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ULLSWATER COMMUNITY COLLEGE SEN/D Information

Including: SEN Policy, Information Report and Accessibility Plan


The purpose of the SEN information report is to provide parents with an account of what UCC is currently doing in the area of Special Educational Needs and Disability over 2015 to 2016. We have prepared this report in a question and answer format and hope you find this information helpful, but if you require any further information please contact Mrs Ellery, our SENCO on 01768 210206 or by e-mail at dellery@ullswatercc.co.uk. You may also wish to see our SEN policy or accessibility plan. They can be found on this link: Click for SEN policy Click for access plan You may also wish to find out more about the Local Offer, which is produced by the Local Authority. The link for this is: http://search3.openobjects.com/kb5/cumbria/fsd/home.page

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INDEX

Page: o 4 - Introduction o 5 - Staffing o 6 - What kinds of Special Educational Needs do you provide for at UCC? o 7 - How do you identify students with SEN? How do you assess their needs? How many students do you have in school with SEN/D? o 10 - Who should I contact if I am concerned that my child has a Special Educational Need? o 10 - Who is the SENCO at UCC? o 11 - What arrangements do you have for parental involvement with regards to student’s Special Educational Needs? o 12 - How do you consult with students about their Special Educational Needs and/or disabilities? o 13 - What support do students with SEN/D get when they move from primary school to secondary school? o 14 - What arrangements are put in place to support students who are moving from UCC to different phases of education and in preparing for adulthood? o 15 - What were the destinations of some of your students who had an Education Health and Care Plan last year? o 16 - What is your approach to teaching students with SEN/D? o 17 - How are adaptations made to the curriculum and the learning environment for students? o 18 - What expertise and training do support staff who work with SEN/D students have? o 19 - How effective is the provision made for students with SEN? o 23 - What type of activities are available for students who have SEN/D at UCC? o 24 - What specialist provision is available for students with severe learning difficulties? o 25 - What support do you have at UCC for improving emotional & social development? o 26 - What other agencies do UCC use to ensure that students and their families’ needs are met? o 27 - What should I do if I have a complaint about the SEN provision for my child? o 27 - What arrangements do you make for admission of disabled students to the school?

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INDEX CONTINUED

Page: o 28 - What steps are taken to prevent disabled students from being treated less favourably than other students? o 29 - What facilities do you have to assist access to the school by disabled students; and do you have an accessibility plan? o 30 - Hear from a Parent o 31- Glossary

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INTRODUCTION At Ullswater Community College we are very proud of the fact that youngsters of all abilities are included in the provision we offer. We see it as a real strength of the school that we can cater for the widest range of interests and abilities because of the excellent team of highly qualified, hardworking, committed and caring specialist staff. Our expertise and experience in inclusive provision means that we look to design and deliver a bespoke solution to each individual’s needs whilst respecting the need for inclusion in class and in the broader life of the school. We aim to create a learning environment that is flexible enough to meet the needs of all who wish to come here. Together we can prepare your child effectively for the transition from primary to secondary education and on to an independent and successful life beyond school

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LEARNING SUPPORT DEPARTMENT 2016/17 Headteacher SMT Link Dawn Ellery HOD Learning Support Co-ordinator / SENCO

Carolyn Dickinson SEN admin Joanne Jenkins Teacher - Assessment Anna Burford VI Form Learning Support Joanne Key Lorraine Egglestone HLTA

Rachel Ridley (2nd in Dept) Assistant SENCO/ Specialist SEN Teacher Helen Pickup SEN Teacher Heather Hopkinson Personalised Curriculum Co-Ordinator

June Westgarth Specialist Teacher

Joanne Key Principle Teaching Asst

Kerry Higgins HLTA

KS3 Jackie Burne (STA) Emma Carrick (STA) Rachel Carruthers (STA) Matthew Collingwood (TA) Vicky Williams (STA) Sian Edmondson (TA) Louise Grant (TA) Abbie Parkin (TA) Chris Partridge (TA) Ryan Veitch (TA) Jade Bibby (App TA)

KS4 Vic Brunetti (STA) Lou Harrison (STA) Janice Talbot (STA) May Kendrick (TA) Jenny Murray (TA) New (TA)

Caroline Broadbridge HLTA - KS4/5 (SRP) KS4/5 (SRP) Emma Collins (TA) Karin Penfold (TA)

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Q.  

What kinds of Special Educational

Needs do you provide for at UCC?

A.

At UCC we cater for a wide range of needs. Here are some of the needs we are currently catering for:

o o o o o o o o o o o o

Specific Learning Difficulties such as dyslexia and dyspraxia Autistic Spectrum Conditions Hearing Impairment Visual Impairment Speech and language difficulties Severe learning difficulties Physical and/or medical difficulties Complex difficulties Social, emotional and mental health or well-being difficulties ADHD, ADD disorders Foetal Alcohol Syndrome Attachment disorders

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Q.

How do you identify students with

SEN? How do you assess their needs? How many

A.

students do you have in school with SEN/D?

Prior to the start of Year 7 we work with the information provided by primary schools, parents and other professionals at the point of entry. Some students may already have been identified as having a Special Educational Need. At the start of Year 7 we use the Cognitive Abilities Test (CATS), and literacy tests to assess all students. This provides us with useful information about each child and their abilities. Our SENCO analyses this information carefully in order to identify students who require targeted support, and any other student who may require further assessment. During Year 7, 8 and 9 we continue to use literacy tests to monitor the progress of students, and identify support where required. There are many points in the year where we evaluate the progress of all of our students, and assess his or her ongoing needs. When teachers have concerns about a student in specific subject areas, they pay particular attention to the areas of concern, and may carry out some subject specific intervention. Where there are persistent concerns teachers can discuss these concerns with Heads of Department, Heads of Year or the SENCO directly. Staff can liaise with the SENCO regarding any concern. If there is sufficient concern, the SENCO will then consider the next steps. Some students are given further assessments when appropriate.

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Here is a copy of our SEN record of need for this year. SEN Register Totals 2016-17 (As at 12.10.16) Total in school: 1368 on roll Yr % 7 - 11 SEN 227 / 20.08 Support 1130 Statement/ 47 / 4.16 EHCP 1130

6th form 21 / 238 11 / 238

8.82

274 / 24.24 1130

32 / 238

13.44

Full School

Totals

%

Totals 248 / 1368 58 / 1368

4.62

306 / 1368

% 18.12 4.24

22.36

Totals in individual Year Groups Year 7 Year Group SEN Support EHCP Year 8 Year group SEN Support EHCP Year 9 Year group SEN Support Statement Year 10 Year group SEN Support EHCP

Numbers in the year group 43 / 228 32 / 228 11 / 228

% of year group

Numbers in the year group 66 / 255 57 / 255 9 / 255

% of year group

Numbers in the year group 63 / 221 57 / 221 6 / 221

% of year group

Numbers in the year group 50 / 208 36 / 208 14 / 208

18.85 14.03 4.82

25.88 22.35 3.53

28.50 25.79 2.71 % of year group 24.03 17.30 6.73

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Year 11 Year group SEN Support EHCP Year 12 Year group SEN Support EHCP Year 13 Year group SEN Support Statement / EHCP

Numbers in the year group 52 / 218 45 / 218 7 / 218

% of year group

Numbers in year group 21 / 142 16 / 142 5 / 142

% of year group

Numbers in year group 11 / 96 5 / 96 6 / 96

% of year group

23.85 20.64 3.21

14.78 11.26 3.52

11.45 5.20 6.25

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Q.

Who should I contact if I am

concerned that my child has a Special Educational Need?

A.

At UCC, the first point of contact is usually the form tutor. However, parents are also able to contact the Head of Year or the SENCO directly.

Q.

A.

Who is the SENCO at UCC?

Our SENCO at UCC is Mrs Dawn Ellery. Her contact details are dellery@ullswatercc.co.uk or 01768 210206.

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Q.

What arrangements do you have for

A.

parental involvement with regards to student’s Special Educational Needs?

For the students who have an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP) at Primary School, if our SENCO is invited to the review meetings in Year 5, we begin discussing transition arrangements with parents, the school and other professionals about what the most appropriate transition will be. This is the start of a number of conversations over the transition period. In addition to other transition arrangements for the whole year group, parents are invited into UCC by the SENCO at the end of Year 6 to discuss the support plan and provision. We then have a settling in review with the SENCO within the first month to ensure that everything is going OK. Following that there will be at least, two further review meetings; an EHCP annual review, and a Support Plan review. For a small group of other students there may be additional meetings required. Parents also have an opportunity for parents meetings with subject staff and form tutors in line with whole school procedures. For children who have a lower level of need, parents are sent their child’s support plan and have an opportunity to contribute to that. Some students and their parents may be invited to a meeting with a member of the learning support team, as required. In addition to this there are also whole school opportunities to meet with form tutors and subject staff in line with school procedures.

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Q.

How do you consult with students

about their Special Educational Needs and/or disabilities?

A.

Along with whole school opportunities to join in ‘pupil voice’ surveys, school council, 1:1 interviews, parents evenings etc, students who have SEN/D will be involved in the review process and this will vary dependent on each case. This can range from having input into what is written into their support plan, to being fully involved in a review of their provision and setting targets / expected outcomes for the future. In addition to this, for students with an Education Health and Care Plan there will be a team of Learning Support Assistants (LSA) who support the student, and one member of the team will be a Link LSA, who will work closely with the student with regards to their needs.

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Q.

What support do students with

SEN/D get when they move from primary school to secondary school?

A.

There are very carefully planned transition arrangements put in place by Mrs Campbell who begins visiting primary schools from Year 5 for all students. In addition to this our SENCO has contact with all of our primary schools. Information is gathered from schools in different ways, depending on the primary school, as this does vary. The SENCO uses all of the information that she is given to create a SEN Support Plan for each student. This plan is then shared with Year 7 staff for Transition Day and at the start of Year 7. Some students, mainly those with an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP), have a bespoke transition plan which includes visits from UCC support staff to the students in their primary setting, followed by a range of additional visits to UCC to ensure that the students are well prepared for the start of life at UCC. For some students it is necessary to have additional meetings with other agencies, parents and primary school to ensure that we were well prepared to meet the needs of the student. If your child has an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP) it is important that the SENCO attends reviews in Year 5 and Year 6. It is really important to begin to work with parents and guardians and other agencies as early as Year 5.

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Q.

What arrangements are put in place

to support students who are moving from UCC to different

A.

phases of education and in preparing for adulthood?

At UCC, we pride ourselves in planning with students to ensure that they take the correct pathway into adulthood, which is reflective of their ambitions. This could take them to higher education, employment, independent living or participation in society. For students with Education Health and Care Plans, we began preparing for this as early as Year 9, and work with relevant agencies, as required, to ensure that the students and families receive good advice and that information is passed on to the next setting, to help aid secure transition. For some of the students, additional visits can made to UCC by the next setting, and we arrange additional visits for students so that they were well prepared for their next venture.

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Q.

What were the destinations of some

of your students who had an Education Health and Care Plan last year?

A.

Last year we had students who went on to o

Study nursing at Northumbria University

o

Study Criminology Degree at Chester University

o Further study at Newton Rigg – Child Care; Hair and Beauty; Beauty Therapy and Small Animal Care; Skills for working life o

Carlisle College – Motor Vehicle course

o

An apprenticeship in Engineering

o

An apprenticeship in Catering

o

Beaumont College – a Scope specialist college - Carlisle Campus

o

Employment with family business plus voluntary employment

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Q.

What is your approach to teaching

A.

students with SEN/D?

At UCC we are really proud of our inclusive approach for all students which includes high quality teaching and learning, an appropriate curriculum offer and the best personal guidance. Teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of all of the students within their classes, including where students access support from Learning Support Assistants or specialised staff.

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Q.

How are adaptations made to the

A.

curriculum and the learning environment for students?

We are really proud of our curriculum offer which meets the needs of a wide range of our students. As we are a strategically resourced provision for Severe Learning Difficulties we offer a range of Entry Level and Functional Skills courses. Each year these are carefully planned by Mrs Ridley (specialist teacher for SLD) and Mr Ellery (Deputy Head teacher – curriculum). Mrs Ridley and Year 9 and Year 11 staff work very closely to ensure that we have the right personal pathway for our students with Severe and/or Complex needs. We continue to plan in advance so that we are well prepared for students when they arrive. This does vary from case to case. Specialist seating and equipment are provided where necessary, and access to our building and curriculum areas is carefully considered for wheelchair users. Some examples of recent adaptions would be: providing some specialist chairs; the placement of lower soap dispensers; providing some specialist maths equipment for a visually impaired student. The importance of working with parents and other professionals from an early stage is extremely important to ensure that we are well prepared.

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Q.

What expertise and training do

A.

support staff who work with SEN/D students have?

At UCC we have an ongoing commitment to Professional Development. Since September 2015 staff have attended training on the following: o Art moderation o Art therapy o Attachment disorders/ disassociation o Autism and the criminal justice system o Awareness of child abuse and neglect o Changes to new SEN policy and framework o Counselling o Coaching sessions o De-escalation techniques o Downs syndrome o Eva chair training – train the trainer o First aid o Food hygiene o Hearing impairment o Higher Level Teaching Assistant course o Maths recovery o Makaton o Moving and handling o PEP training o Psychology and counselling o Reading intervention o SEN conference o SIMS training o Social stories o Speech and language o Strategies to use with students who have behavioural difficulties o Strategies to use with student who have specific literacy difficulties o Supporting maths in the classroom o Use of Ipad with SEN students o Visual Stress o Visual Impairment Training o Sensory Processing o Be Dyslexia Aware – Be Dyslexia Friendly o AQA English step up o Recently qualified teachers CPT with Western Lakes teaching alliance

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We also have teachers with: o specialist teacher status for Severe Learning Difficulties o specialist teacher status for Physical and Medical difficulties o specialist teacher status for Autistic Spectrum Conditions o Advanced Certificate in Specific learning difficulties o Advanced Certificate in Autistic Spectrum Conditions o Certificate in maths recovery o Specialist teacher in psychometric testing, assessment and access arrangements o Cumbria LA assessment accreditation o Masters degree in SEN o Bachelor of Education with SEN as specialism

Q.

A.

How effective is the provision made

for students with SEN?

We believe the support that students receive at UCC is very effective. We work hard to ensure that the curriculum offer covers a wide range of abilities, and ensures that students are able to leave with appropriate qualifications and certificates which can take them on to the next phase of their life.

 

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Progress of Students with SEN/D 32% of SEN Support students achieved 5A* - C at GCSE - including English and Maths – there were 41 students within the cohort. Students who have Severe Learning Difficulties who are part of our Strategic Resourced Provision achieved the following: Progress of Students in 2014 and 2015 Subject area English English Maths Maths Maths Maths Science Science Science Preparation for working life Preparation for working life Art and Design Art and Design Construction Design & Technology Resistant materials Performing Arts

Course level Entry level 1 Entry level 3 Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level 3 GCSE Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level 3 Entry level 2

Number of students 1 4 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1

Entry level 3

2

Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level certificate 3 Entry level certificate 3 Entry level certificate 3

2 3 1 1 5

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Home cooking skills ICT Personal and social development Personal and Social development units Employability units Transition challenge

Level 2 Entry level 3 Entry level 2

5 3 1

Entry level

1

Entry level 3 Asdan

1 1

Progress of Students in 2015 and 2016 Subject area English English English Maths Maths Maths Maths Science Science Science Preparation for working life Preparation for working life Preparation for working life Preparation for working life Art and Design Art and Design Construction Construction IMI motor vehicle Design & Technology Resistant materials Performing Arts Home cooking skills Product design - food

Course level Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level 3 Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level 3 GCSE G Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level 3 Entry level certificate

Number of students 1 3 5 1 1 2 1 2 4 1 1

Entry level 1

1

Entry level 2

1

Entry level 3

3

Entry level 1 Entry level 2 Entry level certificate 3 Btec entry level 3 Entry level 3 Entry level certificate 3

2 3 2 1 2 1

Entry level certificate 3 5 Level 2 5 Entry level certificate 3 1

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Subject Area ICT ICT Functional skills in information and communication Creative I media Personal and social development Personal and Social development units Award in Personal Social development Employability units Aware in employability Unit Award scheme Diploma in life skills Diploma in personal progress (this includes English, maths and ICT

Course Level Entry level 3 OCR pass ELC1

Number of Students 3 2 1

Level 1 Entry level 2

2 1

Entry level 3

2

Level 1

1

Entry level 3 Level 1

1 1 1 1 1

Entry level 3 ASDAN

In addition to this, the Learning Support Department also offer literacy support for students in Key Stage 3 who have Reading and/or Spelling Standardised Scores of below 80, following our screening tests. Literacy Intervention and Progress In 2014 – 2015 Literacy support was given to 76 students in Key Stage 3. o Year 7 – 38 o Year 8 – 23 o Year 9 – 15 Support ranged from o Reading Intervention – 3 sessions a week o Structured Reading and Spelling Programme – 1 or 2 sessions per week o Basic Literacy Support – 1 session per week o Launch the Lifeboat spelling programme – 1 session per week o Reading support plus Launch the Lifeboat spelling programme – 1 session per week o Reading with a member of the support team during registration – 1 session per week

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Students who took part in these interventions made good progress. In Year 7, the average increase in reading age was 2 years progress over a 9 ½ month period. The average increase in spelling age was just under 2 years over a 9 ½ month period. In Year 8, the average increase in reading age was 2 years, over a 1 year period. The average increase in spelling age, was just over 2 years over a 1 year period. 2015- 16

Q.

What type of activities are available

A.

for students who have SEN/D at UCC?

We pride ourselves on our inclusive approach at UCC, and we like to ensure that students have access to a full range of enrichment activities. We take our duty to make reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities very seriously. Students took part in a wide range of activities over the course of last year. In addition to ‘whole school’ activities we also offered o KS4 & 5 residential experience to Blackpool – life skills – self catering o Macmillan Coffee morning for Cancer Research o Luncheon Club with Age UK o Visit to Eycott Hill nature reserve – working with Cumbria Wildlife trust o Christmas Performance linked to drama course – The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; o Evening visit to Dick Whittington and Joseph and His Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat

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o Sunday visit to Rheged to watch live ballet from Russia – Sparticus o Boccia inclusive competition at Penrith Leisure Centre o Table tennis inclusive competition at Penrith Leisure Centre o Day trip to Center Parcs as part of Leisure and tourism course o Swimming o Horse riding with RDA at Rookin House, Troutbeck o Eden inclusive sports day o Regional inclusive sports day o College visits to Newton Rigg and Carlisle College o Work experience for Key Stage 4 and 5 as part of Preparation for Working Life o Visit to Café West – Keswick – Key Stage 5 career opportunities post UCC

Q.

What specialist provision is

A.

available for students with severe learning difficulties?

We have a specialist teacher for Severe Learning Difficulties who advises staff on how to meet the needs of the students with Severe Learning Difficulties; she also works with the Deputy Head Teacher to ensure that there is a suitable curriculum offer for the students in Years 10 – 14 and that students have a personalised pathway beyond KS3 to ensure that they leave UCC with qualifications or suitable accreditation We have a wide range of facilities and specialist provision designed to support the development of students with severe learning difficulties, this includes a sensory room, a specialist bathroom and physio room.

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In addition to school based facilities, we also offer o Horse riding o Speech therapy o Swimming o Sensory sessions o Safe and supervised environment for students during informal parts of the school day o An applied learning centre o A varied extra-curricular provision to meet the needs and interests of all students o And many more extra-curricular and residential experiences

Q.

What support do you have at UCC

A.

for improving emotional and social development?

At UCC we have a programme of assemblies that tackle issues around relationships, friends, communication and bullying. This is then followed up in tutor time using PSHCE resources, half-termly bullying health checks and student voice which includes SEN students. In addition to this tutors use their knowledge of individual students to help work with other staff regarding needs of students. For students with an Education Health and Care Plan, we use a Team Around the Child approach – with a Link Learning Support Assistant taking the lead for specific students, and this member of the team than acts as an advocate for the student when required. In addition to this we work with external voluntary agencies such as Young Advocacy, who visit school each week. We have a supervised play area for vulnerable students, and we run additional social clubs to help promote emotional and social development.

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Q.

What other agencies do UCC use to

A.

ensure that students and their families’ needs are met?

We are fully committed to working with other agencies to support the family and the student, and will actively seek to work with other professionals / agencies with permission from families to do so. We follow the Local Authority (LA) Early Help Assessment / SEND Early Help Assessment Procedures, and have a Team Around the Child / Family approach, which both SENCO and HOY adhere to. Some of the bodies that we work with are: Educational Psychologists, Specialist teachers, Pupil Referral Unit, Kingmoor Assessment Centre, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, School nursing service, Community nursing service, Home and Hospital Tuition, Springboard Development Centre, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, Barnardos, the Local Authority early help team etc.

 

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Q.

What should I do if I have a

A.

complaint about the SEN provision for my child?

Firstly, we would really hope that you wouldn’t have a complaint, but if you do please contact the SENCo or Head of Year to see if your complaint can be resolved. If not, please request a copy of the Schools Complaints procedures from the admin office. In addition to this, we would advise that you contact the Local Authority’s Independent Support Advisorcontact details can be given on request.

Q.

What arrangements do you make

A.

for admission of disabled students to the school?

We hope that the Primary School will make contact with us in Year 5 (or sometimes beforehand) to ensure that we have time to plan for any reasonable adjustments that we may need to make to ensure that we can meet the needs of any disabled students on our school site.

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Q.

What steps are taken to prevent

disabled students from being treated less favourably than other students?

A.

We ensure open access to an appropriate curriculum, and aim to be as inclusive as possible; we include students with disabilities in the same way as for any other student; we nurture a culture of acceptance and we celebrate diversity through assemblies, form time and reward systems; we ensure vigilance of pastoral welfare by working closely with support staff, and have high expectations of all students to make a positive contribution to school.

 

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Q.

What facilities do you have to assist

access to the school by disabled students; and do you

A.

have an accessibility plan?

As a specialist provision we have access to a suite of rooms that include specialist changing and physiotherapy facilities, a sensory room, a medical room and an ICT suite. In addition to this we have lifts in two of our buildings, and we also have ramps to some of our buildings. We have drawn up an accessibility plan following an accessibility audit which was carried out in November 2014. We work hard with parents, students and agencies to ensure that any student with a disability has their needs met appropriately.

 

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HEAR FROM A PARENT

Jill has a daughter – Megan, who is visually impaired. The transition process started for Megan in Year 5, when her primary school invited Mrs Ellery, the SENCO, to a review meeting. By working together with Jill, Megan and primary school staff, we were able to plan for Megan’s transition to secondary school in a personalised way. We needed to assess the site carefully to ensure that she was more familiar with the site than other students so she had many additional visits focussing on getting around the site safely; we sought additional advice from the specialist teaching service and from the mobility officer; all teaching and non-teaching staff were fully briefed about her needs prior to her starting school. We will continue to work with Jill and Megan to ensure that each transition phase goes well. Jill, Megan’s mum, has the following advice for making the move to UCC:

o

Do your research about the schools that you are thinking about sending your child to. o Don’t be afraid to ask questions.

o

Visit the school and meet the SENCO. o Make sure that the primary SENCO invites the secondary SENCO to the annual review in Year 5. o Take up the various opportunities to visit the school so that you see it a number of times. o Talk to other parents. o When your child starts school, if you aren’t happy, contact them straight away so things can be sorted immediately. o Attend all meetings at school so that you have your say – school will listen. o Listen to the advice that the school and other specialists give. o Sometimes meetings can be quite large – take someone with you for support. o Occasionally you might feel you need an extra small meeting – just ask.

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GLOSSARY PTA - Principal Teaching Assistant HLTA - Higher Level Teaching Assistant STA - Senior Teaching Assistant TA - Teaching Assistant EHCP - Education Health and Care Plan SENCO - Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator SEN - Special Educational Needs SEND - Special Educational Needs and Disabilities LSA - Learning Support Assistant SPLD - Specific Learning Difficulties SLCN - Speech, Language and Communication Needs PHYS/ MED - Physical and Medical Difficulties SLD - Severe Learning Difficulties LSA - Learning Support Assistant SEN Policy/ Information Report Information Report appendix Accessibility Plan

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