty roaster headquartered in Hyattsville features single-origin coffees in a hip café setting.

Colorful, artistic lighting created by Imaginex, founded by former UMD student Eric Mintzer, was installed this summer on the bridge connecting campus to midtown to enhance the area’s visibility and vibrancy.

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This 300-room luxury hotel and conference center also features an Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon & Spa, four restaurants, a lobby bar and abundant meeting space.

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PLANTING THE SEEDS OF COMMUNITY Assistant Professor Transforms Neighborhood Garden BY ANNIE DANKELSON

walking down the alley off 11th Street in Northwest D.C., it’s hard to miss the oasis among the brick. Kate Tully opens the Columbia Heights Green gate and unleashes her dog, Deedee, who sprints between the rows of lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, carrots and more. Deedee’s not the only one enthusiastic about the Green. Tully, an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, has overseen the quarteracre neighborhood property for four years, replacing underused individual beds with a thriving collective farm. “Last week we harvested over 85 pounds of greens, of vegetables, which is crazy,” Tully says. “Eighty-five pounds is like a small human.” Tully, whose family grew fruit trees in California, cemented her love of gardening her junior year at Kenyon College, when she lived on an organic orange and mango farm in Costa Rica. After earning her doctorate at the University of Virginia, she went to Columbia University’s Earth Institute and grew maize in East Africa. Tully accepted a job at UMD and moved to Washington, D.C., in 2014, choosing a house right by the neighborhood garden. “It was a mess,” Tully says. “I was always looking out my window wondering, ‘Is anybody down there?’ There were just a couple people who, like, grew one kale plant each.”

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One day, she finally saw someone—Steve Coleman, director of the nonprofit Washington Parks & People, the Green’s owner—and ran downstairs to meet him. He asked her on the spot to be community coordinator. Tully tore out the individual plots and banished wait lists, streamlining the garden management and eliminating barriers to entry. Anyone in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of over 30,000 can plant—if one volunteer goes out of town, others pick up the slack. Today, lettuce grows almost too tall to keep up with. An abundance of basil expands under the shade of healthy tomato plants. The peppers are getting plump. Philip Evich ’18, a student of Tully’s who interned at the Green last summer, created signage to promote it as not only a garden, but also an event space for art shows, poetry nights, work retreats, even birthday parties. The participants have nearly doubled to about 20 per week. “Everyone that volunteers there looks up to Kate like she’s Goddess Earth,” Evich says. Tully has more plans. With such lavish harvests, she’s looking for places to donate food. She has concerts and movie nights on the radar. She’s hoping to increase diversity at the Green, so it more closely matches the neighborhood. “I love watching community happen,” Tully says.

PHOTO BY STEPHANIE S. CORDLE


BOOKSHELF

ACCOLADES THE MARYLAND CENTER FOR HEALTH EQUITY will receive the 2018 Health Equity Award from the American Public Health Association at its annual meeting in November. THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RANKED UMD No. 14 on the

Associate Professor of government and politics STELLA ROUSE examines the political beliefs and policy preferences of America’s most diverse generation in THE POLITICS OF MILLENNIALS.

JASON FARMAN, associate professor of American studies, explores how waiting and delays have shaped us throughout history in DELAYED RESPONSE:

Top 30 College & University list of the largest green power users. UMD also appeared at No. 83 on the National Top 100 list, which includes national companies and organizations.

THE ART OF WAITING FROM THE ANCIENT TO THE INSTANT WORLD.

Assistant Professor of Urban Planning MARCCUS HENDRICKS was awarded an Early-Career Gulf Research Fellowship to explore how infrastructure addresses environmental hazards and climate change. Clinical Professor of Real Estate Development MARGARET MCFARLAND

In RULE MAKERS, RULE BREAKERS: HOW CULTURE WIRES OUR MINDS, psychology Professor MICHELE GELFAND shows that many of the differences in how we think and act are derived from how tightly or loosely we adhere to social norms.

In IMMIGRANTS, EVANGELICALS, AND POLITICS IN AN ERA OF DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE,

Professor of American studies JANELLE WONG examines a new generation of Asian American and Latino evangelicals and why demographic change has not contributed to a political realignment.

was awarded the 2018 Richard T. Ely Distinguished Educator Award from Lambda Alpha International. JULIE GREENE, professor

of history and founding co-director of the Center for Global Migration Studies, received the 2018 China Residency at Sichuan University from the Organization of American Historians and the American History Research Association of China. WENDY MOE, professor of

Assistant Professor of communication CARLY S. WOODS tells the story of women who challenged the idea that they were out of place in formal debating activities in DEBATING WOMEN: GENDER, EDUCATION AND SPACES FOR ARGUMENT, 1835-1945.

In THE SCIENCE AND POLITICS OF RACE IN MEXICO AND THE UNITED STATES, 1910-1950,

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of history KARIN ALEJANDRA ROSEMBLATT delves into the cross-border past of the social sciences in Mexico and the United States.

marketing and director of the master’s program in marketing analytics, was named co-editor of the Journal of Interactive Marketing. Department of Computer Science Professor RANCE CLEAVELAND was named director of the Division of Computing and Communication Foundations at the National Science Foundation for a three-year term.

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FIRST DRAFT Science on Tap Gives Research a Buzz BY SALA LEVIN ’10 Now on the menu at local performance venue and restaurant MilkBoy ArtHouse: science, with a side of bar snacks. Since February, the monthly “Science on Tap” series—a joint offering from the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center’s Artist Partner Program and the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences—has made scientific research as digestible as a pint of beer to scientists and lay audiences alike by having researchers present their work in an informal, nonacademic setting. “It’s a good way for faculty members to practice communicating science to a lay audience—to connect to the community,” says Kan Cao, associate professor of cell biology and molecular genetics, who presented recently with the goal of conveying that her work is

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“actually useful for everyday life, for general health.” Cao’s work on a cure for the rare genetic disease HutchinsonGilford Progeria Syndrome (known as progeria), in which children age prematurely, turned up an unexpected finding—that the chemical methylene blue has an anti-aging effect on skin. Cao presented on “the progression from bench to application”— including her pending patent on a cosmetic skin care product that uses the chemical. The hour-long talks, typically attended by as many as 100 people, represent a melding of disciplines on different ends of the academic spectrum, says Megan Pagado Wells, associate director of the Artist Partner Program. MilkBoy ArtHouse, a collaboration between Philadelphia entertainment company MilkBoy and The Clarice, often hosts more artistic endeavors. “It’s really great to be able to support the work of colleagues across campus—not just in the arts—by providing space for them at arts venues like MilkBoy ArtHouse,” Wells says.

ILLUSTRATION BY MAT T LAUMANN

BETWEEN THE COLUMNS OFFICE OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS 2101 TURNER HALL, 7736 BALTIMORE AVE. COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742

Between the Columns: September 2018  
Between the Columns: September 2018