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‘The more you dream, the farther you get’

© MICHAEL DALDER/Reuters/Corbis

Michael Phelps

UNIT 4: FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

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In this unit you will: talk about the role of sports in your life; read quotes and interviews of famous athletes; write about your appreciation of cheerleading; listen to and analyse a classic football anthem; debate with your classmates on sports topics (integrated language task).


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BE A GOOD SPORT

1.1 ⁄ YOUR CLASSMATE’S SPORTS CHART 1 Interview a classmate about his/her sports activities and sports interests and fill in the chart. Use the key words in the first column to phrase your questions.

QUESTION KEY WORDS

SPOKEN INTERACTION

ANSWER

Active: team, individual sports?

Passive: watching, gaming, fantasy leagues?

Time spent? On practice? On competition? On leisure? Benefits from doing sport?

Injuries?

Favourite sports? Why?

Favourite athletes, team? Why?

2 Report back to the class what you have found out about your classmate in the interview.

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1.2 ⁄ ARE YOU A SPORTS EXPERT? 1 Make a list of difficult sports-related vocabulary that you have used in the interview.

2 Fill in the correct word from the list. fans – injury – venue – defeat – counterfeit – referee – draw – jersey – spectators – abandon 1 About 50,000 … were estimated to be in the stadium. 2 In the World Cup qualifying match between England and Italy, there was no winner. It was a … . 3 You have to watch out when you buy your ticket on the street. It may be … . 4 When jumping over the first hurdle, the favourite competitor pulled a muscle and had to … the race. 5 Famous teams like Manchester United have … all over Europe. 6 The leader in the Tour de France wears a yellow … . 7 I can’t compete in the championship tomorrow. My … hasn’t healed yet. 8 The 2014 World Cup was held in Brazil. Do you know in which … the final was played? 9 After a long series of consecutive wins, Chelsea lost to Manchester City on Saturday. It was their first … in the Premier League in three months. 10 The … blew his whistle to start the game.

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3 Sports word fields. Write the following words under the appropriate sport. Check the meaning with a dictionary if necessary. Some words can be used more than once. If you think there are any important words missing, you can add them yourself. ace – backhand – backstroke – bat – baton – block – breakaway – breaststroke – butterfly – buzzer – catcher – centre – championship – chasing group – court – cup – cyclo-cross – decathlon – defender – disqualify – discus – division – (mixed) doubles – dribble – drop shot – deuce – dunk – offside – false start – field goal – forehand – foul – freestyle – general classification – goalkeeper – guard – half-time – heat – helmet – heptathlon – high jump – homerun – hurdle – inning – javelin – jumpshot – lane – lay-up – league – linesman – long jump – love game – midfielder – outfielder – penalty kick – pitcher – pole vault – quarter – quarterback – relay – seed – to serve – shot put – shoot – singles – smash – sprint – stage – steeplechase – strike – striker – Superbowl – tackle – tiebreak – time trial – touchdown – triple jump – volley – World Series BASEBALL

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AMERICAN FOOTBALL

BASKETBALL

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SWIMMING

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FOOTBALL (SOCCER)

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CYCLING

TENNIS

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ATHLETICS

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4 Write a report about a game or a race for one of the sports from exercise 3. Use at least 10 words from the sports vocabulary in the exercises above. Your text should be 200 words long.

writing

STRATEGY A sports report is a mainly descriptive text on the highlights and atmosphere in a sports game or race. Mind that a sports reporter is not a fan and is therefore objective: he does not take sides and doesn't have favourite competitors either. A typical structure of a sports report is: • Introduction: when, where, who, what. Situate the game or race: event, venue, teams, players, competitors. You can refer to estimates from beforehand: favourites, expected outcome. • Body: description of the game/race. Describe the key moments in the game/race chronologically. Pay attention to tactical choices/changes that impact the outcome. You can also include reactions from the crowd to the performances. • Conclusion (optional): What is most striking to remember from the game/race? Was the result expected or a surprise? Briefly explain why.

© Maxisport / Shutterstock.com

Before writing your own, check out a few examples of existing sports reports online.

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Sports report checklist

me

classmate

1 Content • I can summarise the most important events from the game / race. • I can write an article that is interesting to read. • I can communicate the atmosphere of the game in my report. 2 Vocabulary and grammar • I use at least ten words from the vocabulary exercises. • I can describe the game/race using the correct sports vocabulary. • I use a proper objective journalist’s register. • I use the correct (past) verb forms. 3 Structure • My report has a headline which reflects the content of the report. • I write in paragraphs. • I use an introduction and conclusion. 4 Writing tools • I write my report using Word. • I check the number of words using the tool in Word to make sure my report is the requested length. • I use a spell checker. • I use a dictionary and/or the help track. • I use the grammar survey. Feedback

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2

THE HALO OF SPORTS HEROES

2.1 ⁄ FAMOUS SPORTS QUOTES reading

1 Read these sports quotes. List your top 3 favourite quotes. Say why they appeal to you.

a The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win, but to take part … The essential thing is not to have conquered, but to have fought well. (Pierre de Coubertin, founder of the modern Olympic Games)

C

© Duomo/CORBIS

D

Champions aren’t made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – a desire, a dream, a vision. (Muhammad Ali, boxing, heavyweight world champion in the 1960s)

G In the end, it’s extra effort that separates a winner from second place. But winning takes a lot more than that, too. It starts with complete command of the fundamentals. Then it takes desire, determination, discipline, and selfsacrifice. And finally, it takes a great deal of love, fairness and respect for your fellow man. Put all these together, and even if you don’t win, how can you lose? (Jessie Owens, athletics: 100 and 200 metres sprint, 4x Olympic gold medallist in the 1930s)

Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I’m very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that. (Bill Shankly, legendary football manager of Liverpool in the 1960s)

F Sportsmanship for me is when a guy walks off the court and you really can’t tell whether he won or lost, when he carries himself with pride either way. (Jim Courier, tennis, winner of 4 Grand Slam singles titles)

© Dimitri Iundt/TempSport/Corbis

© Bettmann/CORBIS

E

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I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.

(Michael Jordan, basketball, 6 times NBAchampion with the Chicago Bulls)

A trophy carries dust. Memories last forever. (Mary Lou Retton, gymnastics, Olympic gold medallist in 1984)

speaking

B

H I spent 90 percent of my money on women and drink. The rest I wasted! (George Best, football, legendary striker of Manchester United in the 1960s and 1970s)

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j The Spirit of Sports: the spirit of sports gives each of us who participate an opportunity to be creative. Sports knows no sex, age, race or religion. Sports gives us all the ability to test ourselves mentally, physically and emotionally in a way no other aspect of life can. For many of us who struggle with ‘fitting in’ or our identity – sports gives us our first face of confidence. That first bit of confidence can be a gateway to many other great things!

It’s not the disability that defines you; it’s how you deal with the challenges the disability presents you with. We have an obligation to the abilities we DO have, not the disability. (Jim Abbott, baseball pitcher in the MLB in the 1980s and 1990s, who was born without a right hand, Olympic gold medallist)

k Every kid around the world who plays soccer wants to be Pelé. I have a great responsibility to show them not just how to be like a soccer player, but how to be like a man.

(Dan O’Brien, athletics: decathlon, Olympic gold medallist in the 1990s)

(Pelé, football, 3x World Cup winner, chosen as Football Player of the Century)

M © YiAN Kourt / Shutterstock.com

L Please don’t call me arrogant, but I’m European champion and I think I’m a special one. (Jose Mourinho, football manager)

The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, but if they don’t play together, the club won’t be worth a dime. (Babe Ruth, baseball, played in the MLB for 22 years in the first half of the 20th century, 4x winner of the World Series)

N Football is a simple game: 22 men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end, the Germans win. (Gary Lineker, football, top scorer in the World Cup of 1986. Currently a leading pundit on BBC’s Match of the Day)

My top 3

O You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get. (Michael Phelps, swimming, holds the alltime record of Olympic gold medals: 18)

Chosen because …

1 2 3

2 Some of these quotes go beyond the world of sports. They can be seen as a metaphor for life or as an example to follow. Illustrate this by means of two examples.

speaking

3 Which quotes can hardly be seen as examplary? Briefly explain.

speaking

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2.2 â „ MAKING THE HEADLINES 1 In the introductory interview with a classmate, you were asked about athletes you admire. Which names popped up? Do they deserve your admiration? Why (not)?

SPOKEN INTERACTION

2 Popular athletes get a lot of press coverage. Yet, not all that glitters is gold. Check out these magazine and newspaper front pages. Why did these sports celebs make the headlines? Try to explain the covers: which sport, which athlete and which event does the headline deal with?

reading

1

2

3

4 Sport > Others > General

Slovakian cyclist Peter Sagan criticised for pinching the bottom of podium girl after Tour de Flanders

5

Sport

6

Athlete

7

8

Event

1

2

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3

4

5

6

7

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3 Rank the covers from positive to negative. Motivate your choice orally.

speaking

4 So what does it take to become a great sports star?

SPOKEN INTERACTION

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2.3 ⁄ THE TEAM CAPTAIN: LEADING BY EXAMPLE? SPOKEN INTERACTION

1 In 2.2 we saw some sports celebs who fell off their pedestal. Do you think sports stars are, and should be, role models in society? Why (not)? 2 Can you think of any famous athletes who are role models? In what way?

SPOKEN INTERACTION

3 Is Vincent Kompany a sports star who leads by example? Read the text to find out.

reading

VINCENT KOMPANY

© Andre Chaco/Fotoarena/Corbis

Vincent Kompany (°Uccle, 10 April 1986) is a Belgian professional football player, who can both play as a centre back and as a defensive midfielder. He started his professional career with Anderlecht at the age of 17. He played for Anderlecht for 3 years, winning two Belgian League titles. He won the Belgian ‘Golden Shoe’ in 2004 at a very young age. In 2006, Kompany left Anderlecht for Hamburg, where injuries hampered his breakthrough. In spite of this, he was transferred to Manchester City in 2008. He became team captain of ‘The Citizens’, leading the club to their first English Premier League title in 44 years in 2011 and to a second one in 2014. Kompany is also the captain of the Belgian national team, with which he reached the quarter final of the World Cup in Brazil in 2014. In addition, Kompany is involved in charity (e.g. he is an official FIFA ambassador for SOS Children), he owns Belgian third division football club BX Brussels and he has his own chain of sports bars in Belgium, called ‘Good Kompany’. Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_Kompany

INTERVIEW WITH VINCENT KOMPANY BELGIUM HAD A GREAT YEAR This generation is incredible. It is so rare for a country of our size to have so many incredible players at the same time. Usually it’s hit or miss. This time we are all similar ages, we are all quite young. I mean, I am the oldest in the team. There are great prospects there. Any legacy of this team will be based on the success that the team achieves together, so there is a lot of pressure on us. 5

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— There is no national academy in Belgium, so why have so many top players come through? Is it just luck? I wouldn’t say it’s luck. Belgium is more playing a catching-up role rather than being a leader in youth development. We’ve proved that a small country can produce great youth players. We have benefited a lot from the proximity of big footballing countries. A lot of the players have done at least some of their training in Holland, France and England. But the talent comes from Belgium. And now there is a great enthusiasm for football and people want to use football again socially, either to improve themselves or as a social vehicle. — Belgium is politically divided between Flemish and French speakers. There’s even talk of the country being broken up. How have you overcome those differences within the squad? Because a small part of the country has become a lot more extremist in its demands for separation, the national team is becoming more important, as it has made the other part of the country that wants to stay united become more extreme about other national symbols. Football being what it is and meaning what

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it means, as soon as this team was there, the fans were there in huge numbers. And I think we realised we had to be a different type of team than other national teams. We cannot afford to go back to our countries and play the untouchable superstars. The whole aspect of us being so popular is that we show we are much more committed. We accept the challenge: we have that responsibility on us to help people.

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— Can the national team be a positive reflection of a united country? The political situation in Belgium at the moment is so tense that the right thing to do is stay away from it. But, hey, this is our country and it would be ridiculous for us to stand for anything other than unity. What we do every time is show the good of our country and the potential of our country, other than focus on the differences there might be. We focus on what we have together rather than on what is different.

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— Several Belgian journalists point out that because you speak Flemish and French you are the glue that keeps the team together … I carry a lot of responsibility because I have a lot more experience than the other guys in the team. I think what’s important is that every individual realises that. The advantage is that I always speak my mind. This is what I can give to a team. I can be honest.

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— You’re quite unusual in that you stayed in Belgium to finish your studies. Do you think there is enough emphasis on young English footballers finishing their education? It would be very judgemental for me to say that. It’s difficult to point to education as one issue. England produces a lot of great footballers. Study is not a measure of intelligence. I’ve seen a lot of players without education who are very intelligent players. I don’t think it has much to do with education. Probably sometimes it is an issue of what people look up to when they are growing up. When I was a ten-year-old boy, whenever I saw the future or dreamed about it, I always saw myself lifting cups and playing in full stadiums, scoring goals, defending well. I can’t remember a single memory from my dreams that was about a car or a girl. It was never my motivation. I could never put a number on what that cup was worth. I think sometimes, and it’s not just in England, that our society tends a little bit towards young kids at an early age having more of a feeling that material stuff [is important], that the job is a way to get material stuff rather than the opposite. — As a young player, and a second generation immigrant, how were you received in football back home in Belgium? I guess we are going back to racism. Racism is felt most in grassroots football. We can talk on and on and on about the Premier League, but ultimately what we decide and do has an influence on grassroots football. When I was a kid it was very common for us to go places and be racially abused from six, seven, eight, nine, all the way up until you got into the first team. But it’s more regulated in the first team. I suffered a lot less racism there. I don’t really like to use the word suffered as I didn’t feel like the victim. I more felt sorry for those portraying the acts of racism. I have seen it and it was revolting. But it is grassroots football where you see the impact and maybe too much tolerance of racism. — How do you see the issue in England compared with Belgium? The great thing about England is that people do talk a lot about it. If something happens, it shocks the whole country and the whole country has an opinion. That is a sign that it’s not something that is accepted so that is a great thing. The fact people talk about it is a reflection that this country is a lot more evolved than other countries. England is a lot further than people might make out it might be. But you can always improve. — What is your relationship to Congo today? I have a very strong relationship with Congo. I’m not half Belgian and half Congolese; I’m 100 per cent Belgian and 100 per cent Congolese. It’s a wealth to me to have those two cultural backgrounds. The charity work I do is never something I do because I felt I needed to do it to make myself feel good. It’s a priority in my life. It’s as much a © AGIF / Shutterstock.com

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priority as being a good footballer. Always has been. One enables me to do the other. I’ll keep trying to be a good footballer so it makes the impact I have when I go out there all the better. 80

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— The owner of Manchester City gives very few interviews. What is Sheikh Mansour like and what was it like being in the eye of the storm at the world’s richest club? They are genuinely very involved in what is going on at Manchester City. I guess the one thing that impressed me was the depth in which they decided to transform the club. It would have been very easy to come in and buy the players and gain success that way. What I like about this is it goes along the way I envisage big projects. You go for the harder challenge, looking at the whole operation and try and produce young local players. You’ll never be able to take away the fact people are only looking at the money side of things. But I look at something much deeper than that. Something that has a huge influence on the dynamic of the city and of the lives of young players. It’s an incredible project and I’m proud to be part of it.

Interview by James Montague

Adapted from World Soccer

4 Choose the correct meaning of the underlined words from the given possibilities. The context the word occurs in may be a useful clue. Reread the paragraph of the text in which the sentence occurs before making wild guesses. 1 Usually it’s hit or miss. right or wrong a b random; left to chance c something in the middle 2 There are great prospects there. a something good that might happen in the future b professional players c football scouts 3 Any legacy of this team will be based on ... a money you get from a dead family member b what is handed over from the past c what the law says 4 … the proximity of big footballing countries. a financial support b professional knowledge c closeness 5 … we show we are much more committed. a involved b complicated c skilled 6 It would be very judgemental for me to say that. a legal b arrogant c quick to criticize people 7 Grassroots football a amateur football b football on a really bad pitch c football in the early days of the sport

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© GUSTAU NACARINO/Reuters/Corbis

8 The charity work I do … a physical training b hobby c supporting people in need 9 One enables me to do the other. a makes it possible for b makes it impossible for c provides the talent for 10 They are genuinely very involved in … a intelligently b genetically c honestly

Barcelona's Neymar distributes signed photos to children during a charity visit to the Hospital Sant Joan de Deu in Barcelona, 2014.

11 You go for the harder challenge. a something you have to do. b something that is difficult and really tests your ability. c something you hate to do.

5 Answer the questions about Kompany’s interview with World Soccer.

reading

a Kompany tackles the topic of racism in football. Summarise in your own words how he experienced the problem.

b Compare his encounters with racism in Belgium to those in England. Are they the same?

c Kompany has got a very nuanced view on race and nationalism. Explain.

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d Explain Kompany’s view on the political situation in Belgium.

6 Watch Kompany on life off the pitch and find out about his charity work in his country of origin.

listening

a What made Kompany decide to engage in charity?

b Which two charities does Kompany support? Do you know what they do?

c What does Kompany hope for in the long run?

d Despite his fluency in English, Vincent Kompany is obviously not a native speaker of English. Listen a second time and pay attention to Kompany’s English skills: which elements in his English are still prone to improvement? Does he make any ‘typically Belgian’ errors?

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John Chapman @BelgoFoot

Vincent Kompany elected Man of the Year 2012 by Knack magazine. For achievements on / off the field (a united Belgium, Congo, society) #mcfc 12 December 2012

Source: twitter.com

7 Kompany was proclaimed ‘Man of the Year’ by Knack Magazine. Why do you think he was given this award? What makes him a great sportsman?

SPOKEN INTERACTION

8 Do you think Kompany deserved the award? Explain your point of view.

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SPORTS: A MIRROR OF SOCIETY

3.1 ⁄ CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN SPORTS 1 Which sports are typically Belgian or very popular in Belgium? Why are they popular? 2 Sports rules for dummies: In English-speaking countries our sports are not necessarily as popular. On the other hand, other sports which are not very big in Belgium have an enormous fan base. Can you explain the basic rules of these sports in five sentences to someone who is not into this sport at all? 1 football

4 volleyball

7 (ice) hockey

2 tennis

5 American football

8 cricket

3 basketball

6 rugby

3 Watch the video An American coach in London and find out how Ted Lasso gets confused about the rules of sports.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

speaking

listening

a What is Ted Lasso’s new job?

b Which sport does he normally coach?

c What differences does Lasso notice from the game he is used to? Name at least five.

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d Give three examples of jokes that have been put into this video.

e What is the aim of this short video? Explain.

4 Sometimes, cultural heritage and modern sports form a remarkable mixture. The

national rugby team of New Zealand, also known as the All Blacks, has adopted a Maori tradition. Watch what it is all about and answer the questions.

listening

Š Derik Hamilton/Icon SMI/Corbis

a What is the haka?

Š Paul Chinn/San Francisco Chronicle/Corbis

b Why is it used by the All Blacks?

c How do the non-Maori players feel about the haka?

d Since when has the haka been part of the All Blacks?

e Which criticism can be given to the use of the haka by the All Blacks?

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5 The impact of sports on society can also be seen in the numerous words and expressions that have come from the field of sports into our daily language. Study the list of sports idioms in 7.2. Write a dialogue with your partner in which you use at least three of these sports idioms, but not set in a sports setting. Then act it out.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

6 Your teacher will provide the material for an Anglo-Saxon sports quiz.

reading

3.2 ⁄ CHEERLEADING: A CLICHÉ? 1 Cheerleading is a typical phenomenon of American sports. What do you associate with cheerleading? Write down keywords.

speaking

2 Compare your original ideas to the following three source materials to check whether they are true or not. Write down keywords on your findings after each one.

reading listening

Source 1: a cheerleading blog UNIVERSITY

CHEERLIVING

NEWS

LIFESTYLE

HEALTH & FITNESS

SPIRIT BUILDING

FASHION & BEAUTY

Categories: blog, cheer news, spirit building

SAFETY

VIDEOS

FUN FEATURES

Search

Cheerleaders Only Date Football Players While some cheerleaders date football players, they also date other athletes, cheerleaders, and non-athletes. Additionally, most cheerleaders have too busy a schedule to date! Cheerleaders Aren’t Athletes Even if cheerleading isn’t legally considered a sport, cheerleaders are most certainly athletes. They train just as hard as other athletes and have just as much drive and passion. <

Cheerleading Isn’t Dangerous It’s not just competitive cheer that’s dangerous. Injuries occur all the time from the sidelines of games. For those who don’t think cheer is dangerous, take a look at the numbers. Cheerleaders Are Airheads Cheerleaders not only have to maintain a certain GPA to participate in cheer, they also go on to have amazing careers! Not only have presidents, business executives, and actresses been former cheerleaders, organizations run by cheerleaders promote knowledge and education.

>

GPA: Grade Point Average, school result

Source: www.cheerleadingblog.com

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Source 2: an interview with Tiffany Jimenez, a cheerleader of the NFL-team Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Source 3: an article on cheerleading

BEYOND THE POM-POMS By Hilary Hylton and Harriet Barovick

Thirty cheerleaders are leaping across mats in a dizzying blur of motion and power. A double back handspring whips by, making room for another and another. Then, as Queen blares over a CD player, three groups interlock hands and hurl three tiny teammates 30 ft. into the air. Like fireworks, the girls’ bodies hang, open, then descend gracefully into the arms of waiting teammates. What’s missing from this frenzy of teenage motion is any cheers for the high school football squad. These girls are themselves hard-working athletes, members of the World Cup Shooting © Aspen Photo / Shutterstock.com Stars, an extracurricular, all-star team of 12- to 18-year-olds from Freehold, N.J. They travel up to four hours three times a week for practice and take part in a dozen competitions each year. Many have turned down spots on their high school softball or basketball team to hone their skills with full twists and backflips. This summer’s sleeper hit movie Bring It On, about a San Diego high school cheer team competing for a national championship, was not just Hollywood fantasy. Cheerleading has come a long way from the days of busty, baton-twirling quarterback groupies. Many cheerleaders, of course, still serve primarily as perky high school spirit rousers. But fourteen states now call cheerleading a sport, and all-star teams – strictly competitive groups run by local gyms – are exploding in popularity. Some forty groups organize regional and national competitions, most of them between December and April. ‘Competitive cheer’ has become the fastest-growing high school sport for girls; about a third of U.S. high schools have competitive teams, sometimes in addition to more traditional spirit squads. Nearly 200 colleges offer cheerleading scholarships. And if you think the world of cheerleading is as simple as sis-boom-bah, think again. At big-time competitions held by groups such as the Universal Cheerleading Association and the National Cheerleading Association, teams are judged on how cleanly and creatively they perform original

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2-to-3-minute routines. Most include tumbling, stunts and dance; at NCA events, the all-stars don’t even have to chant a cheer. ‘It’s not really what they’re about anyway,’ says American Cheerleader magazine senior editor Alyssa Roenigk. ‘So in many cases, they’d prefer to compete just to music.’ All-star cheerleaders point out that their skills are a far cry from the usual high school variety, in which the focus is on rooting for the football team. ‘I hated sideline cheering,’ says Nicole Pelillo, 15, who cheered for a Pop Warner team before joining the all-star Shooting Stars in lieu of her high school cheerleading squad. ‘We only got to compete a few times. And, naturally, the fans were there to see football, not us. What we do is so intense, it’s a sport unto itself.’ Increasingly, it has the risks of big-time sports too. Such injuries as broken noses, knocked-out teeth and ankle sprains are common. According to recent data, the rate of cheerleading injuries, caused in large part by increasingly elaborate stunts, was six times as high as that of football injuries among high school kids. Advocates of the sport insist that the number of injuries simply reflects growing participation and that safety guidelines and certification programs are closely followed. In any case, it’s hard to dampen a cheerleader’s spirit. Fourth-grader Ashton Smith, 10, of Austin, Texas, has been practicing twice a week for five years and has already rebounded from two injuries, including a broken wrist. Is it worth it? ‘Cheerleading is my life,’ she says. High school cheerleading, however, still has to fight to be taken seriously. Coaches range from qualified instructors to history teachers talked into volunteering. Elaine Pascale, founder of World Cup Gym, started the program after being frustrated by high school coaching. Cheerleading got so little attention at her school that she was forced to practice in the hall. The boom in high school cheerleading has been spurred in part by a reduction in gymnastics programs. Enthusiasts say competitive cheer offers the challenge of gymnastics without the austerity. And it’s not just for girls anymore; the number of high school male cheerleaders nearly doubled last year, to 1,200. ‘Throwing a girl up in the air, having to know dance moves, is great,’ says New Jersey senior Ehrin Jannell, who gave up wrestling to cheer on an all-star team. ‘And it’s serious, man. I’ve played football too. Cheerleading is harder.’

Source: www.time.com

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3 Write down the arguments you have found in the three sources. Which arguments confirm the cheerleader cliché and which go against it? Cliché confirming

listening

Cliché denying

4 Now write down your nuanced conclusion on ‘cheerleading: a cliché?’ based on the three sources.

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3.3 ⁄ THE HARD NUMBERS Sports is about competing and therefore a real sports fan loves statistics: who is the fastest, the top goalscorer, the best paid, the most expensive transfer, the most popular player etc. Remember the ancient Latin phrase: ‘citius, altius, fortius’ (‘faster, higher, stronger’). 1 Take a close look at these sports statistics. What is striking about these statistics?

reading SPOKEN INTERACTION

Top earners in sport Floyd Mayweather (USA)

$ 85,000,000

Manny Pacquiao (Phi)

$ 68,000,000

Tiger Woods (USA)

$ 59,500,000

LeBron James (USA)

$ 53,000,000

Roger Federer (Swi)

$ 52,700,000

Kobe Bryant (USA)

$ 52,300,000

Phil Mickelson (USA)

$ 47,800,000

David Beckham (GB)

$ 46,000,000

Cristiano Ronaldo (Por)

$ 42,500,000

Peyton Manning (USA)

$ 42,400,000

Source: Forbes

Top football transfers Player

From

To

Transfer fee

Year

1

Gareth Bale (GB)

Tottenham

Real Madrid

€ 100,000,000

2013

2

Cristiano Ronaldo (Por)

Man United

Real Madrid

€ 94,000,000

2009

3

Luis Suarez (Uru)

Liverpool

Barcelona

€ 90,000,000

2014

4

James Rodriguez (Col)

AS Monaco

Real Madrid

€ 80,000,000

2014

5

Zinedine Zidane (Fra)

Juventus

Real Madrid

€ 75,000,000

2001

6

Zlatan Ibrahimovic (Swe)

Inter Milan

Barcelona

€ 69,000,000

2009

7

Kaka (Bra)

AC Milan

Real Madrid

€ 68,000,000

2009

8

Edinson Cavani (Uru)

Napoli

PSG

€ 64,000,000

2013

9

David Luiz (Bra)

Chelsea

PSG

€ 63,000,000

2014

10

Luis Figo (Por)

Barcelona

Real Madrid

€ 62,000,000

2000

Sources: Wikipedia.org, Sport/Voetbal Magazine

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147


2 Have you heard about any changes in these rankings recently? Add them to the graph.

writing

3 Comment on the rankings that you have just read. Is this normal in your view? Explain.

SPOKEN INTERACTION

4 Look up statistics (records, table of honour etc.) of your favourite athlete or team. Bring them to class and tell your classmates about your findings. Make sure you mention the source of the statistics and check whether they are reliable: are your sources recent? Did you use official sites?

speaking

3.4 â &#x201E; REMEMBER THE TITANS 1 Watch the different parts from the film Remember the Titans and answer the questions.

listening

Part one a Why are students protesting at the school?

b Describe the reaction of Emma when she is introduced to Julius.

Part two c Where does coach Boone make his team run to?

d What happened there?

e Why does he take his team there?

148

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Part three f

Explain how and why officials try to sabotage the championship for the Titans.

g What makes the difference in the end for the Titans?

2 Now compare Kompany’s experience to the race issue in American football in the South of the USA. Use the excerpts of the film Remember the Titans.

4

SPOKEN INTERACTION

THE FAN IN YOU

4.1 ⁄ ‘YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE’ SPOKEN INTERACTION

1 Are you a fan? Discuss the following questions. a Do you have a favourite team? Which one? b How do you support your team? c Do you know any club songs? Which ones? 2 Any football fan in the world will probably know this fans’ classic song. Listen to the song (or sing it out loud like football fans would do). Then answer the questions.

You’ll Never Walk Alone (Gerry and the Pacemakers)

listening reading

When you walk through a storm Hold your head up high And don’t be afraid of the dark At the end of the storm Is a golden sky And the sweet silver song of the lark Walk on through the wind Walk on through the rain Though your dreams be tossed and blown

© Tim Clayton/TIM CLAYTON/Corbis

Walk on, walk on with hope in your heart And you’ll never walk alone You’ll never walk alone Walk on, walk on with hope in your heart And you’ll never walk alone You’ll never walk alone.

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149


a Which elements in the song refer directly to football?

b Why does the song appeal to so many football fans?

4.2 ⁄ WEBQUEST: THE KOP Surf the web to find background information on this classic football song and its fans. Real football fans may even be able to fill in a few of the questions by heart. Don’t forget to add the English URL of where you found the information. a What is ‘the Kop’?

b Where does the word ‘Kop’ come from?

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reading


c How do the Kop support their team?

d To which club is the song ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ attributed?

e In which legendary stadium do they play?

f Find out the origin of the song and how it became a football fans’ classic.

g Look for footage of a football match in which the song is sung by the fans and watch it. Save the URL of the footage found.

h Which two dramatic events strengthened the symbolism of the song? Also briefly explain these events.

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Unfortunately, there are also many examples of negative behaviour by supporters. Look for four examples of fan-related incidents in sports. At least two of them should not be about football. © Adam Fradgley/AMA/Matthew Ashton/AMA Sports Photo Agency/ AMA/Corbis

i

4.3 ⁄ THE TAIL (OF THE VERBS) Complete the phrasal verbs in the sentences with the correct particle from the list. Some of them can be used more than once. away – off – up – in – over – down – out 1 Any football fan knows the lines of the chorus of ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’: ‘Walk through the wind, ... .’ 2 There is no need to bring

our last defeat again, coach. I thought we had gone

all that. 3 Mike and I stood outside talking about the game coming 4 After playing rugby in the park, Andy tried to rub

the next day. the dirt from his clothes.

5 We need new shirts for our rugby team. The old ones are totally worn 6 The kick

.

of the game is at 8.00 pm.

7 The cyclists had to slow

because they were approaching a sharp bend.

8 After the referee’s warning, the team captain stopped complaining and finally shut

.

9 There were some empty spots in the first heat of the 200 metres, because a few runners had not turned

.

10 Our coach was furious when we gave

a 4-0 lead.

11 John lost the final of the tournament yesterday. He could sure use some cheering

.

12 Jenny’s son was really disappointed when his application for a football scholarship at the University of Mississippi was turned

.

13 As a practical joke, the players had put up a warning sign on the coach’s dressing room door, which said: ‘KEEP

152

. DANGER!’

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TASK

5

A DEBATE ON SPORTS

5.1 ⁄ PREPARATION 1 Divide the class into groups and prepare for a debate on one of these sports topics.

2 Salary excesses in sports: is a salary cap in popular sports necessary? 3 Gender inequality in sports: equal pay for male and female athletes? 4 Racism in the stadium stands: how to tackle it?

Number:

1 Doping in sports: a zero tolerance policy?

6 Sports coverage in the media: more attention to less popular sports, female sports and Paralympics? 2 Your teacher will give you a role to play in the debate or you will be assigned as debate leader. Make use of these tips for a successful debate.

Class:

5 The responsibility of a celeb athlete: a role model for youngsters?

YOUR DEBATING STRATEGY As a good debater you should: • be well-prepared. • contribute positively to the debate. • be able to explain your point of view. • back up your point of view with arguments. • word arguments well. • listen attentively to other debaters. • leave room for input of other debaters. • be polite in interaction with other debaters. • acknowledge the authority of the debate leader. • modify your point of view if necessary.

UNIT 4

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

Date:

As a good debate leader (moderator) you should: • be well-prepared. • introduce the debate topic. • be objective. • ask intelligent questions to add depth to the debate. • ask for clarification or elaboration if necessary. • stimulate debaters to participate. • make room for all participants. • prevent the debate from being dominated too much by one debater. • forestall impolite interventions in the debate. • conclude the debate by summarising its key points.

Name:

DEBATE LEADER STRATEGY

153


TASK

3 Look up necessary information for the debate, based on the role that you are given. Make sure you gather your arguments accordingly. The debate leader will prepare the introduction and the questions for the debate. Write a summary of your preparation on the worksheet.

STRATEGY Date:

Check the reliabilitity and usefulness of your sources. • Origin: is the source of your information reliable? • Date: are the statistics and the information recent enough? • Relevance: is the information useful for this debate, taking into account the role that you have to play? • Comprehension/Comprehensible: are you able to understand the facts/are you able to explain them in your own words during the debate?

Name:

4 Carefully read the debating expressions in the help track. Use some of them in your debate. It will help you to express your opinion and it will make the debate proceedings run more smoothly.

5.2 ⁄ DEBATING Have a debate on the topic you’ve chosen.

STRATEGY Proceedings of the debate

Class:

Timing: +/- 20 minutes per debate. Keep an eye on the time! • Round 1: The moderator introduces the topic. • Round 2: The moderator introduces every member of the debate group and they briefly summarise their point of view in the debate. • Round 3: Actual debate: the different participants can respond to each other’s point of view. • Round 4: The moderator rounds off the debate, summarising the main arguments and different points of view. He thanks the participants for the debate.

Number: 154

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

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6

PIT STOP

6.1 ⁄ TWIST YOUR TONGUE 1 In English, there are two types of ‘th’: a voiceless ‘th’ [Ɵ] and a voiced ‘th’ [ð]. Listen and then try to pronounce these words correctly, paying attention to the different types of ‘th’.

listening speaking

think thanks through math north depth sixth mouth

th

this that the although breathe

STRATEGY Pronunciation: [Ɵ] and [ð] For [Ɵ] Bring the tip of your tongue between your teeth, in a flat and relaxed position. Then blow out the air. For [ð]

The tongue position and breathing are identical as for the [ð], but now you also let your vocal chords vibrate.

2 Practice your pronunciation, using the sets.

speaking

Set 1

Set 2

Set 3

mother

brother

bother

cloth

sloth

both

three

clothes

thick

there

these

those

death

smooth

truth

other

leather

weather

the tenth

that thunder

this thorn

thin

thorough

though

although

rather

worthy

earth

worth

birth

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155


Set 4

Set 5

Set 6

smother

thanks

thank you

booth

the fourth

the eleventh

think

thought

faith

than

then

thrash

tooth

teeth

breath

breathe

thirty

thirsty

throw

parentheses

thrill

thousand

together

thistle

month

faithful

theatre

the sixth

the fifth

the ninth

6.2 â &#x201E; ORDINAL AND CARDINAL NUMBERS 1 Refresh your memory.

156

1

1st

first

2

2nd

second

3

3rd

third

4

4th

fourth

5

5th

fifth

6

6th

sixth

7

7th

seventh

8

8th

eighth

9

9th

ninth

10

10th

tenth

20

20th

twentieth

100

100th

hundredth

1000

1000th

thousandth

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

UNIT 4


2 Write the ordinal numbers in full in their context. Then read the sentences out loud, pronouncing the 'th' correctly.

speaking

1 On Sunday 13 July 2014 the German football team won the World Championship in Brazil. 2 LeBron James led Miami Heat to their 3rd NBA title in 2013. 3 Chairman Florentino Pérez was delighted when his club Real Madrid won the major European cup for the 10th time. They defeated rivals Atlético Madrid in the Champions League final. 4 With his 25th stage win in the Tour de France, Mark Cavendish broke the record of the most Tour stages won by a sprinter, which had been held by Frenchman André Darrigade. 5 Maria Sharapova started the tournament as 6th seed, based on her rankings in the WTA. 6 Lise Van Hecke has just scored her 24th winning point of the game for the Yellow Tigers. 7 In 2016, Wimbledon will be celebrating the 130th edition of the famous tennis tournament. 8 Romelu Lukaku scored his 15th goal for Everton. 9 Glasgow hosted the 20th edition of the Commonwealth Games. 10 Mia Hamm ended her international football career with an incredible 275th appearance for the USA.

STRATEGY Pronunciation of dates in English There are two possibilities: e.g. 15 November = November (the) fifteenth = the fifteenth of November

6.3 ⁄ INJURY REPORT 1 Help team doctor Andrew by completing the injury report. Rugby team the Bluebridge Braves had a tough game last weekend. A lot of players left the game injured and are doubtful or out for the next game on Saturday. Team doctor Andrew MacFarlane has to make this injury report for the coach and for the local media.

reading

a Choose from these words: to sprain – to pull – to twist – to break – to tear – bruised – blisters – sore – stiff – scratch b Also decide whether the injury will keep the players from playing the next game or not. Choose from: fit – doubtful – out

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BACKS NAME

GAME STATUS

INJURY DESCRIPTION

David Jones

He landed hard on his hand after a failed tackle and his wrist. It will be in a plaster for the next three weeks.

Michael Owusu

He complained about hamstrings after the game, but a couple of days of rest should cure him.

John Peterborough

He skipped one day of training because of on the soles of his feet. He is still getting used to the new type of shoe that the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sponsor provided him.

Kenneth Wilson

He a muscle in his thigh during a scrum and had to be replaced during the game. Intense physiotherapy might just get him ready. FORWARDS

NAME

158

GAME STATUS

INJURY DESCRIPTION

Trevor Anderson

He had some on his back after the opposition desperately tried to grab him when he went for the winning try. The slight bleeding was treated right after the game.

Sean Kilkenny

He his ankle after being tackled by two defenders during a run. His ankle is taped up and he will have to stay off the pitch for at least a week.

Mick McGough

He was very unlucky when he his knee ligaments in a scrimmage at the beginning of the game. It is unlikely that he will be eligible again for a team spot for the remainder of the season.

Darren Undertone

After a hard collision with an opponent, he was taken to hospital, where a scan revealed three ribs.

Signature team doctor

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

BLUEBRIDGE BRAVES

INJURY REPORT: BLUEBRIDGE BRAVES

Your signature

UNIT 4


7

HELP TRACK

7.1 â &#x201E; VOCABULARY: SPORTS to abandon to admire to attack to challenge to compete to defeat to defend to draw to participate / to take part in to train / to practice

championship cup league / division play-offs race tournament trophy

ACTIONS COMPETITIONS

SPORTS

CONCEPTS

PEOPLE

mental coach personal trainer physical trainer team coach

association athlete chairperson cheerleader club coach / trainer icon idol manager medallist participant player role model spectator / fan squad / team umpire / referee

UNIT 4

confidence dedication desire determination discipline opportunity responsibility self-sacrifice sportsmanship / fairness strategy / tactics / game play team spirit

PLACES dressing room field / pitch showers stadium stands track venue

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159


success / to succeed victory to play fair pride deep unique original excess equality ability

failure / to fail defeat to cheat shame shallow stereotypical counterfeit lack inequality disability

PRESS AND SPORTS PRESS COVERAGE

celebrity

sports star

halo

tabloid

match report to quote press conference

DIFFERENT SPORTS See 1.2

160

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UNIT 4


SOCIETY AND SPORTS

RIGHT

achievement

WRONG

discrimination

charity

commitment

legacy

leisure

to merit

scholarship

tolerance

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161


7.2 ⁄ SPORTS IDIOMS 1 The ball is in your court 2 At this stage of the game 3 To blow away the competition 4 To call the shots 5 To get a head start 6 To give it your best shot 7 To have the upper hand 8 To hit below the belt 9 To jump the gun 10 A long shot

11 To be up to par (or not) 12 To be off base 13 On the ball 14 To be out of someone’s league 15 To settle a score with someone 16 To skate on thin ice 17 To take a raincheck 18 To throw in the towel 19 Time out 20 To take sides

7.3 ⁄ COMMENTING STATISTICS AND RANKINGS Useful words and expressions to comment on statistics or rankings • It is striking / remarkable that … • What stands out is … • Worth pointing out is that … • I can’t help but noticing that ... • There are but … • What is missing …

• • • • • • •

the majority of a big part of a large amount of more than half … percent of only a small number of a lack of

• • • • • • •

as a whole on average a quantity numerous several hardly any none

7.4 ⁄ EXPRESSING YOUR OPINION: VOCABULARY AND PHRASES FOR DEBATING

162

Developing an argument

Synthesizing, evaluating

Encouraging

• • • • •

To begin with … As far as I’m concerned … The way I see it … One reason why … Another argument for / against … is … • It could be argued / asserted that … • He maintains that …

• • • • •

• • • • •

Checking understanding

Interrupting

Changing the topic

• Are you saying that …? • Are you trying to say that …? • I’m sorry, did you say: ‘…’? • Do you mean … ? • If I understand you correctly, … • So what you’re really saying is … • Am I right in assuming that …

• Sorry to interrupt you, but … • Could I just say something here? • Actually, … • Hold on! • Hang on! • I just wanted to say that…

• By the way, there’s something else I wanted to tell you. • That reminds me … • On another subject … • Talking about … • This has nothing to do with what we were talking about, but … • Before I forget …

To sum up … All in all, … To be fair, … In short, … In conclusion, …

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

Carry on. Go on. Don’t stop. Tell me more … What makes you say / think that? • I’m all ears. • I’m listening.

UNIT 4


TRACK YOUR PROGRESS

very well

Teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinion

okay

should improve

Name: Class:

very well

My opinion

should improve

UNIT 4

okay

8

MY COMPETENCES Grammar

I can use reported speech. (1.1) I can recognize and use cardinal and ordinal numbers. (6.2)

Vocabulary

I can use appropriate words and expressions about sports and the role of sports in society. (1.1, 1.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 5.2) I can recognize and use phrasal verbs. (3.3, 4.2)

Functional practice: I can describe sports habits and and emotions about sports. (1.1) language in social situations I can interview a classmate about his interests in sports. (1.1) I can report about my classmateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sports interests to the class. (1.1) I can phrase my own opinion about sports related topics. (1.1, 5.2) I can play a role in a debate. (5.1, 5.2) I can explain the rules of a sport to a classmate. (3.1) Communication strategies

I can come up with a debating strategy. (5.1, 5.2) I can participate in a debate. (5.2) I can lead a debate. (5.2)

Sociocultural I can judge and explain the role of sports in aspects of language society. (2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4) I can recognize and understand metaphors in a popsong. (4.1) I can recognize and explain cultural differences in sports. (3.1, 3.2, 3.3) MY SKILLS Listening

I can listen for information. (2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 4.1) I can listen to form an opinion. (2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4)

Reading

I can understand sports quotes. (2.1) I can understand magazine and newspaper headlines and link them to the photos on the cover. (2.2) I can derive the meaning of unknown words from the context. (2.3) I can answer questions about a written interview in a magazine. (2.3)

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163


very well

Teacher’s opinion

okay

very well

should improve

Name: Class:

okay

My opinion

should improve

UNIT 4 I can derive information from a written text. (2.3, 3.2, 4.1) I can compare two texts on the same subject and draw conclusions. (3.2) I can read sports statistics and draw conclusions from them. (3.3) I can look up information on a website. (3.3, 4.2) Spoken interaction

I can discuss sports related topics with my classmates and teacher. (Throughout the unit)

Speaking

I can express personal views and opinions on sports and the impact of sports on society. (1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 5.2) I can report someone else’s view to a third person/party. (1.1, 3.2, 3.3) I can pronounce English dates. (6.2) I can pronounce ‘th’. (6.1)

Writing

I can write a sports report on a match or a race. (1.2) I can summarise the pros and cons on the cliché of cheerleading. (3.2) I can write my opinion on cheerleading. (3.2) I can produce a written worksheet for a debate. (5.1)

MY ATTITUDES Motivation

I want to extend my existing knowledge on a topic. I try to improve my pronunciation.

Work attitude

I apply strategies for tasks. I am willing to take initiative when working together.

Social attitude

I help out classmates in pair or group work. I respect other people's opinions. I share my own opinion with others. I show interest in different points of view. I am willing to look beyond prejudice and stereotypes.

FEEDBACK

164

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UNIT 4

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