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BECAUSE IT MATTERS COMMUNITY REPORT


“

As a university, we have held strong to our traditions. Why? Because it matters.

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | U of L President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Bill Cade in front of University Hall, which is nestled in the coulees along the Oldman River.

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First and foremost are students. They are the focus of everything we do at the University of Lethbridge. It is our calling as a university to educate individuals to become well-rounded and productive members of society who can make important contributions locally, nationally and internationally.

www.uleth.ca/report

Welcome to the University of Lethbridge 2004/2005 Community Report. As Alberta celebrates its centennial, we too have taken the opportunity to reflect on our past. Since our founding in 1967, the University has held strong to its traditions. Why? Because it matters. It matters to us as an institution, it matters to our students and it matters to the communities we serve. This year’s Community Report highlights the time-honoured traditions that define education at the University of Lethbridge.

Diversity enriches the experiences of our students, staff and faculty members. By making education accessible, we have developed a unique and diverse campus that celebrates cultures and reflects the world around us.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

GOVERNMENT: Myles Bourke Grant Pisko Robert Turner Kevin Keith Dan Laplante Doug Stokes A. G. (Guy) McNab Karen Bartsch Dean Setoguchi

June 2005

CHAIRMAN: Terry Royer CHANCELLOR: Shirley DeBow PRESIDENT & VICE-CHANCELLOR: William Cade ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: Aaron Engen John Gill GENERAL FACULTIES COUNCIL: Tom Robinson Derek Peddle SENATE: Sharon Holtman

STUDENTS | 6

The University is also a place of important discovery, creativity and inquiry. Our students and faculty engage in research and discovery in an environment that inspires creativity and fosters the spirit of free inquiry. Here, teaching, learning and scholarship transcend disciplines and exceed expectations.

STUDENTS’ REPRESENTATIVES: Tyler Tanner David Green GRADUATE STUDENTS’ REPRESENTATIVE: Preston Williams NON-ACADEMIC: Linda Anderson

Our teaching, research and creative achievements contribute to the betterment of the communities we serve. And at the end of the day, the University of Lethbridge is accountable. We maintain exemplary financial management of public and private funds through sound budgeting and planning processes. The 2004/2005 Community Report provides a glimpse of the noteworthy stories that have taken place at the University of Lethbridge this year. We invite you to visit the Community Report online at www. uleth.ca/report and read more about the achievements of our students, alumni and faculty. Thank you for sharing your time with us. Dr. Bill Cade President and Vice-Chancellor Professor of Biological Sciences

SECRETARY: Rita Zaugg

DIVERSITY | 8

DISCOVERY | 10

CREATIVITY | 12

INQUIRY | 14

COMMUNITY | 16

ACCOUNTABILITY | 18


The University of Lethbridge and Iunctus Geomatics Corp. partner and create the Alberta Terrestrial Imaging Centre, which brings worldclass SPOT satellite imaging to Lethbridge for academic and commercial uses. It is the first location in North America for this type

BECAUSE

IT

MATTERS

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

of technology. Construction of the receiving station is completed in April 2005.

J A N U A RY

F E B R U A RY (l-r) U of L Chancellor Shirley DeBow congratulates Honorary Degree recipient Pamela Wallin at the U of L’s spring 2005 Convocation.

U of L Pronghorn athletic

Nose volunteers provide community

teams start 2005 on the

members with at least 941 safe rides

right track after a successful

home and raise more than $24,000 for

Operation Red Nose season.

Pronghorn athletics. This is the annual

Over the holidays, more than 500 Red

fundraiser’s tenth season.

The University of Lethbridge Senate approves 11 outstanding individuals to receive Honorary Degrees in 2005 – including Canada’s Consul General to New York City and Canadian journalist Pamela Wallin.

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U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE IT MATTERS - THROUGHOUT THE YEAR


(below: l-r) Political science professor Dr. Geoffrey Hale and geography professor Dr. Derek Peddle are among the few Canadian scholars chosen in 2005 by the (l-r) U of L Supporting Our Students Campaign Chairs: Diane Boyle, administrative assistant; Dr. Dennis Connolly, mathematics and computer science professor; and Kathy Lee, helpdesk coordinator.

Canada-U.S. Fulbright program to study in the United States. The Fulbright Scholarship is one of the academic community’s most prestigious international scholarships.

MARCH

APRIL

Pronghorn Track and Field Head Coach Larry Steinke is

The U of L wraps up its one-month Supporting Our Students campaign

the recipient of the Athletics

to raise funds for scholarships and bursaries for students. Approximately forty per

Alberta Cheemo High

cent of U of L faculty and staff show their financial support.

Performance Coach of the Year award for the second year in a row.

U of L Pronghorn athletes Kate Forbes and Jim Steacy both win Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) gold medals in shot put and weight throw and set new CIS weight throw records at the 2005 CIS Track and Field Championships in Winnipeg.

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report

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The Regional Health and Wellness Centre will be a state-of-the-art facility. It will enhance fitness and recreation opportunities in (l-r) U of L Board of Governors Chair Terry Royer and Lethbridge Mayor Bob Tarleck team up for a slam dunk at the Regional Health and Wellness Centre’s official construction launch.

southwestern Alberta and advance research

The Faculty of Management’s Centre

in subjects like kinesiology and prevention-

for Socially Responsible Marketing,

focused research. It will be a combination of new

in partnership with the Alberta

and existing facilities. The new facility is scheduled

Centre for Injury Control Research,

to open in June 2006. Renovations to the existing

hosts an intermediate-level learning

Physical Education Building are expected to be

symposium in Calgary entitled Social

complete by January 2007.

Marketing: Taking It to the Next Level.

M AY

JUNE The symposium provides participants with tools to advance their knowledge of social Psychology and neuroscience professor Dr. Glen Prusky

marketing. More than 175 people from

receives a surprise donation of $5,000 towards his research

Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan,

program from the Alberta Ride for Sight group, which is a

Singapore and the UK attend.

volunteer organization of motorcycle enthusiasts who raise funds for the Foundation Fighting Blindness.

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U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE IT MATTERS - THROUGHOUT THE YEAR


BECAUSE

IT

MATTERS

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

U of L researchers and graduate students host and participate in an international gathering of more than 120 world experts who study Orthoptera – flying insects such as locusts, grasshoppers, katydids, crickets and their allies.

J U LY

AUGUST

(l-r) U of L representatives Dr. Jim Horsman, Dr. Bill Cade and Dr. Dennis Fitzpatrick; Minister of Advanced Education Dave Hancock; Minister of Economic Development Clint Dunford; U of L Board of Governors Vice-Chair Guy McNab; and Lethbridge Mayor Bob Tarleck.

SEPTEMBER

The U of L’s entry in the 2005

The annual International Conference

Lethbridge Rotary Dragon Boat

of the Orthopterists’ Society addresses

awards the University of Lethbridge $12 million to begin construction on a

Festival, Fiat Dux, paddles its way to a

a wide range of topics including the

Water and Environmental Science Building. This new facility will enable the

bronze medal in the Mixed-B division.

management of Orthoptera as pests

U of L to create an improved research and training environment, increase the impact

The team is made up of U of L faculty, staff,

and valuable members of ecosystems

students, alumni and friends.

worldwide.

The Province of Alberta, through the Ministry of Advanced Education,

of water-related research and provide many unique opportunities for students.

Former Pronghorn defenceman James DeMone tries out for the Vancouver Canucks after being selected and “Making the Cut” on the CBC reality show last year.

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report

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www.uleth.ca/report

U of L undergraduate student Paul Dawson has taken his learning far beyond the typical undergraduate experience. He worked as a summer research student with U of L Canada Research Chair Dr. Alice Hontela to investigate what effects the popular herbicide Roundup has on fish at a cellular level. But that’s not the only discovery he made this summer. He also learned what it’s like to do research in the real world. Read more at www.uleth.ca/report.

Because Students Matter

2005 HIGHLIGHTS

• In June 2005, education professor Dr. Robin Bright was presented with the 2005 University of Lethbridge Distinguished Teaching Medal – an award that was established in 1987 to recognize the central importance of teaching to the University’s philosophy and goals. • In the Fall 2005 Semester, enrolment on the U of L’s Calgary and Edmonton campuses reaches 464 and 450 students, respectively. The University established campuses in these cities in 1996 to meet the needs of college graduates with business diplomas who wanted to pursue a management degree while working. Classes on the Calgary

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STUDENTS

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE STUDENTS MATTER

and Edmonton campuses continue to be offered in the evenings and on Saturdays to accommodate students’ work schedules.

Students are the focus of everything we do at the University of Lethbridge. It is our calling as a university to

• In the Fall 2005 Semester, U of L enrolment exceeds 8,000 students (all U of L campuses). Although the University has grown considerably since 1967, it has remained committed to small classes. The average lecture size at the U of L in 2004/2005 is approximately 33 students.

educate individuals to become wellrounded and productive members of society who can make important contributions locally, nationally and internationally.


U of L Vice-President (Academic) and Provost Dr. Séamus O’Shea stands as a testament to the opportunities that a university education holds. Having grown up in a poor family in rural Ireland, he credits his university education for expanding his horizons and enabling him to explore the world. After O’Shea moved to Canada and completed his PhD, he came to the U of L where he was a professor for 13 years before moving on to senior administrative positions. Over the last 15 years as a vice-president, O’Shea has helped the University grow into one of Canada’s most vital and engaging learning environments. Throughout his career, O’Shea’s focus has remained the same – centred on students so they too can realize a bright future.

I had the opportunity to obtain a university education, and it made an incredible difference in my life. I’ve done what I could to pass the favour on to others. “The University has grown substantially during my time here. We have expanded our undergraduate programs, added graduate programs and grown into a world-class research institution. But as we’ve evolved, our primary objective has remained the same – to provide the best possible learning environment for students. “We have worked very hard to build academic quality, stay student centred and maintain

our flexibility so students can customize their programs and follow their own interests. Class size is a very important factor. When you look at research on how people learn, the most important things are conversations with their teachers and fellow students. We want to make it easier for students to have these conversations. We also want to inspire. We encourage faculty to bring their research into the classroom and share their excitement for inquiry and discovery

with students. The University’s ultimate role is to enable students to become independent thinkers. “Payday for me is Convocation. The most rewarding part of my job is watching the graduates cross the stage, knowing that their education will provide a better quality of life for them and for the broader community.”

Vice-President (Academic) and Provost Dr. Séamus O’Shea outside University Hall, which was designed by Canadian architect Arthur Erickson and officially opened in 1972. | U OF L | www/uleth.ca/report

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Thousands of miles away from her home in Tehran, Iran, 23-year-old Maede Ejaredar is following her lifelong dream to study neuroscience and is currently pursuing her master of science degree at the U of L’s Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience. Ejaredar is studying the effects of stress on epileptogenesis – the development of epilepsy. But as she digs deep into the mysteries of the brain, she is uncovering a new perspective on the world.

“I came to the U of L in 2001 to pursue my undergraduate degree in neuroscience – something I dreamed of doing since I was a little girl. Coming to a new society is a huge adventure in life. Novelty and differences are status quo, but curiosity soon comes to overtake adversity. I have grown a lot since I came to the U of L. When you experience another culture, you learn the importance of accepting others for who they are. “I shared my experience of coming to Canada with international students at last year’s new student orientation. I wanted them to know that they made the right decision to come here. By bringing our different cultures together, we are helping to make a more diverse and enriched environment. “Diversity and adaptability within

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an environment are evident in all biological systems. Synchrony and harmony are what we strive for. I want to share my culture with others and add another piece to the Canadian cultural mosaic.”

While on the

adventurous journey of unravelling the mysteries of the brain, I have also

unfolded multiculturalism within myself.

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | Maede Ejaredar (BSc ’05), master of science student, outside the U of L’s Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, which was officially opened in 2001.


Esther Healy is the University’s Native student advisor. She plays a key role in recruiting Aboriginal students to the U of L as well as providing them with support and resources so they can achieve their academic goals. Read more at www.uleth.ca/report.

Because Diversity Matters Diversity

strengthens the

University and enriches the experiences of our students, staff and faculty members. The University of Lethbridge has a unique and diverse campus that celebrates cultures and reflects the world around us.

www.uleth.ca/report

DIVERSITY

The University of Lethbridge has a tradition of strong Aboriginal connections. Over the years, the University has worked with Aboriginal communities to develop programs and partnerships to meet their needs. In 2003, the University introduced a new position dedicated to Aboriginal students.

2005 HIGHLIGHTS

• In June, the U of L signed two agreements with the Anyang Institute of Technology (AIT) in China to further each institution’s academic objectives and promote better understanding between the faculty and students at both institutions through exchange programs, joint research activities, special cultural and language programs and other projects.

students are on exchange and 41 international students are at the U of L. International management is the Faculty’s fastest growing major with 208 students (up from 57 students in 1998 when the major was introduced). All students in this major are required to go on exchange and take four semesters of language training in French, Japanese, German or Spanish.

• The Faculty of Management signed new exchange agreements with universities in Belgium, Ecuador and Japan this year. The Faculty now has 20 exchange destinations with universities in 14 countries. In the Fall 2005 Semester, 43 U of L management

• In the Fall 2005 Semester, 8.1 per cent of the U of L’s student population are international (visa) students.

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE DIVERSITY MATTERS

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Dr. Olga Kovalchuk’s lifelong interest in health care has inspired a research program with life-saving potential. Kovalchuk, who is both a molecular biologist and a trained medical physician, is studying the molecular mechanisms behind radiation-induced cancer with the aim of finding new cancer treatments.

I don’t think one small lab can tackle all of the problems of humankind, but we are trying to make our contribution as big as we possibly can. “Radiation is a two-sided coin. It is a very effective cancer treatment, but there are secondary cancers that occur as a result of radiation therapy. We want to improve both sides of the coin by increasing cancer patients’ survival rates, mitigating the chances of secondary tumours and developing plant therapies that will enhance the tumour-killing action of radiation. “Research indicates that the children of radiation-exposed parents are more likely to develop certain types of cancers. Using animal models, we are studying why they are at risk and examining options for modifying the radiation treatments that

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people receive to reduce the risks to any future children they may have. “Plant therapies are like a big Pandora’s box, and we don’t know what’s inside. There isn’t a golden bullet, but we hope to find an agent that we could give to people before they receive radiation therapy that would improve their chances of survival and reduce the negative side effects of radiation.”

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | Dr. Olga Kovalchuk, assistant professor of biological sciences, outside the University Library, which was officially opened in 2001.


www.uleth.ca/report

The University of Lethbridge is making big waves in water research. In April 2005, the United Nations announced that the University of Lethbridge would be the Canadian location for its Water for Life program. A few weeks later,

DISCOVERY

federal government representatives announced funding to create new Canada Research Chairs. Dr. Henning Bjornlund, an internationally recognized water resource economist, was appointed as the U of L’s fifth Canada Research Chair. Read more at www.uleth.ca/report

Because Discovery Matters Students and faculty are engaged in research and discovery at the University of Lethbridge. Each day, they bring new light into hospitals, classrooms, theatres, laboratories and the deepest corners of the human mind.

2005 HIGHLIGHTS

• At a time when women are under-represented in university physics departments across the country, physics professor Dr. Adriana Predoi-Cross demonstrates that it is possible to balance a successful research career and a family. Predoi-Cross is one of 23 recipients of NSERC’s 2005 University Faculty Awards, which are designed to increase the representation of women and Aboriginal peoples in the natural sciences and engineering faculties at Canadian universities. • In March 2005, psychology and neuroscience professor Dr. Robert Sutherland was awarded more than $588,000 over five years from

the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to study how some types of stem cell research could assist in the recovery from brain injury and diseases. Dr. Ira Driscoll, who received her doctoral degree in neuroscience from the U of L in June 2005, received $50,000 to work with Sutherland on related research. • In July 2005, psychology and neuroscience professor Dr. Bryan Kolb made headlines for his discovery that nicotine holds promise for stronger stroke recovery. Kolb is the 2004 recipient of the Alberta Science and Technology (ASTech) Leadership Foundation’s Outstanding Leadership in Alberta Science award.

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE DISCOVERY MATTERS

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www.uleth.ca/report

Art professor Nicholas Wade inspires possibilities. The nationally recognized sculptor has exhibited throughout Canada’s major cities. This year, Wade was one of two artists selected by the Winnipeg Arts Council to create work for that city’s new Millennium Library. In addition to sharing his knowledge, skill and experience with his students, Wade’s art practice enables him to teach by example. “I have the energy to encourage students because I know that practising as an artist is a possibility,” says Wade. Read more at www.uleth.ca/report.

Because Creativity Matters

2005 HIGHLIGHTS

• Education professor Dr. Cynthia Chambers is contributing her skills as a researcher and her passion for northern Aboriginal communities to the Ulukhaktuk Literacies Research Project. This multi-partner project examines literacy issues in the Far North. The research team, of which Chambers is a member, has a very simple goal: to change the definition of literacy to include motifs beyond the printed word. • Drama professor Brian Parkinson, a well-known member of the Alberta theatre community and driving force behind the founding and continued success of New West Theatre, was nominated for a Rozsa Award for Excellence in Arts Administration this summer.

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U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE CREATIVITY MATTERS

• “Water Under Fire,” a sevenpart documentary that chronicles a host of threats to Canada’s water supply, aired on networks across Canada this year. It was produced by geography professor Dr. James Byrne and Gallant Productions. Coproducers are education professor Dr. Rick Mrazek and U of A aquatic ecologist Dr. David Schindler. • The arts are alive at the U of L and in Lethbridge. The Faculty of Fine Arts presents an exciting range of events, performances and exhibitions throughout the year. For more information on the 2005/2006 season, visit www.uleth.ca/ffa/events.

C R E AT I V I T Y

Seeking answers requires a creative mind. The University of Lethbridge inspires and ignites creativity so teaching, learning and scholarship can transcend disciplines and exceed expectations.


Geography professor Dr. Craig Coburn may be a professor of science, but he’s also a master of creativity. As part of his research program, Coburn needed an expensive device called a goniometer to better understand the nature of satellite images. He and his colleagues met this challenge with an out-of-the-box solution – they built their own with materials from the local hardware store for only $200. In addition to performing with proven accuracy and saving a great deal of money, their goniometer is also providing U of L students with access to field experience and data that puts them at the head of the class when it comes to remote sensing research.

“A goniometer takes hemispherical measurements of the light reflected off an earth surface target and helps characterize the specific object. For example, determining if a stand of trees imaged by a satellite is spruce or pine, based on the different ways the trees reflect light. Due to the high cost ($10,000 to $400,000), very few such devices exist in North America. “This is cutting-edge research that is becoming more important with the development of high spatial resolution satellites. By understanding how an object reflects light with respect to angle, we should be able to more accurately characterize the object. “The students get to collect and analyse the actual data, which is key to understanding how this type of

Apart from the cash savings, the big bonus to building our own equipment is the access to hands-on experiences .

remote sensing works. Without access to the goniometer, most student projects would be theoretically modelled. As far as we know, it’s the only goniometer in the world that is routinely operated by students.”

Dr. Craig Coburn, assistant professor of geography, with the goniometer (left) in the U of L Papokan Sculpture Park, which was created in honour of the U of L’s 25th anniversary. | U OF L | www/uleth.ca/report

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In her three decades in nursing, Dr. Ruth Grant Kalischuk has cared for the terminally ill and their families, served as the Lethbridge Regional Hospital’s first palliative care coordinator, and conducted academic research into loss, grief and bereavement. Her inquiry into loss reveals that society has much to gain by learning more about the grieving process and healing strategies.

We are still generating our base of knowledge about grieving, and I am excited by the opportunities for innovation.

“Death is a part of life that people often don’t want to talk about, but everyone hopes good palliative care will be in place for them and their significant others when they need it. Our role as health-care professionals is to help the terminally ill individuals and their families orchestrate a meaningful death, however they define it, and support the family in the grieving process. “I want to bring issues of loss into the open. Palliative care will not be there when we need it unless we take some very mindful measures to set it up in a way that meets the needs of individuals and families. Helping people come to terms with loss is one of the most health-promoting

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actions that we as health-care providers can offer, and I want to be part of such progress. “We are still generating our base of knowledge about grieving, and I am excited by the opportunities for innovation. I share my research with front-line health practitioners as well as our student population. A research project is not complete until the findings reach the people who can effect change.”

U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | Dr. Ruth Grant Kalischuk, associate professor of nursing, next to the Book Tower sculpture which is located outside the Centre for the Arts.


INQUIRY

fessor Dr. Craig Monk uses that example from a New Yorker magazine of the 1920s to illustrate how, right or wrong, writing shapes people’s opinions and attitudes. The coverage of the “exotic” sport from stories formerly buried in dusty magazines puts a different spin on the study of English literature. Read more at www.uleth.ca./report.

Because Inquiry Matters The University of Lethbridge fosters the spirit of free inquiry and the critical interpretation of ideas. Whether in response to a problem or in search of new horizons, the University conducts inquiry beyond traditional boundaries.

2005 HIGHLIGHTS

• In September 2005, NextLibrary Inc. announced the launch of a major historic digitization project for southern Alberta. The U of L will act as a host for the southern Alberta digital library providing access on a not-for-profit basis to students, scholars and members of the public. The project is expected to create 100,000 pages of digital images and a searchable index on the Internet for up to 50 historic community newspapers published in southern Alberta since the 1880s. • This summer, five Lethbridge-area Grade 12 students were among more than 40 young scientists from across Alberta to participate in the 2005 Heritage Youth Researcher

www.uleth.ca/report

If a writer in a major magazine described hockey as “…a ridiculous game... played by Canadians hired in groups from the backwoods,” faithful Canadian hockey fans would be outraged. University of Lethbridge English pro-

Summer (HYRS) program. The sixweek HYRS program, developed and funded by the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR), introduces some of Alberta’s brightest high school students to the research world and gives them the chance to gain hands-on laboratory experience under the guidance of top AHFMRfunded researchers. • In May, English professor Dr. Goldie Morgentaler received one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards for translation – the Abraham and Eve Trapunski Memorial Prize in Yiddish Literature and Yiddish Translation.

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE INQUIRY MATTERS

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www.uleth.ca/report

Over the years, long-time Lethbridge resident Mayor Bob Tarleck has watched the University grow and has seen the positive impact it has had on the community. Tarleck taught at the U of L when it was in its infancy, served as a high school educator and elected alderman, and has been a tireless community supporter. Today as mayor, he knows that postsecondary education changes the character of the community because he has lived the experience.

I can’t imagine this community without the U of L. “Lethbridge is unique among cities in Alberta. As the only city not dependent on the energy sector, our future is diverse. As mayor, I want to build an economy and a community based on knowledge, research, innovation and creativity. The U of L and its people and services are a key part of that strategy. “I can’t imagine this community without the U of L. It provides a creative edge that communities without a university do not have – making it easier for people with university-aged children to stay in the community; bringing people from all over

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the world to work in Lethbridge; raising the profile of arts, culture and research; and showing students that they have many different career options. “Right now there is a critical mass of post-secondary education and community innovation taking place. The fact that we have the University of Lethbridge and its students and employees as a key part of our community affirms my belief that we are well positioned to focus less on being a bigger community, and more on being a better community.”

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

COMMUNITY

The University of Lethbridge is proud of our connections to the community. Our teaching, research and creative achievements contribute to the betterment of the communities we serve.


Lethbridge Mayor Bob Tarleck at Lethbridge City Hall. | U OF L | www/uleth.ca/report

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As at March 31 (thousands of dollars)

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

2005

ASSETS

2004

CURRENT ASSETS Cash and short-term investments $ Accounts receivable Inventories Prepaid expenses

18,196 5,420 476 593 24,685

INVESTMENTS CAPITAL ASSETS COLLECTION

51,325

$

139,581

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

47,815

140,412

33,194

32,997

248,785

$

12,553 3,990 541 574 17,658

$ 238,882

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $ Employee benefit liabilities Deferred revenue Deferred tuition fees Deferred contributions Current portion of long term debt

5,460 4,411 936 3,512 13,843 115

$

4,164 4,428 664 3,031 10,726

109 28,277

23,122

Accounts payable - construction projects Long term debt Employee benefit liabilities Deferred capital contributions

158 3,776 5,545 1,739 11,218

319 3,891 4,644 1,282 10,136

UNAMORTIZED DEFERRED CAPITAL CONTRIBUTIONS

84,437

88,358

84,445 11,975 13,713 14,720 124,853

81,050 11,227 5,399 19,590 117,266

LONG TERM LIABILITIES

NET ASSETS Investment in capital assets and collection Endowments Internally restricted net assets Unrestricted net assets

For the Year Ended March 31 (thousands of dollars)

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U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

$

248,785

$ 238,882

2004

REVENUE Grants $ Tuition and related fees Sales of service and products Miscellaneous Investment income Gifts and donations Amortization of deferred capital contributions

67,093 33,743 9,398 3,195 2,395 663 6,153

$

122,640

62,659 30,183 8,095 2,960 1,940 307 6,262 112,406

EXPENSE Salaries 65,915 Employee benefits 10,805 Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries 2,982 Supplies and services 7,618 6,645 Cost of goods sold 2,888 Travel 3,080 Utilities 3,046 External contracted services 2,683 Repairs and maintenance 1,796 Professional fees 839 Interest on long term liabilities 429 Insurance 367 298 Property taxes 219 Loss on disposal of capital assets 1,094 Unrealized loss on write-down of investments 55 Amortization of capital assets 12,064

EXCESS OF REVENUE OVER EXPENSE

58,968 9,694 2,586 2,759 2,801 3,022 2,199 2,242 600 687 199 1 85 11,557

115,880

2005

$

6,760

104,343 $

8,063


is

accountable

stakeholders:

to

many

students,

the

government, granting agencies, donors Through

and

the

community.

sound

budgeting

and planning processes, the University maintains exemplary financial management of public and

private

funds,

satisfies

stakeholder expectations and achieves the U of L’s goals.

2005

2004

www.uleth.ca/report

For the Year Ended March 31 (thousands of dollars)

The University of Lethbridge

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

ACCOUNTABILITY

CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

Excess of revenue over expense $ 6,760 $ Non-cash transactions Amortization of deferred capital contributions (6,153) Amortization of capital assets 12,064 11,557 Loss on disposal of capital assets 1,094 Unrealized loss on write-down of investments 55 Increase in long-term employee benefit liabilities 901 14,721 Increase in non-cash working capital 3,765 18,486

8,063 (6,262) 1 85 636 14,080 267 14,347

CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES: Deposit on capital asset - Sale (purchase) of investments (net) (3,565) Capital asset additions Internally funded (10,163) Externally funded (2,232) (2,445) Financed - Proceeds on disposal of capital assets 68 (15,892) Decrease in construction accounts payable (161) (16,053)

41 919 (6,996) (4,000) 69 (12,412) (209) (12,621)

CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES: Capital contributions received Endowment contributions received Capitalized investment earnings Long term debt proceeds Long term debt repayments

2,689 409 221 - (109) 3,210

2,689 123 180 4,000 6,992

5,643

8,718

CASH AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS, beginning of year

12,553

3,835

INCREASE IN CASH

CASH AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS, end of year $

18,196

$

12,553

The financial information presented cannot be expected to provide as comprehensive an understanding as the information provided in the University’s audited financial statements. Please refer to www.uleth.ca/ fsr for complete financial statements, accompanying notes and the Auditor’s Report.

U OF L | 04/05 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE ACCOUNTABILITY MATTERS

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www.uleth.ca/report

2004/2005 REPORT CARD Research Funding

For the year ended March 31

Federal government Provincial government Other govts., assoc., foundations, institutes Business and industry Other

2005 $

229

Total

2004

$ 5,397 2,364 667 405 168 87

2003

7,490 2,663 1,070

$ 11,620

$ 8,920

$

4,416 2,120 596

164 46 $ 7,342

100% Other

80% 60%

Other govts., assoc., foundations, institutes

40%

Provincial government

20%

Federal government

0%

20

Business and industry

2005

2004

U OF L | 2005 COMMUNITY REPORT | BECAUSE IT MATTERS

2003

Student Enrolment Continues to Grow We are Alberta’s University – anchored by our Lethbridge campus, the University of Lethbridge also operates campuses in Calgary and Edmonton. Student enrolment at the U of L has more than tripled over the last 30 years. Today, the U of L boasts one of the fastest-growing post-secondary student populations in the country with more than 8,000 students from 69 countries – one of the most geographically diverse student populations in Alberta.

26%

27%

other Alberta

Calgary

25%

16%

6%

visa students

other Canada

Lethbridge

Fall 2004

A Major Economic Influencer With more than 1,900 people employed full time or part time, the U of L is Lethbridge’s second-largest employer and provides more than $180.5 million per year in economic benefits to the community.

How does the U of L Score?

Maclean’s Rankings In fall 2004, the U of L ranked second among undergraduate universities in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

of Canada (NSERC)/Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) grants. In fall 2004, the U of L ranked second among undergraduate universities in per cent of budget devoted to student services. 2004 Globe and Mail University Report Card The University of Lethbridge scored grades of “A” and “B+” in half the categories in the 2004 Globe and Mail University Report Card. The University was placed in the “small” category (enrolment less than 12,500 students) with 12 other universities. The U of L was the only Alberta postsecondary educational institution to receive an “A“ in the Overall Quality of Education category. Canadian Undergraduate Survey Consortium (2005 Survey) General undergraduate student body (2005 Survey) 95 per cent of U of L students agree/strongly agree with the statement: “I am satisfied with my decision to attend this university.”

Freshman (2004 Survey) 86 per cent of U of L freshmen say they are attending their first choice university.


CONTACT US: University of Lethbridge LETHBRIDGE CAMPUS 4401 University Drive W. Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Ph: (403) 329-2200 Fax: (403) 329-2097 www.uleth.ca

University of Lethbridge CALGARY CAMPUS Room N104 Senator Burns Building 1301 - 16 Ave. N.W. Calgary, AB T2M 0L4 Ph: (403) 284-8596 Fax: (403) 284-8057

University of Lethbridge EDMONTON CAMPUS U of L Building 1200, 10707 - 100 Ave. Edmonton, AB T5J 3M1 Ph: (780) 424-0425 Fax: (780) 424-0455

The 2005 Community Report was produced by the Office of University Advancement at the University of Lethbridge.

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Alesha Farfus-Shukaliak

PHOTOGRAPHY: Curtis Trent Photography Bernie Wirzba

PUBLISHER: University of Lethbridge Board of Governors

CONTRIBUTORS: Shelagh McMullan Bob Cooney Alesha Farfus-Shukaliak Cindy Armstrong-Esther Dennis Domoney U of L Research Services

EDITOR: Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock

DESIGNER: Stephenie Chester

PRINTING: Calgary Colorpress

The 2004/2005 Community Report is just a glimpse of the noteworthy achievements that took place at the U of L this year. For more stories, please visit www.uleth.ca/report.


www.uleth.ca/report


Report2005  

BECAUSE IT MATTERS COMMUNITY REPORT ” Why? Because it matters. U OF L | www.uleth.ca/report | U of L President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Bill...

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