University of Illinois Press Music catalog 2021

Page 1

MUSIC

2021


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LISTENING TO BOB DYLAN LARRY STARR Experiencing and re-experiencing Dylan’s music “In this fresh and expansive book, Starr invites us to reach beyond the Nobel-winning lyrics and finally hear the brilliance of Dylan’s work as a performer, arranger, composer, and vocal stylist. Each chapter is a lively, accessible master­ class that will make you return again to even the most familiar songs with a sense of wonder and surprise.” —SEAN LATHAM, editor of The World of Bob Dylan Venerated for his lyrics, Bob Dylan in fact is a songwriting musician with a unique mastery of merging his words with music and performance. Larry Starr cuts through pretention and myth to provide a refreshingly holistic appreciation of Dylan’s music. Ranging from celebrated classics to less familiar compositions, Starr invites readers to reinvigorate their listening experiences by sharing his own—sometimes approaching a song from a fresh perspective, sometimes reeling in surprise at discoveries found in well-­known favorites. Starr breaks down often-­overlooked aspects of the works, from Dylan’s many vocal styles to his evocative harmonica playing to his choices as a composer. The result is a guide that allows listeners to follow their own passionate love of music into hearing these songs—and personal favorites—in new ways.

152 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04395-6 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08602-1 $19.95  £14.99

Reader-­friendly and revealing, Listening to Bob Dylan encourages hardcore fans and Dylan-­curious seekers alike to rediscover the music legend.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05288-0 A volume in the series Music in American Life

LARRY STARR is emeritus professor of music history at the University of Washington. He is the author of George Gershwin and coauthor of Rock: Music, Culture, and Business.

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PEACE BE STILL

How James Cleveland and the Angelic Choir Created a Gospel Classic

ROBERT M. MAROVICH The story of a historic Black gospel recording “My mother basically took Lawrence Roberts under her wing and for a brief moment, he was a part of the Drinkard Singers. She saw his calling to minister and encouraged him to answer that call. He was treated and considered a family member. He treated me kindly and we would speak by phone frequently when he moved to Georgia. He will always be fondly remembered as one I know cared about me and my well-being.” —DIONNE WARWICK on Reverend Lawrence Roberts In September of 1963, Reverend Lawrence Roberts and the Angelic Choir of the First Baptist Church of Nutley, New Jersey, teamed with rising gospel star James Cleveland to record Peace Be Still. The LP and its haunting title track became a phenomenon. Robert M. Marovich draws on extensive oral interviews and archival research to chart the history of Peace Be Still and the people who created it. A surprise bestseller, Peace Be Still forged a template for live recordings of services that transformed the gospel music business and Black worship. Marovich also delves into the music’s connection to fans and churchgoers, its enormous popularity then and now, and the influence of the Civil Rights Movement on the music’s message and reception.

224 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 17 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04411-3 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08616-8 $19.95  £14.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05305-4

The first in-­depth history of a foundational recording, Peace Be Still shines a spotlight on the people and times that created a gospel music touchstone.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

ROBERT M. MAROVICH hosts Gospel Memories on Chicago’s WLUW 88.7 FM and is founder and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Gospel Music, www.journalofgospelmusic.com. In 2019, he was nominated for a Grammy Award, Best Album Notes, for The Gospel According to Malaco. He is the author of A City Called Heaven: Chicago and the Birth of Gospel Music.

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ENERGY NEVER DIES

Afro-Optimism and Creativity in Chicago

AYANA CONTRERAS The undefeatable culture of Black Chicago, past and present “Contreras puts virtually every aspect of Black Chicago culture, music, business breakthroughs, and more on the table, then shows exactly how they are all interconnected. She writes the book as the Black experience is actually lived— this guy knows that guy, but the other guy used to work for the two of them. And none of it would’ve happened were it not for a certain audacious manner of hope and optimism found in Black Chicago.” —LEE BEY, author of Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago’s South Side From Afro Sheen to Theaster Gates and from Soul Train to Chance the Rapper, Black Chicago draws sustenance from a culture rooted in self-­determination, aspiration, and hustle. In Energy Never Dies, Ayana Contreras embarks on a journey to share the implausible success stories and breathtaking achievements of Black Chicago’s artists and entrepreneurs. Past and present generations speak with one another, maintaining a vital connection to a beautiful narrative of Black triumph and empowerment that still inspires creativity and pride. Contreras weaves a hidden history from these true stories and the magic released by undervalued cultural artifacts. As she does, the idea that the improbable is always possible emerges as an indestructible Afro-­Optimism that binds a people together.

192 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 12 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04406-9 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08611-3 $19.95  £14.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05300-9

Passionate and enlightening, Energy Never Dies uses the power of storytelling to show how optimism and courage fuel the dreams of Black Chicago.

All rights: University of Illinois

AYANA CONTRERAS is a radio host/producer at Chicago Public Media, a founder/blogger at darkjive.com, and a columnist and reviewer at DownBeat Magazine.

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TANIA LEÓN’S STRIDE

A Polyrhythmic Life

ALEJANDRO L. MADRID A new biography of the classical music artist “There is incredible beauty and power in the way this book attends to aesthetics and artists with rigor and care. What sets it apart are Madrid’s stunning interviews conducted over several years with León and her family, peers, and students. An essential document about an extraordinary artist.” —ALEXANDRA T. VAZQUEZ, author of Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music Acclaimed composer, sought-­after conductor, esteemed educator, tireless advocate for the arts—Tania León’s achievements encompass but also stretch far beyond contemporary classical music. Alejandro L. Madrid draws on oral history, archival work, and ethnography to offer the first in-­depth biography of the artist. Breaking from a chronological account, Madrid looks at León through the issues that have informed and defined moments in her life and her professional works. León’s words become a starting ground—but also a counterpoint—to the accounts of the people in her orbit. What emerges is more than an extraordinary portrait of an artist’s journey. It is a story of how a human being reacts to the challenges thrown at her by history itself, be it the Cuban revolution or the struggle for civil and individual rights.

264 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 40 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 CHARTS, 26 MUSIC EXAMPLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04394-9 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08601-4 $24.95s  £18.99

Nuanced and multifaceted, Tania León’s Stride looks at the life, legacy, and milieu that created and sustained one of the most important figures in American classical music.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05287-3 A volume in the series Music in American Life

ALEJANDRO L. MADRID is a professor of musicology at Cornell University. He is the author of the award-winning In Search of Julián Carrillo and Sonido 13 and coauthor of Danzón: Circum-Caribbean Dialogues in Music and Dance.

Publication supported by a grant from the General Fund of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. All rights: University of Illinois

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QUEER COUNTRY SHANA GOLDIN-PERSCHBACHER Searching for a place within country and Americana music Though frequently ignored by the music mainstream, queer and trans­ gender country and Americana artists have made essential contributions as musicians, performers, songwriters, and producers. Queer Country blends ethnographic research with analysis and history to provide the first in-depth study of these artists and their work. Shana Goldin-Perschbacher delves into the careers of well-known lesbian artists like k.d. lang and Amy Ray and examines the unlikely success of singer-songwriter Patrick Haggerty, who found fame forty years after releasing the first out gay country album. She also focuses on later figures like nonbinary transgender musician Rae Spoon and renowned drag queen country artist Trixie Mattel; and on recent breakthrough artists like Orville Peck, Amythyst Kiah, and chart-­topping Grammy-winning phenomenon Lil Nas X. Many of these musicians place gender and sexuality front and center even as this complicates their careers. But their ongoing efforts have widened the circle of country/Americana by cultivating new audiences eager to connect with the artists’ expansive music and personal identities. Detailed and one-of-a-kind, Queer Country reinterprets country and Americana music through the lives and work of artists forced to the margins of the genre’s history.

288 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 41 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

SHANA GOLDIN-PERSCHBACHER is an assistant professor of music studies in the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04426-7 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08633-5 $24.95s  £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05322-1 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication supported by a grant from the AMS 75 PAYS Fund of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. All rights: University of Illinois

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LYING IN THE MIDDLE

Musical Theater and Belief at the Heart of America

JAKE JOHNSON Imagining a better world from stages across the nation “With an unlikely cast of polygamists, conservative Christians, senior citizens, and aspiring stars who end up cookie cutter performers, Johnson’s polemic for and against the Broadway musical (and how all of us use it) cuts to the heart of our post-truth moment.” —TODD DECKER, author of Show Boat: Performing Race in an American Musical The local and regional shows staged throughout America use musical theater’s inherent power of deception to cultivate worldviews opposed to mainstream ideas. Jake Johnson reveals how musical theater between the coasts inhabits the middle spaces between professional and amateur, urban and rural, fact and fiction, fantasy and reality, and truth and falsehood. The homegrown musical provides a space to engage belief and religion—imagining a better world while creating opportunities to expand what is possible in the current one. Whether it is the Oklahoma Senior Follies or a Mormon splinter group’s production of The Sound of Music, such productions give people a chance to jolt themselves out of today’s post-­ truth malaise and move toward a world more in line with their desires for justice, reconciliation, and community. Vibrant and strikingly original, Lying in the Middle discovers some of the most potent musical theater taking place in the hoping, beating hearts of Americans.

192 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 2 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 LINE DRAWING, 7 MUSIC EXAMPLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04392-5 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08599-4 $24.95s  £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05285-9

JAKE JOHNSON is an associate professor of musicology at Oklahoma City University and the author of Mormons, Musical Theater, and Belonging in America.

A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication supported by a grant from the General Fund of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. All rights: University of Illinois

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POLITICS AS SOUND

The Washington, DC, Hardcore Scene, 1978–1983

SHAYNA L. MASKELL When punk rock and politics collided in the nation’s capital Uncompromising and innovative, hardcore punk in Washington, DC, birthed a new sound and nurtured a vibrant subculture aimed at a specific segment of the city’s youth. Shayna L. Maskell explores DC’s hardcore scene during its short but storied peak. Led by bands like Bad Brains and Minor Threat, hardcore in the nation’s capital unleashed music as angry and loud as it was fast and minimalistic. Maskell examines the music’s aesthetics and the unique impact of DC’s sociopolitical realities on the sound, and the scene, that emerged. As she shows, aspects of the music’s structure merged with how bands performed it to put across distinctive representations of race, class, and gender. But those representations could be as complicated and contradictory as they were explicit. A fascinating analysis of a punk rock hotbed, Politics as Sound tells the story of how a generation created music that produced—and resisted—politics and power. SHAYNA L. MASKELL is an assistant professor in the School of Integrative Studies at George Mason University.

280 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04418-2 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08622-9 $24.95s  £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05312-2 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

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A RESPECTABLE SPELL

Transformations of Samba in Rio de Janeiro

CARLOS SANDRONI Translated by Michael Iyanaga The history of samba music in the early twentieth century “At long last, we can celebrate the publication of this groundbreaking study in English. Carlos Sandroni’s brilliant ‘historical ethnomusicology’ of samba laid the foundations for many subsequent studies, and continues to set a standard in the field. Sandroni is equally adept at fine-grained musical a­ nalysis, rich social-historical contextualization, and crisp, clear explanation. Michael Iyanaga’s sensitive and graceful translation makes this accessible to a broad international audience for the first time. This book is fundamental for all those interested in samba’s emergence and evolution.” —BRYAN MCCANN, author of Hard Times in the Marvelous City: From Dictatorship to Democracy in the Favelas of Rio de Janeiro

304 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 50 MUSIC EXAMPLES

A landmark in Brazilian music scholarship, A Respectable Spell introduces Englishspeaking readers to the rich history of samba from its nineteenth-century origins to its emergence as a distinctive genre in the 1930s. Merging storytelling with theory, Carlos Sandroni profiles performers, composers, and others while analyzing the complex ideologies their music can communicate in their lyrics and rhythms, and how the meaning of songs and musical genres can vary depending on social and historical context. He also delves into lundu, modinha, maxixe, and many other genres of Brazilian music; presents the little-heard voices and perspectives of marginalized Brazilians like the African-descended sambistas; and presents a study in step with the types of decolonial approaches to ethnomusicology that have since emerged, treating the people being studied not only as makers of music but also of knowledge.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04402-1 $125.00x  £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08608-3 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05296-5 A volume in the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies Series English-language rights: University of Illinois. All other rights: Author

Incisive and comprehensive, A Respectable Spell tells the compelling story of an iconic Brazilian musical genre. CARLOS SANDRONI is a professor of ethnomusicology in the Faculty of Music and the Faculty of Anthropology at the Federal University of Pernambuco (Recife). His books include Mário contra Macunaíma: Cultura e política em Mário de Andrade. MICHAEL IYANAGA is an assistant professor of music and Latin American studies at the College of William and Mary. His books include Desafios e particularidades da produção antropológica no Norte e Nordeste do Brasil.

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AROUSING SENSE

Recipes for Workshopping Sensory Experience

TOMIE HAHN Using the senses to open our minds to creativity and learning “A wonderful collection of recipes for workshopping sensory experience, to be realized sometimes by individuals, often through group interaction. The recipes will be useful to leaders in any arts area; in teaching of writing, not just creative writing but also composition; in working with any group where an exploratory, collaborative, fun atmosphere is desirable; as well as in the specific ethnographic application that Hahn emphasizes.” —FRED EVERETT MAUS, coeditor of Oxford Handbook of Music and Queerness Engaging with sensory experience provides a gateway to the contemplation and cultivation of creativity and ideas. Tomie Hahn’s workshopping recipes encourage us to incorporate sensory-­rich experiences into our research, creative processes, and understanding of people. The exercises recognize that playfulness allows for a loosening of self while increasing empathy and vulnerability. Their ability to spark sensory endeavors that reach into our deepest core offers potentially profound impacts on art making, research, ethnographic fieldwork, contemplation, philosophical or personal introspections, and many other activities. Designed to be flexible, these living recipes provide an avenue for performative adventures that invite us to improvise in ways suited to our own purposes or settings. Leaders and practitioners enjoy limitless arenas for using the senses for explorations that range from personally transformative to professionally productive to profoundly moving.

152 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 8 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04416-8 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08620-5 $25.00x  £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05310-8 All rights: University of Illinois

User-­friendly and practical, Arousing Sense is a guide to how teaching through sensory experience can lead to positive, transformative impact in the classroom and everyday life. TOMIE HAHN is a professor emerita of performance ethnology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is the author of Sensational Knowledge: Embodying Culture through Japanese Dance.

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PERFORMING ENVIRONMENTALISMS

Expressive Culture and Ecological Change

Edited by JOHN HOLMES MCDOWELL, KATHERINE BORLAND, REBECCA DIRKSEN, and SUE TUOHY Traditional peoples’ artistic response to environmental peril “This collection is enriched by a broad range of disciplinary and analytic perspectives and the authors’ deep and long-standing commitments to the naturalcultural worlds they explore. Readers from across the humanities will find novel points of departure in confronting ecocidal inequalities and all-hands-on-deck ­challenges to collective survival.” —CHARLES L. BRIGGS, author of Unlearning: Rethinking Poetics, Pandemics, and the Politics of Knowledge 296 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 35 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 6 LINE DRAWINGS, 2 MAPS, 3 CHARTS

Performing Environmentalisms examines the existential challenge of the twenty-­first century: improving the prospects for maintaining life on our planet. The contributors focus on the strategic use of traditional artistic expression—storytelling and songs, crafted objects, and ceremonies and rituals—performed during the social turmoil provoked by environmental degradation and ecological collapse. Highlighting alternative visions of what it means to be human, the authors place performance at the center of people’s responses to the crises. Such expression reinforces the agency of human beings as they work, independently and together, to address ecological dilemmas. The essays add these people’s critical perspectives— gained through intimate struggle with life-­altering forces—to the global dialogue surrounding humanity’s response to climate change, threats to biocultural diversity, and environmental catastrophe.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04403-8 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08609-0 $30.00x  £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05297-2 All rights: University of Illinois

JOHN HOLMES MCDOWELL is a professor of folklore and ethno­ musicology at Indiana University. His books include Poetry and Violence: The Ballad Tradition of Mexico’s Costa Chica. KATHERINE BORLAND is an associate professor and director of the Center for Folklore Studies at The Ohio State University. REBECCA DIRKSEN is an associate professor of folklore and ethnomusicology at Indiana University and the author of After the Dance, the Drums Are Heavy: Carnival, Politics, and Musical Engagement in Haiti. SUE TUOHY is an emerita senior lecturer of folklore and ethnomusicology and adjunct faculty in East Asian languages and cultures and in global and international studies at Indiana University.

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DHOL

Drummers, Identities, and Modern Punjab

GIBB SCHREFFLER Writing the drummers into the story of contemporary dhol “A compassionately written and deeply researched ethnography and historiography of dhol playing in Punjab as well as the Punjabi diaspora in North American and the United Kingdom. It paves new ground in assessing the mutual interaction between these distinct populations while demonstrating the challenges that face dhol-playing communities due to neoliberalism, cultural nationalism, and the growth and financial clout of the Punjabi diaspora.” —STEFAN FIOL, author of Recasting Folk in the Himalayas: Indian Music, Media, and Social Mobility An icon of global Punjabi culture, the dhol drum inspires an unbridled love for the instrument far beyond its application to regional vernacular music. Yet the identities of dhol players within their local communities and the broadly conceived Punjabi nation remain obscure.

280 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 19 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 19 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 1 MAP

Gibb Schreffler draws on two decades of research to investigate dhol’s place among the cultural formations within Punjabi communities. Analyzing the identities of musicians, Schreffler illuminates concepts of musical performance, looks at how these concepts help create or articulate Punjabi social structure, and explores identity construction at the intersections of ethnicity, class, and nationality in Punjab and the diaspora. As he shows, understanding the identities of dhol players is an ethical necessity that acknowledges their place in Punjabi cultural history and helps to repair their representation.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04407-6 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08612-0 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05301-6 All rights: University of Illinois

An engaging and rich ethnography, Dhol reveals a beloved instrumental form and the musical and social practices of its overlooked performers. GIBB SCHREFFLER is an associate professor of music at Pomona College. He is the author of Boxing the Compass: A Century and a Half of Discourse about Sailors’ Chanties.

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NEW IN PAPER

HARRY T. BURLEIGH

From the Spiritual to the Harlem Renaissance

JEAN E. SNYDER The unusual life and soaring art of an essential American composer “The definitive biography of Burleigh.” —BLACK GROOVES Harry T. Burleigh (1866–1949) played a leading role in American music and culture in the twentieth century. Celebrated for his arrangements of spirituals, Burleigh was also the first African American composer to create a significant body of art song. Jean E. Snyder follows Burleigh’s life from his Pennsylvania childhood through his fifty-­year tenure as soloist at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan. As a composer, Burleigh’s pioneering work preserved and transformed the African American spiritual; as a music editor, he facilitated the work of other black composers; as a role model, vocal coach, and mentor, he profoundly influenced American music. Snyder provides rich historical, social, and political contexts that explore Burleigh’s professional and personal life within an era complicated by changes in race relations, class expectations, and musical tastes.

448 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 32 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 19 MUSIC EXAMPLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08632-8 $24.95s  £18.99

Drawing on research into archives and family histories, Harry T. Burleigh reclaims the life and art of an essential American composer.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09810-9

JEAN E. SNYDER is a former assistant professor of music at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania.

A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by grants from the Lloyd Hibberd Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund. All rights: University of Illinois

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MUSIC AS MAO’S WEAPON

Remembering the Cultural Revolution

LEI X. OUYANG Music, memory, and a legacy of extremes “This is a significant contribution to the sparse literature on musical life during China’s Cultural Revolution. The focus on individual experience and the categorization of different impacts on different generations are unusual and illuminating.” —HELEN REES, author of Echoes of History: Naxi Music in Modern China China’s Cultural Revolution (1966–1976) produced propaganda music that still stirs unease and, at times, evokes nostalgia. Lei X. Ouyang uses selections from revolutionary songbooks to untangle the complex interactions between memory, trauma, and generational ­imprinting among those who survived the period of extremes. Interviews combine with ethnographic fieldwork and surveys to explore both the Cultural Revolution’s effect on those who lived through it as children and contemporary remembrance of the music created to serve the Maoist regime. As Ouyang shows, the weaponization of music served an ideological revolution but also revolutionized the senses. She examines essential questions raised by this phenomenon, including: What did the revolutionization look, sound, and feel like? What does it take for individuals and groups to engage with such music? And what is the impact of such an experience over time?

232 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 13 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 13 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 13 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04417-5 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08621-2 $28.00x  £20.99 EBOOK, 978-0-252-05311-5

Perceptive and provocative, Music as Mao’s Weapon is an insightful look at the exploitation and manipulation of the arts under authoritarianism.

All rights: University of Illinois

LEI X. OUYANG is an associate professor of music at Swarthmore College.

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NEW IN PAPER

CHARLES IVES’S CONCORD

Essays after a Sonata

KYLE GANN Exploring Ives’s transcendent masterpiece “Gann’s analysis takes the form of a kind of biblical exegesis, where canonical texts are pored over by ever-new ­generations. He achieves a balance between writing for Ives specialists and delivering a text that is compulsively ­readable. . . . This is a book to savor with headphones.” —TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT In 1921, Charles Ives sent out copies of a piano sonata to two ­hundred strangers. The music’s dissonant chords, complex rhythms, and seemingly chaotic structure confounded the recipients, as did the accompanying book, Essays before a Sonata. Kyle Gann merges exhaustive research with his own experience as a composer to reveal the Concord Sonata and the essays in full. Diffracting the twinned works into their essential aspects, Gann lays out the historical context that produced Ives’s masterpiece and illuminates the arguments Ives explored in the Essays. Gann also provides a movement-­by-­movement analysis of the work’s harmonic structure and compositional technique; connects the sonata to Ives works that share parts of its material; and compares different versions of the Concord to reveal important aspects of Ives’s creative process.

464 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 1 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPH, 9 CHARTS, 290 MUSIC EXAMPLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08630-4 $30.00x  £22.99

A critical and theoretical tour de force, Charles Ives’s Concord provides the first comprehensive consideration of a work at the heart of twentieth-century American music.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09936-6

KYLE GANN is a composer and the Taylor Hawver and Frances Bortle Hawver Professor of Music at Bard College. His books include The Arithmetic of Listening: Tuning Theory and History for the Impractical Musician and No Such Thing as Silence: John Cage’s 4'33".

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ELLIOTT CARTER SPEAKS

Unpublished Lectures

ELLIOTT CARTER Edited and with an Introduction by Laura Emmery Revelatory talks by the Pulitzer Prize–winning composer “An exciting new contribution to Carter scholarship that documents one of the most important voices in concert music of the modern era. Audiences of contemporary music, musicians, and scholars of this era will find a rich new vein of material that reveals how Carter perceived his role in the musical history and culture of his time—along with a broad collection of analyses of compositions from Debussy and Bartók to Nono, Varèse, and Penderecki.” —DOUGLAS RUST, University of Southern Mississippi These previously unpublished lectures by Elliott Carter date to the summer of 1967, when the acclaimed composer taught at the Contemporary Music Workshop held by the University of Minnesota. Leading an introductory course on orchestra repertoire, Carter gave nine hours of lectures covering principal topics like how to live with the musical present and whether the symphony orchestra was a relic of the past or a possible active force for new music. But Carter’s observations and prompts by audience questions broadened the discussion into areas ranging from electronic music to analyses of works by other artists and himself. Laura Emmery presents the complete text from each session alongside introductions, commentary, and annotated examples that provide valuable context for readers.

240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 6 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 41 MUSIC EXAMPLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04420-5 $55.00x £44.00 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05316-0 A volume in the series Music in American Life

Expansive and essential, Elliott Carter Speaks opens up the artist’s teaching and introspection to new contemporary perspectives on his thought and art.

All rights: University of Illinois

ELLIOTT CARTER (1908–2012) was an American composer, educator, and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. His many works include String Quartet No. 2 and Piano Concerto. LAURA EMMERY is an assistant professor of music theory at Emory University. She is the author of Compositional Process in Elliott Carter’s String Quartets: A Study in Sketches.

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NOW IN A UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS PRESS EDITION

THE SOUNDS OF PLACE

Music and the American Cultural Landscape

DENISE VON GLAHN The role of place in works by fourteen American composers “This is an excellent book, a pleasure to read and a substantial contribution to American musicology, cultural geography, and interdisciplinary scholarship.” —AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW Composers like Charles Ives, Duke Ellington, Aaron Copland, and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich created works that indelibly commemorated American places. Denise Von Glahn analyzes the soundscapes of fourteen figures whose “place pieces” tell us much about the nation’s search for its own voice and about its ever-­changing sense of self. She connects each composer’s feelings about the United States and their reasons for creating a piece to the music, while analyzing their compositional techniques, tunes, and styles. Approaching the compositions in chronological order, Von Glahn reveals how works that celebrated the wilderness gave way to music engaged with humanity’s influence—benign and otherwise—on the landscape, before environmentalism inspired a return to nature themes in the late twentieth century.

384 PAGES. 6 X 9.25 INCHES 6 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 8 LINE DRAWINGS, 39 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Wide-­ranging and astute, The Sounds of Place explores high art music’s role in the making of national myth and memory.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08607-6 $30.00x  £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05295-8

DENISE VON GLAHN is the Curtis Mayes Orpheus Professor of Musicology at Florida State University, where she is also coordinator of the Musicology Area. She is the author of Libby Larsen: Composing an American Life and Music and the Skillful Listener: American Women Compose the Natural World.

A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

Winner of the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award

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INTERVIEWS WITH AMERICAN COMPOSERS

Barney Childs in Conversation

BARNEY CHILDS Edited by Virginia Anderson Twenty-three influential composers, in their own words “A unique time capsule of recent history of the state of the field of art music composition in the United States in 1972. Virginia Anderson presents Childs’s interviews as-is, warts and all. As such, each interview is revealing of the character of the times and of the protagonists.” —CHRIS BROWN, Professor Emeritus and former Co-Director of the Center for Contemporary Music, Mills College In 1972–73, Barney Childs embarked on an ambitious attempt to survey the landscape of new American concert music. He recorded freewheeling conversations with fellow composers, most of them under forty, all of them important but most not yet famous. Though unable to publish the interviews in his lifetime, Childs had gathered invaluable dialogues with the likes of Robert Ashley, Olly Wilson, Harold Budd, Christian Wolff, and others.

456 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04399-4 $60.00x  £48.00

Virginia Anderson edits the first published collection of these conversations. She pairs each interview with a contextual essay by a contemporary expert that shows how the composer’s discussion with Childs fits into his life and work. Together, the interviewees cover a broad range of ideas and concerns around topics like education, notation, developments in electronic music, changing demands on performers, and tonal music.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05292-7 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund.

Innovative and revealing, Interviews with American Composers is an artistic and historical snapshot of American music at an important crossroads.

All rights: University of Illinois

BARNEY CHILDS (1926–2000) was an experimental music composer, poet, and educator. His compositions included chamber music and music for keyboards. VIRGINIA ANDERSON maintained the Experimental Music Catalogue and was the editor of the Journal of Experimental Music Studies. She died in 2021.

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MUSIC

AMERICANALAND

Where Country & Western Met Rock ’n’ Roll

JOHN MILWARD Portraits by Margie Greve A musical genre forever outside the lines “Concise, lively, and informative, with many colorful anecdotes adding intriguing detail. Milward’s deep knowledge of music history and expertise on roots-music genres make Americanaland an essential addition to the music book canon.” —HOLLY GEORGE-WARREN, author of Janis: Her Life and Music With a claim on artists from Jimmie Rodgers to Jason Isbell, Americana can be hard to define, but you know it when you hear it. John Milward’s Americanaland is filled with the enduring performers and vivid stories that are at the heart of Americana. At base a hybrid of rock and country, Americana is also infused with folk, blues, R&B, bluegrass, and other types of roots music. Performers like Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Joni Mitchell, and Gram Parsons used these ingredients to create influential music that took well-­ established genres down exciting new roads. The name Americana was popularized in the 1990s to describe similarly inclined artists like Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, and Wilco. Today, Brandi Carlile and I’m With Her are among the musicians carrying the genre into the twenty-first century.

JUNE 2021 304 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 25 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04391-8 $29.95 £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05281-1

Essential and engaging, Americanaland chronicles the evolution and resonance of this ever-changing amalgam of American music. Margie Greve’s hand-embroidered color portraits offer a portfolio of the pioneers and contemporary practitioners of Americana.

A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

JOHN MILWARD has written about popular music for more than forty years. He was the chief pop music critic for the Chicago Daily News and USA Today, and has written for Rolling Stone, the New York Times, and No Depression. He is the author of Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ’n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues). MARGIE GREVE’s work has appeared in Rolling Stone and the New Yorker and has been shown in galleries in New York City and the Hudson Valley.

Top row, L to R: Jimmie Rodgers; The Carter Family; Hank Williams; Elvis Presley Second row, L to R: Carl Perkins; Patsy Cline; Chuck Berry; Johnny Cash; Jerry Lee Lewis Third row, L to R: Ray Charles; The Beatles; Bob Dylan; Dolly Parton Fourth row, L to R: Joni Mitchell; Gram Parsons; Neil Young; Jerry Garcia; The Byrds Fifth row, L to R: The Band; Willie Nelson; Buddy Miller; Steve Earle; Merle Haggard Bottom row, L to R: Townes Van Zandt; Emmylou Harris; Jason Isbell; Jeff Tweedy

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MUSIC

PUNKS IN PEORIA

Making a Scene in the American Heartland

JONATHAN WRIGHT and DAWSON BARRETT Punk rock culture in a preeminently average town “Punks in Peoria isn’t just a deep, heartfelt dive into the punk subculture of America’s quintessential small city. It’s an exquisite map of how music flows through social structures and between generations. Essential reading for anyone interested in how art impacts life.” —JASON HELLER, author of Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-fi Exploded Synonymous with American mediocrity, Peoria was fertile ground for the boredom- and anger-fueled fury of punk rock. Jonathan Wright and Dawson Barrett explore the do-it-yourself scene built by Peoria punks, performers, and scenesters in the 1980s and 1990s. From fanzines to indie record shops to renting the VFW hall for an all-ages show, Peoria’s punk culture reflected the movement elsewhere, but the region’s conservatism and industrial decline offered a richer-than-usual target environment for rebellion. Eyewitness accounts take readers into hangouts and long-lost venues, while interviews with the people who were there trace the ever-changing scene and varied fortunes of local legends like Caustic Defiance, Dollface, and Planes Mistaken for Stars. What emerges is a sympathetic portrait of a youth culture in search of entertainment but just as hungry for community—the shared sense of otherness that, even for one night only, could unite outsiders and discontents under the banner of music.

JUNE 2021 240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 25 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04380-2 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08579-6 $22.95 £17.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05270-5

A raucous look at a small-city underground, Punks in Peoria takes readers off the beaten track to reveal the punk rock life as lived in Anytown, U.S.A.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

JONATHAN WRIGHT is a writer, editor, musician, and longtime veteran of the Peoria music scene. He is editor in chief at Peoria Magazines. DAWSON BARRETT is an associate professor of history at Del Mar College. His books include The Defiant: Protest Movements in Post-Liberal America.

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MUSIC / WOMEN’S HISTORY

UNBINDING GENTILITY

Women Making Music in the Nineteenth-Century South

CANDACE BAILEY Hearing southern women in the pauses of history “Unbinding Gentility dismantles facile stereotypes about women’s music making in the nineteenth century in order to explore the complex intersections of women’s musical practices and social class, race, and region. Women whose experiences have been silenced or caricatured come to life in this richly researched and substantial history of the U.S. South. Bailey reveals how gentility was no predictor of social or economic status, that accomplishment was not solely the domain of white elite women, and that there is much we still need to learn from the material culture of women’s musical lives.” —GLENDA GOODMAN, author of Cultivated by Hand: Amateur Musicians in the Early American Republic

APRIL 2021 304 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 32 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 TABLES

Southern women of all classes, races, and walks of life practiced music during and after the Civil War. Candace Bailey examines the history of southern women through the lens of these musical pursuits, uncovering the ways that music’s transmission, education, circulation, and repertory help us understand its meaning in the women’s culture of the time. Bailey pays particular attention to the space between music as an ideal accomplishment—part of how people expected women to perform gentility—and a real practice—what women actually did. At the same time, her ethnographic reading of binder’s volumes, letters and diaries, and a wealth of other archival material informs new and vital interpretations of women’s place in southern culture.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04375-8 $125.00x  £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08574-1 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05265-1 A volume in the series Music in American Life

A fascinating collective portrait of women’s artistic and personal lives, Unbinding Gentility challenges entrenched assumptions about nineteenth-century music and the experiences of the southern women who made it.

All rights: University of Illinois

CANDACE BAILEY is a professor of music at North Carolina Central University. She is the author of Music and the Southern Belle: From Accomplished Lady to Confederate Composer and Charleston Belles Abroad: The Music Collections of Harriet Lowndes, Henrietta Aiken, and Louisa Rebecca McCord.

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ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES / MUSIC

MANIFEST TECHNIQUE

Hip Hop, Empire, and Visionary Filipino American Culture

MARK R. VILLEGAS An obscured vanguard in hip hop “Manifest Technique brilliantly demonstrates how to place Filipino American choreography, lyrics, and crew ­allegiances at the heart of our study of hip hop as a cultural vernacular. Villegas invites us to listen deep and to ­consider how these expressive forms carry forward memories, desires, and critiques.” —THEODORE S. GONZALVES, author of The Day the Dancers Stayed: Performing in the Filipino/American Diaspora Filipino Americans have been innovators and collaborators in hip hop since the culture’s early days. But despite the success of artists like Apl.de.Ap of the Black Eyed Peas and superstar producer Chad Hugo, the genre’s significance in Filipino American communities is often overlooked. Mark R. Villegas considers sprawling coast-to-coast hip hop networks to reveal how Filipino Americans have used music, dance, and visual art to create their worlds. Filipino Americans have been exploring their racial position in the world in embracing hip hop’s connections to memories of colonial and racial violence. Villegas scrutinizes practitioners’ language of defiance, placing the cultural grammar of hip hop within a larger legacy of decolonization.

JULY 2021 240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 TABLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04378-9 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08577-2 $26.00x  £19.99

An important investigation of hip hop as a movement of racial consciousness, Manifest Technique shows how the genre has inspired Filipino Americans to envision and enact new ideas of their bodies, their history, and their dignity.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05268-2 A volume in the series The Asian American Experience, edited by Eiichiro Azuma, Jigna Desai, Martin Manalansan IV, Lisa Sun-Hee Park, and David K. Yoo

MARK R. VILLEGAS is an assistant professor of American studies at Franklin & Marshall College.

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MUSIC

THE MUSIC OF JAMES TENNEY

Volume 1: Contexts and Paradigms

ROBERT WANNAMAKER Parsing the works of the experimental music pioneer “An astonishing book, a virtual encyclopedia of James Tenney that threatens to leave no remaining scope for further scholarly work on his music. It answered many questions I’ve long had about Tenney’s music, and has already acted as a spur to my own work. The amount of information one could currently find on Tenney’s work would comprise only a small fraction of what is included here.” —KYLE GANN, author of The Arithmetic of Listening: Tuning Theory and History for the Impractical Musician

JUNE 2021 336 PAGES. 7 X 10 INCHES 84 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 6 TABLES

Robert Wannamaker’s monumental two-volume study explores the influential music and ideas of American composer, theorist, writer, performer, and educator James Tenney. Delving into the whole of Tenney’s far-ranging oeuvre, Wannamaker provides in-depth, aurally grounded analyses of works linked to the artist’s revolutionary theories of musical form, timbre, and harmonic perception.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04367-3 $65.00x £52.00

Volume 1: Contexts and Paradigms chronologically surveys Tenney’s creative development and output. Wannamaker begins each section with biographical, aesthetic, and technical context that illuminates a distinct period in Tenney’s career. From there, he analyzes a small number of pieces that illuminate the concerns, characteristics, and techniques that emerged in Tenney’s music during that time. Wannamaker supplements the text with musical examples, graphs, and diagrams while also drawing on unpublished material and newly available primary sources to flesh out each work and the ideas that shaped it.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05256-9 Publication supported by grants from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund; and the California Institute for the Arts.

A landmark in experimental music scholarship, The Music of James Tenney is a first-of-its-kind consideration of the music titan and his work.

All rights: University of Illinois

ROBERT WANNAMAKER is Associate Dean for Academic and Special Projects in the School of Music at the California Institute of the Arts. He is a composer, improviser, music theorist, mathematician, and educator.

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MUSIC

THE MUSIC OF JAMES TENNEY

Volume 2: A Handbook to the Pieces

ROBERT WANNAMAKER A work-by-work guide to the composer’s groundbreaking music “Wannamaker’s essential, extraordinary work on the music of James Tenney is a brilliantly detailed and exhaustively researched addition to our comprehensive understanding of Tenney’s music and compositional ideas, and to our conception of music of the second half of the twentieth century.” —LARRY POLANSKY, Emeritus Strauss Professor of Music, Dartmouth College JUNE 2021

Robert Wannamaker’s monumental two-volume study explores the influential music and ideas of American composer, theorist, writer, performer, and educator James Tenney. Delving into the whole of Tenney’s far-ranging oeuvre, Wannamaker offers close, aurally grounded analyses of works linked to the artist’s revolutionary theories of musical form, timbre, and harmonic perception.

440 PAGES. 7 X 10 INCHES 212 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 14 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04368-0 $75.00x £60.00

Written as a reference work, Volume 2: A Handbook to the Pieces presents detailed entries on Tenney’s significant post-1959 experimental works (excepting pieces covered in Volume 1). Wannamaker includes technical information, an analysis of intentions and goals, graphs and musical examples, historical and biographical context, and thoughts from Tenney and others on specific works. Throughout, he discusses the striking compositional ideas found in Tenney’s music and, where appropriate, traces an idea’s appearance from one piece to the next to reveal the evolution of the composer’s art and thought.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05257-6 Publication supported by grants from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund; and the California Institute for the Arts.

A landmark in experimental music scholarship, The Music of James Tenney is a first-of-its-kind consideration of the music titan and his work.

All rights: University of Illinois

ROBERT WANNAMAKER is Associate Dean for Academic and Special Projects in the School of Music at the California Institute of the Arts. He is a composer, improviser, music theorist, mathematician, and educator.

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ETHNOMUSICOLOGY / AFRICAN STUDIES

KUSAMIRA MUSIC IN UGANDA

Spirit Mediumship and Ritual Healing

PETER J. HOESING A performance culture of illness and wellness “An important work, this book is the first in-depth, interdisciplinary study of spirit mediumship as both a healing mechanism and musical way of life in south-central Uganda. It is relevant to African studies, anthropology, ethnomusicology, history, and public health.” —DAMASCUS KAFUMBE, author of Tuning the Kingdom: Kawuugulu Musical Performance, Politics, and Storytelling in Buganda In southern Uganda, ritual healing traditions called kusamira and nswezi rely on music to treat sickness and maintain well-being. Peter J. Hoesing blends ethnomusicological fieldwork with analysis to examine how kusamira and nswezi performance socializes dynamic processes of illness, wellness, and health. People participate in these traditions for reasons that range from preserving ideas to generating strategies that allow them to navigate changing circumstances. Indeed, the performance of kusamira and nswezi reproduces ideas that remain relevant for succeeding generations. Hoesing shows the potential of this social reproduction of well-being to shape development in a region where over 80 percent of the population relies on traditional healers for primary health care.

JUNE 2021 208 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 6 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 1 TABLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04382-6 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08581-9 $28.00x £20.99

Comprehensive and vivid with eyewitness detail, Kusamira Music in Uganda offers insight into important healing traditions and the overlaps between expressive culture and healing practices, the human and other-than-human, and Uganda’s past and future.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05272-9 Publication supported by a grant from the L.J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund. All rights: University of Illinois

PETER J. HOESING is Director of Sponsored Programs at Dakota State University and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine.

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MUSIC / BIOGRAPHY

HOMER RODEHEAVER AND THE RISE OF THE GOSPEL MUSIC INDUSTRY KEVIN MUNGONS and DOUGLAS YEO From tent revivals to radio and records with a gospel music innovator “I am truly taken by the book. It is good, informative, comprehensive, and free of the usual assortment of clichés, academic hems and haws, and over-spiritualization. It takes the often over-simplified view of music and revivalism and exposes it to a fascinating cross-weave of thought, content, and context which, to my embarrassment, I thought I had already had a handle on. I recommend it without reservation. There is no doubt in my mind that general readers and specialists alike will benefit from reading this book.” —HAROLD BEST, emeritus professor of music and dean emeritus of the Wheaton College Conservatory of Music

JUNE 2021 368 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 65 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Homer Rodeheaver merged evangelical hymns and African American spirituals with popular music to create a potent gospel style. Kevin Mungons and Douglas Yeo examine his enormous influence on gospel music against the backdrop of Christian music history and Rodeheaver’s impact as a cultural and business figure. Rodeheaver rose to fame as the trombone-playing song leader for evangelist Billy Sunday. As revivalism declined after World War I, Rodeheaver leveraged his place in America’s newborn celebrity culture to start the first gospel record label and launch a nationwide radio program. His groundbreaking combination of hymnal publishing and recording technology helped define the early Christian music industry. In his later years, he influenced figures like Billy Graham and witnessed the music’s split into southern gospel and black gospel.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04384-0 $125.00x  £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08583-3 $32.00x  £24.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05274-3 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

Clear-eyed and revealing, Homer Rodeheaver and the Rise of the Gospel Music Industry is an overdue consideration of a pioneering figure in American music. KEVIN MUNGONS is a writer for print and digital platforms and an editor at Moody Publishers. DOUGLAS YEO was bass trombonist of the Boston Symphony and has taught trombone at Wheaton College and Arizona State University.

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MUSIC

UNLIKELY ANGEL

The Songs of Dolly Parton

LYDIA R. HAMESSLEY Foreword by Steve Buckingham The creative process of a great American songwriter “Lydia Hamessley invites us on a deep dive into the world of Dolly Parton as songwriter. The book weaves together insightful analyses of the musical forms, cultural roots, and meanings found in Parton’s vast catalog, with Parton’s own accounts of her music. Hamessley unveils these songs as the heart and substance of Parton’s contributions to popular culture, and will inspire every reader to take yet another listen.” —JOCELYN R. NEAL, author of Country Music: A Cultural and Stylistic History OCTOBER

Dolly Parton’s success as a performer and pop culture phenomenon has overshadowed her achievements as a songwriter. But she sees herself as a songwriter first, and with good reason. Parton’s compositions like “I Will Always Love You” and “Jolene” have become American standards with an impact far beyond country music.

296 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 31 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE, 5 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04352-9 $125.00x £100.00

Lydia R. Hamessley’s expert analysis and Parton’s characteristically straightforward input inform this comprehensive look at the process, influences, and themes that have shaped the superstar’s songwriting artistry. Hamessley reveals how Parton’s loving, hardscrabble childhood in the Smoky Mountains provided the musical language, rhythms, and memories of old-time music that resonate in so many of her songs. Hamessley further provides an understanding of how Parton combines her cultural and musical heritage with an artisan’s sense of craft and design to compose eloquent, painfully honest, and gripping songs about women’s lives, poverty, heartbreak, inspiration, and love.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08542-0 $19.95 £14.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05240-8 A volume in the series Women Composers All rights: University of Illinois

Filled with insights on hit songs and less familiar gems, Unlikely Angel covers the full arc of Dolly Parton’s career and offers an unprecedented look at the creative force behind the image. LYDIA R. HAMESSLEY is a professor of music at Hamilton College.

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MUSIC / BIOGRAPHY

THE LADY SWINGS

Memoirs of a Jazz Drummer

DOTTIE DODGION and WAYNE ENSTICE Foreword by Carol Sloane Scenes from a jazz life “A unique and important contribution to the history of jazz.” —DEE SPENCER, composer, performer, and educator Dottie Dodgion is a jazz drummer who played with the best. A survivor, she lived an entire lifetime before she was seventeen. Undeterred by hardships, she defied the odds and earned a seat as a woman in the exclusive men’s club of jazz. Her dues-paying path as a musician took her from early work with Charles Mingus to being hired by Benny Goodman at Basin Street East on her first day in New York. From there she broke new ground as a woman who played a “man’s instrument” in first-string, allmale New York City jazz bands. Her inspiring memoir talks frankly about her music and the challenges she faced, and shines a light into the jazz world of the 1960s and 1970s.

288 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 25 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Vivid and always entertaining, The Lady Swings tells Dottie Dodgion’s story with the same verve and straight-ahead honesty that powered her playing.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04359-8 $110.00x £88.00

JANUARY

PAPER, 978-0-252-08551-2 $22.95 £17.99

DOTTIE DODGION is a trailblazing American jazz drummer. WAYNE ENSTICE is a coauthor of Jazzwomen: Conversations with Twenty-One Musicians and Jazz Spoken Here: Conversations with Twenty-Two Musicians.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05247-7 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

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MUSIC / AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

WHEN SUNDAY COMES

Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras

CLAUDRENA N. HAROLD Gospel music after the Golden Age “When Sunday Comes is the book we’ve been waiting for—a thoughtful and thought-provoking analysis of the impact contemporary singers, songwriters, and musicians have made, and continue to make, on gospel music.” —ROBERT M. MAROVICH, author of A City Called Heaven: Chicago and the Birth of Gospel Music Gospel music evolved in often surprising directions during the post– Civil Rights era. Claudrena N. Harold’s in-depth look at late-century gospel focuses on musicians like Yolanda Adams, Andraé Crouch, the Clark Sisters, Al Green, Take 6, and the Winans, and on the network of black record shops, churches, and businesses that nurtured the music. Harold details the creative shifts, sonic innovations, theological tensions, and political assertions that transformed the music, and revisits the debates within the community over groundbreaking recordings and gospel’s incorporation of rhythm and blues, funk, hip-hop, and other popular forms. At the same time, she details how sociopolitical and cultural developments like the Black Power Movement and the emergence of the Christian Right shaped both the art and attitudes of African American performers.

NOVEMBER 288 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 22 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04357-4 $125.00x £100.00

Weaving insightful analysis into a collective biography of gospel icons, When Sunday Comes explores the music’s essential place as an outlet for African Americans to express their spiritual and cultural selves.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08547-5 $22.95 £17.99

CLAUDRENA N. HAROLD is a professor of African American and African studies and history at the University of Virginia. She is the author of New Negro Politics in the Jim Crow South and The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South, 1918–1942.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

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MUSIC / BIOGRAPHY

FIRST TIME IN PAPERBACK AND E-BOOK

SOUL ON SOUL

The Life and Music of Mary Lou Williams

TAMMY L. KERNODLE With a new preface A jazz woman in a jazzman’s world, with a new preface by the author “Diligently chronicles the life and times of the extraordinary innovator.” —JAZZ TIMES The jazz musician-composer-arranger Mary Lou Williams spent her sixty-­year career working in—and stretching beyond—a dizzying range of musical styles. Her integration of classical music into her works helped expand jazz’s compositional language. Her generosity made her a valued friend and mentor to the likes of Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie. Her late-in-life flowering of faith saw her embrace a spiritual jazz oriented toward advancing the civil rights struggle and helping wounded souls.

OCTOBER 360 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 16 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Tammy L. Kernodle details Williams’s life in music against the backdrop of controversies over women’s place in jazz and bitter arguments over the music’s evolution. Williams repeatedly asserted her artistic and personal independence to carve out a place despite widespread bafflement that a woman exhibited such genius. Embracing Williams’s contradictions and complexities, Kernodle also explores a personal life troubled by lukewarm professional acceptance, loneliness, relentless poverty, bad business deals, and difficult marriages.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04360-4 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08553-6 $24.95s £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05248-4

In-depth and epic in scope, Soul on Soul restores a pioneering African American woman to her rightful place in jazz history.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

TAMMY L. KERNODLE is a professor of musicology at Miami University of Ohio. She served as associate editor of the three-volume Encyclopedia of African American Music and as a senior editor for the revision of New Grove Dictionary of American Music.

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MUSIC / MIDWEST

INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH BLUEGRASS

Southwestern Ohio’s Musical Legacy

Edited by FRED BARTENSTEIN and CURTIS W. ELLISON Foreword by Neil V. Rosenberg High lonesome in the heartland “A new urban folk music, nurtured and shaped by a folk community in an industrial setting, has made the world familiar with southwestern Ohio’s bluegrass. Many facets of the region’s rich musical heritage are explored and celebrated in this book, a welcome addition to the literature on bluegrass.” —NEIL V. ROSENBERG, from the foreword JANUARY

In the twentieth century, Appalachian migrants seeking economic opportunities relocated to southwestern Ohio, bringing their music with them. Between 1947 and 1989, they created an internationally renowned capital for the thriving bluegrass music genre, centered on the industrial region of Cincinnati, Dayton, Hamilton, Middletown, and Springfield. Fred Bartenstein and Curtis W. Ellison edit a collection of eyewitness narratives and in-depth analyses that explore southwestern Ohio’s bluegrass musicians, radio broadcasters, recording studios, record labels, and performance venues, along with the music’s contributions to religious activities, community development, and public education. As the bluegrass scene grew, southwestern Ohio’s distinctive sounds reached new fans and influenced those everywhere who continue to play, produce, and love roots music.

272 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 112 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 CHART

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04364-2 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08560-4 $29.95s £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05253-8 A volume in the series Music in American Life

Revelatory and multifaceted, Industrial Strength Bluegrass shares the inspiring story of a bluegrass hotbed and the people who created it.

Publication supported by a grant from the Judith McCulloh Endowment for American Music.

Contributors: Fred Bartenstein, Curtis W. Ellison, Jon Hartley Fox, Rick Good, Lily Isaacs, Ben Krakauer, Mac McDivitt, Nathan McGee, Daniel Mullins, Joe Mullins, Larry Nager, Phillip J. Obermiller, Bobby Osborne, and Neil V. Rosenberg.

All rights: University of Illinois

FRED BARTENSTEIN is an adjunct instructor in music at the University of Dayton. He is the editor of Bluegrass Bluesman, The Bluegrass Hall of Fame, and two anthologies of writings by folk arts impresario Joe Wilson. CURTIS W. ELLISON is a professor emeritus of history and American studies at Miami University. He is the author of Country Music Culture: From Hard Times to Heaven and editor of Donald Davidson’s The Big Ballad Jamboree.

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MUSIC / BIOGRAPHY

NEW IN PAPER

SERVING GENIUS

Carlo Maria Giulini

THOMAS D. SALER The biography of the masterful conductor who directed from the heart “A thorough, balanced, and illuminating portrait of the charismatic Italian as man and maestro.” —CHICAGO TRIBUNE Stints with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, Vienna Symphony, and Los Angeles Philharmonic made Carlo Maria Giulini one of the most renowned and beloved conductors of the twentieth century. Thomas D. Saler tells the intertwined stories of Giulini’s extraordinary career and fascinating personal life, including the maestro’s musical awakening, his student years in Rome, his nine months in hiding for his anti-fascist beliefs during World War II, and his selfless devotion to his wife. Throughout, Saler explores how Giulini conveyed his own nuanced musicianship to an orchestra and addresses the conductor’s repertoire of choice, leadership style, and moral framework. Extensive interviews with Giulini’s family, critics, arts administrators, orchestra members, and collaborating soloists round out an unprecedented portrait of an extraordinary musical figure.

SEPTEMBER 256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 21 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

PAPER, 978-0-252-08561-1 $24.95s £18.99

THOMAS D. SALER is a conservatory-trained musician and was a longtime member of the Milwaukee Symphony Chorus. He is the author of several books on personal finance.

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MUSIC / BIOGRAPHY

GEORGE FREDERICK BRISTOW KATHERINE K. PRESTON A biography of the nineteenth-century composer and musician “This remarkable book makes an essential contribution not only to our understanding of Bristow’s life, but to the landscape of nineteenth-century American music in all its multi-dimensionality. It is the definitive biography for years to come.” —DOUGLAS SHADLE, author of Orchestrating the Nation: The Nineteenth-Century American Symphonic Enterprise As American classical music struggled for recognition in the mid-nineteenth century, George Frederick Bristow emerged as one of its most energetic champions and practitioners. Katherine K. Preston explores the life and works of a figure admired in his own time and credited today with producing the first American grand opera and composing important works that ranged from oratorios to symphonies to chamber music. Preston reveals Bristow’s passion for creating and promoting music, his skills as a businessman and educator, the respect paid him by contemporaries and students, and his tireless work as both a composer and in-­demand performer. As she examines Bristow against the backdrop of the music scene in New York City, Preston illuminates the little-known creative and ­performance culture that he helped define and create.

NOVEMBER 208 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 6 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04342-0 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08532-1 $29.95s £22.99

Vivid and richly detailed, George Frederick Bristow enriches our perceptions of ­musical life in nineteenth-century America.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05230-9 A volume in the series American Composers

KATHERINE K. PRESTON is a professor emerita of music at the College of William & Mary. Her five books and many edited volumes include Opera for the People: English-Language Opera and Women Managers in Late Nineteenth-Century America and Opera on the Road: Traveling Opera Troupes in the United States, 1825–1860.

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CHEN YI LETA E. MILLER and J. MICHELE EDWARDS A user-friendly guide to the composer’s rich and engaging music “Drawing on extensive interviews, they depict this globe­ trotting composer’s cultural milieu in vivid detail and persuasively demonstrates the multifaceted and transnational dimension of the composer’s musical world. Their musical readings are vivid and insightful, full of rich information about Chen’s aesthetics, idioms, and distinctive style. This is a must read to anyone who is interested in concert music of twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” —NANCY RAO, author of Chinatown Opera Theater in America Chen Yi is the most prominent woman among the renowned group of new wave composers who came to the United States from mainland China in the early 1980s. Known for her creative output and a distinctive merging of Chinese and Western influences, Chen built a musical language that references a breathtaking range of sources and crisscrosses geographical and musical borders without eradicating them.

DECEMBER 256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 12 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 14 CHARTS, 105 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 2 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04354-3 $110.00x £88.00

Leta E. Miller and J. Michele Edwards provide an accessible guide to the composer’s background and her more than 150 works. Extensive interviews with Chen complement in-depth analyses of selected pieces from Chen’s solos for Western or Chinese instruments, chamber works, choral and vocal pieces, and compositions scored for wind ensemble, chamber orchestra, or full orchestra. The authors highlight Chen’s compositional strategies, her artistic elaborations, and the voice that links her earliest and most recent music. A concluding discussion addresses questions related to Chen’s music and issues such as gender, ethnicity and nationality, transnationalism, border crossing, diaspora, exoticism, and identity.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08544-4 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05242-2 A volume in the series Women Composers Publication of this book was supported by grants from the Donna Cardamone Jackson Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund.

LETA E. MILLER is a professor of music emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of biographies of Aaron Jay Kernis and Lou Harrison. J. MICHELE EDWARDS, musicologist and conductor, is a professor emerita of music at Macalester College and focuses her research on women musicians, especially from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

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WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES / THEATER

STARRING WOMEN

Celebrity, Patriarchy, and American Theater, 1790–1850

SARA E. LAMPERT Women pushing the limits of public life in antebellum America “An excellent intervention in women’s history and theater history, with significant new insights into the precarious gender politics that accompanied star female actors’ appearance and the ways the economic underpinnings of the business of theater colored those politics. This is an important book.” —CAROLYN EASTMAN, author of A Nation of Speechifiers: Making an American Public after the Revolution Women performers played a vital role in the development of American and transatlantic entertainment, celebrity culture, and gender ideology. Sara E. Lampert examines the lives, careers, and fame of overlooked figures from Europe and the United States whose work in melodrama, ballet, and other stage shows shocked and excited early U.S. audiences. These women lived and performed the tensions and contradictions of nineteenth-century gender roles, sparking debates about women’s place in public life. Yet even their unprecedented wealth and prominence failed to break the patriarchal family structures that governed their lives and conditioned their careers. Inevitable contradictions arose. The burgeoning celebrity culture of the time forced women stage stars to don the costumes of domestic femininity even as the unsettled nature of life in the theater defied these ideals.

OCTOBER 280 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 19 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04335-2 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08526-0 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05223-1 A volume in the series Women, Gender, and Sexuality in American History, edited by Susan Cahn, Wanda A. Hendricks, and Deborah Gray White

A revealing foray into a lost time, Starring Women returns a generation of performers to their central place in the early history of American theater. SARA E. LAMPERT is an associate professor of history at the University of South Dakota.

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MUSIC

BACH PERSPECTIVES, VOLUME 13

Bach Reworked

Edited by LAURA BUCH Parody, transcription, adaptation “This intriguing collection casts new light on Bach’s influences and impact through illuminating case studies in how composers borrow, adapt, and rework music of their predecessors, spanning from Bach’s own reworkings to ways his music has infused modern jazz and funk.” —J. PETER BURKHOLDER, author of Charles Ives: The Ideas Behind the Music Scholars and performers have long noted J. S. Bach’s abundant use of parody procedures: that is, the recycling and reworking of pre-­existing material from his own compositions or from other sources. Laura Buch edits essays exploring how the composer parodied the work of others and how other composers did the same with him. The contributors delve into the works of Baroque-era composers from Bach himself to C. P. E. Bach, Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer, and Ferruccio Busoni. But they also cast a wider net, investigating the ways Bach’s music cross-pollinates with contemporary composer-performers John Lewis and the Modern Jazz Quartet, and keyboardist Bernie Worrell and Parliament-Funkadelic. The diverse contexts illuminate a broad range of parody techniques, from structural scaffolding and contrapuntal elaboration to integration with stylistic languages far removed from the Baroque.

DECEMBER 176 PAGES. 7 X 10 INCHES 14 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 64 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 19 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04363-5 $60.00x £48.00 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05251-4 A volume in the series Bach Perspectives All rights: University of Illinois

An insightful look at how composers build on each other’s work, Bach Reworked reveals how nuanced understandings of parody procedures can fuel both musical innovation and historically informed performance. Contributors: Stephen A. Crist, Ellen Exner, Moira Leanne Hill, Erinn E. Knyt, and Markus Zepf LAURA BUCH is an editor of C. P. E. Bach: The Complete Works, a project of The Packard Humanities Institute, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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ETHNOMUSICOLOGY / EDUCATION

AMERICAN GAMELAN AND THE ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL IMAGINATION ELIZABETH A. CLENDINNING Gamelan history and practice in the diaspora "An ambitious work that can really spark scholarship that intersects ethnomusicology, performance studies, and the scholarship on teaching and learning. Clendinning discusses the positive aspects of world music ensembles, but is also open about the ethical issues involved in running a gamelan in an institution of higher education." —ERIC HUNG, Music of Asian America Research Center Gamelan and American academic institutions have maintained their close association for more than sixty years. Elizabeth A. Clendinning illuminates what it means to devote one’s life to world music ensemble education by examining the career and community surrounding the Balinese-American performer and teacher I Made Lasmawan. Weaving together stories of Indonesian and American practitioners, colleagues, and friends, Clendinning shows the impact of academic world music ensembles on the local and transnational communities devoted to education and the performing arts. While arguing for the importance of such ensembles, Clendinning also spotlights how performers and educators use them to create stable and rewarding artistic communities. Cross-cultural ensemble education emerges as a worthy goal for students and teachers alike, particularly at a time when people around the world express more enthusiasm about raising walls to keep others out rather than building bridges to invite them in.

SEPTEMBER 264 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 6 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 MAPS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04338-3 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08529-1 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05226-2 Publication supported by a grant from the Bruno Nettl Endowment for Ethnomusicology.

ELIZABETH A. CLENDINNING is an assistant professor of music at Wake Forest University.

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ANTHROPOLOGY / FOLKLORE

NEW IN PAPER

STORYTELLING IN SIBERIA

The Olonkho Epic in a Changing World

ROBIN P. HARRIS How the Sakha revived a nearly extinct art form “A most welcome contribution to the analysis of the problems facing traditional art forms in the modern world.” —JOURNAL OF AMERICAN FOLKLORE Olonkho, the epic narrative and song tradition of Siberia’s Sakha people, declined to the brink of extinction during the Soviet era. In 2005, UNESCO’s Masterpiece Proclamation sparked a resurgence of interest in olonkho by recognizing its important role in humanity’s oral and intangible heritage. SEPTEMBER

Drawing on her ten years of living in the Russian North, Robin P. Harris documents how the Sakha have used the Masterpiece program to revive olonkho and strengthen their cultural identity. Harris’s personal relationships with and primary research among Sakha people provide vivid insights into understanding olonkho and the attenuation, revitalization, transformation, and sustainability of the Sakha’s cultural reemergence. Her interdisciplinary analysis considers the nature of folklore alongside ethnomusicology, anthropology, comparative literature, and cultural studies to shed light on how marginalized peoples are revitalizing their own cultural heritage.

256 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 14 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 LINE DRAWING, 1 MAP, 3 CHARTS, 3 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 15 TABLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08552-9 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09988-5 A volume in the series Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World

ROBIN P. HARRIS is an associate professor at Dallas International University and serves as the director of DIU’s Center for Excellence in World Arts.

Publication of this book was supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the L. J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund. All rights: University of Illinois

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ALWAYS THE QUEEN

The Denise LaSalle Story

DENISE LASALLE, with DAVID WHITEIS The autobiography of the southern soul superstar “I’ve known Denise LaSalle for many years personally, professionally, and spiritually. Her legacy will live on forever. I am blessed to have been a ‘Knight in Her Majesty’s court.’ Long live the Queen.” —BENNY LATIMORE Denise LaSalle’s journey took her from rural Mississippi to an unquestioned reign as the queen of soul-blues. From her early R&B classics to bold and bawdy demands for satisfaction, LaSalle updated the classic blueswoman’s stance of powerful independence while her earthy lyrics about relationships connected with generations of female fans. Off-stage, she enjoyed ongoing success as a record label owner, entrepreneur, and genre-crossing songwriter.

MAY

As honest and no-nonsense as the artist herself, Always the Queen is LaSalle’s in-her-own-words story of a lifetime in music. Moving to Chicago as a teen, LaSalle launched a career in gospel and blues that eventually led to the chart-topping 1971 smash “Trapped by a Thing Called Love” and a string of R&B hits. She reinvented herself as a soul-blues artist as tastes changed and became a headliner on the revitalized southern soul circuit and at festivals nationwide and overseas. Revered for a tireless dedication to her music and fans, LaSalle continued to tour and record until shortly before her death.

256 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 37 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04307-9 $110.00x £91.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08494-2 $19.95 £15.99

DENISE LASALLE (1934–2018) was a soul and blues singer-songwriter and businesswoman. Her songs include “Trapped by a Thing Called Love,” “Married, but Not to Each Other,” and the modern-day soul-blues standards “A Lady in the Street,” “Don’t Jump My Pony,” and “Someone Else Is Steppin’ In.” LaSalle entered the Blues Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in 2015. DAVID WHITEIS is a journalist, writer, and educator living in Chicago. His books include Blues Legacy: Tradition and Innovation in Chicago and Southern Soul-Blues.

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MUSIC / AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

THE HEART OF A WOMAN

The Life and Music of Florence B. Price

RAE LINDA BROWN Edited and with a Foreword by Guthrie P. Ramsey Jr. Afterword by Carlene J. Brown An in-depth look at the groundbreaking black woman composer “Rae Linda Brown’s work extends beyond the conventional biography as it offers an analytical narrative that interrogates Price’s negotiation of the politics of race and gender, her role in advancing the black symphonic aesthetic, and her dedication to social change and racial equality on and off of the concert stage.” —TAMMY L. KERNODLE, author of Soul on Soul: The Life and Music of Mary Lou Williams JUNE

The Heart of a Woman offers the first-ever biography of Florence B. Price, a composer whose career spanned both the Harlem and Chicago Renaissances, and the first African American woman to gain national recognition for her works.

336 PAGES 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 18 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 49 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Price’s twenty-five years in Chicago formed the core of a working life that saw her create three hundred works in diverse genres, including symphonies and orchestral suites, art songs, vocal and choral music, and arrangements of spirituals. Through interviews and a wealth of material from public and private archives, Rae Linda Brown illuminates Price’s major works while exploring the considerable depth of her achievement. Brown also traces the life of the extremely private individual from her childhood in Little Rock through her time at the New England Conservatory, her extensive teaching, and her struggles with racism, poverty, and professional jealousies. In addition, Brown provides musicians and scholars with dozens of musical examples.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04323-9 $125.00x £103.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08510-9 $29.95s £23.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05211-8 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by grants from the H. Earle Johnson Fund of the Society for American Music, the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund, and the Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy (www.wophil.org).

RAE LINDA BROWN was a professor at the University of Michigan and a professor and Robert and Marjorie Rawlins Chair of the Department of Music at the University of California, Irvine. She was the author of Music, Printed and Manuscript, in the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Negro Arts and Letters: An Annotated Catalog. She died in 2017. GUTHRIE P. RAMSEY JR. is the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of Music at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop and The Amazing Bud Powell: Black Genius, Jazz History, and the Challenge of Bebop.

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WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES / EDUCATION

DEGREES OF DIFFERENCE

Reflections of Women of Color on Graduate School

Edited by KIMBERLY D. McKEE and DENISE A. DELGADO Foreword by Karen J. Leong A go-to resource for helping women of color survive, and thrive, in grad school “The personal and the political are addressed in this multi­ faceted collection, which is a blanket of resources for graduate students and tenure-track academics, as well as for seasoned and tenured committee members, serving on university rank and tenure committees. Bravas! This is a great addition to a collection of groundbreaking literature in this area.” —GABRIELLA GUTIÉRREZ Y MUHS, editor of Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

MAY 232 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES

University commitments to diversity and inclusivity have yet to translate into support for women of color graduate students. Sexism, classism, homophobia, racial microaggressions, alienation, disillusionment, a lack of institutional and departmental support, limited help from family and partners, imposter syndrome, narrow reading lists—all remain commonplace. Indifference to the struggles of women of color in graduate school and widespread dismissal of their work further poison an atmosphere that suffocates not only ambition but a person’s quality of life.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04318-5 $110.00x £91.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08505-5 $19.95s £15.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05206-4

In Degrees of Difference, women of color from diverse backgrounds give frank, unapologetic accounts of their battles—both internal and external—to navigate grad school and fulfill their ambitions. At the same time, the authors offer strategies for surviving the grind via stories of their own hard-won successes with self-care, building supportive communities, finding like-minded mentors, and resisting racism and unsupportive faculty and colleagues.

All rights: University of Illinois

Contributors: Aeriel A. Ashlee, Denise A. Delgado, Nwadiogo I. Ejiogu, Delia Fernández, Regina Emily Idoate, Karen J. Leong, Kimberly D. McKee, Délice Mugabo, Carrie Sampson, Arianna Taboada, Jenny Heijun Wills, and Soha Youssef KIMBERLY D. MCKEE is an associate professor in the Integrative, Religious, and Intercultural Studies Department at Grand Valley State University and the author of Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States. DENISE A. DELGADO received her Ph.D. from the Ohio State University and works as an analyst and trainer.

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FILM / MUSIC

VOICING THE CINEMA

Film Music and the Integrated Soundtrack

Edited by JAMES BUHLER and HANNAH LEWIS Daring new ideas on what we hear at the movies “Including works by many of film music’s finest scholars, the diversity of articles and approaches here is most welcome. Some pieces will prove to be real game-changers, beautifully written and argued.” —CARYL FLINN, author of Brass Diva: The Life and Legends of Ethel Merman Theorists of the soundtrack have helped us understand how the voice and music in the cinema impact a spectator’s experience. James Buhler and Hannah Lewis edit in-depth essays from many of film music’s most influential scholars in order to explore fascinating issues around vococentrism, the voice in cinema, and music’s role in the integrated soundtrack.

MARCH

The collection is divided into four sections. The first explores historical approaches to technology in the silent film, French cinema during the transition era, the films of the so-called New Hollywood, and the post-production sound business. The second investigates the practice of the singing voice in diverse repertories such as Bergman’s films, Eighties teen films, and girls’ voices in Brave and Frozen. The third considers the auteuristic voice of the soundtrack in works by Kurosawa, Weir, and others. A last section on narrative and vococentrism moves from The Martian and horror film to the importance of background music and the state of the soundtrack at the end of vococentrism.

352 PAGES 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 66 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 12 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 6 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04300-0 $125.00x £103.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08486-7 $30.00x £23.99

JAMES BUHLER is a professor of music theory at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Theories of the Soundtrack and a coauthor of Hearing the Movies: Music and Sound in Film History. HANNAH LEWIS is an assistant professor of musicology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of French Musical Culture and the Coming of Sound Cinema.

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NEW IN PAPER

PEGGY SEEGER

A Life of Music, Love, and Politics

JEAN R. FREEDMAN A full-length biography of the folk music legend “O, how I love this book! It gives me everything I wanted to know about my friend, the salty and sweet Peggy Seeger and her unique and prolific family. All the pain is there, but so are the achievements and the joys. This book goes on my shelf next to The Mayor of MacDougal Street, and I can offer no higher praise than that.” —TOM PAXTON Born into folk music’s first family, Peggy Seeger has blazed her own trail artistically and personally. Jean R. Freedman draws on a wealth of research and conversations with Seeger to tell the life story of one of music’s most charismatic performers and tireless advocates.

FEBRUARY

Here is the story of Seeger’s multifaceted career from her youth to her pivotal role in the American and British folk revivals, from her instrumental virtuosity to her tireless work on behalf of environmental and feminist causes. Freedman also delves into Seeger’s fruitful partnership with Ewan MacColl, including their creation of the renowned Festival of Fools, their legendary Radio Ballads series, their many projects with the young folksingers of the Critics Group, and their recording company Blackthorne Records.

408 PAGES 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 19 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

JEAN R. FREEDMAN earned a Ph.D. in folklore from Indiana University. She is the author of Whistling in the Dark: Memory and Culture in Wartime London.

A volume in the series Music in American Life

PAPERBACK 978-0-252-08513-0 $19.95 £15.95 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09921-2

Publication of this book was supported by grants from the Manfred Bukofzer Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and from the L. J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund. All rights: University of Illinois

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MUSIC / WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

HILLBILLY MAIDENS, OKIES, AND COWGIRLS

Women’s Country Music, 1930–1960

STEPHANIE VANDER WEL Pioneering women and their soundtrack of searching in country music “Women’s struggle for inclusion is one of the biggest stories in country music today. Vander Wel’s rich history shows how female artists fought for a voice and made it central to country’s stories of gender, class, and migration in mid– twentieth-century America.” —NADINE HUBBS, author of Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music From the 1930s to the 1960s, the booming popularity of country music threw a spotlight on a new generation of innovative women artists. These individuals blazed trails as singers, musicians, and performers even as the industry hemmed in their potential popularity with labels like woman hillbilly, singing cowgirl, and honkytonk angel.

MARCH 256 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 11 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 3 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Stephanie Vander Wel looks at the careers of artists like Patsy Montana, Rose Maddox, and Kitty Wells against the backdrop of country music’s golden age. Analyzing recordings and appearances on radio, film, and television, she connects performances to real and imagined places and examines how the music sparked new ways for women listeners to imagine the open range, the honky-tonk, and the home. The music also captured the tensions felt by women facing geographic disruption and economic uncertainty. While classic songs and heartfelt performances might ease anxieties, the subject matter underlined women’s ambivalent relationships to industrialism, middle-class security, and established notions of femininity.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04308-6 $110.00x £91.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08495-9 $25.95s £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05194-4 Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Judith McCulloh Endowment for American Music, and by the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

STEPHANIE VANDER WEL is an associate professor of music at the University at Buffalo.

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MUSIC

NEW IN PAPER

THE STRING QUARTETS OF BEETHOVEN Edited by WILLIAM KINDERMAN Exploring anew the world’s most important single body of classical chamber music “As other scholars read and digest the ideas expressed in these essays, they will be encouraged to reexamine works both by Beethoven and other composers in light of the concepts and methodologies presented here. This book is highly recommended reading for anyone interested in Beethoven’s quartets, or any facet of Beethoven’s music, as well as for libraries serving research and graduate programs in music history, musicology, or music theory.” —NOTES

MARCH 360 PAGES 7 X 10 INCHES 282 LINE DRAWINGS, 8 TABLES

“We do not understand music—it understands us.” This aphorism by Theodor W. Adorno expresses the quandary and the fascination many listeners have felt in approaching Beethoven’s late quartets. No group of compositions occupies a more central position in chamber music, yet the meaning of the works continues to stimulate debate. William Kinderman’s The String Quartets of Beethoven stands as the most detailed and comprehensive exploration of the subject. It collects new work by leading international scholars who draw on a variety of historical sources and analytical approaches to offer fresh insights into the aesthetics of the quartets, probing expressive and structural features that have hitherto received little attention. Kinderman also includes an appendix with updated information on the chronology and sources of the quartets and a detailed bibliography.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08515-4 $35.00x £27.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09162-9 All rights: University of Illinois

WILLIAM KINDERMAN is Professor and Inaugural Leon M. Klein and Elaine Krown Klein Chair of Performance Studies in the Herb Alpert School of Music at UCLA. His publications include Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations, Beethoven, and the three-volume Artaria 195: Beethoven’s Sketchbook for the Missa solemnis and the Piano Sonata in E Major, Opus 109.

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MUSIC

ARTFUL NOISE

Percussion Literature in the Twentieth Century

THOMAS SIWE The authoritative text on the artists, works, and innovations of the percussion revolution “Simply stated, this is a singular contribution detailing the history of percussion literature in the twentieth century made by one of the most knowledgeable percussion educators who was witness to many of the composers and compositions he discusses.” —KATHLEEN KASTNER, Wheaton College Conservatory of Music Twentieth-century composers created thousands of original works for solo percussion and percussion ensemble. Concise and ideal for the classroom, Artful Noise offers an essential and much-needed survey of this unique literature. Percussionist Thomas Siwe organizes and analyzes the groundbreaking musical literature that arose during the twentieth century. Focusing on innovations in style and the evolution of the percussion ensemble, Siwe offers a historical overview that connects the music to scoring techniques, new instrumentation and evolving technologies as well as world events. Discussions of representative pieces by seminal composers examine the resources a work requires, its construction, and how it relates to other styles that developed during the same period. In addition, Siwe details the form and purpose of many of the compositions while providing background information on noteworthy artists. Each chapter is supported with musical examples and concludes with a short list of related works specifically designed to steer musicians and instructors alike toward profitable explorations of composers, styles, and eras.

JULY 240 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 2 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 88 MUSIC EXAMPLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04313-0 $110.00x £91.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08500-0 $28.00x £21.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05201-9

THOMAS SIWE is a professor emeritus of music at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Percussion: A Course of Study for the Future Band and Orchestra Director and Ten Hall of Fame Snare Drum Solos, and a member of the Percussive Arts Society’s Hall of Fame.

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ETHNOMUSICOLOGY / MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES

MUSICAL ETHICS AND ISLAM

The Art of Playing the Ney

BANU ŞENAY The “sweet servitude” of learning the ney in today’s Turkey “Musical Ethics and Islam is easy on the mind’s eye and the ear, full of insight, and a genuine pleasure to read. Şenay well understands her instrument, the crafting of its sounds and the complex demands of her teacher’s ‘jealous gift.’ It charts a new and distinct route through the cultural complexities of Islamic revival in Turkey and beyond; her conclusions will be of real interest to anthropologists of music and of Islam alike.” —MARTIN STOKES, coeditor of Islam and Popular Culture APRIL

After the establishment of the Turkish Republic, Turkey’s secularized society disdained the ney, the Sufi reed flute long associated with Islam. The instrument’s remarkable revival in today’s cities has inspired the creation of teaching and learning sites that range from private ney studios to cultural and religious associations and from university clubs to mosque organizations.

240 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 12 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 3 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 1 TABLE

Banu Şenay documents the years-long training required to become a neyzen—a player of the ney. The process holds a transformative power that invites students to create a new way of living that involves alternative relationships with the self and others, changing perceptions of the city, and a dedication to craftsmanship. Şenay visits reed harvesters and travels from studios to workshops to explore the practical processes of teaching and learning. She also becomes an apprentice ney-player herself, exploring the desire for spirituality that encourages apprentices and masters alike to pursue ney music and its scaffolding of Islamic ethics and belief.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04302-4 $110.00x £91.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08488-1 $28.00x £21.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05188-3 All rights: University of Illinois

BANU ŞENAY is a lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Macquarie University, Australia. She is the author of Beyond Turkey’s Borders: Long-distance Kemalism, State Politics, and the Turkish Diaspora.

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ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

SIGNS OF THE SPIRIT

Music and the Experience of Meaning in Ndau Ceremonial Life

TONY PERMAN Investigating the power of music to shape emotion and community in Zimbabwe “Perhaps of the greatest benefit for anyone in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, Signs of the Spirit provides the most thorough and coherent general theory of music and emotion to date. Perman’s theory, in turn, is based on a highly specified explanation of the ways that musical performance and emotion are meaningful and, especially, the ways iconic and symbolic generality are transformed into an unqualified experience of the indexical here-and-now.” —THOMAS TURINO, author of Music as Social Life: The Politics of Participation

JUNE 280 PAGES 6 X 9 INCHES 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 MAP, 9 CHARTS, 15 MUSIC EXAMPLES

In 2005, Tony Perman attended a ceremony alongside the living and the dead. His visit to a Zimbabwe farm brought him into contact with the madhlozi, outsider spirits that Ndau people rely upon for guidance, protection, and their collective prosperity.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04325-3 $110.00x £91.00

Perman’s encounters with the spirits, the mediums who bring them back, and the accompanying rituals form the heart of his ethnographic account of how the Ndau experience ceremonial musicking. As Perman witnessed other ceremonies, he discovered that music and dancing shape the emotional lives of Ndau individuals by inviting them to experience life’s milestones or cope with its misfortunes as a group. Signs of the Spirit explores the historical, spiritual, and social roots of ceremonial action and details how that action influences the Ndau’s collective approach to their future. The result is a vivid ethnomusicological journey that delves into the immediacy of musical experience and the forces that transform ceremonial performance into emotions and community.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08517-8 $30.00x £23.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05213-2 All rights: University of Illinois

TONY PERMAN is an assistant professor of music at Grinnell College.

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EARL SCRUGGS AND FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREAKDOWN

The Making of an American Classic

THOMAS GOLDSMITH The breakneck banjo tune that became a song for the ages “The Bluegrass Reader successfully manages to appeal to both the bluegrass insider and the newcomer to the genre, and in the process has given well-deserved new life to some masterful bits of writing.” —BLUEGRASS UNLIMITED

“An enormous contribution to the history of bluegrass and a fascinating read, well organized and well told. Goldsmith’s lengthy interview with Earl is a treasure trove of information not only about ‘Foggy Mountain Breakdown’ but about the early days of bluegrass and specifically Earl’s working relationship with Bill Monroe, which has long been clouded in mystery.” —MURPHY HICKS HENRY, author of Pretty Good for a Girl: Women in Bluegrass 200 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 12 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Recorded in 1949, “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” changed the face of American music. Earl Scruggs’s instrumental essentially transformed the folk culture that came before it while helping to energize bluegrass’s entry into the mainstream in the 1960s. The song has become a gateway to bluegrass for musicians and fans alike as well as a happily inescapable track in film and television.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04296-6 $99.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08478-2 $19.95 £14.99

Thomas Goldsmith explores the origins and influence of “Foggy Mountain Break­ down” against the backdrop of Scruggs’s legendary career. Interviews with Scruggs, his wife Louise, disciple Béla Fleck, and sidemen like Curly Seckler, Mac Wiseman, and Jerry Douglas shed light on topics like Scruggs’s musical evolution and his working relationship with Bill Monroe. As Goldsmith shows, the captivating sound of “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” helped bring back the banjo from obscurity and distinguished the low-key Scruggs as a principal figure in American acoustic music.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05182-1 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported in part by a grant from the Judith McCulloh Endowment for American Music.

THOMAS GOLDSMITH is a music journalist. For more than thirty years, he has worked both in daily newspapers in North Carolina and Tennessee and as a freelance writer. He is the editor of The Bluegrass Reader and was the International Bluegrass Music Association’s Print Media Person of the Year.

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BLUES BEFORE SUNRISE 2

Interviews from the Chicago Scene

STEVE CUSHING Face-­to-­face with the blues, one more time “Cushing has provided a massive public service . . . with this enthralling volume.” —JUKE BLUES

“Rarely are sequels better than the originals, but Blues Before Sunrise 2 is a happy exception. Cushing delivers another truly significant contribution to the blues literature.” —EDWARD KOMARA, editor of Encyclopedia of the Blues In this new collection of interviews, Steve Cushing once again invites readers into the vaults of Blues Before Sunrise, his acclaimed nationally syndicated public radio show. Icons from Brewer Phillips (talking about his days with Memphis Minnie) to the Gay Sisters stand alongside figures like schoolteacher Flossie Franklin, who helped Leroy Carr pen some of his most famous tunes; saxman Abb Locke and his buddy Two-Gun Pete, a Chicago cop notorious for killing people in the line of duty; and Scotty ”The Dancing Tailor” Piper, a font of knowledge on the black entertainment scene of his day.

264 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 37 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04282-­9 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08465-­2 $24.95  £18.99

Cushing also devotes a section to religious artists, including the world-famous choir Wings Over Jordan and their travails touring and performing in the era of segregation. Another section focuses on the jazz-influenced Bronzeville scene that gave rise to Marl Young, Andrew Tibbs, and many others, while a handful of Cushing’s early brushes with the likes of Little Brother Montgomery, Sippi Wallace, and Blind John Davis round out the volume.

E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­05168-­5 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

Diverse and entertaining, Blues Before Sunrise 2 adds a chorus of new voices to the fascinating history of Chicago blues. STEVE CUSHING has hosted Blues Before Sunrise for forty years. He is the author of Blues Before Sunrise: The Radio Interviews and Pioneers of the Blues Revival.

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BLUES LEGACY

Tradition and Innovation in Chicago

DAVID WHITEIS Photographs by Peter M. Hurley Chicago blues artists performing against the backdrop of history “Appealing to serious jazz fans, Whiteis’s history serves as a handy reference to Chicago blues. “ —PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

“In his latest history on Chicago blues, Whiteis is, as usual, informative and stimulating, while addressing some considerably contentious issues. The author has long demonstrated that he is one of the best writers on blues. He has a way with words that can paint a vivid portrait of his subject or scene.” —ROBERT PRUTER, author of Chicago Soul 336 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 49 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Chicago blues musicians parlayed a genius for innovation and emotional honesty into a music revered around the world. As the blues evolves, it continues to provide a soundtrack to, and a dynamic commentary on, the African American experience: the legacy of slavery; historic promises and betrayals; opportunity and disenfranchisement; and the ongoing struggle for freedom. Through it all, the blues remains steeped in survivorship and triumph, a music that dares to stare down life in all its injustice and iniquity and still laugh—and dance—in its face.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04288-1 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08470-6 $24.95 £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05174-6

David Whiteis delves into how the current and upcoming Chicago blues generations carry on this legacy. Drawing on in-person interviews, Whiteis places the artists within the ongoing social and cultural reality their work reflects and helps create. Beginning with James Cotton, Eddie Shaw, and other bequeathers, he moves through an all-star council of elders like Otis Rush and Buddy Guy and on to inheritors and today’s heirs apparent like Ronnie Baker Brooks, Shemekia Copeland, and Nellie “Tiger” Travis.

A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported in part by a grant from the Judith McCulloh Endowment for American Music. All rights: University of Illinois

Insightful and wide-ranging, Blues Legacy reveals a constantly adapting art form that, whatever the challenges, maintains its links to a rich musical past. DAVID WHITEIS is a journalist, writer, and educator living in Chicago. He is a past winner of the Blues Foundation’s Keeping the Blues Alive Award for Achievement in Journalism. He is the author of Southern Soul-Blues and Chicago Blues: Portraits and Stories. PETER M. HURLEY is a photographer, muralist, graphic designer, and songwriter, and an active contributing photographer to Living Blues magazine.

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ROCKING THE CLOSET

How Little Richard, Johnnie Ray, Liberace, and Johnny Mathis Queered Pop Music

VINCENT L. STEPHENS Pushing boundaries with an all-­star bill of hitmakers “Well-argued and thoughtful.” —ARTS FUSE

“This is culturally and historically informed scholarship of the highest order. Stephens seeks to question and complicate the established historical way of thinking and to provide a nuanced reading of queerness that admits the powerful possibilities of the ‘open secret’ in a pre-­Liberation era when popular male musicians neither could nor necessarily desired to come out of the closet.” —THEO CATEFORIS, author of Are We Not New Wave? Modern Pop at the turn of the 1980s

248 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 16 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

The all-embracing, ”whaddya got?” nature of rebellion in Fifties America included pop music’s unlikely challenge to entrenched notions of masculinity. Within that upheaval, four prominent artists dared to behave in ways that let the public assume—but not see—their queerness. That these artists cultivated ambiguous sexual personas often reflected an understandable fear but also a struggle to fulfill personal and professional expectations.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04280-­5 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08463-­8 $27.95s  £20.99 E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­05166-­1

Vincent L. Stephens confronts notions of the closet—both coming out and staying in—by analyzing the careers of Liberace, Johnny Mathis, Johnnie Ray, and Little Richard. Appealing to audiences hungry for novelty and exoticism, the four pop icons used performance and queering techniques that ran the gamut. Liberace’s flamboyance shared a spectrum with Mathis’s intimate sensitivity while Ray’s overwrought displays as “Mr. Emotion” seemed worlds apart from Little Richard’s raise-the-roof joyousness. As Stephens shows, the quartet not only thrived in an era of gray flannel manhood, they pioneered the ways generations of later musicians would consciously adopt sexual mystery as an appealing and proven route to success.

A volume in the series New Perspectives on Gender in Music, edited by Suzanne Cusick and Henry Spiller Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. All rights: University of Illinois

VINCENT L. STEPHENS is the director of the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity and a contributing faculty member in music at Dickinson College. He is a coeditor of Post Racial America? An Interdisciplinary Study.

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THE ARITHMETIC OF LISTENING

Tuning Theory and History for the Impractical Musician

KYLE GANN Seeing through the secret lens of tuning to new musical horizons “There is unlikely to be a better book that, confined by the limitations of mere words, can provide a comprehensive review of the many things Ashley has achieved. A real page-turner” —EXAMINER.COM

“Not only explains the materials and history of this music in great detail but also—and probably most importantly—illustrates how these scales and harmonies are used in actual living, breathing music. What has always been missing from the literature is an overarching guide to the field that is clearly written for both the amateur and professional. This is that book.” —JOHN SCHNEIDER, Grammy Award–winning producer 312 PAGES. 7 X 10 INCHES 49 CHARTS, 107 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 4 TABLES, 20 EQUATIONS

”Tuning is the secret lens through which the history of music falls into focus,” says Kyle Gann. Yet in Western circles, no other musical issue is so ignored, so taken for granted, so shoved into the corners of musical discourse.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04258-­4 $110.00x £88.00

A classroom essential and an invaluable reference, The Arithmetic of Listening offers beginners the grounding in music theory necessary to find their own way into microtonality and the places it may take them. Moving from ancient Greece to the present, Kyle Gann delves into the infinite tunings available to any musician who feels straitjacketed by obedience to standardized Western European tuning. He introduces the concept of the harmonic series and demonstrates its relationship to equal-tempered and well-tempered tuning. He also explores recent experimental tuning models that exploit smaller intervals between pitches to create new sounds and harmonies.

PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08441-­6 $34.95s  £26.99 E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­05142-­5 Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Dragan Plamenac Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Systematic and accessible, The Arithmetic of Listening provides a much-needed primer for the wide range of tuning systems that have informed Western music. Audio examples demonstrating the musical ideas in The Arithmetic of Listening can be found at: www.kylegann.com/Arithmetic.html

All rights: University of Illinois

KYLE GANN is a composer and the Taylor Hawver and Frances Bortle Hawver Professor of Music at Bard College. His books include Charles Ives’s Concord, No Such Thing as Silence: John Cage’s 4’33”, and Robert Ashley.

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HOT FEET AND SOCIAL CHANGE

African Dance and Diaspora Communities

Edited by KARIAMU WELSH, ESAILAMA G. A. DIOUF, and YVONNE DANIEL Foreword by Thomas F. DeFrantz Preface by Danny Glover, Harry Belafonte, and James Counts Early Indelible stories of living African dance within the African diaspora “Many of the authors are themselves the sources of both dance traditions created within the last decades and of significant studies about them. This work is unprecedented and, thanks to its insider perspectives, only possible as the editors have constructed it.” —SHEILA S. WALKER, editor of African Roots, American Cultures: Africa in the Creation of the Americas

328 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 11 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS, 5 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 LINE DRAWINGS, 2 MAPS, 2 CHARTS, 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE

The popularity and profile of African dance have exploded across the African diaspora in the last fifty years. Hot Feet and Social Change presents traditionalists, neo-traditionalists, and contemporary artists, teachers, and scholars telling some of the thousands of stories lived and learned by people in the field. Concentrating on eight major cities in the United States, the essays explode myths about African dance while demonstrating its power to awaken identity, self-worth, and community respect. These voices of experience share personal accounts of living African traditions, their first encounters with and ultimate embrace of dance, and what teaching African-based dance has meant to them and their communities. Throughout, the editors alert readers to established and ongoing research and provide links to critical contributions by African and Caribbean dance experts.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04295-9 $125.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08477-5 $30.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05181-4 Publication of this book was supported in part by the University of Illinois Press Fund for Anthropology.

Contributors: Ausettua Amor Amenkum, Abby Carlozzo, Steven Cornelius, Yvonne Daniel, Charles “Chuck” Davis, Esailama G. A. Diouf, Indira Etwaroo, Habib Iddrisu, Julie B. Johnson, C. Kemal Nance, Halifu Osumare, Amaniyea Payne, William SerranoFranklin, and Kariamu Welsh

All rights: University of Illinois

KARIAMU WELSH is a professor emerita of dance at Temple University. Her books include Umfundalai: An African Dance Technique. ESAILAMA G. A. DIOUF is the founding director of Bisemi Foundation Inc. and the Arts and Culture Consultant at the San Francisco Foundation. YVONNE DANIEL is a professor emerita of dance and Afro-American studies at Smith College. Her books include Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomblé and Caribbean and Atlantic Diaspora Dance: Igniting Citizenship. www.press.uillinois.edu

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A GURU’S JOURNEY

Pandit Chitresh Das and Indian Classical Dance in Diaspora

SARAH MORELLI The work and art of a dance master in America “Morelli has crafted a narrative filled with powerful historical, biographical, and musical insights while also capturing the human dimensions of musical performance and transmission. An exciting contribution to the ethno­ musicological literature and a striking study of issues surrounding migration, ethnicity, and gender.” —KAY KAUFMAN SHELEMAY, author of Soundscapes: Exploring Music in a Changing World, third edition An important modern exponent of Asian dance, Pandit Chitresh Das brought kathak to the United States in 1970. The North Indian classical dance has since become an important art form within the greater Indian diaspora. Yet its adoption outside of India raises questions about what happens to artistic practices when we separate them from their broader cultural contexts.

270 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 38 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 32 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 3 TABLES

A Guru’s Journey provides an ethnographic study of the dance form in the San Francisco Bay Area community formed by Das. Sarah Morelli, a kathak dancer and former Das student, investigates issues in teaching, learning, and performance that developed around Das during his time in the United States. In modifying kathak’s form and teaching for Western students, Das negotiates questions of Indianness and non-Indianness, gender, identity, and race. Morelli lays out these discussions for readers with the goal of deepening their knowledge of kathak aesthetics, technique, and theory. She also shares the intricacies of footwork, facial expression in storytelling, and other aspects of kathak while tying them to the cultural issues that inform the dance.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04286-7 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08468-3 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05172-2 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book is supported by grants from the University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music and the AHSS Book Publication Support Fund and from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

SARAH MORELLI is an associate professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Denver and a performing kathak artist.

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JOSEPHINE BAKER AND KATHERINE DUNHAM

Dances in Literature and Cinema

HANNAH DURKIN Two great artists creating new visions of black womanhood “Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham is a tour-­de-­force brilliantly analyzing the cinematic depictions in a black Atlantic context. The full implications of the European depictions of these wonderful dancers is teased out through exhaustive attention to dancing techniques, cinematography, and the two women’s autobiographical writings. A must-read for all scholars of African American performance and cultural politics.” —ALAN RICE, author of Creating Memorials, Building Identities: The Politics of Memory in the Black Atlantic 272 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham were the two most acclaimed and commercially successful African American dancers of their era and among the first black women to enjoy international screen careers. Both also produced fascinating memoirs that provided vital insights into their artistic philosophies and choices. However, difficulties in accessing and categorizing their works on the screen and on the page have obscured their contributions to film and literature.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04262-­1 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08445-­4 $27.95s  £20.99

Hannah Durkin investigates Baker’s and Dunham’s films and writings to shed new light on their legacies as transatlantic artists and civil rights figures. Their trailblazing dancing and choreography reflected a belief that they could use film to confront racist assumptions while also imagining—within significant confines— new aesthetic possibilities for black women. Their writings, meanwhile, revealed their creative process, engagement with criticism, and the ways each mediated cultural constructions of black women’s identities. Durkin pays particular attention to the ways dancing bodies function as ever-changing signifiers and de-stabilizing transmitters of cultural identity. In addition, she offers an overdue appraisal of Baker’s and Dunham’s places in cinematic and literary history.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05146-3 All rights: University of Illinois

HANNAH DURKIN is a lecturer in literature and film at Newcastle University. She is a coeditor of Visualising Slavery: Art Across the African Diaspora.

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UNSETTLED SCORES

Politics, Hollywood, and the Film Music of Aaron Copland and Hanns Eisler

SALLY BICK Two legendary composers and high art’s uneasy partnership with Hollywood “Sally Bick has given us a thoughtful, fair-minded, and unfailingly engaging study of radical undercurrents in 1930s and 1940s Hollywood, with an emphasis on two very different composers, Aaron Copland and Hanns Eisler. Bick has the rare ability to write about abstract and technical aspects of music in a manner that will enlighten both scholar and general listener.” —TIM PAGE, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for criticism The Hollywood careers of Aaron Copland and Hanns Eisler brought the composers and their high art sensibility into direct conflict with the premier producer of America’s potent mass culture. Drawn by Hollywood’s potential to reach—and edify—the public, Copland and Eisler expertly wove sophisticated musical ideas into Hollywood and, each in his own distinctive way, left an indelible mark on movie history.

258 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 1 COLOR PHOTOGRAPH, 10 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 12 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 4 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04281-2 $99.00x  £79.00

Sally Bick’s dual study of Copland and Eisler pairs interpretations of their writings on film composing with a close examination of their first Hollywood projects: Eisler’s score for Hangmen Also Die! and Copland’s music for Of Mice and Men. Bick illuminates the different ways the two composers treated a film score as means of expressing their political ideas on society, capitalism, and the human condition. She also delves into their often conflicted attempts to adapt their music to fit Hollywood’s commercial demands, an enterprise that took place even as they wrote hostile critiques of the film industry.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08464-5 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05167-8 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund.

SALLY BICK is an associate professor of music at the University of Windsor.

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NEW IN PAPER

GEORGE SZELL’S REIGN

Behind the Scenes with the Cleveland Orchestra

MARCIA HANSEN KRAUS Shaping dissonance into beauty with the master conductor “The author gives us an entertaining and revealing picture of Szell working with his musicians over the years. After you read this, you will know him better than if it had been a mere biography. When you finish a chapter, you are eager to go on to the next because it’s a fascinating tale—and sometimes it’s even rather amazing.” —AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE George Szell was the Cleveland Orchestra’s towering presence for over a quarter of a century. From the boardroom to the stage, Szell’s powerful personality affected every aspect of a musical institution he reshaped in his own perfectionist image. 272 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 33 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE

Marcia Hansen Kraus’s participation in Cleveland’s classical musical scene allowed her an intimate view of Szell and his achievements. A musician herself and married to an oboist who worked under Szell, Kraus pulls back the curtain on this storied era through fascinating interviews with orchestra musicians and patrons. Their recollections combine with Kraus’s own to paint a portrait of a multifaceted individual who both earned and transcended his tyrannical reputation. If some musicians hated Szell, others loved him or at the least respected his fair-minded toughness. A great many remember playing under his difficult leadership as the high point in their professional lives.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08481-2 $24.95 £18.99

Filled with vivid backstage stories, George Szell’s Reign reveals the human side of a great orchestra—and how one visionary built a premier classical music institution.

All rights: University of Illinois

E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­09991-­5 A volume in the series Music in American Life

MARCIA HANSEN KRAUS is a musician and composer in Cleveland, Ohio.

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OVER HERE, OVER THERE

Transatlantic Conversations on the Music of World War I

Edited by WILLIAM BROOKS, CHRISTINA BASHFORD, and GAYLE MAGEE Enlisting music to fight the war to end all wars “With its stimulating blend of revealing music interpretation and compelling historical context, this volume brings the music of World War I to life in fascinating detail.” —CHRISTINA BAADE, author of Victory through Harmony: The BBC and Popular Music in World War II During the Great War, composers and performers created music that expressed common sentiments like patriotism, grief, and anxiety. Yet music also revealed the complexities of the partnership between France, Great Britain, Canada, and the United States. Sometimes, music reaffirmed a commitment to the shared wartime mission. At other times, it reflected conflicting views about the war from one nation to another or within a single nation.

266 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 23 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 16 CHARTS, 10 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Over Here, Over There examines how composition, performance, publication, recording, censorship, and policy shaped the Atlantic allies’ musical response to the war. The first section of the collection offers studies of individuals. The second concentrates on communities, whether local, transnational, or on the spectrum in between. Essay topics range from the sinking of the Lusitania through transformations of the entertainment industry to the influenza pandemic.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04270-­6 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08454-­6 $30.00x  £22.99 E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­05156-­2.

Contributors: Christina Bashford, William Brooks, Deniz Ertan, Barbara L. Kelly, Kendra Preston Leonard, Gayle Magee, Jeffrey Magee, Michelle Meinhart, Brian C. Thompson, and Patrick Warfield

Publication of this book was supported in part by the Otto Kinkeldey Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

WILLIAM BROOKS is a professor of music at the University of York and an associate professor emeritus of composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-­Champaign. CHRISTINA BASHFORD is an associate professor of musicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-­Champaign, and the author of The Pursuit of High Culture: John Ella and Chamber Music in Victorian London. GAYLE MAGEE is a professor of musicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-­Champaign, and the author of Charles Ives Reconsidered.

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ISLAND GOSPEL

Pentecostal Music and Identity in Jamaica and the United States

MELVIN L. BUTLER A rare look at Jamaican Pentecostals and their music “Island Gospel is a much-needed and important contribution to Pentecostal studies and ethnomusicology. . . . The book offers insights that will be useful to scholars and students across a wide range of fields and disciplines.” —JOURNAL OF FOLKLORE RESEARCH

“The most extensive ethnographic study to date of Pentecostal music practices. The author’s perspective as a practicing believer and respected ethnomusicologist provides unprecedented access to the community and a deep understanding of Pentecostal traditions and discourses.” —JUDAH COHEN, author of Jewish Liturgical Music in Nineteenth-Century America

224 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 4 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Pentecostals throughout Jamaica and the Jamaican diaspora use music to declare what they believe and where they stand in relation to religious and cultural outsiders. Yet the inclusion of secular music forms like ska, reggae, and dancehall complicates music’s place in social and ritual practice, challenging Jamaican Pentecostals to reconcile their religious and cultural identities.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04290-4 $99.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08472-0 $25.00x £18.99

Melvin L. Butler journeys into this crossing of boundaries and its impact on Jamaican congregations and the music they make. Using the concept of flow, Butler’s ethnography evokes both the experience of Spirit-influenced performance and the transmigrations that fuel the controversial sharing of musical and ritual resources between Jamaica and the United States. Highlighting constructions of religious and cultural identity, Butler illuminates music’s vital place in how the devout regulate spiritual and cultural flow while striving to maintain both the sanctity and fluidity of their evolving tradition.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05176-0 A volume in the series African American Music in Global Perspective, edited by Portia K. Maultsby Publication of this book is supported by a grant from the Bruno Nettl Endowment for Ethnomusicology.

Insightful and original, Island Gospel tells the many stories of how music and religious experience unite to create a sense of belonging among Jamaican people of faith.

All rights: University of Illinois

MELVIN L. BUTLER is an associate professor of musicology at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami and a saxophonist with Brian Blade and the Fellowship Band and many other artists.

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GAMELAN GIRLS

Gender, Childhood, and Politics in Balinese Music Ensembles

SONJA LYNN DOWNING The girls and young women reshaping gamelan in Bali “Downing effectively grounds her main argument and supporting points through analysis of her rich ethnographic data. Not only am I convinced, but I felt like I was in Bali with her, meeting her consultants, hearing them speak, getting a sense of their personalities, and watching them grow and mature.” —CHRISTINA SUNARDI, author of Stunning Males and Powerful Females: Gender and Tradition in East Javanese Dance In recent years, girls’ and mixed-gender ensembles have challenged the tradition of male-dominated gamelan performance. The change heralds a fundamental shift in how Balinese think about gender roles and the gender behavior taught in children’s music education. It also makes visible a national reorganization of the arts taking place within debates over issues like women’s rights and cultural preservation.

254 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 21 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 LINE DRAWING, 2 MAPS, 1 TABLE

Sonja Lynn Downing draws on over a decade of immersive ethnographic work to analyze the ways Balinese musical practices have influenced the processes behind these dramatic changes. As Downing shows, girls and young women assert their agency within the gamelan learning process to challenge entrenched notions of performance and gender. One dramatic result is the creation of new combinations of femininity, musicality, and Balinese identity that resist messages about gendered behavior from the Indonesian nation-state and beyond. Such experimentation expands the accepted gender aesthetics of gamelan performance but also sparks new understanding of the role children can and do play in ongoing debates about identity and power.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04271-­3 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08455-­3 $28.00x  £20.99 E-­BOOK, 978-­0-­252-­05157-­9 A volume in the series New Perspectives on Gender in Music, edited by Suzanne Cusick and Henry Spiller

SONJA LYNN DOWNING is an associate professor of ethnomusicology at Lawrence University.

Publication of this book is supported by a grant from the Bruno Nettl Endowment for Ethnomusicology. All rights: University of Illinois

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THE CASHAWAY PSALMODY Transatlantic Religion and Music in Colonial Carolina

STEPHEN A. MARINI Reviving spirit and music from the pages of a once-lost text “Offering a microhistory of meticulous precision, Marini forges through it a study of broad interdisciplinary scope, a rare synthesizing perspective on the musical, religious, commercial, and educational cultures of the eighteenth-century colonies. I know of no one else in the field who could have pulled off this feat the way Marini has— an exceptional combination of indefatigable archival research with practiced musical expertise.” —LEIGH ERIC SCHMIDT, author of Restless Souls: The Making of American Spirituality Singing master Durham Hills created The Cashaway Psalmody to give as a wedding present in 1770. A collection of tenor melody parts for 152 tunes and sixty-three texts, the Psalmody is the only surviving tunebook from the colonial-era South and one of the oldest sacred music manuscripts from the Carolinas. It is all the more remarkable for its sophistication: no similar document of the period matches Hills’s level of musical expertise, reportorial reach, and calligraphic skill.

478 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 14 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 MAPS, 3 CHARTS, 36 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 2 TABLES

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04284-3 $65.00x  £52.00

Stephen A. Marini, discoverer of The Cashaway Psalmody, offers the fascinating story of the tunebook and its many meanings. From its musical, literary, and religious origins in England, he moves on to the life of Durham Hills; how Carolina communities used the book; and the Psalmody’s significance in understanding how ritual song—transmitted via transatlantic music, lyrics, and sacred singing—shaped the era’s development. Marini also uses close musical and textual analyses to provide a critical study that offers music historians and musicologists valuable insights on the Psalmody and its period.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05170-8 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by the Lloyd Hibberd Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Meticulous in presentation and interdisciplinary in scope, The Cashaway Psalmody unlocks an important source for understanding life in the Lower South in the eighteenth century.

All rights: University of Illinois

STEPHEN A. MARINI is the Elisabeth Luce Moore Professor of Christian Studies and a professor of American religion and ethics at Wellesley College. He is the author of Sacred Song in America: Religion, Music, and Public Culture and contributing editor for sacred music for The Grove Dictionary of American Music, second edition, and singing-master of Norumbega Harmony, a choral ensemble specializing in eighteenth-century AngloAmerican psalmody.

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LEONARD BERNSTEIN AND THE LANGUAGE OF JAZZ KATHERINE BABER Shaping jazz into symphonies and show tunes—only in America “Baber offers compelling evidence of the composer’s integration of jazz and blues into his wide-ranging work.” —LIBRARY JOURNAL

“Baber’s discussions of Bernstein’s music are well-­ researched, cogent, and thoughtful. . . . A firm foundation on which to further investigate Bernstein’s music and from a variety of angles.” —ARTS FUSE Leonard Bernstein’s gifts for drama and connecting with popular audiences made him a central figure in twentieth-century American music. Though a Bernstein work might reference anything from modernism to cartoon ditties, jazz permeated every part of his musical identity as a performer, educator, and intellectual.

290 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 22 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 1 TABLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04237-9 $110.00x £88.00

Katherine Baber investigates how jazz in its many styles served Bernstein as a flexible, indeed protean, musical idea. As she shows, Bernstein used jazz to signify American identity with all its tensions and contradictions and to articulate community and conflict, irony and parody, and timely issues of race and gender. Baber provides a thoughtful look at how Bernstein’s use of jazz grew out of his belief in the primacy of tonality, music’s value as a unique form of human communication, and the formation of national identity in music. She also offers in-depth analyses of On the Town, West Side Story, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and other works to explore fascinating links between Bernstein’s art and issues like eclecticism, music’s relationship to social engagement, black-Jewish relations, and his own musical identity.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08416-4 $27.95s £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05121-0 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund, and from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

KATHERINE BABER is an associate professor of music history at the University of Redlands.

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DANCING REVOLUTION

Bodies, Space, and Sound in American Cultural History

CHRISTOPHER J. SMITH Using dance as a political language to unite and resist “A respected musicologist and vernacular musician, Smith offers a sprawling overview of vernacular dance in the US as evidence of people’s ‘contesting, constructing, and ­reinventing social orders’. Highly recommended.” —CHOICE

“A very ambitious and impressive study. The breadth and scope of the book are remarkable. It is highly engaging and readable and expands our understanding of the potential of dance (and music/sound) to serve as a potent force for social engagement.” —JULIE MALNIG, editor of Ballroom, Boogie, Shimmy Sham, Shake: A Social and Popular Dance Reader

280 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 5 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Throughout American history, patterns of political intent and impact have linked the wide range of dance movements performed in public places. Groups diverse in their cultural or political identities, or in both, long ago seized on street dancing, marches, open-air revival meetings, and theaters, as well as in dance halls and nightclubs, as a tool for contesting, constructing, or reinventing the social order.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04239-3 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08418-8 $27.95s £20.99

Dancing Revolution presents richly diverse case studies to illuminate these patterns of movement and influence in movement and sound in the history of American public life. Christopher J. Smith spans centuries, geographies, and cultural identities as he delves into a wide range of historical moments. These include the Godintoxicated public demonstrations of Shakers and Ghost Dancers in the First and Second Great Awakenings; creolized antebellum dance in cities from New Orleans to Bristol; the modernism and racial integration that imbued twentieth-century African American popular dance; the revolutionary connotations behind images of dance from Josephine Baker to the Marx Brothers; and public movement’s contributions to hip hop, antihegemonic protest, and other contemporary transgressive communities’ physical expressions of dissent and solidarity.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05123-4 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

Multidisciplinary and wide-ranging, Dancing Revolution examines how Americans turned the rhythms of history into the movement behind the movements. CHRISTOPHER J. SMITH is a professor, chair of musicology, and founding director of the Vernacular Music Center at the Texas Tech University School of Music. He is the author of the award-winning book The Creolization of American Culture: William Sidney Mount and the Roots of Blackface Minstrelsy. www.press.uillinois.edu

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CULTURAL SUSTAINABILITIES Music, Media, Language, Advocacy

Edited by TIMOTHY J. COOLEY Foreword by Jeff Todd Titon A daring interdisciplinary journey into the nexus of the humanities and ecological science “Written to introduce the reader to the universal practice of ‘musicking’ and the influence of real-time environmental upheaval on its conception and performance, and the physical and technological systems that support and maintain its integrity, the scope and scale of the literature illuminates the immense challenges of survival in a time of climatic upheaval.” —ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES

“Cultural Sustainabilities is a must-read for those interested in ecomusicology and will serve as a valuable resource for scholars in the environmental humanities writ large. . . . Students encountering Cultural Sustainabilities will be inspired to explore, advocate, and create a more equitable and pleasurable ‘sound commons.’ ” —MARK PEDELTY, author of A Song to Save the Salish Sea: Musical Performance as Environmental Activism

364 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 19 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 3 CHARTS, 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE

Environmental sustainability and human cultural sustainability are inextricably linked. Reversing damaging human impact on the global environment is ultimately a cultural question, and as with politics, the answers are often profoundly local. Timothy J. Cooley presents twenty-three essays by musicologists and ethno­musicologists, anthropologists, folklorists, ethnographers, documentary filmmakers, musicians, artists, and activists, each asking a particular question or presenting a specific local case study about cultural and environmental sustainability. Contributing to the environmental humanities, the authors embrace and even celebrate human engagement with ecosystems, though with a profound sense of collective responsibility created by the emergence of the Anthropocene.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04236-2 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08415-7 $32.00x £24.99 E-BOOK, 978-0252-05120-3 Publication supported by funding from the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Contributors: Aaron S. Allen, Michael B. Bakan, Robert Baron, Daniel Cavicchi, Timothy J. Cooley, Mark F. DeWitt, Barry Dornfeld, Thomas Faux, Burt Feintuch, Nancy Guy, Mary Hufford, Susan Hurley-Glowa, Patrick Hutchinson, Michelle Kisliuk, Pauleena M. MacDougall, Margarita Mazo, Dotan Nitzberg, Jennifer C. Post, Tom Rankin, Roshan Samtani, Jeffrey A. Summit, Jeff Todd Titon, Joshua Tucker, Rory Turner, Denise Von Glahn, and Thomas Walker

All rights: University of Illinois

TIMOTHY J. COOLEY is a professor of music and global studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Surfing about Music and Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists, Ethnographers, and Mountain Musicians.

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LIVING ETHNOMUSICOLOGY Paths and Practices

MARGARET SARKISSIAN and TED SOLÍS Foreword by Bruno Nettl Afterthoughts by Mark Slobin The first-ever ethnography of the discipline “Living Ethnomusicology: Paths and Practices is ultimately an interesting and unique contribution to the discipline.” —JOURNAL OF FOLKLORE RESEARCH

“This is a brilliant and original idea for a volume. The book focuses on nearly all aspects of the field, including most of the possible careers. As such, it is extraordinary and makes conclusive statements about what ethnomusicology is and who ethnomusicologists are.” —DAVID HARNISH, author of Bridges to the Ancestors: Music, Myth, and Cultural Politics at an Indonesian Festival

504 PAGES. 7 X 10 INCHES 52 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Ethnomusicologists have journeyed from Bali to Morocco to the depths of Amazonia to chronicle humanity’s relationship with music. Margaret Sarkissian and Ted Solís guide us into the field’s last great undiscovered country: ethnomusicology itself. Drawing on fieldwork based on person-to-person interaction, the authors provide a first-ever ethnography of the discipline. The unique collaborations produce an ambitious exploration of ethnomusicology’s formation, evolution, practice, and unique identity. In particular, the subjects discuss their early lives and influences and trace their varied career trajectories. They also draw on their own experiences to offer reflections on all aspects of the field. Pursuing practitioners not only from diverse backgrounds and specialties but from different eras, Sarkissian and Solís illuminate the many trails ethnomusicologists have blazed in the pursuit of knowledge.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04234-8 $125.00x £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08413-3 $32.00x £24.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05118-0 Publication of this book is supported by grants from the Quitiplás Foundation, the Provost’s Office at Smith College, Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, and the Arizona State University School of Music.

A bountiful resource on history and practice, Living Ethnomusicology is an enlightening intellectual exploration of an exotic academic culture.

All rights: University of Illinois

MARGARET SARKISSIAN is a professor of music at Smith College. She is the author of D’Albuquerque’s Children: Performing Tradition in Malaysia’s Portuguese Settlement. TED SOLÍS is a professor of music at Arizona State University. He is the editor of Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Musics.

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RITUAL SOUNDINGS

Women Performers and World Religions

SARAH WEISS Representing women’s traditions and re-envisioning comparative practices “As I read along, I found myself smiling and nodding at the text’s cleverness and its validating evidence for women’s agency in the performance of scandalous ‘soundings’ of protest and dissent. This is a fascinating, well-written, and extraordinarily well-researched book.” —ELLEN KOSKOFF, author of A Feminist Ethnomusicology: Writings on Music and Gender

“This study is a treasure trove of marriage-rituals that women perform within the context of the world religion they are affiliated to. It is a pleasure to savour the presentation of their variety.” —RELIGION AND GENDER 198 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 1 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPH, 1 TABLE

The women of communities in Hindu India and Christian Orthodox Finland alike offer lamentations and mockery during wedding rituals. Catholic women of southern Italy perform tarantella on pilgrimages while Muslim Berger girls recite poetry at Moroccan weddings. Around the world, women actively claim agency through performance during such ritual events. These moments, though brief, allow them a rare freedom to move beyond culturally determined boundaries.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04229-4 $99.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08408-9 $25.00x £18.99

In Ritual Soundings, Sarah Weiss reads deeply into and across the ethnographic details of multiple studies while offering a robust framework for studying music and world religion. Her meta-ethnography reveals surprising patterns of similarity between unrelated cultures. Deftly blending ethnomusicology, the study of gender in religion, and sacred music studies, she invites ethnomusicologists back into comparative work, offering them encouragement to think across disciplinary boundaries. As Weiss delves into a number of less-studied rituals, she offers a forceful narrative of how women assert agency within institutional religious structures while remaining faithful to the local cultural practices the rituals represent.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05113-5 A volume in the series New Perspectives on Gender in Music, edited by Suzanne Cusick and Henry Spiller Publication of this book is supported by the Lloyd Hibberd Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

SARAH WEISS is a senior research scientist at the Institute for Ethnomusicology at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz (Kunst Universität Graz). She is the author of Listening to an Earlier Java: Aesthetics, Gender, and the Music of Wayang in Central Java.

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PEGGY GLANVILLE-HICKS

Composer and Critic

SUZANNE ROBINSON A unique woman’s unstoppable journey to the center of American music “Robinson is especially good at making period and place come alive for the reader. The book should richly reward any reader who wants to explore American musical and literary history in this period—and the people who made it and lived it.” —AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE As both composer and critic, Peggy Glanville-Hicks contributed to the astonishing cultural ferment of the mid-twentieth century. Her forceful voice as a writer and commentator helped shape professional and public opinion on the state of American composing. The seventy musical works she composed ranged from celebrated operas like Nausicaa to intimate, jewel-like compositions created for friends. Her circle included figures like Virgil Thomson, Paul Bowles, John Cage, and Yehudi Menuhin.

338 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 26 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Drawing on interviews, archival research, and fifty-four years of extraordinary pocket diaries, Suzanne Robinson places Glanville-Hicks within the history of American music and composers. “P.G.H.” forged alliances with power brokers and artists that gained her entrance to core American cultural entities such as the League of Composers, New York Herald Tribune, and the Harkness Ballet. Yet her impeccably cultivated public image concealed a private life marked by unhappy love affairs, stubborn poverty, and the painstaking creation of her artistic works.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04256-0 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08439-3 $30.00x £22.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05140-1 A volume in the series Music in American Life

Evocative and intricate, Peggy Glanville-Hicks clears away decades of myth and storytelling to provide a portrait of a remarkable figure and her times.

Publication of this book was supported in part by grants from the Henry and Edna Binkele Classical Music Fund and from the Manfred Bukofzer Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

SUZANNE ROBINSON is on the faculty of the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, Australia. She is a coeditor of several books, including Grainger the Modernist.

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RETHINKING AMERICAN MUSIC Edited by TARA BROWNER and THOMAS L. RIIS Eclectic topics, cutting-edge research, and America’s musical heritage “Rethinking American Music demonstrates the diversity of current scholarship on American music culture.” —CHOICE

“A marvelous compendium of scholarship in American music, this book illustrates the wondrous diversity of American musical culture from the eighteenth century to today. Essays on classical, sacred, popular, jazz, hip hop, and theatrical styles deal with performance, patronage, identity, and ethnography and illustrate wonderfully the breadth of Richard Crawford’s enormous legacy in the field of Americanist music studies.” —KATHERINE K. PRESTON, author of Opera for the People: EnglishLanguage Opera and Women Managers in Late 19th-Century America

384 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 3 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 32 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 4 TABLES

In Rethinking American Music, Tara Browner and Thomas L. Riis curate essays that offer an eclectic survey of current music scholarship. Ranging from Tin Pan Alley to Thelonious Monk to hip hop, the contributors go beyond repertory and biography to explore four critical yet overlooked areas: the impact of performance; patronage’s role in creating music and finding a place to play it; personal identity; and the ways cultural and ethnographic circumstances determine the music that emerges from the creative process. Many of the articles also look at how a piece of music becomes initially popular and then exerts a lasting influence in the larger global culture. The result is an insightful state-of-the-field examination that doubles as an engaging short course on our complex, multifaceted musical heritage.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04232-4 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08410-2 $35.00x £26.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05115-9 A volume in the series Music in American Life

Contributors: Karen Ahlquist, Amy C. Beal, Mark Clague, Esther R. Crookshank, Todd Decker, Jennifer DeLapp-Birkett, Joshua S. Duchan, Mark Katz, Jeffrey Magee, Sterling E. Murray, Guthrie P. Ramsey Jr., David Warren Steel, Jeffrey Taylor, and Mark Tucker

Publication of this book is supported by the Lloyd Hibberd Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

TARA BROWNER is a professor of ethnomusicology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her books include Heartbeat of the People: Music and Dance in the Northern Pow-Wow. THOMAS L. RIIS is Professor of Music Emeritus and former director of the American Music Research Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the author of Frank Loesser.

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NEW IN PAPERBACK

FROM SCRATCH

Writings in Music Theory

JAMES TENNEY Edited by Larry Polansky, Lauren Pratt, Robert Wannamaker, and Michael Winter Writings from a giant of avant-garde composing “If you want to encounter one of the major thinkers of twentieth century music, James Tenney’s writing is worth getting to know, and if you’re at all interested in the history of music technology and its development, his writing is essential.” —SOUND BYTES MAGAZINE One of the twentieth century’s most important musical thinkers, James Tenney did pioneering work in multiple fields, including computer music, tuning theory, and algorithmic and computer-assisted composition. From Scratch arranges, edits, and revises Tenney’s hard-to-find writings into one indispensable collection. Selections focus on his fundamental concerns—”what the ear hears”—and include thoughts and ideas on perception and form, tuning systems and especially just intonation, information theory, theories of harmonic space, and stochastic (chance) procedures of composition.

504 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 36 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 8 TABLES

PAPER, 978-0-252-08437-9 $35.00x £26.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-09667-9 All rights: University of Illinois

JAMES TENNEY was a prolific and important experimental composer, theorist, writer, and performer. His books include Meta + Hodos: A Phenomenology of Twentieth-Century Musical Materials and an Approach to the Study of Form. LARRY POLANSKY is Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Emeritus Strauss Professor of Music at Dartmouth College, and founding editor of the Leonardo Music Journal. LAUREN PRATT is the associate producer of music at Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater and executor of the Tenney estate. ROBERT WANNAMAKER is Associate Dean at the California Institute of the Arts, where he teaches music composition, theory, history, and literature. MICHAEL WINTER is a composer and founder and director of the wulf. in Los Angeles and helped complete Tenney’s final musical work, Arbor Vitae.

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MORMONS, MUSICAL THEATER, AND BELONGING IN AMERICA JAKE JOHNSON Using others’ voices to bring one closer to God “Through careful historiography and close attention to sound, Johnson expertly maps the intersections of voice studies, Mormon doctrine, race and religion, and the worlds of American musical theater. Mormons, Musical Theater, and Belonging in America convinces us that theology, theatricality, nationality, and vocality are entwined in Mormonism and extend in fascinating ways into American popular culture.” —JEFFERS ENGELHARDT, author of Singing the Right Way: Orthodox Christians and Secular Enchantment in Estonia 222 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 5 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 12 MUSIC EXAMPLES

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints adopted the vocal and theatrical traditions of American musical theater as important theological tenets. As Church membership grew, leaders saw how the genre could help define the faith and wove musical theater into many aspects of Mormon life.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04251-5 $99.00x £79.00

Jake Johnson merges the study of belonging in America with scholarship on voice and popular music to explore the surprising yet profound link between two quintessentially American institutions. Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Mormons gravitated toward musicals as a common platform for transmitting political and theological ideas. Johnson sees Mormons using musical theater as a medium for theology of voice—a religious practice that suggests how vicariously voicing another person can bring one closer to godliness. This sounding, Johnson suggests, created new opportunities for living. Voice and the musical theater tradition provided a site for Mormons to negotiate their way into middle-class respectability. At the same time, musical theater became a unique expressive tool of Mormon culture.

PAPER, 978-0-252-08433-1 $25.00x £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05136-4 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

JAKE JOHNSON is an assistant professor of musicology in the Wanda L. Bass School of Music at Oklahoma City University.

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