University of Illinois Press Labor Studies Catalog 2021

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LABOR STUDIES

2021


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BLACK STUDIES / DISABILITY STUDIES

THE MARK OF SLAVERY

Disability, Race, and Gender in Antebellum America

JENIFER L. BARCLAY Exploring the disability history of slavery “Barclay’s deft handling of disability through her archival research, the brilliance of her scholarship on the ways that blackness becomes synonymous with disability, her skillful use of Black Critical Disability Studies as a methodological framework, and clear and persuasive prose allows us greater insight into the debilitating effects of slavery as a disabling device for its victims.” —DEIRDRE COOPER OWENS, author of Medical Bondage: Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynecology Time and again, antebellum Americans justified slavery and white supremacy by linking blackness to disability, defectiveness, and dependency. Jenifer L. Barclay examines the ubiquitous narratives that depicted black people with disabilities as pitiable, monstrous, or comical, narratives used not only to defend slavery but also to argue against it. As she shows, this relationship between ableism and racism impacted racial identities during the antebellum period and played an overlooked role in shaping American history afterward. Barclay also illuminates the everyday lives of the 10 percent of enslaved people who lived with disabilities. Devalued by slaveholders as unsound and therefore worthless, these individuals nonetheless carved out an unusual autonomy. Their roles as caregivers, healers, and keepers of memory made them esteemed within their own communities and celebrated figures in song and folklore.

APRIL 2021 264 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 11 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 TABLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04372-7 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08570-3 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05261-3

Prescient in its analysis and rich in detail, The Mark of Slavery is a powerful addition to the intertwined histories of disability, slavery, and race.

A volume in the series Disability Histories, edited by Kim Nielsen and Michael Rembis

JENIFER L. BARCLAY is an assistant professor of history at the University at Buffalo.

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MUSIC

PUNKS IN PEORIA

Making a Scene in the American Heartland

JONATHAN WRIGHT and DAWSON BARRETT Punk rock culture in a preeminently average town “Punks in Peoria isn’t just a deep, heartfelt dive into the punk subculture of America’s quintessential small city. It’s an exquisite map of how music flows through social structures and between generations. Essential reading for anyone interested in how art impacts life.” —JASON HELLER, author of Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-fi Exploded Synonymous with American mediocrity, Peoria was fertile ground for the boredom- and anger-fueled fury of punk rock. Jonathan Wright and Dawson Barrett explore the do-it-yourself scene built by Peoria punks, performers, and scenesters in the 1980s and 1990s. From fanzines to indie record shops to renting the VFW hall for an all-ages show, Peoria’s punk culture reflected the movement elsewhere, but the region’s conservatism and industrial decline offered a richer-than-usual target environment for rebellion. Eyewitness accounts take readers into hangouts and long-lost venues, while interviews with the people who were there trace the ever-changing scene and varied fortunes of local legends like Caustic Defiance, Dollface, and Planes Mistaken for Stars. What emerges is a sympathetic portrait of a youth culture in search of entertainment but just as hungry for community—the shared sense of otherness that, even for one night only, could unite outsiders and discontents under the banner of music.

JUNE 2021 240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 25 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04380-2 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08579-6 $22.95 £17.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05270-5

A raucous look at a small-city underground, Punks in Peoria takes readers off the beaten track to reveal the punk rock life as lived in Anytown, U.S.A.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

JONATHAN WRIGHT is a writer, editor, musician, and longtime veteran of the Peoria music scene. He is editor in chief at Peoria Magazines. DAWSON BARRETT is an associate professor of history at Del Mar College. His books include The Defiant: Protest Movements in Post-Liberal America.

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SPORTS / MEDIA STUDIES

FIGHTING VISIBILITY

Sports Media and Female Athletes in the UFC

JENNIFER MCCLEAREN Ultimate Fighting Championship and the present and future of women’s sports “A scathing critique of the exploitation that defines the relationship of the UFC to its women fighters, Fighting Visibility fills a hole in the study of sports. Never has this subject been explored with the depth and clarity that we have here. A necessary and groundbreaking read. It makes the point with crystal clarity: visibility and equity are not the same thing.” —DAVE ZIRIN, sports editor, The Nation Mixed-martial arts stars like Amanda Nunes, Zhang Weili, and Ronda Rousey have made female athletes top draws in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). Jennifer McClearen charts how the promotion incorporates women into its far-flung media ventures, and then she investigates the complexities surrounding female inclusion. On the one hand, the undeniable popularity of cards headlined by women add much-needed diversity to the sporting landscape. On the other, the UFC leverages an illusion of promoting difference—whether gender, racial, ethnic, or sexual—to grow its empire with an inexpensive and expendable pool of female fighters. McClearen illuminates how the UFC’s half-hearted efforts at representation generate profit and cultural cachet while covering up the fact it exploits women of color, lesbians, gender non-conforming women, and others.

MARCH 2021 232 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 12 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS, 22 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04373-4 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08572-7 $24.95s £18.99

Thought provoking and timely, Fighting Visibility tells the story of how a sports entertainment phenomenon made difference a part of its brand—and the ways women paid the price for success.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05263-7 A volume in the series Studies in Sports Media, edited by Victoria E. Johnson and Travis Vogan

JENNIFER MCCLEAREN is an assistant professor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin.

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FILM / WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

MOVIE WORKERS

The Women Who Made British Cinema

MELANIE BELL Rolling the credits on six decades of women in film “Melanie Bell describes Movie Workers as a history that aims to ‘disrupt the present’ and she has done just that. Marshalling a rich array of evidence from trade union records, oral histories, and contemporaneous sources, Bell uncovers the essential work that women have performed at all levels of the British film industry for decades—work rendered invisible in traditional histories which have for too long glorified film directors as solitary creative geniuses and stubbornly refused to recognize feminized labor as labor.” —SHELLEY STAMP, author of Lois Weber in Early Hollywood JUNE 2021

After the advent of sound, women in the British film industry formed an essential corps of below-the-line workers, laboring in positions from animation artist to negative cutter to costume designer. Melanie Bell maps the work of these women decade-by-decade, examining their far-ranging economic and creative contributions against the backdrop of the discrimination that constrained their careers. Her use of oral histories and trade union records presents a vivid counter-narrative to film history, one that focuses not only on women in a male-dominated business, but on the innumerable types of physical and emotional labor required to make a motion picture. Bell’s feminist analysis looks at women’s jobs in film at important historical junctures while situating the work in the context of changing expectations around women and gender roles.

288 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 19 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 12 CHARTS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04387-1 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08586-4 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05277-4 A volume in the series Women and Film History International, edited by Kay Armatage, Jane M. Gaines, and Christine Gledhill

Illuminating and astute, Movie Workers is a first-of-its-kind examination of the unsung women whose invisible work brought British filmmaking to the screen. MELANIE BELL is an associate professor of film and media at the University of Leeds. Her books include Julie Christie: Stardom and Cultural Production and Femininity in Frame: Women and 1950s British Popular Cinema.

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LABOR HISTORY / WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

A MATTER OF MORAL JUSTICE

Black Women Laundry Workers and the Fight for Justice

JENNY CARSON A long-overlooked group of workers and their battle for rights and dignity “An engaging book on a workforce that has received surprisingly little attention from labor historians. Carson provides a highly readable analysis of how racialized and gendered were job assignments, union organizing campaigns, and labor politics.” —DENNIS DESLIPPE, author of Protesting Affirmative Action: The Struggle over Equality after the Civil Rights Revolution JULY 2021

Like thousands of African American women, Charlotte Adelmond and Dollie Robinson worked in New York’s power laundry industry in the 1930s. Jenny Carson tells the story of how substandard working conditions, racial and gender discrimination, and poor pay drove them to help unionize the city’s laundry workers. Laundry work opened a door for African American women to enter industry, and their numbers allowed women like Adelmond and Robinson to join the vanguard of a successful unionization effort. But an affiliation with the powerful Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) transformed the union from a radical, community-­ based institution into a bureaucratic organization led by men. It also launched a difficult battle to secure economic and social justice for the mostly women and people of color in the plants. As Carson shows, this local struggle highlighted how race and gender shaped worker conditions, labor organizing, and union politics across the country in the twentieth century.

312 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 12 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04390-1 $125.00  £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08589-5 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05280-4 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

Meticulous and engaging, A Matter of Moral Justice examines the role of African American and radical women activists and their collisions with labor organizing and union politics.

Publication supported by a grant from the Howard D. and Marjorie I. Brooks Fund for Progressive Thought

JENNY CARSON is an associate professor of history at Ryerson University.

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LABOR HISTORY

GRAND ARMY OF LABOR

Workers, Veterans, and the Meaning of the Civil War

MATTHEW E. STANLEY Enlisting memory in a new fight for freedom “This powerful and judicious study changes how we think about Civil War memories and working-class histories. Sure grasp of the multiplicity of United States labor—African American and white, native-born and newcoming, female and male, North and South, veteran and not—illuminates how a constantly recreated remembrance of the emancipatory side of the war could produce a broad language of freedom, one bound to contain its own contradictions and limitations.” —DAVID ROEDIGER, author of Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All

APRIL 2021 320 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

From the Gilded Age through the Progressive era, labor movements reinterpreted Abraham Lincoln as a liberator of working people while workers equated activism with their own service fighting for freedom during the war. Matthew E. Stanley explores the wide-ranging meanings and diverse imagery used by Civil War veterans within the sprawling radical politics of the time. As he shows, a rich world of rituals, songs, speeches, and newspapers emerged among the many strains of working-class cultural politics within the labor movement. Yet tensions arose even among allies. Some people rooted Civil War commemoration in nationalism and reform, and in time, these conservative currents marginalized radical workers who tied their remembering to revolution, internationalism, and socialism.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04374-1 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08573-4 $30.00x  £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05264-4 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

An original consideration of meaning and memory, Grand Army of Labor reveals the complex ways workers drew on themes of emancipation and equality in the long battle for workers’ rights. MATTHEW E. STANLEY is an associate professor of history at Albany State University. He is the author of The Loyal West: Civil War and Reunion in Middle America.

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ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES / WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

QUEERING THE GLOBAL FILIPINA BODY

Contested Nationalisms in the Filipina/o Diaspora

GINA K. VELASCO Globalization, work, and the images of Filipinas in the media “A rich analysis of the transnational circuits of culture, labor, goods, and ideology circulating around the material and symbolic body of the Filipina. With its uniquely nuanced documentation and theorization of multiple, competing nationalisms, this book clear-sightedly accounts, on the one hand, for heteropatriarchy within the Filipino diaspora and, on the other hand, the limits of queer white definitions of desire and liberation.” —SARITA SEE, author of The Decolonized Eye: Filipino American Art and Performance

NOVEMBER 192 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 6 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Contemporary popular culture stereotypes Filipina women as sex workers, domestic laborers, mail order brides, and caregivers. These figures embody the gendered and sexual politics of representing the Philippine nation in the Filipina/o diaspora. Gina K. Velasco explores the tensions within Filipina/o American cultural production between feminist and queer critiques of the nation and popular nationalism as a form of resistance to neoimperialism and globalization.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04347-5 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08537-6 $26.00x £19.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05235-4

Using a queer diasporic analysis, Velasco examines the politics of nationalism within Filipina/o American cultural production to consider an essential question: can a queer and feminist imagining of the diaspora reconcile with gendered tropes of the Philippine nation? Integrating a transnational feminist analysis of globalized gendered labor with a consideration of queer cultural politics, Velasco envisions forms of feminist and queer diasporic belonging, while simultaneously foregrounding nationalist movements as vital instruments of struggle.

A volume in the series The Asian American Experience, edited by Eiichiro Azuma, Jigna Desai, Martin Manalansan IV, Lisa Sun-Hee Park, and David K. Yoo All rights: University of Illinois

GINA K. VELASCO is an assistant professor in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at Gettysburg College.

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COMMUNICATIONS / BUSINESS

THE HUAWEI MODEL

The Rise of China’s Technology Giant

YUN WEN Understanding Huawei’s march onto the global scene “The well-organized approach, including the discussions of overseas investment and labor practices, presents unique findings, and adds to our knowledge not only of Huawei’s path, but also of Chinese private company dynamics in broader terms. The primary source material, especially the author interviews with Huawei and other Chinese corporate officials, adds a valuable dimension to our understanding of the company’s development.” —ERIC HARWIT, author of China’s Telecommunications Revolution In 2019, the United States’ trade war with China expanded to blacklist the Chinese tech titan Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. The resulting attention showed the information and communications technology (ICT) firm entwined with China’s political-economic transformation. But the question remained: why does Huawei matter?

NOVEMBER 248 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 6 CHARTS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04343-7 $110.00x £88.00

Yun Wen uses the Huawei story as a microcosm to understand China’s evolving digital economy and the global rise of the nation’s corporate power. Rejecting the idea of the transnational corporation as a static institution, she explains Huawei’s formation and restructuring as a historical process replete with contradictions and complex consequences. She places Huawei within the international political economic framework to capture the dynamics of power structure and social relations underlying corporate China’s globalization. As she explores the contradictions of Huawei’s development, she also shows the ICT firm’s complicated interactions with other political-economic forces.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08533-8 $25.00x £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05231-6 A volume in the series The Geopolitics of Information, edited by Dan Schiller, Pradip Thomas, and Yuezhi Zhao

Comprehensive and timely, The Huawei Model offers an essential analysis of China’s dynamic development of digital economy and the global technology powerhouse at its core.

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YUN WEN is a senior economist at an economic policy research firm in Vancouver, Canada.

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IMMIGRATION STUDIES / ASIAN STUDIES / LABOR HISTORY

ETHNIC DISSENT AND EMPOWERMENT

Economic Migration between Vietnam and Malaysia

ANGIE NG Ọ C TR ẦN The lives of migrant workers from Vietnam and the systems that use them “Focusing on Vietnam’s labor export policy to Malaysia, Angie Trần shows us why gender and ethnic hierarchies matter in remaking the politics of control and dissent. Essential reading for all those interested in South-South labor brokerage and temporary migration.” —BRENDA S. A. YEOH, coeditor of Routledge Handbook of Asian Migrations OCTOBER

Vietnam annually sends a half million laborers to work at low-skill jobs abroad. Angie Ngọc Trần concentrates on ethnicity, class, and gender to examine how migrant workers belonging to the Kinh, Hoa, Hrê, Khmer, and Chăm ethnic groups challenge a transnational process that coerces and exploits them. Focusing on migrant laborers working in Malaysia, Trần looks at how they carve out a third space that allows them a socially accepted means of resistance to survive and even thrive at times. She also shows how the Vietnamese state uses Malaysia as a place to send poor workers, especially from ethnic minorities; how it manipulates its rural poor into accepting work in Malaysia; and the ways in which both countries benefit from the arrangement.

296 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 9 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 MAP, 1 CHART, 2 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04336-9 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08527-7 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05224-8

A rare study of labor migration in the Global South, Ethnic Dissent and Empowerment answers essential questions about why nations send and use migrant workers and how the workers protect themselves not only within the system, but by circumventing it altogether.

A volume in the series Studies of World Migrations, edited by Donna R. Gabaccia and Leslie Page Moch All rights: University of Illinois

ANGIE NG Ọ C TR ẦN is a professor of political economy at California State University, Monterey Bay. She is the author of Ties That Bind: Cultural Identity, Class, and Law in Vietnam’s Labor Resistance.

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LABOR HISTORY / LAW

WORKERS AGAINST THE CITY

The Fight for Free Speech in Hague v. CIO

DONALD W. ROGERS Labor organizing, machine politics, and a turning point in constitutional law “Skillfully blending the histories of American civil liberties, organized labor, and urban politics, Rogers shows us how a complex set of forces has shaped and limited the rights of modern Americans to assemble and speak their minds in public.” —JAMES J. CONNOLLY, author of An Elusive Unity: Urban Democracy and Machine Politics in Industrializing America The 1939 Supreme Court decision Hague v. CIO was a constitutional milestone that strengthened the right of Americans, including labor organizers, to assemble and speak in public places. Donald W. Rogers eschews the prevailing view of the case as a morality play pitting Jersey City, New Jersey, political boss Frank Hague against the Committee for Industrial Organization (CIO) and allied civil libertarian groups. Instead, he draws on a wide range of archives and evidence to re-evaluate Hague v. CIO from the ground up. Rogers’s review of the case from district court to the Supreme Court illuminates the trial proceedings and provides perspectives from both sides. As he shows, the economic, political, and legal restructuring of the 1930s refined constitutional rights as much as the court case did. The final decision also revealed that assembly and speech rights change according to how judges and lawmakers act within the circumstances of a given moment.

SEPTEMBER 280 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04346-8 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08536-9 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05234-7 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

Clear-eyed and comprehensive, Workers against the City revises the view of a milestone case that continues to impact Americans’ constitutional rights today. DONALD W. ROGERS is a lecturer in the Department of History at Central Connecticut State University. He is the author of Making Capitalism Safe: Work Safety and Health Regulation in America, 1880–1940 and editor of Voting and the Spirit of American Democracy: Essays on the History of Voting and Voting Rights in America.

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LABOR HISTORY / AMERICAN HISTORY

THE LABOR BOARD CREW

Remaking Worker-Employer Relations from Pearl Harbor to the Reagan Era

RONALD W. SCHATZ Members of the National War Labor Board and the world they made “A learned, engaging, and important book on a subject about which most labor historians today, I suspect, know relatively little. Ron Schatz demonstrates convincingly, through clear and absorbing case studies, that the officials responsible for operationalizing a labor-relations system in these years also brought their worldviews, desires for stability, and passions to many other arenas ranging from higher education to baseball to Gorbachev and the end of the Cold War.” —ERIC ARNESEN, author of Brotherhoods of Color: Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality

JANUARY 344 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 16 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Ronald W. Schatz tells the story of the team of young economists and lawyers recruited to the National War Labor Board to resolve union-management conflicts during the Second World War. The crew (including Clark Kerr, John Dunlop, Jean McKelvey, and Marvin Miller) exerted broad influence on the U.S. economy and society for the next forty years. They handled thousands of grievances and strikes. They founded academic industrial relations programs. When the 1960s student movement erupted, universities appointed them as top administrators charged with quelling the conflicts. In the 1970s, they developed systems that advanced public sector unionization and revolutionized employment conditions in Major League Baseball.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04362-8 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08559-8 $29.95s £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05250-7 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

Schatz argues that the Labor Board vets, who saw themselves as disinterested technocrats, were in truth utopian reformers aiming to transform the world. Beginning in the 1970s stagflation era, they faced unforeseen opposition, and the cooperative relationships they had fostered withered. Yet their protégé George Shultz used mediation techniques learned from his mentors to assist in the integration of Southern public schools, institute affirmative action in industry, and conduct Cold War negotiations with Mikhail Gorbachev.

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RONALD W. SCHATZ is a professor of history at Wesleyan University. He is the author of The Electrical Workers: A History of Labor at General Electric and Westinghouse, 1923–60.

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LABOR HISTORY / AMERICAN HISTORY

UPON THE ALTAR OF WORK

Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism

BETSY WOOD The North-South divide over child labor, 1850–1939 “Betsy Wood manages to say highly original things about an old subject—the movement to abolish child labor. Was the labor of children a new form of slavery or an embodiment of the free labor ideal sanctified by the Civil War? Wood shows how, despite (white) sectional reconciliation, a deep divide between reform-minded northerners and rural southerners over child labor, and the power of the government to abolish it, persisted well into the twentieth century. At a time when millions of children are at work throughout the world, the book is extraordinarily timely.” —ERIC FONER

SEPTEMBER

Rooted in the crisis over slavery, disagreements about child labor broke down along sectional lines between the North and South. For decades after emancipation, the child labor issue shaped how Northerners and Southerners defined fundamental concepts of American life such as work, freedom, the market, and the state.

256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 5 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Betsy Wood examines the evolution of ideas about child labor and the on-theground politics of the issue against the backdrop of broad developments related to slavery and emancipation, industrial capitalism, moral and social reform, and American politics and religion. Wood explains how the decades-long battle over child labor created enduring political and ideological divisions within capitalist society that divided the gatekeepers of modernity from the cultural warriors who opposed them. Tracing the ideological origins and the politics of the child labor battle over the course of eighty years, this book tells the story of how child labor debates bequeathed an enduring legacy of sectionalist conflict to modern American capitalist society.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08534-5 $28.00x £20.99

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04344-4 $110.00x £88.00

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05232-3 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein All rights: University of Illinois

BETSY WOOD is a professor of history at Hudson County Community College.

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LABOR HISTORY / MIDWEST

UNION RENEGADES

Miners, Capitalism, and Organizing in the Gilded Age

DANA M. CALDEMEYER The self-interest behind joining, or not joining, a union “With brilliant, incisive empathy, Caldemeyer reconstructs the complex pragmatism of Midwestern coal-mining families as they navigated Gilded Age capitalism, often outside and against organized labor. This original, persuasive study is essential for anyone trying to understand the rural-­ industrial working class.” —JAROD ROLL, author of Spirit of Rebellion: Labor and Religion in the New Cotton South In the late nineteenth century, Midwestern miners often had to decide if joining a union was in their interest. Arguing that these workers were neither pro-union nor anti-union, Dana M. Caldemeyer shows that they acted according to what they believed would benefit them and their families. As corporations moved to control coal markets and unions sought to centralize their organizations to check corporate control, workers were often caught between these institutions and sided with whichever one offered the best advantage in the moment. Workers chased profits while paying union dues, rejected national unions while forming local orders, and broke strikes while claiming to be union members. This pragmatic form of unionism differed from what union leaders expected of rank-and-file members, but for many workers the choice to follow or reject union orders was a path to better pay, stability, and independence in an otherwise unstable age.

JANUARY 256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 4 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04350-5 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08540-6 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05238-5 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

Nuanced and eye-opening, Union Renegades challenges popular notions of workers attitudes during the Gilded Age. DANA M. CALDEMEYER is an assistant professor of history at South Georgia State College.

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RADICAL STUDIES / CARIBBEAN STUDIES

NEW IN PAPER

BLACK FLAG BORICUAS

Anarchism, Antiauthoritarianism, and the Left in Puerto Rico, 1897–1921

KIRWIN R. SHAFFER Transnational networks of radicalism in the Caribbean “An important contribution to the historiography of labor, radicalism, and political culture in Puerto Rico, with important implications for our understanding of the broader history of radicalism in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and within Cuban and Puerto Rican diasporas.” —JOURNAL OF AMERICAN ETHNIC HISTORY This pathbreaking study examines the radical Left in Puerto Rico from the final years of Spanish rule into the 1920s. Positioning the island as part of a regional anarchist network that stretched from Puerto Rico and Cuba to Tampa and New York City, Kirwin R. Shaffer illustrates how Caribbean anarchists linked their struggle to international campaigns against religion, governments, and industrial capitalism. These groups spearheaded the development of an anarchist vision for Puerto Ricans at a time when the island was a political no-man’s-land. Shaffer follows the anarchist alliance with the Federación Libre de Trabajadores, the largest labor organization in Puerto Rico, and tells the story of the Bayamón Bloc, the most successful Puerto Rican anarchist organization until the United States government unraveled it during the Red Scare.

SEPTEMBER 240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 1 MAP, 3 TABLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08557-4 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09490-3 All rights: University of Illinois

KIRWIN R. SHAFFER is a professor of Latin American studies at Penn State University Berks College. He is the author of Anarchist Cuba: Countercultural Politics in the Early Twentieth Century and Anarchists of the Caribbean: Countercultural Politics and Transnational Networks in the Age of US Expansion.

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CURRENT EVENTS / BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS / AMERICAN HISTORY

AMERICAN UNEMPLOYMENT

Past, Present, and Future

FRANK STRICKER Lies your economists told you—and the truths that can change the nation “Frank Stricker has done the nation an important service, wisely analyzing the history of unemployment, and our attempts to redress this problem. By exposing our failures as well as our successes, he provides a badly needed template for action.” —ROBERT SLAYTON, author of Empire Statesman: The Rise and Redemption of Al Smith The history of unemployment and concepts surrounding it remain a mystery to many Americans. Frank Stricker believes we need to understand this essential thread in our shared past. American Unemployment is an introduction for everyone that takes aim at misinformation, willful deceptions, and popular myths to set the record straight:

JUNE 296 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 9 TABLES

•  Workers do not normally choose to be unemployed.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04315-4 $125.00x £103.00

•  In our current system, persistent unemployment is not an aberration. It is much more common than full employment, and the outcome of elite policy choices.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08502-4 $19.95 £15.99

•  Labor surpluses propped up by flawed unemployment numbers have helped to keep real wages stagnant for more than forty years.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05203-3

•  Prior to the New Deal and the era of big government, laissez-faire policies repeatedly led to depressions with heavy, even catastrophic, job losses.

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•  Undercounting the unemployed sabotages the creation of government job programs that can lead to more high-paying jobs and full employment. Written for non-economists, American Unemployment is a history and primer on vital economic topics that also provides a roadmap to better jobs and economic security. FRANK STRICKER is a professor emeritus of history, interdisciplinary studies, and labor studies at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is the author of Why America Lost the War on Poverty—and How to Win It.

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LABOR HISTORY

NEW IN PAPER

WORKERS IN HARD TIMES

A Long View of Economic Crises Edited by LEON FINK, JOSEPH A. McCARTIN, and JOAN SANGSTER Historical perspectives on workers, capitalism, and the Great Recession “This is the rare edited collection that makes readers wish they were at the original conference at which the papers first appeared. . . . Present there and in this volume are some of the biggest names in labor and industrial history.” —JOURNAL OF AMERICAN HISTORY MARCH

This award-winning volume of essays connects the Great Recession of 2007–2009 to economic crises that took place in various industrialized nations across the globe. The authors find parallels and cause-and-effect possibilities that push readers to rethink the relationship between capital and labor, the waged and unwaged, and the employed and jobless. They also predict an uncertain future for workers, and although the essays do not offer concrete solutions, the essayists provide an understanding of the causes of recession that will aid in the pursuit of effective remedies during future crises.

320 PAGES 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 1 MAP, 17 CHARTS, 3 TABLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08512-3 $30.00x £23.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09597-9 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

Contributors: Sven Beckert, Sean Cadigan, Leon Fink, Alvin Finkel, Wendy Goldman, Gaetan Heroux, Joseph A. McCartin, David Montgomery, Edward Montgomery, Scott Reynolds Nelson, Melanie Nolan, Bryan D. Palmer, Joan Sangster, Judith Stein, Hilary Wainright, and Lu Zhang LEON FINK is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the author of Sweatshops at Sea: Merchant Seamen in the World’s First Globalized Industry, from 1812 to 2000. JOSEPH A. MCCARTIN is a professor of history at Georgetown University and the author of Collision Course: Ronald Reagan, the Air Traffic Controllers, and the Strike that Changed America. JOAN SANGSTER is a professor of gender and women’s studies at Trent University and the author of Transforming Labour: Women and Work in Postwar Canada.

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Winner of the Book of the Year Award from the International Labor History Association

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DEATH TO FASCISM

Louis Adamic’s Fight for Democracy

JOHN P. ENYEART Reclaiming the life of a progressive visionary “Enyeart knows his subject intimately and passionately.” —TRUTHDIG

“In this well-researched, original work, Enyeart establishes the importance of Louis Adamic as an influential political and cultural figure of the period between the 1930s and the early Cold War. Adamic’s life reveals the presence of a robust anticolonialist and antifascist strand of thinking in the often-overlooked early twentieth-century immigrant/ethnic Left.” —JOHN BUKOWCZYK, editor of Immigrant Identity and the Politics of Citizenship 238 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 4 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Born to Slovenian peasants, Louis Adamic commanded crowds, met with FDR and Truman, and built a prolific career as an author and journalist. Behind the scenes, he played a leading role in a coalition of black intellectuals and writers, working-class militants, ethnic activists, and others that worked for a multiethnic America and against fascism.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04250-8 $99.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08432-4 $25.00x £18.99

John P. Enyeart restores Adamic’s life to the narrative of American history. Dogged and energetic, Adamic championed causes that ranged from ethnic and racial equality to worker’s rights to anticolonialism. Adamic defied the consensus that equated being American with Anglo-Protestant culture. Instead, he insisted newcomers and their ideas kept the American identity in a state of dynamism that pushed it from strength to strength. In time, Adamic’s views put him at odds with an establishment dedicated to cold war aggression and white supremacy. He increasingly fought smear campaigns and the distortion of his views—both of which continued after his probable murder in 1951.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05135-7 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein All rights: University of Illinois

JOHN P. ENYEART is professor and chair of the Department of History at Bucknell University. He is the author of The Quest for “Just and Pure Law”: Rocky Mountain Workers and American Social Democracy, 1870–1924.

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THE WORLD IN A CITY

Multiethnic Radicalism in Early Twentieth-Century Los Angeles

DAVID M. STRUTHERS How working people from around the world imagined a new Los Angeles “David Struthers’s fresh and fascinating look at Los Angeles radicalism shows us long-forgotten facets of city history. Dedicated anarchist activists, an alphabet soup of radical organizations, an interracial rank-and-file—all had a profound impact on Los Angeles’s transformation into a modern city. Struthers’s mix of research and fluid storytelling takes us back to an era of soaring hopes and racial togetherness that, for a time, sustained a grand vision of a Los Angeles that might have been.” —Mike Davis, author of City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles 310 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 MAPS, 1 CHART, 3 TABLES

A massive population shift transformed Los Angeles in the first decades of the twentieth century. Americans from across the country relocated to the city even as an unprecedented transnational migration brought people from Asia, Europe, and Mexico. Together, these newcomers forged a multiethnic alliance of anarchists, labor unions, and leftists dedicated to challenging capitalism, racism, and often the state.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04247-8 $99.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08425-6 $28.00x £20.99

David M. Struthers draws on the anarchist concept of affinity to explore the radicalism of Los Angeles’s interracial working class from 1900 to 1930. Uneven economic development created precarious employment and living conditions for laborers. The resulting worker mobility led to coalitions that, inevitably, remained short lived. As Struthers shows, affinity helps us understand how individual cooperative actions shaped and reshaped these alliances. It also reveals social practices of resistance that are often too unstructured or episodic for historians to capture. What emerges is an untold history of Los Angeles and a revolutionary movement that, through myriad successes and failures, produced powerful examples of racial cooperation.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05131-9 A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein All rights: University of Illinois

DAVID M. STRUTHERS is an adjunct assistant professor at the Copenhagen Business School.

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NEW IN PAPERBACK

FOSTERING ON THE FARM Child Placement in the Rural Midwest

MEGAN BIRK A somber chapter in the history of American childhood “Birk forcefully describes the power of ideology and its tragic consequences, using institution records, newspapers, and reformers’ publications. Recommended.” —CHOICE

“A richly detailed picture of child welfare in the period from 1870 to the Great Depression. The study’s timeframe captures a significant period in the history of child welfare policy, while its geographical boundaries allow the author to examine the ground-level practices that resulted from those policies. . . . An informative, interesting, and well-researched book that merits attention from historians in a broad range of fields.” —MICHIGAN HISTORICAL REVIEW 256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 8 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 MAPS

From 1870 until after World War I, reformers led an effort to place children from orphanages, asylums, and children’s homes with farming families. The reformers believed children would learn lessons in family life, citizenry, and work habits that institutions simply could not provide.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08436-2 $25.00x £18.99

Drawing on institution records, correspondence from children and placement families, and state reports, Megan Birk scrutinizes how the farm system developed—and how the children involved became some of America’s last indentured laborers. Birk reveals how the nostalgia attached to misplaced perceptions about healthy, family-based labor masked the cruel realities of abuse, overwork, and loveless upbringings. She also considers how rural people cared for their own children while being bombarded with dependents from elsewhere. Finally, Birk traces how the ills associated with rural placement eventually forced reformers to transition to a system of paid foster care, adoptions, and family preservation.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09729-4 All rights: University of Illinois

Winner of the Vincent De Santis First Book Prize, Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

MEGAN BIRK is an associate professor at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.

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NEW IN PAPERBACK

LATIN AMERICAN MIGRATIONS TO THE U.S. HEARTLAND

Changing Social Landscapes in Middle America

Edited by LINDA ALLEGRO and ANDREW GRANT WOOD New perspectives on a hot-button issue “Allegro and Wood organized a volume that provides a more humane depiction of Latin American immigrants by carefully documenting the challenges and possibilities they present in the region. . . . They also do an excellent job of positioning the Midwest as a dynamic region where complex and often contradictory politics coexist.” —THE ANNALS OF IOWA

“Allegro and Wood have assembled an interesting and informative set of essays useful to any scholar interested in the history of immigration to the United States and its regional, local, and national implications for the present and the future. A welcome assessment of what can happen when globalization disrupts rural communities on both sides of the border.” —THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHERN HISTORY 344 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 1 MAP, 18 CHARTS, 9 TABLES

This collection examines Latina/o immigrants and the movement of the Latin American labor force to the central states of Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Arkansas, Missouri, and Iowa. Contributors look at outside factors affecting migration, including corporate agriculture, technology, globalization, and government. They also reveal how cultural affinities like religion, strong family ties, farming, and cowboy culture attract these newcomers to the Heartland.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08435-5 $28.00x £20.99

LINDA ALLEGRO is an independent scholar engaged in immigrant and worker advocacy in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ANDREW GRANT WOOD is the Stanley Rutland Professor of American History at the University of Tulsa. He is the author of Agustín Lara: A Cultural Biography.

A volume in the series The Working Class in American History, edited by James R. Barrett, Julie Greene, William P. Jones, Alice Kessler-Harris, and Nelson Lichtenstein

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09492-7

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