University of Illinois Press Dance Studies 2021 catalog

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A RESPECTABLE SPELL

Transformations of Samba in Rio de Janeiro

CARLOS SANDRONI Translated by Michael Iyanaga The history of samba music in the early twentieth century “At long last, we can celebrate the publication of this groundbreaking study in English. Carlos Sandroni’s brilliant ‘historical ethnomusicology’ of samba laid the foundations for many subsequent studies, and continues to set a standard in the field. Sandroni is equally adept at fine-grained musical a­ nalysis, rich social-historical contextualization, and crisp, clear explanation. Michael Iyanaga’s sensitive and graceful translation makes this accessible to a broad international audience for the first time. This book is fundamental for all those interested in samba’s emergence and evolution.” —BRYAN MCCANN, author of Hard Times in the Marvelous City: From Dictatorship to Democracy in the Favelas of Rio de Janeiro

304 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 50 MUSIC EXAMPLES

A landmark in Brazilian music scholarship, A Respectable Spell introduces Englishspeaking readers to the rich history of samba from its nineteenth-century origins to its emergence as a distinctive genre in the 1930s. Merging storytelling with theory, Carlos Sandroni profiles performers, composers, and others while analyzing the complex ideologies their music can communicate in their lyrics and rhythms, and how the meaning of songs and musical genres can vary depending on social and historical context. He also delves into lundu, modinha, maxixe, and many other genres of Brazilian music; presents the little-heard voices and perspectives of marginalized Brazilians like the African-descended sambistas; and presents a study in step with the types of decolonial approaches to ethnomusicology that have since emerged, treating the people being studied not only as makers of music but also of knowledge.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04402-1 $125.00x  £100.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08608-3 $28.00x  £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05296-5 A volume in the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies Series English-language rights: University of Illinois. All other rights: Author

Incisive and comprehensive, A Respectable Spell tells the compelling story of an iconic Brazilian musical genre. CARLOS SANDRONI is a professor of ethnomusicology in the Faculty of Music and the Faculty of Anthropology at the Federal University of Pernambuco (Recife). His books include Mário contra Macunaíma: Cultura e política em Mário de Andrade. MICHAEL IYANAGA is an assistant professor of music and Latin American studies at the College of William and Mary. His books include Desafios e particularidades da produção antropológica no Norte e Nordeste do Brasil.

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AROUSING SENSE

Recipes for Workshopping Sensory Experience

TOMIE HAHN Using the senses to open our minds to creativity and learning “A wonderful collection of recipes for workshopping sensory experience, to be realized sometimes by individuals, often through group interaction. The recipes will be useful to leaders in any arts area; in teaching of writing, not just creative writing but also composition; in working with any group where an exploratory, collaborative, fun atmosphere is desirable; as well as in the specific ethnographic application that Hahn emphasizes.” —FRED EVERETT MAUS, coeditor of Oxford Handbook of Music and Queerness Engaging with sensory experience provides a gateway to the contemplation and cultivation of creativity and ideas. Tomie Hahn’s workshopping recipes encourage us to incorporate sensory-­rich experiences into our research, creative processes, and understanding of people. The exercises recognize that playfulness allows for a loosening of self while increasing empathy and vulnerability. Their ability to spark sensory endeavors that reach into our deepest core offers potentially profound impacts on art making, research, ethnographic fieldwork, contemplation, philosophical or personal introspections, and many other activities. Designed to be flexible, these living recipes provide an avenue for performative adventures that invite us to improvise in ways suited to our own purposes or settings. Leaders and practitioners enjoy limitless arenas for using the senses for explorations that range from personally transformative to professionally productive to profoundly moving.

152 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 8 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04416-8 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08620-5 $25.00x  £18.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05310-8 All rights: University of Illinois

User-­friendly and practical, Arousing Sense is a guide to how teaching through sensory experience can lead to positive, transformative impact in the classroom and everyday life. TOMIE HAHN is a professor emerita of performance ethnology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is the author of Sensational Knowledge: Embodying Culture through Japanese Dance.

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MANIFEST TECHNIQUE

Hip Hop, Empire, and Visionary Filipino American Culture

MARK R. VILLEGAS An obscured vanguard in hip hop “Manifest Technique brilliantly demonstrates how to place Filipino American choreography, lyrics, and crew ­allegiances at the heart of our study of hip hop as a cultural vernacular. Villegas invites us to listen deep and to ­consider how these expressive forms carry forward memories, desires, and critiques.” —THEODORE S. GONZALVES, author of The Day the Dancers Stayed: Performing in the Filipino/American Diaspora Filipino Americans have been innovators and collaborators in hip hop since the culture’s early days. But despite the success of artists like Apl.de.Ap of the Black Eyed Peas and superstar producer Chad Hugo, the genre’s significance in Filipino American communities is often overlooked. Mark R. Villegas considers sprawling coast-to-coast hip hop networks to reveal how Filipino Americans have used music, dance, and visual art to create their worlds. Filipino Americans have been exploring their racial position in the world in embracing hip hop’s connections to memories of colonial and racial violence. Villegas scrutinizes practitioners’ language of defiance, placing the cultural grammar of hip hop within a larger legacy of decolonization.

240 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 1 TABLE

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04378-9 $110.00x  £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08577-2 $26.00x  £19.99

An important investigation of hip hop as a movement of racial consciousness, Manifest Technique shows how the genre has inspired Filipino Americans to envision and enact new ideas of their bodies, their history, and their dignity.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05268-2 A volume in the series The Asian American Experience, edited by Eiichiro Azuma, Jigna Desai, Martin Manalansan IV, Lisa Sun-Hee Park, and David K. Yoo

MARK R. VILLEGAS is an assistant professor of American studies at Franklin & Marshall College.

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HOT FEET AND SOCIAL CHANGE

African Dance and Diaspora Communities

Edited by KARIAMU WELSH, ESAILAMA G. A. DIOUF, and YVONNE DANIEL Foreword by Thomas F. DeFrantz Preface by Danny Glover, Harry Belafonte, and James Counts Early Indelible stories of living African dance within the African diaspora “Many of the authors are themselves the sources of both dance traditions created within the last decades and of significant studies about them. This work is unprecedented and, thanks to its insider perspectives, only possible as the editors have constructed it.” —SHEILA S. WALKER, editor of African Roots, American Cultures: Africa in the Creation of the Americas

328 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 11 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS, 5 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 2 LINE DRAWINGS, 2 MAPS, 2 CHARTS, 1 MUSIC EXAMPLE

The popularity and profile of African dance have exploded across the African diaspora in the last fifty years. Hot Feet and Social Change presents traditionalists, neo-traditionalists, and contemporary artists, teachers, and scholars telling some of the thousands of stories lived and learned by people in the field. Concentrating on eight major cities in the United States, the essays explode myths about African dance while demonstrating its power to awaken identity, self-worth, and community respect. These voices of experience share personal accounts of living African traditions, their first encounters with and ultimate embrace of dance, and what teaching African-based dance has meant to them and their communities. Throughout, the editors alert readers to established and ongoing research and provide links to critical contributions by African and Caribbean dance experts.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04295-9 $125.00x £79.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08477-5 $30.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05181-4 Publication of this book was supported in part by the University of Illinois Press Fund for Anthropology.

Contributors: Ausettua Amor Amenkum, Abby Carlozzo, Steven Cornelius, Yvonne Daniel, Charles “Chuck” Davis, Esailama G. A. Diouf, Indira Etwaroo, Habib Iddrisu, Julie B. Johnson, C. Kemal Nance, Halifu Osumare, Amaniyea Payne, William SerranoFranklin, and Kariamu Welsh

All rights: University of Illinois

KARIAMU WELSH is a professor emerita of dance at Temple University. Her books include Umfundalai: An African Dance Technique. ESAILAMA G. A. DIOUF is the founding director of Bisemi Foundation Inc. and the Arts and Culture Consultant at the San Francisco Foundation. YVONNE DANIEL is a professor emerita of dance and Afro-American studies at Smith College. Her books include Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomblé and Caribbean and Atlantic Diaspora Dance: Igniting Citizenship. www.press.uillinois.edu

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A GURU’S JOURNEY

Pandit Chitresh Das and Indian Classical Dance in Diaspora

SARAH MORELLI The work and art of a dance master in America “Morelli has crafted a narrative filled with powerful historical, biographical, and musical insights while also capturing the human dimensions of musical performance and transmission. An exciting contribution to the ethno­ musicological literature and a striking study of issues surrounding migration, ethnicity, and gender.” —KAY KAUFMAN SHELEMAY, author of Soundscapes: Exploring Music in a Changing World, third edition An important modern exponent of Asian dance, Pandit Chitresh Das brought kathak to the United States in 1970. The North Indian classical dance has since become an important art form within the greater Indian diaspora. Yet its adoption outside of India raises questions about what happens to artistic practices when we separate them from their broader cultural contexts.

270 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 38 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 32 MUSIC EXAMPLES, 3 TABLES

A Guru’s Journey provides an ethnographic study of the dance form in the San Francisco Bay Area community formed by Das. Sarah Morelli, a kathak dancer and former Das student, investigates issues in teaching, learning, and performance that developed around Das during his time in the United States. In modifying kathak’s form and teaching for Western students, Das negotiates questions of Indianness and non-Indianness, gender, identity, and race. Morelli lays out these discussions for readers with the goal of deepening their knowledge of kathak aesthetics, technique, and theory. She also shares the intricacies of footwork, facial expression in storytelling, and other aspects of kathak while tying them to the cultural issues that inform the dance.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04286-7 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08468-3 $28.00x £20.99 E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05172-2 A volume in the series Music in American Life Publication of this book is supported by grants from the University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music and the AHSS Book Publication Support Fund and from the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

SARAH MORELLI is an associate professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Denver and a performing kathak artist.

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JOSEPHINE BAKER AND KATHERINE DUNHAM

Dances in Literature and Cinema

HANNAH DURKIN Two great artists creating new visions of black womanhood “Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham is a tour-­de-­force brilliantly analyzing the cinematic depictions in a black Atlantic context. The full implications of the European depictions of these wonderful dancers is teased out through exhaustive attention to dancing techniques, cinematography, and the two women’s autobiographical writings. A must-read for all scholars of African American performance and cultural politics.” —ALAN RICE, author of Creating Memorials, Building Identities: The Politics of Memory in the Black Atlantic 272 PAGES. 6 X 9 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS

Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham were the two most acclaimed and commercially successful African American dancers of their era and among the first black women to enjoy international screen careers. Both also produced fascinating memoirs that provided vital insights into their artistic philosophies and choices. However, difficulties in accessing and categorizing their works on the screen and on the page have obscured their contributions to film and literature.

HARDCOVER, 978-­0-­252-­04262-­1 $99.00x  £79.00 PAPER, 978-­0-­252-­08445-­4 $27.95s  £20.99

Hannah Durkin investigates Baker’s and Dunham’s films and writings to shed new light on their legacies as transatlantic artists and civil rights figures. Their trailblazing dancing and choreography reflected a belief that they could use film to confront racist assumptions while also imagining—within significant confines— new aesthetic possibilities for black women. Their writings, meanwhile, revealed their creative process, engagement with criticism, and the ways each mediated cultural constructions of black women’s identities. Durkin pays particular attention to the ways dancing bodies function as ever-changing signifiers and de-stabilizing transmitters of cultural identity. In addition, she offers an overdue appraisal of Baker’s and Dunham’s places in cinematic and literary history.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05146-3 All rights: University of Illinois

HANNAH DURKIN is a lecturer in literature and film at Newcastle University. She is a coeditor of Visualising Slavery: Art Across the African Diaspora.

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DANCING REVOLUTION

Bodies, Space, and Sound in American Cultural History

CHRISTOPHER J. SMITH Using dance as a political language to unite and resist “A respected musicologist and vernacular musician, Smith offers a sprawling overview of vernacular dance in the US as evidence of people’s ‘contesting, constructing, and ­reinventing social orders’. Highly recommended.” —CHOICE

“A very ambitious and impressive study. The breadth and scope of the book are remarkable. It is highly engaging and readable and expands our understanding of the potential of dance (and music/sound) to serve as a potent force for social engagement.” —JULIE MALNIG, editor of Ballroom, Boogie, Shimmy Sham, Shake: A Social and Popular Dance Reader

280 PAGES. 6.125 X 9.25 INCHES 20 BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS, 5 MUSIC EXAMPLES

Throughout American history, patterns of political intent and impact have linked the wide range of dance movements performed in public places. Groups diverse in their cultural or political identities, or in both, long ago seized on street dancing, marches, open-air revival meetings, and theaters, as well as in dance halls and nightclubs, as a tool for contesting, constructing, or reinventing the social order.

HARDCOVER, 978-0-252-04239-3 $110.00x £88.00 PAPER, 978-0-252-08418-8 $27.95s £20.99

Dancing Revolution presents richly diverse case studies to illuminate these patterns of movement and influence in movement and sound in the history of American public life. Christopher J. Smith spans centuries, geographies, and cultural identities as he delves into a wide range of historical moments. These include the Godintoxicated public demonstrations of Shakers and Ghost Dancers in the First and Second Great Awakenings; creolized antebellum dance in cities from New Orleans to Bristol; the modernism and racial integration that imbued twentieth-century African American popular dance; the revolutionary connotations behind images of dance from Josephine Baker to the Marx Brothers; and public movement’s contributions to hip hop, antihegemonic protest, and other contemporary transgressive communities’ physical expressions of dissent and solidarity.

E-BOOK, 978-0-252-05123-4 A volume in the series Music in American Life All rights: University of Illinois

Multidisciplinary and wide-ranging, Dancing Revolution examines how Americans turned the rhythms of history into the movement behind the movements. CHRISTOPHER J. SMITH is a professor, chair of musicology, and founding director of the Vernacular Music Center at the Texas Tech University School of Music. He is the author of the award-winning book The Creolization of American Culture: William Sidney Mount and the Roots of Blackface Minstrelsy. www.press.uillinois.edu

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