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UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 1 | FALL 2013

SOU T H E R N A L B E R TA MAGAZ I NE


no limits In this issue of SAM we are demonstrating that there really are no limits. Like the evolution from summer to autumn, this time of year is all about change. This is evident in the physical transformation that takes place throughout the region as southern Alberta bursts alive with the fiery colours of the season. On campus, that energy is matched by our students whose return signifies the start of another academic year.

stay informed

This semester marked some significant changes at the U of L that we’re happy to highlight in this issue of SAM, including physical changes to campus thanks to the successful completion of construction, a soon-to-be-ratified institutional Strategic Plan and the early stages of planning for the Destination Project. The stories here provide a glimpse into the amazing work that continues to define the University of Lethbridge as one of Canada’s leading academic and research institutions.

Your official U of L news source: www.ulethbridge.ca/unews Photos of your University: www.flickr.com/ulethbridge Join our Facebook group: www.facebook.com/ulethbridge.ca

I would be remiss if I didn’t also mention that we are thrilled to welcome astronaut Col. Chris Hadfield as speaker for the 2014 Calgary Alumni & Friends Dinner this March! Tickets go on sale this month, so don’t miss out on your opportunity to hear from someone who’s life and career truly exemplify that the sky is no longer the limit. I hope you enjoy.

Follow: @ulethbridgenews Check out all of our publications online: www.issuu.com/ulethbridge

Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock, Editor

ON THE COVER: JOHN WILL A PECULIAR CAPE BRETON CARPET, 1979 OIL ON CANVAS From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection; Gift of Jeffrey Spalding, 1985.

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features 20 | UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE

ART GALLERY

U of L fine arts students explore Canadian identity and

2 ALBERTA’S DESTINATION UNIVERSITY Students are the driving reason behind what’s ahead for the U of L.

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take their work to Prairie communities.

THE SKY IS NOT THE LIMIT

SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

36 | SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE

As the speaker at the 2014 Calgary Alumni & Friends Dinner, astronaut Col. Chris Hadfield will share lessons, motivate and inspire.

At the U of L, students are engaged in exemplary research and the results are nothing short of extraordinary.

43 | ALUMNI NEWS AND EVENTS

Catch up on what happened at the U of L this fall.

Meet the new ULAA president Grant Adamson (BSc ’03)

and learn how you can get involved with the

Alumni Association.

45 | ALMA MATTERS U of L alumni are always up to amazing and exciting things. Alma Matters features news and notes from your former classmates.

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DANCE OF CHANGE

NO LIMITS

Lisa Doolittle is using dance to effect change in communities.

Silicon Valley entrepreneur and executive Anil Pereira (BMgt ’87) is the inaugural Faculty of Management Executive in Residence.

EDITOR: Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Alesha Farfus-Shukaliak DESIGNERS: Stephenie Karsten Three Legged Dog Design PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jason Jones Eva Kolenko Photography Rod Leland Leslie Ohene-Adjei Rob Olson Jason Smith Jaime Vedres

4O ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR Meet this year’s honouree, Dr. Robert Morrison (BA ’83), an incurable romantic with a passion for poetry.

CONTRIBUTORS: Bob Cooney Kristine Carlsen Wall Jane Edmundson Natasha Evdokimoff Sheri Gallant Betsy Greenlees Trevor Kenney Kali McKay Josephine Mills Julia Mitchell Arianna Richardson Maureen Schwartz Stacy Seguin David Smith Dana Yates U of L Advancement

PRINTING: PrintWest SAM is published by University Advancement at the University of Lethbridge twice annually. The opinions expressed or implied in the publication do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Lethbridge Board of Governors. Submissions in the form of letters, articles, story ideas or notices of events are welcome.

SAM is distributed free of charge to a controlled circulation list. To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your address, please contact us. SAM – University Advancement University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive W. Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Toll free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: sam@uleth.ca www.ulethbridge.ca To view SAM online, visit: www. issuu.com/ulethbridge

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SOME SAY IT’S THE JOURNEY THAT MATTERS. OTHERS ARGUE IT’S THE DESTINATION. AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, WE BELIEVE YOU CAN’T HAVE ONE WITHOUT THE OTHER.

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BY ALESHA FARFUS-SHUKALIAK (BA/BMGT ’01)

The University of Lethbridge campus is always spectacular in fall. Adorned with red, yellow and orange, campus kisses summer goodbye in the morning chill and takes on an autumn glow, welcoming the return of students. Excitement is palpable those first few days in September. Students flood the hallways, looking for new classes, meeting new friends and making new memories. This semester, more than 8,300 students are enrolled on the U of L’s Lethbridge, Calgary and Edmonton campuses. And it’s these students – each one of them – who are the driving reason behind what’s ahead for the U of L. At the 2013 Fiat Lux address this fall, U of L President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Mike Mahon introduced the draft 2014-2019 Strategic Plan. Building on its predecessor, this next edition – a sequel, really – outlines five familiar priorities: excel as a comprehensive university, continue enhancing the student experience, promote

access to quality post-secondary education, build internal community while enhancing relationships with external communities, and enhance the sustainability of the University. The plan comes at a pivotal time for the U of L – a time when universities across the province are re-evaluating budget priorities. “Our Strategic Plan and mandate tell us quite clearly who we are and what our priorities are,” says Mahon. “We will be the Alberta university recognized for our commitment to the individual person, for the quality, uniqueness and responsiveness of our programs, and for our accessibility to diverse communities. We will be Canada’s destination for all who seek a comprehensive, liberal education-based university that promotes a diverse and inclusive environment and inspires research-informed teaching and learning, creative discovery, scholarship, professional endeavours, experiential opportunities and community engagement.”

“AS ALBERTA’S DESTINATION UNIVERSITY, WE WILL ENSURE THAT STUDENTS REMAIN CENTRAL TO WHAT WE DO AT THE UNIVERSITY.” DR. MIKE MAHON After a busy summer, there are a lot of noticeable changes on campus this fall – all aimed at enhancing the student experience and putting the U of L on the map as Alberta’s Destination University. On the south end of campus, the new student residence, Mt. Blakiston House, opened its doors in August, providing a new home-away-fromhome for 259 students. “Mt. Blakiston offers a great experience because it is built to accommodate students: every detail

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was thought out by students for students,” says resident and third-year U of L student Deserae Gogel. “I love the large windows and how much light we get; all of the little study nooks are amazing for group or independent study; and having a work-out facility on the first floor saves me a cold hike to the PE building.” Evidence of the 2012 University Campus Master Plan taking shape can also be seen with the development of the new quad, a vibrant outdoor

“I LOVE THE LARGE WINDOWS AND HOW MUCH LIGHT WE GET AND ALL OF THE LITTLE STUDY NOOKS ARE AMAZING FOR GROUP OR INDEPENDENT STUDY.” DESERAE GOGEL

green space outside of Markin Hall. A visible expression of university community, the area features a core open space surrounded on three sides by small rolling hills – an ideal gathering space for students, staff and visitors. The Suitcase sculptures, created by longtime fine arts faculty member and former associate dean, the late Carl Granzow, stand at the southeast section and will greet visitors for years to come. The main entrance to the Students’ Union Building is in the midst of transformation with the revitalization of the South Plaza – again aimed at creating a gathering space on campus. The tunnel also received major upgrades, while the murals continue to tell an important part of the University’s history. The commitment to the student experience, however, goes well beyond the physical campus and is woven into the very fabric of the University and is supported by enhanced student services. Last spring, the University announced a new on-site food-service provider. ARAMARK commenced its services in the spring and

Suitcase sculptures by Carl Granzow

introduced a full-service Starbucks, which features cozy seating, a coffee-bar atmosphere and a stunning view of University Hall and the eastern coulees. In addition, a new Subway and Tim Hortons are now in UHall and the campus

Deserae Gogel

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cafeteria underwent extensive renovations, has a new name and a new menu. The Urban Market brings flair and healthy choices to on-campus dining with resort-like options such as freshly squeezed orange juice, stone-baked pizzas and personal grilling. The U of L also introduced the Student Success Centre earlier this year, which includes Study Skills Services, Tutoring Services and Mental Health Education. “Through programs, services and partnerships, the Centre empowers every student to achieve success and personal wellbeing,” says Trish Jackson (BASc ’03), manager of the Student Success Centre. “The Centre

takes a holistic approach to encourage students to set goals, examine various aspects of their lifestyles, connect with appropriate supports, make positive changes and achieve their goals.” Campus renovations, a new food-services provider and additional student support services all speak to the University’s commitment to the student experience, says Mahon. “As Alberta’s Destination University, we will ensure that students remain central to what we do at the University.” The resulting efforts have secured the U of L placement as one of Canada’s leading universities. The U of L is recognized on the national stage as one of Canada’s top-three undergraduate institutions (2014 Maclean’s University Rankings) and one of Canada’s top-three undergraduate research universities (RE$EARCH Infosource, 2013). And for students like Sarah MacDonald, a firstyear student from Strathmore, Alta., the benefits are evident.

“I wanted to go to school where I’d be comfortable,” she says. “A lot of my high school teachers who I really liked graduated from the U of L and recommended it, so I applied. Although I’ve only been here a few months, I’m having a great experience. My professors are very excited about what they are teaching – and they are genuinely interested in me – and the scholarships I’ve received have helped alleviate a lot of my financial worries. I look forward to every day because there is always something amazing happening.”

“I LOOK FORWARD TO EVERY DAY BECAUSE THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING AMAZING HAPPENING.” SARAH MACDONALD

Sarah MacDonald

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That spirit of “imagining the possibilities” has remained at the heart of the U of L for nearly half a century, and it will shape what the institution will become over the next 50 years. Last year, the University introduced the University Campus Master Plan, the most extensive development plan the University of Lethbridge has undertaken since the original west campus was developed. A cornerstone of the plan is the Destination Project – the construction of a new academic building, the revitalization of University Hall and the construction of a new central plant for the University.

WHEN A GROUP OF LETHBRIDGE CITIZENS RALLIED TOGETHER IN THE 1960S TO ESTABLISH A UNIVERSITY IN LETHBRIDGE, THEY IMAGINED INFINITE POSSIBILITIES. TODAY THE U OF L IS RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF CANADA’S LEADING UNIVERSITIES AND HAS FAR EXCEEDED ITS FOUNDERS’ MOST AMBITIOUS EXPECTATIONS.

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“The Destination Project will contribute to Alberta’s need to recruit the best and brightest scientific talent to our province, enhance our research capacity and enable the aspirations of the next generation of researchers and entrepreneurs,” explains U of L President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Mike Mahon. The construction of a new science facility and the revitalization of University Hall will provide a great opportunity to help define liberal education at the U of L for the 21st century.

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“We can lead the academic world in redefining liberal education to support the ever-changing nature of teaching and scholarship, and enable our students to be best prepared for our world’s evolving landscape,” says Mahon. In planning for the Destination Project, the University has been imaginative and innovative in its thinking, and envisions the concept of the new science facility as more than a teaching and research space, but a place for community engagement and outreach.

UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND RESEARCH SPACE The Destination Project will bring together faculty and students from across the science disciplines, promoting and enabling curricular innovation, helping students achieve their academic goals and fostering a community of science at the U of L and within southern Alberta. It will create new environments and subsequently new paths by which information and ideas can be shared. These facilities will house exceptional research laboratories. They will build on the U of L’s demonstrated success in attracting world-leading researchers to Alberta who are working to solve some of the most pressing

problems our society faces today. This will be where scientists not only invite industry, community groups and government to learn about their latest discoveries, it will be a place where bench space is shared between them. It will be where partnerships are born and ideas become reality.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALIZATION The Destination Project will be a place where undergraduate and graduate research opportunities flourish, where knowledge transfer and commercialization happen; the place the next generation of researchers, scientists and scholars credit for the start of their science careers. It will be a place where undergraduate and graduate students can begin their careers in the sciences, where they can take their ideas and, with the help of faculty researchers, entrepreneurs and industry mentors, turn them into productive businesses. It will include incubation space to be used by industry, entrepreneurial Albertans and investors from around the globe. The Destination Project will be the bedrock that ensures Lethbridge is home to one of Canada’s renowned high-tech and innovation hubs and southern Alberta continues to create wealth for the entire province.

A SCIENCE CENTRE FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA This facility will be a centre for community engagement. It will offer rich resources for lifelong learning, provide meeting places for citizens and the research community, support schools and contribute to the cultural and economic vitality of communities. It will be an educational resource for teachers who provide curriculum-aligned learning opportunities and experiences for the K-12 system in Alberta. The great science teachers who already emerge from the U of L will attain a new standard of education and training unmatched anywhere in the world. It will also be a welcoming, interactive and fun venue for children and their families to visit for a day or a week through already-established community initiatives like science camps. The Destination Project will enable a hands-on approach to learning that will ignite a greater curiosity for science in our community. Site selection for the facility is currently underway. Help shape the future of the University of Lethbridge. Visit: destination-project.ulethbridge.ca for more information and to provide your feedback.

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BY KALI MCKAY (BA ’06, MA ’10) PHOTOS COURTESY OF NASA

Since blasting off in December 2012, astronaut Colonel Chris Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into the collective consciousness not felt since man first walked on the moon. He was sitting on the back of a neighbour’s couch in Sarnia, Ont., watching Neil Armstrong take those famous first steps on July 20, 1969, when Hadfield decided he was going to be an astronaut when he grew up. “Me and a million other kids,” says Hadfield, who was born in 1959, making him a child of the classic space age. “I wasn’t quite 10 when they walked on the moon, but it was a seminal moment in my life.” Having always been interested in the inner workings of the world around him, Hadfield admits he was by nature a curious child. Nevertheless, it’s impossible to deny the impact the Apollo 11 mission had on his young mind. “If you want to show a young person the wonderful things that can result when you apply the latest in technology, science, engineering and math to make the impossible happen, it’s hard to be more inspiring than that,” recalls Hadfield, who 44 years later, is inspiring a whole new generation of future space travellers. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong” by the BBC, today Hadfield is the role model he himself was looking for as a young Canadian with dreams of travelling to space. An elite group, astronauts have a variety of backgrounds and experience. Some have degrees in engineering, physics or medicine, while others come directly from the military. With no Canadian examples to follow, Hadfield made his own way, having to find an entry point into what seemed like an impenetrable world.

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AS THE SPEAKER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE 2014 CALGARY ALUMNI & FRIENDS DINNER, COLONEL CHRIS HADFIELD WILL IMPART THE USEFUL AND PRACTICAL LESSONS HE’S LEARNED THROUGHOUT A REMARKABLE CAREER TO MOTIVATE OTHERS TO ACHIEVE DREAMS THAT MAY SEEM OUT OF THIS WORLD.

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“IT REALLY WAS AN EARLY COMMITMENT TO MY EDUCATION – EDUCATION IN ALL ITS FORMS – THAT ALLOWED ME TO DO THE THINGS THAT I’VE DONE.” COL. CHRIS HADFIELD

“In the beginning, I had no idea how I was going to make it happen,” recalls Hadfield, who eventually decided to pursue a career as a military test pilot because it seemed like a logical first step. He joined the Canadian Armed Forces and earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering before being selected to attend U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in California. He did post-graduate work at the University of Waterloo and the University of Tennessee before eventually being selected by the Canadian Space Agency as one of four new Canadian astronauts from a field of 5,330 applicants in June 1992. “It really was an early commitment to my education – education in all its forms – that allowed me to do the things that I’ve done,” says Hadfield, looking back on his success in landing one of these coveted positions. And, while he admits the prospect of gazing down at Earth’s blue marble, conducting extraterrestrial research and perhaps eventually exploring new worlds is only available to a handful of candidates, for Hadfield that’s enough. “Today, astronaut is a viable career choice as a Canadian,” says Hadfield, acknowledging the

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irresistible allure the position still holds for thousands of young people. “The odds are very small, but they aren’t zero. It’s a tough road but it’s definitely something that should be on the guidance counsellors’ list of Canadian professions that students can aspire to.” He sees this as a natural progression of our country’s involvement in the space program. “Canada’s maturation in this business is really just a straight, linear increase in trust and accomplishment over time,” explains Hadfield, citing examples of the country’s initial involvement, followed by the development of Canadarm, and leading most recently to his role as the first Canadian commander of the International Space Station (ISS). “And with each step forward, we have opened the door a little more and helped remove some of the obstacles I faced when I was trying to get into the program.” For him, these types of dreams are only made possible if people can see the bigger picture. “We all need to think beyond the horizons of our own street or school or town, so that we can think of ourselves on a larger stage,” says Hadfield,

referring back to how watching the first man walk on the moon completely changed his perspective on what was possible. “One of the things I’ve tried to do throughout my career is show the opportunities that do exist by helping put things on the horizon that people may not have even thought about,” says Hadfield. “The fact is that some little kid in some little town from Canada might walk on the moon one day, but you have to get their attention first.” And that’s exactly what he did. For more than five months, Hadfield woke the world with a simple tweet: “Good morning, Earth.” And followers did not need to imagine the view from more than 423 km above Earth’s surface – Hadfield shared magnificent photos of our home planet to his nearly one million fans worldwide using social media. “The space station is a terrific platform for sharing,” says Hadfield, adding that it’s our first permanent outpost and has been occupied since 2000. “Even amongst all the other news and noise of the world, our effort to leave our own planet resonates with people. And, as a result, millions of people around the world stop and pay attention.”

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Hadfield has always worked hard to share his experiences in space with the rest of the world, but advances in technology have made that infinitely easier. Harnessing the power of social media to make his experience accessible to millions, his most recent mission was shared in real-time and helped infuse a sense of wonder into the collective consciousness not felt since man first walked on the moon. “The immediacy granted by social media gave me a stronger voice than I’ve had on previous missions,” says Hadfield, whose moving photos and insightful tweets helped provide a new perspective on our world. “It’s really easy to be selfish if you’ve never been anywhere but home. It’s hard to have any regard for the rest of the world if it’s all just theoretical to you. But if you can see how similar the rest of the world is to how you are and how the actions you take today have impacts globally, it immediately changes your perspective, and as a result, your decision-making. The space station is a wonderful place to share

that perspective and therefore to try and help people make better decisions.” Although Hadfield returned to Earth in May 2013 and recently retired, he continues to bring the glory of space travel and the lessons he learned over a 35-year career to everyone he encounters and, on March 27, 2014, he will share his story with guests at the University of Lethbridge 2014 Calgary Alumni & Friends Dinner. “At any university, including the U of L, there are so many opportunities available,” says Hadfield, who hopes events like the upcoming dinner will help motivate people to get involved. “Too many students go through their whole education without even realizing that those exchange programs, or scholarships, or electives even exist. It’s up to the alumni and friends of the University to not only ensure the opportunities are there but to ensure students know about them and take advantage of them.”

“AS COMMANDER OF THE SPACE STATION, IT SUDDENLY STRUCK ME THAT A NINE-YEAR-OLD CHOSE MY CAREER. AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, IT ACTUALLY WORKED OUT.” COL. CHRIS HADFIELD For Hadfield, events like this bring things full circle. “As commander of the space station, it suddenly struck me that a nine-year-old chose my career. And, more importantly, it actually worked out,” says Hadfield with a laugh. “The odds were improbable but they would have been zero if at nine I hadn’t seen the impossible happen and made the choice to pursue it.”

T H URS D AY, MARCH 27, 2014 W ES T IN C A LGARY | 320 4 AV E SW, CALGARY $175 PER TICKET OR $1,400 PER TABLE Join guest speaker Col. Chris Hadfield as he imparts the lessons he’s learned throughout a remarkable career to motivate others to achieve dreams that may seem out of this world. Tickets available November 25, 2013. To purchase tickets, visit: www.uleth.ca/conreg/calgarydinner or contact University Advancement at 1-866-552-2582 or advancement.events@uleth.ca. Tickets are limited.

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AT UNIVERSITIES AROUND THE WORLD, UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS STUDY THE RESULTS OF ACADEMIC RESEARCH, BUT TYPICALLY THEY AREN’T INVITED TO HELP GENERATE THOSE FINDINGS THEMSELVES. SOMETHING DIFFERENT, HOWEVER, IS HAPPENING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE.

EXEMPLARY RESEARCH + ENGAGED STUDENTS

=extraoRdinary res BY DANA YATES PHOTOS BY LESLIE OHENE-ADJEI

At the U of L, undergraduate students in multiple disciplines are working alongside faculty members, supporting the long and often complex process of academic research. It’s a tremendous opportunity for learning – particularly when it’s combined with a liberal education.

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U of L students – at all levels – play a key role in the discoveries they learn about in the classroom. By participating in the investigative journey, their learning goes beyond the theoretical to the practical. Their curiosity is piqued, their creativity grows and their confidence to handle future academic challenges increases. Students gain critical-thinking and communication skills that will prove useful in advanced studies as well as the workplace.

Meanwhile, the entire U of L community benefits from the new viewpoints and inquiries that arise while working with research-focused students – many of whom will go on to become the next generation of researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs and community leaders. Such exciting examples of learning and collaboration are pillars at the U of L, where research encompasses a broad spectrum of

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

sults

Melissa Bexte, a 17-year-old high school student from Picture Butte, spent the summer learning about neuroscience at the U of L’s CCBN as part of the BIP program. Read more on page 16.

activities and a liberal-arts education means students are free to explore diverse paths to discovery – whether that means conducting research in the laboratory, preparing for case competitions, applying classroom-based knowledge to real-world challenges or contributing to important cultural projects.

with strong research and problem-solving skills – a true definition of a liberal education for the 21st century. And those graduates are prepared to go on to great achievements. In fact, one-third of all chief executive officers of Fortune 500 companies have a liberal-education background.

Discover Research Throughout the following pages, you will be introduced to students who have similar dreams of success and are pursuing them at the U of L — proving that when highly engaged learners participate in exemplary research, the results are extraordinary.

Taken together, these experiences speak to the adaptability and big-picture thinking of students

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Excelling

on the world stage Learning from the best – that’s exactly what a group of research-focused students is doing at the University of Lethbridge. Members of the U of L’s International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) team are part of a phenomenon that began 10 years ago as a course at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Today, the annual iGEM contest is the world’s leading undergraduate synthetic biology competition – and each year, U of L students regularly rank among the top iGEM teams worldwide. An emerging field, synthetic biology sees cells, enzymes and metabolic pathways as more than biological entities; they’re sophisticated parts that can be programmed like machines to perform specific activities. As a result, research in synthetic biology is opening up remarkable possibilities in such sectors as agriculture, pharmaceutical, medical diagnostics, clean energy and resource extraction. In 2011, for example, U of L students developed a petrochemical-eating bacteria that could be used to help clean up water in tailings ponds, a discovery that placed the University’s iGEM team among the top 16 competitors in the world, alongside students from Harvard University,

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MIT, the University of Washington and Johns Hopkins University. This October, the U of L’s iGEM team once again demonstrated its strong innovation abilities. In addition to creating a bioengineering part that works like a zip drive, compressing genetic information, the team developed software that rapidly determines what DNA sequences are compatible to compress together. These inventions, which will allow future bioengineers more flexibility in their research, captured top prize in the 2013 North American iGEM Regional Jamboree held in Toronto. Moreover, the firstplace finish secured the team – made up of Dustin Smith (BSc ’13), Graeme Glaister, Jenna Friedt (BSc ’11, MSc ’13), Suneet Kharey, Harland Brandon (BSc ’13) and Zak Stinson – a spot in the international iGEM competition at MIT in November, where the team claimed two prominent awards. Providing students with the opportunity to compete against teams from around the world is just one way iGEM benefits its participants, says U of L biochemistry professor Dr. Hans-Joachim (H.J.) Wieden. Considered the driving force

behind the U of L’s iGEM teams, Wieden serves as the students’ advisor and coach. He is also a highly respected researcher in his own right. Director of the Alberta RNA (ribonucleic acid) Research and Training Institute at the U of L, Wieden was also recently appointed the Innovates Centre of Research Excellence (iCORE) Chair of Bioengineering. Funded by a $2-million investment from Alberta Innovates-Technology Futures, the role enables Wieden’s research team to study how biological systems can be engineered to achieve breakthroughs in materials science, chemistry, biochemistry, health and nanoscience. “iGEM enables students to get their first taste of research,” says Wieden. “They understand the goal of the project, and learn how to think outside of the box, troubleshoot and apply their knowledge to create scientific discoveries. All of this unlocks students’ creativity.” What’s more, he continues, iGEM cultivates students’ entrepreneurial potential. The teams manage their own projects and raise funds to support their work, as well as learn how to communicate effectively and connect their work

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

U of L iGEM students Isaac Ward, Mackenzie Coatham (BSc ’12), Harland Brandon (BSc ’13) and Erin Kelly are using their research and entrepreneurial skills to launch their own company.

to real-world needs. Finally, as young researchers themselves, they come to realize the importance of supporting the forward-thinking scientists of the future: high school students. To that end, U of L students have started iGEM teams in high schools in southern Alberta. And those high school students are following in the success of their older counterparts. Earlier this year, in fact, a team of Lethbridge high school students representing schools from across the city, won the Green Brick grand prize at iGEM’s international High School Jamboree at MIT, as well as trophies for Best New Biobrick Natural for their engineered DNA part and Best Wiki, the website used to display their project. Advised by Wieden as well as U of L undergraduate and graduate students, the high school team – consisting of 22 students from Lethbridge-area high schools, including Kieran McCormack, Chris Isaac, Elaine Bird, Fiona Spitzig, Yoyo Yao, Patrick O’Donnell and Katie Thomas, who represented the team at the jamboree – successfully created a longer lasting form of Oxytocin. A hormone that’s most-commonly used to aid childbirth, Oxytocin degrades quickly and soon becomes unstable,

iGEM students are representing the U of L on the world stage. Back row (L-R) Harland Brandon (BSc ’13), Dustin Smith (BSc ’13), Graeme Glaister, Zak Stinson and Dr. H.J. Wieden (faculty advisor). Front row (L-R) Suneet Kharey and Jenna Friedt (BSc ’11, MSc ’13).

making it expensive and difficult to store. While such complex projects can be challenging for high school students, the research experience is invaluable, says former iGEM high school team member Erin Kelly. “Being on the high school team was a steep learning curve, but I learned research methods through hands-on experience and that definitely made the transition to university easier,” says Kelly. Now a second-year biochemistry student at the U of L, she serves as an advisor to the current iGEM high school team along with fourth-year neuroscience student Isaac Ward and master of biochemistry student Mackenzie Coatham (BSc ’12). The trio, all former members of the undergraduate iGEM team, have used their resulting research and entrepreneurial skills to launch the spinoff company Synbiologica Ltd. Along with Brandon (now a U of L master’s student in biochemistry), and U of L neuroscience professor Dr. Gerlinde Metz and Wieden as advisors, the group is in the process of patenting their big idea – a biomedical technology that provides rapid hormone-detection results. Their idea is expected to be 93 per cent

more cost-effective than traditional antibody technology, bringing the next generation of hormone detection to the research, agriculture and medical markets. In recognition of its scientific innovation, the Synbiologica team has earned numerous accolades. They include winning $10,000 in the South Venture Business Plan Competition and taking first place in the Tech Stream side of the Chinook Entrepreneurial Challenge, an annual businessplanning competition hosted by Community Futures Lethbridge Region. The group received an additional $10,000 in cash, a one-year lease on space in the tecconnect: An Alberta centre for new commerce – a high-tech business incubator operated by Economic Development Lethbridge – plus a range of other in-kind prizes, including business consulting from MNP and ActionCOACH, and several thousand dollars worth of media services. “iGEM gave us the motivation and skills to explore multidisciplinary research,” says Ward, chief executive officer of Synbiologica. “And from there, we realized that we don’t have to follow the usual career route. We can create our own jobs.”

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Biological Information Processing program puts

research in the hands of students Rajat Thapa (BSc ’12) may have started his undergraduate studies in the United States, but he knows exactly what drew him to the University of Lethbridge to complete his Bachelor of Science in neuroscience: “The world-renowned neuroscience faculty at the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience (CCBN),” says the native of Nepal. The CCBN – the only research facility of its kind in Canada – is home to some of the founders of the behavioural neuroscience field. One of those highly respected researchers is Dr. Robert Sutherland, Chair of the Department of Neuroscience, who has a long list of scientific achievements to his credit. Among them, his team was the first in the world to reverse a memory deficit in a dementia model by regenerating cells in the cerebral cortex.

In addition to conducting his own research, Sutherland plays a key role in supporting and inspiring the next generation of scientists. As director of the University’s Biological Information Processing (BIP): From Genome to Systems Level program, Sutherland oversees a premier training initiative in neuroscience. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) through their Collaborative Research and Training Experience program, BIP provides students with a hands-on experience that is easily translatable to industry – a feature that stands BIP apart from more traditional academic paths. Equally important, says Sutherland, is the calibre of researchers who students work alongside. “In this program, students learn from an unparalleled group of mentors who are world leaders in their fields,” he says.

Thapa, now a master’s student in neuroscience, is a BIP program participant. Working under the supervision of neuroscientist Dr. Aaron Gruber, an expert in the neural basis of decision-making, Thapa is studying the role that different subregions of the brain play when animals make decisions and exhibit particular behaviour. Gaining a better understanding of this process may one day help researchers find novel and effective solutions to addiction, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. “The U of L’s neuroscience program allowed me to jump right into research,” says Thapa, who intends to pursue a PhD down the road. “It’s helping me gather tools in terms of methods, data-analysis techniques, and creative and critical-thinking tools necessary to pursue the questions I hope to someday answer.”

Master’s student Rajat Thapa (BSc ’12) is seeking answers to some of the brain’s most mysterious puzzles and making important discoveries along the way.

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

A case of excellence Management students Tasneem Kapacee, Britney Anderson, Jaden Evanson and Sean Maddocks are taking their management skills into the boardroom. (Not pictured, Sahib Chhatwal)

Five University of Lethbridge management students have proven they have what it takes to advise a board of directors how to govern in an ethical and responsible manner, and earned a $10,000 prize for their efforts. In March 2013, Faculty of Management students Britney Anderson, Sahib Chhatwal, Jaden Evanson, Tasneem Kapacee and Sean Maddocks took first place at the Certified Management Accountants (CMA) and Certified General Accountants (CGA) Alberta’s Board Governance Case Competition in Calgary. The students had six hours to analyse a case about board governance that was based on a fictitious, not-for-profit company and create a presentation with their recommendations. Those

presentations were then evaluated by a judging panel of esteemed business leaders.

From a student perspective, case competitions provide opportunities to apply theory and practice.

Case competitions further engage students in the learning process, says management professor Dr. M. Gordon Hunter. Together with fellow Faculty of Management professors Glen Baker and Bruce Thurston (BASc ’78), as well as accounting student and former case competition participant Eric MacLeod, Hunter coached the U of L team to their win.

“We had to do a lot of research on best practices in board management. All of it is applicable in the real world,” says third-year accounting student Evanson, adding that preparing for the competition meant going beyond lessons learned in the classroom.

“The students learned how to apply their accounting knowledge at a high level within an organization. They took financial data and applied it to board management,” says Hunter.

That opportunity to gain practical experience was also appreciated by Kapacee, a fourth-year accounting student. “I realized the importance of a cohesive team,” she says. “We had to recognize what people brought to the table and play to everyone’s strengths.”

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Oral History Project

brings the past to life U of L master’s student Karissa Patton (BA ’13) and undergraduate student Maria Livingston are investigating the past as part of the Oral History Project.

Gallery by BMO Financial Group earlier this year along with funding to support research related to the art gift.

The late English writer Rudyard Kipling once reflected, “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” University of Lethbridge students Karissa Patton (BA ’13) and Maria Livingston would likely agree with that observation.

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Last summer, Patton, who is now pursuing a master’s degree in history, and Livingston, a third-year Native American studies student, worked together on the Oral History Project, a story-gathering initiative supported by the U of L Art Gallery, University Archives and the Centre for Oral History and Tradition.

A cultural icon of southern Alberta and one of the most important portraitists of First Nations people, de Grandmaison was a nomadic painter who often stayed with ranchers, farmers and aboriginal families for several days at a time while he painted their portraits. His work not only documented the history of First Nations people in Canada, but was also unmatched in its ability to capture the unique personalities of those who sat for portraits.

Today Livingston continues to be involved in the project, which is aimed at helping people to enhance their understanding of artist Nicholas de Grandmaison (1892-1978) and his unique connections to First Nations communities. The University has a vast collection of de Grandmaison artwork and artifacts, including 67 original pastel portraits that were donated to the U of L Art

With guidance from U of L archivist, Mike Perry (MEd ’06), and professor Lisa Doolittle of the Department of Theatre and Dramatic Arts, Patton and Livingston contacted members of the Kainai, Siksika and Piikani First Nations, searching for and interviewing people who may have had contact either with de Grandmaison or any of the subjects featured in his paintings.

“Collecting individual narratives is important because people aren’t writing things down as much as they once did. Also, the stories that have been included in historical archives in the past have often just been those of famous people and politicians,” says Patton. To ensure the full range of stories compiled in the oral history project are shared for years to come, Livingston is now working on an educational program for high school students and an online resource for middle school students. The initiatives are a way of giving back to First Nations communities and youth, says Livingston, who is of Cree heritage. “I’m thankful for the opportunity to work on this project,” she says. “Along with hearing great storytelling, I’ve learned more about First Nations culture and history, and that complements what I’ve been learning in school.”

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P HOTO B Y J AS ON S MI T H

SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

THIS IS JUST A SAMPLING OF THE EXTRAORDINARY RESEARCH THAT TAKES PLACE AT THE U OF L. DISCOVER MORE STORIES AT: WWW.ULETH.CA/RESEARCH

Programming a

bright future Darcy Best (BSc ’11), front, Hugh Ramp (BSc ’13), left, and Chris Martin, right, are programming their way to the top.

It’s not every day that you avoid being eaten by digital zombies. But a team of U of L students has proven it’s just the way to earn a second-place finish at an international programming competition. The University’s programming contest team participated for the first time in the prestigious annual world finals of the Association for Computing Machinery’s International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC). Sponsored by IBM, the competition was held in St. Petersburg, Russia, last summer. The team, made up of Hugh Ramp (BSc ’13), who was a fourth-year physics student at the time, Christopher Martin, a fourth-year computer science student, Darcy Best (BSc ’11), a second-year MSc mathematics student, and coaches Dr. Howard Cheng (mathematics and computer science) and Dr. Kevin Grant (mathematics and computer science), took second prize in the open challenge competition that required students to write an artificial intelligence program that would

successfully play a zombie-filled video game on the team’s behalf. The challenge was part of a larger competition in which nearly 30,000 students from around the world participated in regional contests, solving several complex computing problems within a gruelling, five-hour deadline.

real-world demands of computing. “You must work together under intense time constraints. There’s no room for any failure,” he says. What’s more, says Martin, preparing for the competition is often just as challenging as the contest. U of L students spent 15 to 20 hours a week – on top of their regular studies – practising sample computing problems. “The more time you put in, the better you will do,” he says.

In this battle of logic, strategy and mental endurance, each team had to huddle around a single computer while addressing various problems. For example, the students had to quantify the impact of water pollution and determine how to get commuters to their destinations as quickly as possible without traffic congestion.

It’s a sentiment echoed by Best. “You have to learn to use new algorithms that aren’t taught in your courses. As a result, my coding skills have gone through the roof.” Those abilities, he says, have given him an advantage over his classmates, who often must invest considerable time becoming proficient at writing computer programs.

In the end, among the 120 teams that advanced to the world finals, the U of L students placed third among the Canadian competitors in the main event, 12th out of 23 North American teams and 80th overall.

Best, however, isn’t the only one whose ICPC experience has complemented his education. Teammate Ramp, for instance, has gone on to pursue graduate studies at the University of Alberta, providing further evidence that hands-on learning serves as a springboard to future success.

The competition, says Cheng, equips students for the

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

art + people = x series WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE CANADIAN? TWO U OF L FINE ARTS STUDENTS EXPLORE CANADIAN IDENTITY AND TAKE THEIR WORK TO PRAIRIE COMMUNITIES.

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

BY DAVID SMITH IMAGES BY ARIANNA RICHARDSON (BFA ’13)

Last summer, University of Lethbridge fine arts students – Arianna Richardson (BFA ’13), a Lethbridge artist, and David Smith, an emerging curator and intern in Art History/Museum Studies – worked together to create a travelling exhibition titled The Canada Collection. This show was mounted at both the Forestburg and District Museum

in Forestburg, Alta., as well as the Mountain View Museum and Archives in Olds, Alta. The exhibit examined the constructed nature of Canadian identity through the tourism industry, and how symbols of Canada have been produced in popular culture. The exhibition featured a photographic series titled Frontier that had been created upon Richardson’s receipt of the Roloff

Beny Foundation Fellowship in Photography Award in 2012. This series documented the presence of “Frontier” brand motor homes across the Prairies in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. As a visible example of how Canadian identity has been marketed in relation to the wild and untamed landscape, the repeated encounters represent a reminder of a changing idea about what it means to be Canadian.

Also present in the exhibition were Richardson’s custom-made craft kits. Paralleling commercial sales in the tourism industry, her kits reflected the notion of a supply-anddemand model for the definition of “Canadian.” A custom pennant and make-your-own pennant kit were each created for the Forestburg installation with a portion of the proceeds going to the host museum. Similarly a finished lunch bag and self-assembled

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

VISITORS WERE ABLE TO SEE THE WAYS IN WHICH CANADIAN IDENTITY HAS BEEN CONSTRUCTED.

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lunch-bag kit were produced for the Mountain View Museum and Archives in Olds. At both venues, her works and items from the collection generated plenty of conversation with the artist and among the visitors. The exhibition derives its name from a third component that is the collected artifacts of Canadiana. Assembled from Richardson’s visits to thrift shops, yard sales and antique shops, the collection reflects both the serious and playful way that Canadian identity has been merchandised over many years.

museum (which is a key player in the tourism industry and the proliferation of regional identity) inspired viewers to witness the ideologies at work around them. In The Canada Collection, visitors were able to see Drawing inspiration from historic the ways in which Canadian identity Canadian artists with a shared interest has been constructed through the in the relationship between Canadian variety of different approaches identity and landscape as well as more envisioned by Richardson. contemporary artists evaluating its shortcomings in a variety of media, Richardson’s work has precedent in the canon of Canadian art. Presenting this exhibition in the Like moulted feathers found as traces of a bird, these objects represent ideas that may not be useful anymore and demonstrate the ever-changing nature of Canadian imagery.


U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

art + people = x series

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P HOTO B Y LES L I E OHEN E- ADJ EI

“THIS IS THE KIND OF COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH THAT CAN IGNITE NEW IDEAS, MOVE PEOPLE’S HEARTS AND POSSIBLY CHANGE BEHAVIOURS AND COMMUNITIES.” LISA DOOLITTLE

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BY TREVOR KENNEY

Lisa Doolittle once lived the life of a professional artist, drawing on the passion for her craft as a dancer and choreographer to create a shared experience with her audience.

about it, circus work is all about trust and when you are flying off a trapeze and have to be caught by somebody else, you learn a lot about responsibility and trust.”

That passion still burns inside Doolittle, only now the outlet is academia, where her research expertise and love for dance and theatre have come together to effect real change in the community.

That is the essence of ASC, bringing together diverse groups and using the arts as a catalyst to open lines of communication, to create community awareness and inclusivity and to encourage engagement for the betterment of our communities.

Doolittle, a professor of theatre arts in the University of Lethbridge’s Faculty of Fine Arts, is the Teaching and Learning Research Coordinator for the Art for Social Change (ASC) project, a comprehensive five-year national research program that examines the effectiveness of using the arts as a means of community engagement and to encourage positive social change. “We’ve known for years that the arts are an effective form of initiating change,” says Doolittle. “There are countless examples throughout the country where arts programs are used as a way to connect and engage communities, but there has been very little evaluation of why and how these programs are effective.” What exactly is Art for Social Change? It is the application of arts-based processes to address issues of social concern and to encourage social innovation. It is an artist acting as a facilitator to spark dialogue, new ideas and actions with members of communities who would not otherwise define themselves as artists. Doolittle cites an exciting international program based in Quebec, known as Social Circus, where Cirque du Soleil is working with at-risk youth and teaching them circus skills. “It sounds almost counterintuitive to be working with at-risk youth and teaching them what most people believe to be very risky and dangerous behaviours,” says Doolittle. “But when you think

For Doolittle, dance is a powerful vehicle for change. This new research program enables study of an ongoing project initiated by the University of Calgary’s Anne Flynn (professor of dance) that involves residents of subsidized-housing complexes for senior citizens, many of which are first generation immigrants to Canada with varying degrees of English-language proficiency.

Doolittle’s role as the teaching and learning coordinator is key for the project’s long-term sustainability. Its success will be dictated by the capacity that is built nationally between educational institutions, artists and both arts and non-arts community-based organizations. “It’s so important that we are able to continue producing excellent practitioners who understand high quality artistic work as well as social-change work, and then are able to communicate with and bring together all different kinds of people,” she says, adding that the U of L could eventually become the site of a research institute that furthers the study and dissemination of ASC practices.

“The arts bring people together,” says Doolittle. “The arts do not separate people – they are communal activities and when communities come together, big things can happen.”

Doolittle will oversee the research and the eventual implementation of new teaching and learning practices, with considerable local support from Dr. Cynthia Chambers and Dr. Erika Hasebe-Ludt of the Faculty of Education, Ramona Big Head (BA ’96, BEd ’96, MEd ’09), Dr. Jean Harrowing (BSc ’78) of the Faculty of Health Sciences, Dr. Rachael Crowder (who teaches at the U of L for the Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary) and the U of L’s Teaching Centre. Alumna Candace Lewko (BEd ’95, BFA ’95, MEd ’09) contributes an additional perspective from the context of her position as Curriculum Consultant, Educational Enhancement Team, at Lethbridge College.

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) understands the potential value of ASC to Canadian communities. It is driving the national research program with $2.5 million in funding, allowing 20 collaborators, numerous national and local organizations and six partnering universities to come together for the first largescale, systemic project of its kind in Canada.

“It seems like the time has come for this kind of work to get a higher profile,” says Doolittle. “This is the kind of collaborative research that can ignite new ideas, move people’s hearts and possibly change behaviours and communities. When people get together you can move mountains and I think that is the impact we will see in our communities – people will move mountains.”

Doolittle and Flynn are also working with people who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, and, in partnership with Decidedly Jazz Danceworks, will study the impact of their participation in dance classes – not only looking at how dancing may assist in increasing independence and mitigating symptoms of the disease, but also how effective these classes are in creating a sense of community for an often-marginalized population.

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All the Right Moves BY NATASHA EVDOKIMOFF (BA ’95, BMGT ’97) PHOTOS BY ROD LELAND (BFA ‘09)

Would the world be a better place if more people played chess? The philosopher in Dr. Lance Grigg loves that question, but the educator in him loves it even more. Grigg is an education professor at the University of Lethbridge who came to the profession by way of an undergraduate degree in philosophy. An avid chess player himself, Grigg has also taught countless other people how to play the game. Why? Because he believes fostering critical thinking is key to creating a more functional society, and the correlation between chess playing and the development of critical thinking is too powerful to ignore. Critical thinking has been defined as reflective thinking that is focused on what to believe or do. It’s about effective problem-solving; coming to a sensible course of action based on gathered information and sound reasoning. Grigg uses chess as one method of teaching others how to think critically – the effects of which extend well beyond the game board.

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“IN CHESS THERE IS A LOT OF ROOM FOR CREATIVITY WITHIN A SET OF FIRM RULES. YOU HAVE A NUMBER OF OPTIONS WITH EVERY MOVE, AND YOU HAVE TO MAKE A DECISION BASED ON A SPECIFIC CONTEXT.“ DR. LANCE GRIGG


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“In chess there is a lot of room for creativity within a set of firm rules,” says Grigg. “You have a number of options with every move, and you have to make a decision based on a specific context. Research has shown that chess helps people to think strategically and creatively in other aspects of their lives. It helps them identify relevant information and patterns, and develop a sense of autonomy within a team setting. That’s what critical thinking is all about, and ultimately, that’s what being a responsible citizen is about, too.” Grigg has been an educator for more than 25 years. He began at the U of L in 1996, and focuses on critical thinking in his teaching as well as in his research. In the classroom Grigg’s students are encouraged to use critical thinking not only to complete the course work, but as a way to share authority and steer the learning. “I engage my students in a variety of questioning strategies to get them involved in the material in a critical way, and develop intellectual risk tolerance that will hopefully spill over into their daily lives,” he says. “As an educator it’s my job to foster intellectual courage. I share power in the classroom, and always leave the door open for students to ask critical questions with regard to the material. A good critical thinker is open to all points of view and is continually self-correcting. You have to model critical thinking to teach it, and as students become teachers they will hopefully in turn model it, too.” Grigg recently began a new research project working with Grade 12 social studies teachers, gathering their perceptions of students’ critical-thinking skills as they graduate from high school. The research will also include professors teaching 1000-level classes at the U of L in order to gather their perceptions of the critical-thinking skills of first-year university students. Grigg will work with both groups over a two-year period, investigating differences and mentoring instructors on how to foster critical thinking. Beyond the interesting findings the study is certain to uncover, Grigg says the research will further his personal mission to raise the level of critical thinking and the quality of critical thinkers on a broad scale. “Do we need a citizenry that is responsible? Reasonable? Ethical? That strives for the common good? I’d say we do. The relationship between sustaining a fair and just society and growing a population of burgeoning critical thinkers is strong.”

“LIBERAL EDUCATION BROADENS VIEWPOINTS AND SIMULTANEOUSLY RESPECTS INDIVIDUAL PERSPECTIVES. IT IS THE VERY FOUNDATION OF CRITICAL THINKING.” DR. LANCE GRIGG

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Grigg says the U of L’s liberal-education foundation is an ideal platform for promoting critical thinking, and that the Faculty of Education is in a unique position to help advance critical thinking from the ground up in schools. “The very notion of liberal education is freedom of thought,” says Grigg. “Liberal arts students deepen their understanding in many areas, which ultimately shapes how they view society and what it means to be a responsible citizen. Liberal education broadens viewpoints and simultaneously respects individual perspectives. It is the very foundation of critical thinking.”


P HOTO B Y MANDY PACK ( B N ‘09)

MALAWI SCHOOL CHILDREN HELP U OF L STUDENTS GAIN A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE WORLD.

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PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY MANDY PACK (BA ‘09), STACY PELESKEY (BN ‘08) AND ANUVA PRADHAN (BN ‘09).

“We offer very different kinds of programming. Some of it is very practice-ready in terms of focus, and some of it is a lot broader with an emphasis on learning how to support populations or individuals on their It’s a timeless quote with universal relevance, and path toward health and wellness,” he explains. “In one that is particularly meaningful to students at the either case, our primary goal is to graduate healthUniversity of Lethbridge who have travelled to Africa care professionals who understand that health is as part of the Malawi Field Study program. multifaceted and affected by many different factors related to location, culture, history, politics and more.” Since the Faculty of Health Sciences began offering the field study in 2008, 48 U of L students have taken The Malawi program is open to U of L students from their learning to Malawi and 14 more are registered to all disciplines, and instils lessons in community go this spring. Their objective: to conduct culturally building and cultural understanding. relevant health-promotion activities in Malawi in “The program helps students understand how relation to the diseases of malaria, tuberculosis and HIV-AIDS, and to explore the complexities that arise complex the world really is, and to see that there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all solution to in such an endeavour due to cultural differences, any issue,” Harrowing says. “It offers an ongoing, traditional practices and societal beliefs. broad-spectrum type of learning that’s applicable in many ways.” “The program is designed to help students learn about global health and how populations achieve When U of L alumna Stacy Peleskey (BN ’08) went health in other parts of the world,” says U of L to Malawi, she connected with Malawian children nursing professor Dr. Jean Harrowing (BSc ’78), and delivered important health messages in ways she who along with U of L fine arts professor Lisa never anticipated. Doolittle, established and now co-ordinate the The Dalai Lama once wrote, “With realization of one’s own potential and self-confidence in one’s ability, one can build a better world.”

program. “The students come to understand that global is local, and local is global – that some of the challenges people face in a place like Malawi aren’t necessarily all that different than some of the challenges people face here.”

The Malawi program is one example of the Faculty of Health Sciences’ aim to provide transformational education, nurture intellectual curiosity, engage with diverse populations and promote responsible global citizenship. The Faculty’s dean, Dr.Christopher Hosgood, says that instilling a global perspective in students is every bit as important to the Faculty as providing solid clinical knowledge.

“THE PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO HELP STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT GLOBAL HEALTH AND HOW POPULATIONS ACHIEVE HEALTH IN OTHER PARTS OF THE WORLD.” DR. JEAN HARROWING (BSC ’78)

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“Song and dance are integral to Malawian culture, so it was important that we share some of our Canadian culture in that way,” says Peleskey. “I did the ‘moose song’ in almost every classroom we went into. The kids loved it. It gave us an immediate connection and helped break down any barriers getting in the way of the teaching and learning we were there to do.” Animal antics aside, the Malawi field study was a deeply moving experience for Peleskey, one that changed the trajectory of her life and continues to resonate with her today.

Maluwa, director of Education Services with Museums of Malawi. Maluwa is the U of L’s key contact in Malawi, laying all the groundwork for each trip. In addition to the innumerable logistical details he hammers out, Maluwa plays host, translator and mentor to the student travellers. Simply put, the program wouldn’t be possible without him. Maluwa met Harrowing in 2007 when he visited the Galt Museum in Lethbridge as part of a Commonwealth Association of Museums tour, and played a key role in establishing the program that would benefit U of L students and the people of Malawi alike. In recognition of his work, Maluwa received the 2013 Friend of Health Sciences Award, an annual honour given by the Faculty of Health Sciences that recognizes an individual or agency who has made a significant contribution to health education and research at the University of Lethbridge. While he is honoured to be recognized, his focus remains on the program and the difference it makes in the lives of those affected. “Through the fundraising efforts of U of L students, more than 3,000 mosquito nets have been distributed and given to children and pregnant women. This is one of the most reliable methods of malaria prevention,” Maluwa says. “As well, through education and health promotion 4,000 people have been tested for their HIV status, which is an entry point to HIV prevention and management.”

U of L students have also donated soccer balls, sugar, clothes, schools supplies and even a wheelchair to children and HIV-positive individuals. And once they return to Canada, the U of L students are expected “The Malawi trip was one of the most amazing things to give a public presentation as a way of sharing their experiences and acknowledging the privilege of I’ve ever done. It impacted my life at the time and participating in the service-learning project. continues to do so even now five years later,” says Peleskey, who works as a nurse in public health. “The U of L students have had a tremendous impact. “The opportunity to experience such a diverse By delivering messages of health promotion in culture was unbelievable. It fuelled my nursing a culturally relevant way, the Malawian students career, gave me skills I use today and helped me and communities can adopt and incorporate them grow as a person.” into their systems of learning,” says Maluwa. “The Malawi program positively affects everyone Peleskey’s feelings about the program are shared involved, not only the people of Malawi, but also among her classmates. U of L students – who are ambassadors of global health promotion at the local and international level. “We hear it again and again – the program There’s tremendous learning on both sides.” changes a student’s way of thinking,” says Aaron

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“THE MALAWI PROGRAM POSITIVELY AFFECTS EVERYONE INVOLVED, NOT ONLY THE PEOPLE OF MALAWI, BUT ALSO U OF L STUDENTS.” AARON MALUWA (pictured below)

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“YOU HAVE TO BE ABLE TO MEET OPPORTUNITY WHEN IT PRESENTS ITSELF, AND YOU HAVE TO BE SHARP ENOUGH TO SEE THE OPPORTUNITY WHEN IT ARISES.” ANIL PEREIRA (BMGT ’87)

BY NATASHA EVDOKIMOFF (BA ’95, BMGT ’97) PHOTOS BY EVA KOLENKO PHOTOGRAPHY

Talking with Anil Pereira (BMgt ’87) is a bit like having to grab onto a speeding train. The conversation moves quickly, and it takes work to keep up. Pereira’s words shoot out like rapid-fire artillery, his mind moving a mile a minute from one point to the next – a steady stream of thoughts and anecdotes coming at you with pinpoint accuracy and searing resonance. A halfhour discussion seems to pass in the blink of an eye, and afterward you’re left with a dizzying amount of information that you sense is extremely valuable, but will take some time to fully decipher.

TechCrunch Disrupt Startup Battlefield – one of 20 companies (out of 1,200 applicants) that competed to be named the most promising new technology venture of the year. Prior to establishing Verious, Pereira was founder and CEO of SecondSpace (now DataSphere), senior VP at Classmates Online and an early-tolater-stage executive at VeriSign – helping all three companies achieve unprecedented growth and success. VeriSign, for example, grew from under $1 million to over $1.3 billion in revenue during his tenure.

Twenty-six years after earning a Bachelor of Management degree at the University of Lethbridge, Pereira spent a week on campus in the fall of 2013 and will return again in the spring of 2014 as the inaugural Faculty of Management Executive in Residence, bringing more than 20 years of business experience along with him and the kind of résumé management students dream of building.

Pereira honed his marketing skills at American Express in New York, where he held several key roles in the Consumer Card Services Group and was promoted to VP in under four years. He began his career as a programmer with Andersen Consulting (now Accenture), where he was quickly promoted to supervisor and never looked back. Not a bad list of accolades, especially for someone who prior to attending the U of L was a college dropout.

Pereira is a highly respected Silicon Valley entrepreneur and executive – currently the founder and executive chairman of Verious, a code-recommendation engine for software developers around the globe. Founded in 2011, Verious was a finalist in the prestigious

“I was attending community college in British Columbia, got caught up in the restaurant industry and dropped out of school,” Pereira recalls. “I wasn’t sure I was going to ever go back, but I decided I wanted to get some management skills, so I applied to the U of L.”

Despite the fact that Pereira’s previous grades were less than stellar, his innate drive to succeed showed early on. Upon arriving in Lethbridge, he was told that he needed six more classes to be admitted into the Faculty of Management, but was only allowed to register for five the first semester. Undeterred, Pereira struck a deal with the admissions officer that would lay the foundation for his work ethic from that day forward. “I said if he allowed me to take six courses, I’d guarantee to have an A average in every one of them by midterm. If I didn’t, I’d drop a course. He agreed, and I held up my end of the deal. I got As in all of those classes that semester, and I kind of surprised myself in the process. It was the first real academic stretch I made, and I started to believe that I could accomplish more,” recalls Pereira, who went on to earn his Bachelor of Management with great distinction and was later recognized as the U of L Alumnus of the Year in 2000. “Stretching” is a word that Pereira uses often in conversation, and for him it’s more of a philosophy than a descriptive term. He’ll tell you he’s stretched over and over again throughout his career, extending himself in ways he knew would push him forward in the direction he needed and wanted to go. 33


“The early days of my career were pretty much all about seeing how far I could stretch. Working hard, working smart and looking for opportunities where I could push past my own perceived limits. I very often had to convince employers that I was capable of doing certain things, and then had to prove it to myself after they hired me.” Pereira applied to the MBA program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania after being promoted to supervisor at Andersen Consulting (Accenture), a move that he otherwise might not have considered if he’d worked quietly as a programmer instead of playing to his strength as a leader. “I was a lousy programmer, but the partners liked what I was doing in terms of looking for growth opportunities and managing people. One of my U of L profs encouraged me to apply to a top-tier business school and so I gave it a shot,” recalls Pereira, “When I got to Wharton I was terrified. Suddenly I was in the ring with people out of New York and Los Angeles, from companies like Goldman Sachs and McKinsey. It was intimidating, but it didn’t take me long to discover that I could go toe-to-toe with anyone. I’ve learned over time that it’s good to have your guard up, maybe be a little under confident, but people are people. It’s possible to compete at a higher level no matter where you are or where you come from.” Pereira says the example his parents set when they immigrated to Canada from India when he was four still resonates with him today. That and the unwavering support of his wife, Sheri (Turnbull) Pereira (BMgt ’87), and his family are the foundation upon which he’s built his career.

Funded by the Chartered Professional Accountants, the Executive in Residence program creates opportunities for senior leaders in industry and government to visit the Faculty of Management to share their knowledge and insights with students, faculty and staff at the University of Lethbridge and the communities it serves.

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“My parents gave up successful lives in India to start over in a new country. It was a huge risk, but it taught me that to grow you have to be willing to fail. The same is true with my wife, Sheri. We’ve always managed risk as a couple. It’s impossible to take career risks and not have a supportive spouse next to you.” As the first Executive in Residence at the U of L, Pereira brings a lifetime of risk-vs-reward experience and immeasurable business knowledge to the Faculty of Management. He served one week on campus in November, and will serve two more weeks in the spring, visiting the Lethbridge, Calgary and Edmonton campuses. “I’m honoured and thrilled to come back in this capacity,” says Pereira. “The U of L has evolved so

“I’M EXCITED TO HELP CONTINUE THE UNIVERSITY’S SUCCESS AND GROWTH, AND I’M ESPECIALLY EXCITED TO WORK WITH STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM.” ANIL PEREIRA (BMGT ’87)

much. I’m excited to help continue the University’s success and growth, and I’m especially excited to work with students in the classroom. My goal is to tie research and classroom teachings to practical, realworld examples of businesses in today’s marketplace that are in the midst of growth and facing various challenges. I want to help students apply theory in real ways, and help them understand how to manage their own careers, whether in professional services, small business or as the CEO of a company.” Recalling his own days as a U of L student, Pereira says the University – and specifically the Faculty of Management – provided him with exposure to research and many different disciplines early on. “The U of L is a top-ranked research university, and I think research is underappreciated because those skills really help you across a variety of dimensions later on in life,” he says. “Problem-solving has its roots in research. What is the problem? What is the hypothesis? What are you trying to solve and what are the alternatives? That methodology flows through the Faculty of Management, and the breadth of classes I took was a great foundation for a career in business.” In addition to running Verious, Pereira plays an active role as an advisor to several other technology companies – start-ups that are staffed by younger people who are full of new ideas and potential. As he does with all promising young managers, Pereira makes an effort to provide an equal measure of skill and common sense in his counsel. “At VeriSign we had a saying that has guided me throughout the balance of my career: It’s better to be lucky than good. I wish I could say that success is all about planning, but there is a good amount of luck involved, too. You have to be able to meet opportunity when it presents itself, and you have to be sharp enough to see the opportunity when it arises.”

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Why Alumni Give Back

“My experience at the U of L was amazing, and I want current students to have that same experience.” Kallie Desruisseaux, BA (Hons) ’08

“I am grateful for the opportunities the

“I’ve always believed in giving back to things

“My donations aren’t big – I give a little bit

University of Lethbridge has given me and my

that I think are worthwhile and meaningful.

here and a little bit there. It all grows, and I

family, and I feel a responsibility to give back.”

For me, the University of Lethbridge is just that.”

can see the impact.”

Patti Pharo, MEd ’00

Carla Ferrari, BFA ’01, BEd ’04

Mike Bennett, BA ’72

U of L alumni are stepping forward to show their support for their University. Your gifts help fund research and programs; scholarships, bursaries and other student awards; and opportunities for learning outside the classroom. Most importantly, your support says U of L alumni care. Please join Kallie, Patti, Carla and Mike and make a gift today. www.ulethbridge.ca/giving


SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE

Significant

This is just a sampling of all the extraordinary stories we have to share. Stay up-to-date with the official news source of the University of Lethbridge:

AND MENTIONABLE

www.ulethbridge.ca/unews

KOVALCHUK WINS ASTECH AWARD FOR AGRICULTURAL CONTRIBUTIONS University of Lethbridge epigenetic researcher Dr. Igor Kovalchuk was honoured with the Innovation in Agricultural Science Award at the 2013 ASTech Awards held in Calgary on Oct. 25. The Innovation in Agricultural Science Award recognizes an individual, team or company that has demonstrated exceptional innovation or has developed a technology of significance to Alberta’s agriculture industries. Because of Kovalchuk’s groundbreaking epigenetic work (the study of how genes are expressed or “turned on” by environmental factors) fields of medicinal poppies may soon grow in the Canadian Prairies and biomonitoring plants will detect pollution in the air, water and earth.

Kovalchuk and his epigenetic work have sparked new crop industries in Alberta’s agriculture sector. He is currently working with a Canadian biotech company that plans to develop a market for the thebaine poppy industry in Canada. Kovalchuk’s lab is the scientific arm of this endeavour into the development of a poppy industry. His own company, Plantbiosis, is currently developing new varieties of transgenic plants that will have unique properties – to sense the presence of environmental pollution. Building on his previous success with plant biomonitors, he has developed a completely novel idea of plant biomonitoring that would allow the ability to sense the presence of a pollutant and also to detect and visualize it through laser-based aerial imaging.

NEW BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN NATIVE AMERICAN ART The Faculty of Fine Arts proudly launched a new degree program with a focus on Native American art: the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Native American Art). One of only three such programs in Canada, this unique and historically significant offering reflects the importance of aboriginal art and culture in

this region and across North America. Developed in collaboration by the Department of Art and the Department of Native American Studies, the new BFA (Native American Art) program offers students majors in art studio or art history/museum studies with an emphasis on Native American art and culture.

RANKINGS REMAIN HIGH Rankings of Canadian universities have been announced and the University of Lethbridge has securely held its place as one of Canada’s leading universities. The U of L is recognized as one of Canada’s top-three undergraduate institutions (2014 Maclean’s University Rankings) and one of Canada’s top-three undergraduate research universities (RE$EARCH Infosource, 2013).

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SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE

CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES

AMONG ALBERTA’S MOST INFLUENTIAL

At the Fall 2013 Convocation, the U of L celebrated the achievements of 240 graduates who received undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees, diplomas and certificates. Welcome to the U of L alumni family!

U of L researchers Dr. David Naylor (physics and astronomy) and Dr. Robert Sutherland (neuroscience) were among Alberta’s 50 Most Influential People (2013) in a recent issue of Alberta Venture.

MOBILE APP HELPING NURSING STUDENTS WITH CLINICAL DECISION-MAKING A research project underway at Chinook Regional Hospital aims to determine if having medical information at the fingertips of student nurses improves their clinical decision-making at a patient’s bedside.

at the University of Lethbridge.

The application used in this study was developed by the U.S.-based medical-software firm Pepid, and contains as much information as would be found in multiple textbooks. The $10,000 study is funded by the Western and North-Western Region Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing and the University of Lethbridge Teaching Fund.

Researchers are comparing the clinical decisionmaking of these student nurses with other student nurses who do not have the app. Students without the app would typically leave the bedside and locate information in a medical textbook or, in the case of a medication issue, consult with the hospital pharmacist. All student nurses are under the supervision of registered nurses at the Alberta Health Services (AHS) hospital.

PHOTO B Y B OB CO ON E Y

“Health care is an information-intensive environment. With this study, we’re trying to determine if clinical decision-making improves with immediate access to current, evidenceDuring the 15-month study, which started last May, based information about patient diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.” about 30 fourth-year nursing students from the University of Lethbridge will have an application installed on their mobile phones that contains a U of L nursing student Tony Slezina says the app has been invaluable in his work with patients. wealth of medical and nursing information.

“The ability to make sound clinical decisions is vital to ensure patients receive safe, high-quality health care,” says study lead Dr. Monique Sedgwick, assistant professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences

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PHOTO BY EOIN COLQUHOUN

SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE

HORNS WOMEN’S RUGBY THIRD IN CANADA WEST The University of Lethbridge Pronghorns women’s rugby team is back on the medal podium, receiving bronze after a third-place finish at the Canada West Championships this fall. The Horns are perennially among the country’s elite rugby programs and narrowly missed an opportunity to play in the conference title game. After capturing six consecutive Canada West gold medals and a trio of national championships, the back-to-back conference bronze medals show the Horns are on the right path as they continue to restock with young talent in their quest to return to the top.

PIONEERING NEUROSCIENTIST RECOGNIZED Dr. Bryan Kolb (neuroscience) received the Confederation of Alberta Faculty Associations (CAFA) Distinguished Academic Award for 2013. The CAFA Distinguished Academic Awards are designed to recognize academic staff members at universities who, through their research and/or other scholarly, creative or professional activities, have made outstanding contributions to the wider community beyond the university.

ENROLMENTS ARE UP This semester, more than 8,300 students are enrolled on the U of L’s Lethbridge, Calgary and Edmonton campuses. Of those, 1,100 are new high school graduates, an increase of 11.3 per cent over last year, and registrations from students living in Calgary are up nearly 35 per cent over this time last year. Local numbers are also up 31.5 per cent over last year in local high school students choosing to attend the U of L. As well, international student registration is up by 8.1 per cent, and notably graduate student enrolments are up 16.4 per cent.

“While the University of Lethbridge remains very committed to attracting undergraduate students from across Alberta, Canada and the world, this year’s increase in graduate students is reflective of the U of L’s continued maturation as a comprehensive university,” says Provost and Vice-President (Academic) Dr. Andrew Hakin.

VOLUNTEER LETHBRIDGE AND UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ANNOUNCE PARTNERSHIP The University of Lethbridge and Volunteer Lethbridge are creating greater opportunities for student community service and volunteerism activities by entering into a partnership that saw Volunteer Lethbridge relocate its offices to the University’s Dr. Foster James Penny Building in mid-November. “This partnership will prove to be of tremendous benefit to the citizens of Lethbridge by providing more opportunities for our students to serve in the community as volunteers,” says University of Lethbridge President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Mike Mahon. “It will also be of great value to our students. As a university we have identified it as our responsibility to instil a sense of citizenship in our students, and this begins by creating a climate of support and

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encouragement for community engagement. This partnership further establishes that climate.” Many U of L students already embrace the volunteer experience and the University has worked with Volunteer Lethbridge on a number of initiatives, such as the annual Volunteer Fair and through participation in Project Paintbursh. “This is such a good opportunity for us to further establish our relationship with Volunteer Lethbridge because it’s a partnership that allows both organizations to better serve the citizens of Lethbridge,” says Mahon. “When the University opened the Penny Building, a key goal was to strengthen the connection we have with Lethbridge and the southern Alberta community, and this partnership continues that mission.”

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Explore the Arts SEASON AT A GLANCE – NOVEMBER TO MARCH

THEATRE AND MUSIC

EXHIBITIONS

December 6 Rivka Golani Scholarship Concert

November 7 to December 24 February 11 to 15 Courting Johanna by Marcia Johnson Acting Out

January 16 Canadian Idol No More

8 p.m. | University Recital Hall

8 p.m. | David Spinks Theatre

Main Gallery & Helen Christou Gallery

When two teenage girls discover a personal letter written by the housekeeper, they decide to play a trick on her, leading to consequences they could never have imagined. Based on the short story Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage by Pulitzer-Prize winning Canadian author Alice Munro.

Explores identity and activism through humorous references to pop culture. Includes new work by Wendy Coburn and pieces by General Idea from the U of L Collection.

Main Gallery

One of the world’s leading violists presents a concert in support of U of L student scholarships. January 25 Abbondànza 6 p.m. | CoCo Pazzo Italian Café

A memorable evening of gourmet food, fine art and fun to raise funds for Fine Arts student scholarships.

Curator: Josephine Mills

January 9 to February 6 Rubberneck Row Helen Christou Gallery

February 15 Peter Visentin & Friends

“Rubbernecking” is the colloquial term used to describe the act of gawking January 31 & February 1 or staring at something of interest, 8 p.m. | University Recital Hall Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro Chamber music by Juon, Shostakovich and often out of morbid curiosity. The 8 p.m. | Southminster United Church Arensky performed in trios, quartets and Helen Christou Gallery, with its unique U of L Opera Workshop and Lethbridge location and design, will feature works quintets by Graham Tagg (viola), David Symphony Orchestra present this witty, by artists including Bill Featherston, Visentin (viola), Peter Visentin (violin), comic and yet profound tale of love, John Will and Victor Cicansky that Norbert Boehm (violin), Mark Rodgers revenge and forgiveness revolving around (cello) and Deanna Oye (piano). trigger our voyeuristic tendencies. the relationship between Figaro and Curator: Chad Patterson Susanna on their wedding day.

For more information about any of these events or a complete listing of the 2013/2014 Season at a Glance, please visit: www.ulethbridge.ca/finearts/events

Part of the Complex Social Change Series. Artists: Lori Blondeau & Adrian Stimson

January 23 to March 6 We Can’t Compete Main Gallery

Two Toronto artists and activists present their own work and that of guest artists. Includes panel discussions and audience feedback. Curators/artists: Allyson Mitchell & Deirdre Logue

CULTURE VULTURE SATURDAYS January 25, February 15 & March 15 Main Gallery

For all ages. Hands-on activities related to exhibitions and the U of L Collection. For more information on the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, please visit: www.ulag.ca


2013 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR, DR. ROBERT J. H. MORRISON, IS HELPING IGNITE A PASSION FOR LITERATURE IN THE NEXT

P HOTO BY L E S L I E OHE N E -ADJ E I

GENERATION OF STUDENTS.

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BY KALI MCKAY (BA ’06, MA ’10)

In his masterpiece Tintern Abbey, poet William Wordsworth describes returning to the banks of the River Wye in southeast Wales and experiencing an odd combination of his present impressions, the memory of a past visit, and the thought of how he’ll look back on this moment in years to come. For 2013 Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Dr. Robert J. H. Morrison (BA ’83), Wordsworth’s famous words have never resonated more deeply. “That poem’s got it all,” he says as he starts reciting lines from memory in a performance that would captivate even the most dismissive of students. His playful approach belies the seriousness of his endeavour. Morrison is a world-renowned scholar of 19th century English literature whose clear and thought-provoking approach to his subject matter has earned him international praise. Reflecting on everything that he’s accomplished, he adamantly maintains that none of it would have been possible if he hadn’t enrolled in a first-year English class with Dr. Paul Upton at the University of Lethbridge. “That class changed my life,” says Morrison, who admits he arrived at the U of L in 1979 without much direction. “Upton’s class had a profound impact on me. I’ve been in universities from 1979 until today and have never encountered a teacher like him. He was conversational, impassioned and deeply caring about poetry.” Having discovered his passion, Morrison pursued a degree in English and completed a Bachelor of Arts in 1983. “The University of Lethbridge was the perfect fit for me,” says Morrison, looking back on his undergraduate experience. “The fact that it was a small, vibrant university in my hometown made all the difference to the student I was back then.” Heeding the advice of another influential professor, Dr. Bill Lambert, Morrison followed his passion for Romantic literature to the University of Oxford where he completed a Master of Philosophy under the tutelage of Jonathan Wordsworth, the great, great, great nephew of the poet who captured Morrison’s attention as an undergraduate student.

“I HAVE ALWAYS TRIED TO BE AN ACADEMIC WHO TOOK BOTH SIDES OF THE JOB SERIOUSLY – RESEARCH AND TEACHING.” DR. ROBERT J. H. MORRISON Department of English in 1987-88, and then returned to the U.K. to pursue a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, which he completed in 1991. Morrison’s doctoral research examined the life and work of famed English essayist Thomas De Quincey, something he continues to do today. “I’m always working on De Quincey,” says Morrison with a laugh. His book, The English Opium-Eater: A Biography of Thomas De Quincey, published in 2009, was a finalist for the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Biography, Britain’s oldest literary award, and is recognized as the comprehensive source on the life and work of De Quincey. “I have always tried to be an academic who took both sides of the job seriously – research and teaching,” says Morrison, echoing some of the same values that remain fundamental to the U of L today. “They cross-fertilize each other and I think that the people who do that make the university experience much more interesting.” Using his own research interests as a guide, Morrison is helping ignite a passion for literature in the next generation. Currently a full professor in the Department of English at Queen’s University, he believes that works written hundreds of years ago have the power to shape today’s world. “I try to impress on every single one of my students that these works are not just something that happened a hundred years ago,” says Morrison. “Literature shapes our consciousness. What Wordsworth wrote 200 years ago matters now.” His impassioned approach has earned him the respect of both colleagues and students. He accepts the accolades humbly, but remains true to the love of literature that started it all.

“It was Dr. Lambert who recommended I read Jonathan and think about Oxford,” says Morrison, who was again grateful for the connections he made at the U of L. “I wouldn’t have got there on my own.”

“Paul Upton did an enduring job of impressing on me the importance of literature,” says Morrison, reflecting on how what started as a first-year university class evolved into a lifelong passion.

From there, he returned home and accepted a teaching position at the U of L. He taught full time in the

There’s no doubt Morrison’s students will be saying the same thing years from now.

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BE PART OF THE TRADITION

Order your official University of Lethbridge alumni ring today. Available only to University of Lethbridge graduates, the Fiat Lux Ring is an enduring symbol of your achievement and an emblem of pride that ties you to the University and your fellow alumni.

Cast in sterling silver, the ring is available in a wide or narrow band and features a number unique to each owner engraved on the inside. For more information or to order, visit www.ulethbridge.ca/alumni.

John Gill

Memorial Golf To u r n a m e n t

Thank You Participants & Sponsors

Save the date: John Gill Memorial Golf Tournament

June 13, 2014 Henderson Lake Golf Club

Thank you to the many corporate sponsors who made the 2013 John Gill Memorial Golf Tournament such a success.

JANICE AND GLENN VARZARI

E V ENT T IT LE SPONSOR

Faculty of Education


2013/14

U OF L ALUMNI ASSOCIATION COUNCIL President Grant Adamson BSc ’03 Vice-President Randy Kobbert BMgt ’86 Treasurer Jason Baker BMgt ’02 Past President Kathy Lewis BN ’83, MEd ’99 Secretary Sharon Malec BEd ’73 Alumni Association Directors Neil Boyden BASc ‘73, BEd ‘85, MEd ‘94 Rachel Caldie BMgt ’07 Jeff DeJong BFA ‘98 Michael Gabriel BASc ‘04 Greg Imeson BA ’04 Ted Likuski BEd ’74 Jeff Milner, BFA ’06, BEd ‘12 Jan Tanner BA ’04, MA ’06 Board of Governors Representative Richard Masson BMgt ‘87 Students’ Union Representative Shuna Talbot Graduate Students’ Association Representative Fahid Naeem Calgary Chapter President Jeff Wilson BMgt ‘05 Edmonton Chapter President Shannon Digweed PhD ‘09

UPCOMING ALUMNI EVENTS

DO YOU KNOW A NOTABLE ALUMNUS?

To RSVP or for more information about any of these events, e-mail alumni@uleth.ca or call 403-317-2825.

The University of Lethbridge Alumni Association is accepting nominations for 2014 Alumnus of the Year Award and the 2014 Alumni Honour Society awards.

U of L Jazz Ensemble with Alastair Kay Proudly sponsored by the U of L Alumni Association Nov. 30, 8 p.m. | U of L Theatre $20 regular, $15 alumni/seniors, $12 students Faculty Artists & Friends Scholarship Concert featuring Rivka Golani (LLD ’13) Proudly sponsored by the U of L Alumni Association Dec. 6, 8 p.m. | University Recital Hall All proceeds will support the U of L FNMI Bursary $70* regular, $65* alumni/seniors, $15 students (*includes $50 tax receipt)

Calgary Chapter Food Bank Assistance Dec. 14, 8:15 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Lend a hand at a local food bank with fellow alumni RSVP to alumni@uleth.ca

The Alumnus of the Year Award recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement or who have achieved an international reputation in their chosen field. This award is presented each year at Fall Convocation. The Alumni Honour Society recognizes the achievement of successful alumni within the global community. The alumni inducted into this prestigious group have served as role models to our students through success in their vocation, outstanding community service, or superior accomplishment in their avocation. This award is presented during Spring Convocation.

Alumni Celebration & Fiat Lux Ring Ceremony May 28, 2014

Nomination deadline is Dec. 31, 2013. For nomination packages visit: www.uleth.ca/alumni/awards

John Gill Memorial Golf Tournament June 13, 2014 Henderson Lake Golf Club

For more information, please contact the Alumni Relations Office at 403-317-2815 or e-mail at alumni@uleth.ca. All nominations are confidential.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Chapter Chair Leroy Little Bear BASc ‘72, DASc ‘04

Alumni Benefits & Services

Contact us: University of Lethbridge Alumni Association 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Phone: 403-317-2825 Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca

As a graduate of the University of Lethbridge, you are a lifelong member of the Alumni Association. Stay connected to make the most of your membership. Visit www.ulethbridge.ca/alumni

LIKE our Alumni page at www.facebook.com/ULethbridgeAlum Follow us: @ULethbridgeAlum Join our LinkedIn group: University of Lethbridge Alumni, Students, Faculty & Staff

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ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS

New ULAA President Grant Adamson BSc ’03 As the new president of the University of Lethbridge Alumni Association, Grant Adamson (BSc ’03) looks forward to the opportunity to strengthen connections between alumni and enhance the University community.

developed a severe case of mononucleosis and was subsequently unable to take a full course load for the next several years. It was then that he truly experienced the fellowship and support found within the University community. “I sought out help when I needed it and I found it all over the place,” he remembers. “I became involved with the Organization of Residence Students, the Students’ Union and the curling club. Getting involved in extra-curricular activities was very fulfilling and kept me going until I was well enough to take on full course loads.”

Growing up on a farm in southern Alberta, the value of community was made clear to Grant Adamson (BSc ’03) long before he started classes at the University of Lethbridge. “A farm is not a place where you can grow or develop on your own,” says Adamson, noting that community is essential to the success of most farming operations. “For that reason, community involvement has been an unwritten part of my family philosophy for as long as I can remember.” It was a lesson he brought with him when he arrived at the U of L. “When I graduated from high school I wanted to see who I was away from the farm,” explains Adamson. “Someone suggested I would be a good teacher, so I researched and found that the University of Lethbridge had an excellent program for teachers and chose to come to Lethbridge.” Adamson, however, discovered his passion was in science, so in his second year he switched his studies to biology. That same year, he

“I ENCOURAGE ALUMNI TO RECONNECT AND GET INVOLVED. WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT YOUR STORIES, YOUR SUCCESSES AND YOUR ADVENTURES.” GRANT ADAMSON (BSC ’03)

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Adamson graduated in 2003 and began his career in the oil industry, working in environmental sciences. After the project he was working on shut down, he spent several years pursuing an interest in real-estate investment, but fond memories of his agricultural heritage always beckoned. In 2007, everything came together when Adamson began working with hybrid canola-seed production at Monsanto Canada Inc. It was the perfect combination of biotechnology and agriculture all in one. Three years later, Adamson accepted a position at Dow AgroSciences where he continues to work as their lead agronomist for canola-seed production in southern Alberta, the Pacific Northwest and Chile. One of his secondary duties is liaising with the University, recruiting students to work with Dow AgroSciences as summer interns and potentially as long-term employees. “The University is a great supplier of excellent students who have a background in, or knowledge of, agriculture, or who are willing to learn about it,”says Adamson, who is happy to support students both through his profession and with the ULAA. For him, it’s a natural continuation of a relationship with the University that started when he was an undergraduate student. Since 2005, Adamson has served as a director, treasurer and vice-president and was elected as president in July.

New U of L alumni president Grant Adamson (BSc ‘03) with his wife Rebecca Adamson (BA/BEd ’99, MEd ‘09) at an event celebrating the U of L’s recognition as Canada’s Research University of the Year for 2012.

“I got involved with the association because I missed my own connection with the University,” says Adamson. “Participation with the ULAA is a great way for alumni to foster and maintain that link.” Since becoming involved with the executive, Adamson has seen the association become increasingly involved in the community and take on a more formal role within the institution. Recently, the ULAA began a strategic-planning exercise that will help set objectives for the future and define the direction taken by the association as it moves forward. “My goal is to lead the maturation and formality process,” says Adamson, who relishes the opportunity to help give alumni a voice in shaping the University’s future. “With 36,750 alumni coming of age in the workforce, we are at a tipping point. I encourage alumni to reconnect and get involved by sharing your stories, your successes and your adventures to help make connections between alumni and strengthen the U of L community as a whole.”

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Alma MATTERS 1980 Jon Ackroyd BMgt ’88 Ackroyd is a board member of the Registered Public Accountants Association.

1990 Nicole Lakusta BA ’91, BEd ’91, MEd ’06 “I currently am the curriculum educational technology facilitator with Parkland School Division (just west of Edmonton). I have the pleasure to work with and for 21 different administrators.”

Maurice Forget BA ’95 “I graduated with distinction with a Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics and TESOL from the University of Leicester in April 2013. My thesis was a critical discourse analysis of power in language in thought leadership marketing. Shortly thereafter, I landed my first permanent English lecturer position at Aalto University in Espoo, Finland. It’s been a long and interesting road since my Lethbridge days. That said, the breadth of my history studies at

WHAT’S NEW? Let your classmates know what you are up to by sharing a note about your life. Share your news with us by e-mail, phone or mail.

Alumni Relations University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca

Submissions chosen for publication may have been edited for length and clarity. The requested information is collected under the authority of the Alberta Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, for the purpose of managing the alumni records for use in University of Lethbridge publications. Questions concerning the collection, use and disposal of this information can be directed to University Advancement.

the U of L has proven a great boon to my current teaching and writing career. For the last 14 years, I’ve been teaching English here in Helsinki, Finland, in the private sector and at the University of Helsinki and Aalto University. I’m planning to do my doctorate in the same field.” Rhona-Mae Arca BA ’95, BMgt ’95 “I was presented with the Tech Teacher of the Year Award, recognized before my peers at the Canadian Federation of Music Teachers’ Associations convention in Halifax, N.S.”

Maria Ford BA ’95 “I have owned and operated Kaszas Marketing in Ottawa since 2002.” Aaron Berg BSc ’95, MSc ’97, Dr. Aaron Berg, a geography professor at the University of Guelph, was awarded a Canada Research Chair in Hydrology and Remote Sensing. Jen Karpiuk BA ’98 “I worked in human services for seven years and then took some time to be a full-time at-home mother. I returned to university, this time the U of Alberta,

Frame your

SUCCESS The University of Lethbridge Alumni Association is offering five new styles of professional frames to choose from that are each elegantly emblazoned with the University of Lethbridge shield. To see the different styles and purchase a frame, visit: www.uleth.ca/alumni/degree-frames

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ALMA MATTERS to complete my education degree, convocating in 2010. I have been employed with the Medicine Hat Public School district full time since 2010 and currently teach Grade 7 humanities.” Jeffrey DeJong BFA ’98 “I enjoy participating with the University of Lethbridge Alumni Association, Lethbridge Y’s Mens Club (YMCA) and Lethbridge Minor Baseball.”

2000 Matt Malek BA ’02, BMgt ’02 “I won the National Award from the Canadian Grocer Magazine call centre information Generation NEXT, for innovation and dedication in the retail grocery sector for my work with foreign workers.”

Reg Sawilla BSc ’02 “In December 2012, I moved to the Netherlands to take up the position of senior scientist in the Cyber Defence and Information Assurance group at NATO Communications and Information Agency. I plan to stay in Europe for three to five years.” Leslie Wolowidnyk-Vogel BA ’95, BEd ’04 “I am currently a teacher at Vauxhall Elementary School, Grades 1 to 6 MLP/ Kanadier Program.” Meghan Kooyman BA ’07, BEd ’07 “I am currently studying a postgraduate MBBS course, for completion December 2014.” Amanda Langbroek BMgt ’07 “I have been working with the

Calgary Farmers’ Market for more than two years. It has been an amazing experience to work with over 80 vendors and to bring in nearly one million guests a year to our beautiful city.”

Lethbridge Faculty of Management, Tait has progressively moved through the organization, taking on positions of greater responsibility since she joined the staff in 2008.

Ashlea Johnson BN ’09 “As a representative of Lethbridge (and Alberta), I won the national title of Miss Earth Canada in 2011. I went on to represent Canada at the month-long international Miss Earth Pageant, one of the top three.”

Tamara Martel BSc ’12 “After receiving my Bachelor of Science in archaeology and geography with a concentration in GIS, it didn’t take me long to get my dream job! Currently I am working for Landsong Heritage Consulting Ltd. based out of Moberly Lake, B.C. My position at the company is archaeologist/ GIS specialist. I never thought that being in the middle of nowhere would be so much fun! Plus the perks of living in beautiful northeastern British Columbia.”

2010 Danielle Tait BMgt ’10 Danielle Tait is the associate director at the SAAG, overseeing the administrative functions of the gallery and in charge of Finance and Fund Development. A graduate of the University of

FAMILY FIAT LUX RINGS

GINGEZEL

Ken Hamilton (BASc ’85) and his daughter, Tayler (BSc ’10, MSc ’13), received their rings together at the annual U of L Fiat Lux Ring ceremony.

Wife-and-husband team U of L physics grads Dr. Judi Suni Hall (BASc ’72) and Dr. Donald S. Hall (BASc ‘72) have just completed the fourth book in their epic science-fiction series, Gingezel. The series, Gingezel 1: The Limit, Gingezel 2: Bad to Worse, Gingezel 3: Fault, and

Read more alumni stories at: www.uleth.ca/alumni/news

Gingezel 4: Hacker, explores a reactor accident on a remote mining planet across the galaxy. The books are written from the point of view of the designers of the power system and the analysts brought in to determine the cause of the accident. Learn more at www.gingezelscifi.com.

CONGRATULATIONS TO LETHBRIDGE LEADERS The U of L extends sincere congratulations to alumni who are leading communities across the province. In Lethbridge, specifically, the following U of L alumni were voted onto City council this fall.

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S AM | S o u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e

Jeff Carlson – BFA ‘92 Jeff Coffman – MA ‘10 Liz Iwaskiw – BASc (BA) ‘77 Joe Mauro – BASc (BA) ‘83


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IN MEMORIAM

In Memoriam The U of L’s founding president Dr. W. A. Sam Smith (LLD ’90) always maintained “people matter ultimately.” This sentiment has remained at the heart of the U of L over the last 46 years. We are deeply saddened by the loss of the following members of our community. We thank them for letting the U of L be part of their story, and we extend our sincerest condolences to their family and friends. Vera Sylvester BEd ’72 Passed away January 8, 2012 Phyllis Oborne BEd ’78 Passed away February 15, 2012 Gabrielle Ragan BEd ’72 Passed away February 16, 2012 Barbara Jurcic BMgt ’02 Passed away March 17, 2012 Laurin Mann BASc ’77 Passed away December 31, 2012 Kimberly Harkness BMgt ’93 Passed away March 11, 2013

Catherine Russell Mgt Certificate ’91 Passed away April 5, 2013 Laura Vadnais BEd ’76 Passed away April 16, 2013

Rob Nelson BMgt ’02 Passed away June 21, 2013 John Brocklesby BASc ’69, BEd ’73 Passed away June 23, 2013

Sophie Williams BEd ’79 Passed away April 21, 2013

Ailsa Fiander-Morris, Former Senate Member Passed away July 12, 2013

Ann Goodwin BN ’83 Passed away April 29, 2013

Ronald Perverseff, Former Staff Passed away July 27, 2013

Laurie Donaldson BEd ’76 Passed away May 6, 2013

William C. Latta, Professor Emeritus Passed away July 29, 2013

You’ve paid your dues. Start paying less with TD Insurance.

Sharon Hendrickson BEd ‘94, BSc ‘09 Passed away August 13, 2013 Sue Labuhn BA ‘02 Passed away August 26, 2013 Gerry Conaty LLD ’07 Passed away September 9, 2013 List as of October 31, 2013. We take every effort to ensure the accuracy of this list. If you note an error or omission, please accept our sincere apologies and contact Alumni Relations at 403-317-2825 or alumni@uleth.ca.

University graduates can save more. At TD Insurance, we recognize all the time and effort you put into getting where you are. That’s why, as a University of Lethbridge alumnus, you have access to our TD Insurance Meloche Monnex program which offers preferred group rates and various additional discounts. You’ll also benefit from our highly personalized service and great protection that suits your needs. Get a quote today and see how much you could save.

Request a quote today 1-888-589-5656 melochemonnex.com/uleth

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The TD Insurance Meloche Monnex home and auto insurance program is underwritten by SECURITY NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. The program is distributed by Meloche Monnex Insurance and Financial Services Inc. in Quebec and by Meloche Monnex Financial Services Inc. in the rest of Canada. For Quebec residents: We are located at 50 Place Crémazie, Montreal (Quebec) H2P 1B6. Due to provincial legislation, our auto insurance program is not offered in British Columbia, Manitoba or Saskatchewan. *No purchase is required. There is one (1) prize to be won. The winner may choose between an amount of $60,000 CAD to build a dream kitchen of his/her choosing or $60,000 CAD cash. The winner will be responsible for choosing a supplier and for coordinating all of the required work. The contest is organized by Security National Insurance Company and is open to members and other eligible persons who reside in Canada and belong to a professional or alumni group which has entered into an agreement with the organizer and is entitled to receive group rates from the organizer. The contest ends on October 31, 2014. The draw will be held on November 21, 2014. A skill-testing question is required. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. The complete contest rules are available at melochemonnex.com/contest. Actual prize may differ from image shown. ®/ The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or a wholly-owned subsidiary, in Canada and/or other countries.

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28_MM9178-13_MMI.EN•uleth (8.5x5.125).indd 1

S AM | S o u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e Projet : Annonce MMI 2013

Province : Alberta

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Discover your passion

“I was able to discuss my aspirations with many professors at the U of L. Their diverse ideas and interests helped to shape my education and my future.” C. Blake Evernden (BFA ‘09) MFA Candidate

Flexibility and support at the U of L gave C. Blake Evernden the inspiration to create. It was his professors who encouraged MFA candidate C. Blake Evernden (BFA ‘09) to continue on after his Bachelor of Fine Arts in visual arts to complete a master’s degree at the University of Lethbridge. Because of the vibrant creative community at the U of L and the flexibility of the program, he was able to join his visual arts background with his passion for filmmaking. This union between the two art forms has been the driving force behind his research.

Today, concept artist, illustrator, storyboard artist, screenwriter, makeup and effects artist, actor and filmmaker are just a few of the accomplishments you’ll find on his CV. Blake’s research and current projects have taken him to places like Toronto and New York, and he is currently working on his third feature film.

At the U of L, you can create your own opportunities, and work side-by-side with some of the brightest minds in the world, giving you an unparalleled, extraordinary experience in graduate education. For more information, contact: sgsinquiries@uleth.ca or call 403-329-5194.

The University of Lethbridge offers master’s degrees in arts, fine arts, music, sciences, To apply, visit: management, education, counselling and health sciences as well as PhDs in multidisciplinary areas. www.uleth.ca/graduatestudies


HOMECOMING

DON’T GET October 12-14, 2012

LOST INSPIRE IN SPACE THE

The University of Lethbridge is celebrating its 45th anniversary this year and is to inviting alumni and friends back toatcampus for Win tickets seeallCol. Chris Hadfield the Alumni & Friends Dinner* Homecoming 2012, a weekend of lectures and lunches, tours andAlumni who update their information or As time passes, U of L alumni move, get married, change names or jobs, and sometimes, unfortunately, we lose touch. talks, dinners and dialogue. complete the SAM readership survey before

NEXT GENERATION

December 31, 2013, will be entered to win two tickets to the Alumni & Friends Dinner • Your active e-mail address We hope you’ll join us as we celebrate all that is the U of L – • If you’ve moved and your address has changed on March 27, 2014, featuring Canadian past, present and future. more information or to register, visit • If you’re a U of L family and you’d like to receive only oneFor issue of SAM Col. Chris Hadfield. When you think back to your U of L days, what do youastronaut, remember? • If you’d like to receive SAM electronically www.ulethbridge.ca/alumni/homecoming.

Stay connected. Please let us know:

If you have a story you’d like to share with us

It may be the friendships you made, the Visit www.uleth.ca/survey/sam to updateprofessors your information and who helped you along the way, the view of UHall nestled in the coulees, complete a short survey on SAM. cheering on the Horns or the feeling you had when you crossed the stage at convocation.

*Tickets are valued at $350. Accommodations and travel not included.

Share your experience. Help us inspire the next generation of U of L students and encourage someone you know to apply now.

Today, your university is one of Canada’s leading universities, recognized as Canada’s Research University of the Year (Undergraduate Category) and ranked as one of Canada’s top-three undergraduate universities in Maclean’s.

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Publications Mail Agreement No. 0040011662 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: University Advancement University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive W. Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4

13-05-16 3:31 PM

SAM Magazine - Fall 2013  

SAM is published by University Advancement atthe University of Lethbridge twice annually.

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