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COPYRIG-HT 19 30

ALLEN S JANSSEN E DITOR·I N•CHIE. F FRA NK

D. S M U I N

BUSINESS MANAGER


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PU Bll SHED BY THE

ASSOCIATED

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UNIV'E.RSITY OF IDAHO


OR.DE.R. Of BOOKS EVEN IN(; AI IDAHO

ADMIN ISIRi\JION

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EVEN IS OF 1HE YtAR AI HI f IICS A[ I I\' II I f l I DAF10 \VOMtN OR&AN I ZJ\ liONS SP II F


DEDICATION TO I HAT NEW ERA Of PRO&RESS IN WHitH OUR STU DENIS AND UNIVERSII Y • HAVF • ENTERED W[ DEDICATE THIS VOLU~E Of THE &EM Of TH t WOUNTAI NS

IN I HE BELl EF I HAf PRESENT ACHIEVEM[NI IS A FOU NDA II 0 N FOR fUTURE CiR[AJNBS 4

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CrR.E.E.T IN Cr .S

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Yo u are in the midst of an ad venture, a li llle:> grim to so me, gay to others. Some of you are barely beginning it-Ot hers of you are n earing its end. AU of you mu L ha ve so me notion of its p urpose. I it proving to be worth i ts co t to you? Are you learning how more to enj oy the t hings of las ting value? Are you learning better how t o appreciate ennobling fri end hips? I your storehouse b ecoming better Locked with thing which make for power? I hope the an w'c rs are yes. When reading the Ge m ofth e Mountains twen t y years hence you will know. PR E I DE T

F. J.

K ELL Y


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LV· Rf.FLE.CT· IT·INAALL ITl· SINCE..RlTV ·AND ... ,. VITALITY, \VE.· PRJ;SE.NT .a••THE· (r[.M. OFA 4938•AA ' A· R!.CORJ)·O F·TH [·YEA~ ACHI[V[M[NTS. THIS YEARBOOK· ATTEMPTS TO PICTURt·THt·NtW· rORCf.. IN ·TI!IJ[· ~ANN[R:THRf)lJGit OlJT • ITS· PAVES A

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N ot unlike other yearbooks, T u E G EM of 1930 has, as its arou路ed purpose, the accurate portray al of a school year. As y ou scan its pages you may be conscious of an unfolding picture such as m.ight be seen on screen or stage; a ret路ue, a f ollies, a mudeL'ille program. Complet in makeup, the program has a certain plot, the action appearing humorous or containing an element of sorrow. You will laugh or you will cry , if y ou are human, and yet when the p etjormance has come to a close, how soon you forget it amid th e actualities of real life. Th e sorrows of the tragedienn e were superficial ancl the funny man who macle y ou laugh wa s unreal , unnatural. But wasn't there benefit in it? JV asn't it really worth while?


Dcutt )uy Glutl('r Eldrillgc

Vrogrrss is the keynote of education in America. The University of Id aho prides it elf in the fa ct that it has heen able to kee p step \\ ith the leaders. rn 1929 another de finite move forward \\aS taken by the establi hment of a University Junior College, the fir t in any tate universi ty. Its program embraces the work done here tofore in the first t \\ o years of the College of Le tters and Science, the School of Business Administration, and the School of Education. Into this college go all fre shmen and sophomores intending to take up these lines of work, as well as those who are undecided as to their futur e vocations. The University Junior College proposes to do two thing : to give a trong foundati on in genera l educa tion for those who do not intend to take more th an two yea r of college work, and to furni sh to all candidates for the non-technica l degrees a broad and liberal foundation for any curriculum which they ma y wish to follow in the senior colleges. For both s tudent and state the plan is practical and econo mical. The success with which the plan has met in its first yea r is due in large part to the efforts of the chairman of the Administrative Council of the college. D ea n J. G. E ldridge, servin g hil:i twenty-ninth year at Idaho, is progres 路ive, far-sighted and in valuable.

Page 19


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T he Boa rc.l of B.cgenls is the governin g body of the Uni vers ity of Ida ho. l Ls members arc appointed by the Governor of the stale a nd Lhcy ser ve for fi ve yea rs. Their t erms arc o arranged that one expires each yea r. Whi le Lhe president of the Univer ity is in local control of the Uni ver ity, the po ition of Lhc board is particularly vital in determining the policy which the chool i to follow.

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is to these o mcia ls of the University of ld a ho that the ac tu a l wor k of direc t administration is e ntrusted. They h ave th e duty of p utting into effect the decisions and instructions of the Board of Education and the Board of Regents. To them Idaho owes grea t thanks for work efficiently done.

Page 21


l rl'ing II illartl Junes

"ti cl io, 1d a lto!" In yo ur ow n charact eristic phrase you ha ve gree ted meo n campus wa lk, in crowded corrid or, in social hall, where ever we ha vc me t. The greeting has in its cheery ring a no te of cordiality, of friend hip, eve n or co mrades hi p. B e t o r a ll i its ineeri ty. I t ba given me a real g low of ati fa ctio n, and mad e me feel I wa a mo ng thos<' '' ho had t r u t an d confid ence in tho e who are chosen to help the m along the road of elf-educa tion . H ow ca n one h u t b e th ri lled O) ue h a res ponse t o one's p resence! 1 t is a call to eq ua l frie nd ship a nd sincerity, a c hallenge t o give one's b est t o the business a t ha nd. So 1 have said in my hea rt, and o penly, too, wh at 1 a m glad t o a y hr rr . HYo u are the be. t boys and girls I have rve r worked for. I will be one of you. o lo ng a I con t inue t o be your guest I will tri ve t o keep your fai th . And w hen in tim e I m ay go m y wa ndering way your hea rt) greetin g will still ring in my ear , to lin ger as a cheri bed m emory." ••u ello, Id aho!" - l avDc W . J o ·Es.

Page 22


Per m eal j . French

Vroper educational values with definiteness of aim and r 'r.;" purpose have b een responsible for the con servative growth and development of the Uni versity of l daho. lts ranking is with those in tituti ons tha t have attained to high honor. To many people of the tate who have not realized its development, it i, a source of never-endin g surprise, for already it stands a m agnificent monument to the citizens who gave it and to tho e who have fostered it. The love that it has engendered in tudents' hearts will always live and bring them back again and again to glimpse youth, renew fri endships and avow allegiance. The progress of the University is certain, but there must be neither artificia lity nor lack of hones t, steady purpose. rt nmst bui ld men a nd women of courage, character, and ability, for their measure alone will be the measure of her progress. -

PER.M E AL

J. FRENCH.

Page 23


Dean j ay Clover Eldri(lgc

The D ean of the Universit y F aculty is one of the important administrative officers under the president. But whereas each of the ot her deans is responsibl e for his o wn school or college, the duties of the dean of the fa culty concern the University as a wh ole. H e supplements the fun ctions of the college deans; his duties are advisory; he facilitates relationsbjps of the several schools and colleges with the president and with the general fac ulty . T hese fun ctions are most definitely apparent in the dean's capacity as vice-chairman of the Academic Council, which is the central administrative body of the University . In t he president's absence the dean presides. To the dean are assigned m an y gen eral duties growing out of these m eetings; he reports the proceedings to the general faculty. D ean Eldridge is head of the D epartment of Modern Languages and chairman of the Advisor y Council of the University Junior Coun cil as well as D ean of the University F aculty. Since he is t he dean longest in service of the institution, in that sense his deanship is honorary.

Pagf' 24

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Dean Martin Fuller Angell

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The College of L etters and Science, this year for the first time, is a senior college. In it juniors and seniors sp ecialize in the arts and sciences. The plan of major and minor subj ect s is supplanted b y a schem e of curricula, each of which centers in one major subj ect and its closel y correlated matter. Time for the student will be saved, the material covered will h e more valuable and the result much more practical. This year a number of sophomores in the University are studying in the Senior College because their requirements are thus more easily met. In the academic yea r 1931-1932, however, the plan becomes full y operative. The dean of the Senior College of Letters and Science can well be classed as Ha man who." Martin Fuller Angell , Ph.D., has served the University for fifteen years with enthusiasm, quality and distinction.

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De01(E(/war<l John Iddings

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The College of Agriculture is not only adequately equipped with laboratory and class-room facilities, but has a welltrained and highly effi cient facult y. In ever y field of agriculture, the Idaho institution is a recognized leader . Th e University has 612 acres of land at Moscow with which to work, and in four other places in the state are large experi m ental tract s which total 700 acres. The CoJlege of Agriculture is one of th e divisions of the University separate from the junior college syst em, for it gives a four -year course which culmjnates in the degree of B.S.(Agr.). During their first two years all students take the sa me course and then they may major in almost any of the numerous branches of agriculture. The r esult is a trained leader for resea rch, for extension, and for many other forms of public activity . The University is particularly fortunate in having Edward John Iddings, M .S., to administer the work of the College of Agriculture. H e mrects the exten sion and experimental work with a high effectiveness, and advises both students and faculty members of the College with a fin e insight and understanding.

Page 26


Dean William Edward Masterson

~ grea t many active lawyers of the slate have been ttmost agreeably su rprised" upon investiga ti on of the 路Law School of the University of l dabo. With an almost entirel y new facuh y this year, the aim of the chool to give a knowledge of t he fundamental lega l principles and lo develop the power of independent lega l rca oning and an alysis has been rea lized to a greater degree than ever before. A thorough profc sional t raining is what the school gives and it does it in a way th at meet s with the hig hes t req uirements of the American Bar Association and the Association of American Schools. Up to t he present time this rating has b een given to on ly a Jimited number of law schools in America. The minimum curricula covers a period of three school years and gives prepa ration for the practice of law in any American state. Size and facilities weigh strongly in the school's favor. Dean William Edward Ma st erson, M.A., LL.B., S.J.D., LL.D., brings to th e Idaho Law School a training and experience far ab ove t he ordi nary. H e became dean thi s year after serving one year as associate professor of law in the University.

Page 27


Deau hvw Cllarles Crawford

T ti l: CU LLI:C71: () t= I:N C71N I: I:VINC7 T o b e adept in any of the various fi elds of e ngineering, it is necessa ry to have a thorough training in highly specialized and advanced course . The U ni ver it) of Ida ho ranks high among school which gi ve thi scientific training. In well equipped laboratories and shops, stude nts most compet entl y instructed are given tra ining in Civil, E lectrica l, M echa nical, Chemi cal, or Agricultural E ngineering. Tn the work of the school a lmost every de partme nt of the University is utili zed to give practical and ex perimental work to the s tudents. The plan of cour es is so arranged that the first two years are occupied with general prep ara tion in engineering and the sciences and th e last t wo with professional work. D ea n I va n C. Crawford, C.E., who is serving hi seventh year as the h t> ad of t he chool , has been identified with ever y move of progres of the U ni versity. T o Idaho he is a distinct asset.


Dean Francis Caml'r Milll'r

Tlil: St:li()()L ().= .=()~I:ST~"' 13y taking advantage of all of the natural opporlumttes offered, and b y keeping abreast of the times in ever y phase of its work, the Idaho Forestry School ha s drvclo pcd Lo a position where today it is considered one of the best in the United Stales. Within close proximity to the Uni versity are all of the phases of the lumber industry, and these, with the Univcr ity's own laboratories, arboretum, and experimental trac ts, are utilized in presenting an invaluable and practical course in forestry. The school is doing much to produce men who will be able to cope with the proble ms of conser va tion and reforestation-vi tal que Lion of the da). The co ur. r is divided into three four-year curricula, and many graduate subj ects are taught to students from almost every section of America. The dean of the school, Francis Garner Miller, M. F., is in a large part responsible for the hig h standing which the school enjoys. Idaho ca n well afford to honor him.

J>age 29


Dean Anltur William f'altrenwald

TI-ll: ยงf:I-Jf)f)L f)r: Ml,...l:ยง The Idaho School of Mines is situ ated at the heart of the

most diversely produ c ti ve mineral r egion of the world. rn nearly every part of Idaho there are va luable minera l depo its of orne kind . Tt is only appropriate, then, tha t the U niversity of Idaho should ma intain a ranking school of mining with courses in Geology, Mining, a nd M etallurgy. Because of the suitable location, the courses arc intensely practical and have gone far to produce men trained to develop the great mineral wealth of the tate. Deta iled studies of mining and methods are made po ible by fi<'lrl trips and summer work each year. Graduate and stud ent courses ha ve ever b een efficient and progressi ve. D ea n Arthur Willi am Fahren wald, E.M., Met.E., of the School of Mine is a new member of the Univer ity taff this year. lie come well versed in what ma y he termed Hthe mining game," and has proved himself ca pable and high ly qualified.

P,ge 30


Dc>a11 ]ames Franklin J\lfesse11ger

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of the School of Education co nsis ts in trau11ng high school t eachers, principals, superintendents, and upervisors. The School is also at the dispo al of t eachers in service who wish to improve them selves, school trustees looking for teachers, and t eachers looking for positions. The suppl y of teachers is increasing and it is possible to raise the standards. Throughout the country the tendency is to increase the number of education courses required for a certificate. It has been said for many yea rs that t eachin g should become a real profession, and now that goal is bein g approached. Las t summer there were fort y-five graduates on the ca mpus who wer e candidates for the master's degree in Education. The U ni ver ity of Idaho has been very successful in placing its graduates in tb c public schools, and also in the higher institutions of the orthwest. Idaho graduates are found on the faculties of nea rl y every normal school and college in the four states of the Inland Empire.

Pag<' 31


/Jean Ralph ffwucr Farmer

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J=ivc majors-Finance, Accountin g, Commerce, Extractive Indus tries, and Secretarial Sciences-are offered b y the School of Business Administration, a senior college of the U niversity. During the student's first two years, general courses arc taken in the junior college, and th en one of the above majors is chosen for specialized study in the junior and senior yea rs. The work given in the School is of ver y hig h charact er. Although the Uni versity is not in a large business district, it is in a belt where three great industriesmining, lumbering, farm ing- flourish. This gives ample opportunity for practical business contacts, and, coupled with the high grade of instruction given, makes the Idaho Business School rate high . D ean Ralph Hunter Farmer, A.B., bas b een connected with the University since 1927. He b ecame dean of the school in 1929, and it is but mild praise to say that his promotion was highly justified. H e is a progressive business man and a good educator.

Page 32


Dea11 M arti11 Fulil路r lng<'ll

The Graduate chool of the University of Idaho is orga nized to cover the graduate work lead ing to a mas ter's degree in thirty different departments of the Un iversity. Thi s plan makes it pos iblc to present the two yea rs advanced work in widely varying fields of university s tudy and with ample opportu njtie for well direc ted specializalion. The work is open to gradual<'S of any school of recognized standing. While the purpose of the chool is to provide the student with the m ethod of independent tudy and di cipline of original research, the student is given opportunity to work with scholars intimately on advanced work and at the same Lime to assume initiati ve a nd responsibility. For the purpose of encouraging thi s stud y the University offers a number of fellowsrups and scholarships with valuabl e financial aid. D ean Angell is also dean of tills School and hi interest in the work of graduate tudents is such as to command high sta ndards and effective rc ults. Jl e resumed this work after an absence of two yea rs during which he acted a Executive D ean at the Southern Bra nch.

Page 33


Professor of Dairy Husbandry HAROLD LUCIUS AXTELL, Ph.D. Professor of Classical Languages JosEPH WESLEY BARTON, Ph.D. Professor of P sychology HOBART BERESFORD, B. S . ( Agr.Engr.) Professor of Agricultural Engineering Con ELIUS } AMES BnoSNA , Ph.D. - Professor of American History LEO B. CALLA ' D - Professor of Physical Edu,cation CuRTIS \ VoRTH C HE OWETH, M.A. Professor of Philosophy EDWAHD RoB ERT C HRIS:MA , Col. , U.S.A. -Professor of M.ilitary Science and Tactics FREDERICK CoRSE C n unc u , Ph.D. Professor of Eztropean History CARLETO cu~nn ' GS - Professor of AtJusic Professor of English and Dramatics J o rr N H ousTo G S HMA , M.A. FLOYD w HlT EY GAlL, Ph.D. Professor of Botany IIE RY FALLENSTEI GAUSS, M.E. Professor of 1Uechanical Engineering WILLIAM v. H ALVEHSO ', Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology Professor of Animal Husbandry CuTI-IBEnT WRIGHT HICKMA , M.S. ( Ag r. ) Professor of Law PE DLETO How AHD, LL.B. Professor of Forestry ERNEST EvERETT HUBERT, Ph.D. Professor of Agronomy H AROLD WATKINS HuLBERT, M . S. ( Ag r . ) CHARLES WILLIAM Hu GERFOnD, Ph.D. Professor of Plant Pathology FLOYD WAR I CK ATKESO ' , B.S. ( Agr. )

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RALP II FIELDLNC ll u T c m ' SON K AT HERI ' E JE SE ' M.S. J. H uGo J o H so ' ,

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TuOl\t AS STONER KERR, J oH

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Kos T ALEK, Ph.D.

CLIFFORD EL fER LAiUPMA ' B.S.(Agr.)

Professor of Physical Hducatio1t Prof essor of Ho rne Econornics Professor of Electrical Engineering Professor of Political Science Prof essor of Organic Chem.istry Professor of Poultry Husbandry

Professor of Geology HERBERT ELMER LATTlG, M.S. ( Ed.) Professor of Agricultural Education GEORGE MoREY MILLER, Ph.D. - Professor of English RA YMON D MYLAR MosuER, Ph.D. - Professor of Educational P sychology JESS E EDWARD RET HERFORD, M.A. Professor of History RALPH D ouGLAS R ussELL, Ph.D. Professor of Secondary Education MARGARETE LOUISE SA RGE T, M.A. Professor of R oman ce Languages EUGENE T AYLOR, M.A. - Profe.ssor of i\fathematics CLAR E ' CE CoRNE LIUS VI NCENT, M.S.(Agr. ) Professor of Horticulture CARL LEOPOLD vo ENDE, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry CLAUDE W AKELA D, M.S. Professor of Entomology ELLA Woons, P h .D. Research Professor of Ho rne Econom.ics FnANCIS B AK E R LANEY, Ph.D.


S(•11111ur 1r illiam Eclgur IJuruh

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I n April, 1929, almon 0. Levin. o n donated a SSS,OOO gift to the Unjver ity of ldaho for the es tabli shment of the Wi lliam Edgar Borah Ou tl awry of War Founda tio n in recognition of the work don e by Idaho's se nior senator in advocating th is move to make war a crime in international law. al mon 0. Levin ·on bas been ca lled ((the non- top peace advocate" and a man (('\ ho ha tipped the world b y the o cillation of hi own weig ht," becau e it wa in hi brain that the tartling plan of outlawing wa r originated. The donor i one of the most pro mine nt corporation lawyers in the Uruted States. After the '\Vorld War he becam e interested in thr legal aspect of war and then originated hi s plan, whic h he took to \Vashington and has brought to the attention of t he whole worl d. Mr. Levinso n's stoutest all y has b een Senator William Edgar Borah, who ha s long advocated anti-war plans and lectured in the ca u e of peace. In the Senate of the United tatrs, a chairman of the Foreig n Relations Committee, he ha worked hard to further moves for peace, and it was throug h hi influence that Mr. Lev inon's idea was bro ught to final realization in th e Pact of P a ris or the K ellogg Peace Pact. To Senator Borah Mr. Levin on wished to give expression of hi s gratitude, and con equentl y he ha made this gift to the Universi t y in the enator' state. Thi fund i to be u eel in a way yet to be determined by the Board of Regents, for the furtherance of world peace educa tion. Idaho i gra teful for the opportunity to deal with international rela tions in a way that will contribute to world ccurity.

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CeurgP ]:;. /lorton

~ o one person at the University of ldaho has a more d irect and wid espread contact with its stud ents than the Graduate Manager, George E. Horton. The nature of the position itself makes this both possible and neces sary as t he Graduate Manager's office has direct control of every pha se of acti vity of the A. S. U . I., includin g athletics, publications, dramatics, debate, stock judging competitions and other interest s t oo numerous to relate. " Cap," as the man who must personall y atten d to all matters pertaining to these fun ctions, bas a di st inctiveness of abil it y and personality that would m ake him a difficult man to rep lace. Idaho's progress as a student M rs. Alma Brown group is in large measure due to bis careful supervision. Working alongside " Cap" and evincing no less interest than be towards all A. S.U.I. work is Mrs. Alma Brown, secr etary to the Graduate Manager. Mrs. Brown, with her three years' experien ce in this posit ion, is known alike b y both men and women students for her efficient handling of all details which come under her supervision. The share that Mrs. Brown has contributed t o the progress of the A.S. U.I. is not to b e underestimated.

Pugc 38


AldOtJ Tall

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V erhaps the highest honor that can co me to a stud ent at the University of Idaho is that of being elected president of t he student body. E lect ion to this office is a mark not only of the es teem and respect of the students, but also of character and ability to a high degree. Five years ago Aldon Tall quietly bega n working toward the many honors which he now hold s. Last spring his elec tio n to the office of Pre ident of the Associated Stude nts of the University of Idaho marked the culmination of a long list of activities on the ca mpus. H e had b een a member of the Executive Board for two years, Vice-President of Blue K ey and a mem b er of Silver Lance, the Pre -Med Club, the U niversit y Dorothy Rouse Orc hestra and the Uni versity P ep Band. This year, the president of the A.S.U.I., who is also chairman of the Executive Board, has been in a po ition of greater responsibility than ever before. The present administration ca me to Idaho with the policy of student self-government. In line with this policy, the dutie of the student body officers have grea tly increased. Through this period Mr. Tall has guided the organization conservatively and well.

Page 39


Tire Board

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T he Executive Board is the agency through whic h the will of the Associa ted tudents is e pressed and exe cuted. Constituted as it is, all legislative and executi ve power is vested in this group. It exercises control ovrr all the various collegiate and intercollegi at e activities sponsored b y the A. . U .I. Members of the Board are chosen for a period of one year b y the student body at the annual May election. The Executive Board consist s of th e three officers of the A.S.U .I. , the Presid cn t and Vice -President, who arr cho en fr o m the incoming senior class, a nd the Sccrrtary, who is chosen from the incoming senior or j uni or George Hu/x>r clas ; al o eight m embers are elected as follows: two mrn and two women from the inco ming senior class, two men and one woman fro m the incoming junior class, and a man from the incoming sophomore class. In addi tion there is a fa culty adviser and a resident alumnus, appo.i ntcd b y the President of the Univer ity from recommen dations b y the Execu ti ve Board, who arc ex-officio member. . The E ditor of T he A rgonaut and the Presid ent of the Associa ted \Vo men Student are also ex -officio members. Thi year the Boa rd has been ver y effi cient and has capably hand led the m a tters brought before it. B y the very nature of its or ganization a la rge sh are of its duti c~

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/11 Session

are more or less a matter of routi ne and the Board members are frequr ntl y given t oo little credit. The Department of Ath letics, D ebate, Dramatics, and Publications arc all financed b) means of funds paid in b y the student body. The apportionment and disburse ment of these fund. on a proportional basis is one of the chief f unc ti ons of the Board. This is carried out on the budget plan, and once each se mes ter these budge ts must be arranged so as to achieve a balance at the end of the year. U nder the leadership of the presen t chairman the Board has endeavored to perfect student cooperatio n Dron Cmuford in a ll ph a es of college life. Student government at the University of Idaho h a been extremely compet ent a nd the University ad ministration and Executive Board cooperate a t all times to achi eve and insure student initiative and responsibi lity. At the present time the following people are serving on th e Executi ve Board : Aldon Tall, Chairman ; George Huber, Vice-Chairman; D orothy R ouse, ecretary; Robert B rown, E d ward Peterson, Laura Clark, Lucile Glindeman, enior Representativrs; Charles Graybill , Peyton o mmercamp, Grace Par ons, Junior Representativrs; E lwyn P e terson, Sophomore Hepresenta ti ve; Dean Ivan C. Crawford , George E. Horton, Crrlri c d'Easum, Zeld a ewcomb, ex -officio members.

Page 41


P Qu /tou

T lwmet::

The entire administration of Presid ent Kelly at the Univcrsily of Idaho ha s been particularl y marked b y an efforl Lo arrive at close cooperation b e tween the student body and the fa culty of the Uni ersily. ot only has this attempt been carried to matters of ludenl government, bul al so into the field of admini trative work. ot onl y has the change of attilude been brou ght about, bul everal more tangibl r things have resulled. One of the e ver y noticeable result has been the Co uncil of Group Presidents, which ha been formed this year to mee t with the repre entatives of the admini tration in order to discuss affairs which ma y well be bes t decided after a thorough understanding of student opinion has been gained. The Council is composed of the presidents of all the groups on the campus, including halls, sororities and fraternities. President K elly, himself, ha been meeting with the m reg ularly as the administration rcpre entative. The organization of thi group is e ffec ted b y the existence of a chairman and a secretary . E d wa rd Poulton has been the chairm an during the sem e t er jus t p assed and Marguerite Tho me tz has been the ecre tary. AJread ) thi decidedly new feature of cooperation ha given promising resulls. Of nccc sity, the work of the Co uncil must be of a re tric tcd nature and it mu t deal largely with c urrent affairs. However, this year the Council has given valuable aid in determining the number and length of vacations for next year. The matter of student representation on the Academic Council was discussed and its value was determined b y the Council. The very important matters of exempting Seniors from final exam ination if their mid-scm c ter grades are sufficientl y high wa also taken care of. The Council has proved e fficienl and hig hly v al uable.


•-

·----1 -

-


ixon

)ansSl'll

r=

our succcs ful years have marked the course of the Class of 1930, i ls m embers havin g been out tandin g in all branches of ca mpus activities. hortl y after the six hundred and ninet y tudents had enrolled in 1926, they m e l and elect ed the following offi cers: E lm o Thomas, president; McKenzie Yager, v ice-president; Evc 1) n heils, secre tary; and J osrph Mollo y, treasurer. The second semester officers were: D ea n ewhou e, president; Conroy Gill espie, vice-presid ent; Artylee Fl ollada, secretary; a nd Irene Auger, treasurer. The trials and Lribul a tions of frN>hman life a lmo t over, the clas celebrated at the Freshm an Glee, thr an nu al frrshm an dance. The class song, uHello, Ida ho," written b y Lucile Haddock and Vernon Taylor, won fir l place a t the . tunt fest. So phomore officers for the first semes ter were: E dward Coon, president; Glynn Griffith , vice-president; Marylou Cra ven, secretary; a nd Dorothy Fred ri ckson, treasurer. Winning the Hulm e fight from Lh e frrshme n gave an encouraging st art to th e sophomore year. The srcond semes ter officer were: Georgr Huber, president; Paul Gowen, vice-pre ident; Ruth Newho use, secretary, and Betty Grammer, treasurer. The princip al l . ocial functio n of the cl a for this ) car was the oph o: .....;~;;;:;;;;..;..;;,;,;;;~..;,;:;= more F rolic, held late in the spring. THIS IS OUR EDICT The junior yea r, recognized a one of great activity for any clas , was especially active for the class of 1930. The firs t semest er officers were: E d ward P e terson, president; J essie Little, secretary; and M a rjorie Ford, treasurer. A seric of j unior mixers throughout the yea r • ,.,,., , ....... •••P'IJU' .. " ~"',....' .~:;-..;,\'~ ' ' " "f~~:i., •;,.-;-}r:-u ~~~,,::.~ • ser ved to stimulat e class spirit as never before. econd ,._ "' ester officers were: John oden, president; Vera em THE C1..ASS OF 1929 , C handler, vice -president; D orothy hea rs, secretary; . .....,o,, . . . . , o » 1 4 .... , J and J ohn H arrison, trea. urer. Junior Week was a big Frosll Etlict, 1926 event in the history of the class. Under the genera l C. t. II 0 'f L 0....0 4-• & D Y L 0

i)

4.. A •

i SKUNKS! ~ . .

~t r

4

'"' ....

Page 46

,, "

,,

04

~n••n• t

... I ..


Burgher

Ne(ll

Stalker

Walker

chairmanship of Robert Brown, it opened one Tu esda y night with a serenade, presented b y talented members of the class. Wednesday th e juniors entertained the University with a snappy assembly. That evening th e juniors paraded, and later attended the junior party. The Prom Friday n ight and the Cabaret Saturday night ended the week. Committee chairmen were: Serenade, Clayton Loosli; Assembly, Frank Winzeler; Parade, J ess Egurrola; Party, Betty Grammer; Prom, Edward P et erson; and Cabaret, Harr y Daubert. On Campus Day outstanding juniors were p ledged to the senior honoraries- Mortar Board and Si lver Lance. Aldon Ta ll was elected A.S. U.I. President for the following year. With the dropping out of many students and the uni ficat ion of the class throughout four yea rs, some three hundred members of the class return ed th is ye ar as seniors to complete their college course, two hundred and seventy -four of them receiving their degrees on June 9, 1930. Officers for the first semester were: Allen Jan ssen, president; Lawrence P eck, vice -president; Edith Bradshaw, secretary ; and Grace N ixon , treasurer. Second semest er officers were: Darwin Burgher, president; Doroth y eal, vice-president; Beatrice Stalker, secretary; and Patrick Walker, treasurer. The Senior Ball, with Clair Gale as chairman, and the Senior Picnic under the chairman ship of George H uher, were the outstanding social events of the class. Class committee chairmen were: Stunt, Maitland Huhbard; Assembly, J ess Egurrola; Song, Ruth ewhouse; Gift, Marjorie Bloom; Announcements, Allen Janssen; and Cap and Gown , Robert St. Clair. On Ca mpus Day Ruth Newhouse was crowned Ma y Queen. The class also points with pride to George Huber, Rhodes Scholar, and Darwin Burgher , Frank McMillin, and Harold Stowell, prominent athletes. Ju11ior Parade, 1929

Page 47


Clair Calc, Chairmatt

The Senior Ball , held at t he E lk ' T e mple D ecemb er 7, was no t o nl y the social eve nt of the month, but also the fir st o utsta nding formal a ffair of t he school year. The hall was attracti vely decorat ed in a black a nd white color sche me, wi t h an a bundance of cut flowers and potted pl ant s placed ab ou t the ides and ends t o bri ghten t he conventional b ackgro und. hades were con t r ucted over the l am ps on the side walls t o give an effect of light being proj ected t oward b o th the ceiling and floor. Thi gave the ball the appeara nce of being larger a nd more impressive. The orchest ra, which wa borrowed from Pull ma n for the occa ion , was heltered by a simple b lack and white awning. D uring intermi ion ex hibition of tap dan cing and a number of popul ar songs were presented for t he approva l of t he guests b y talent from the orchest ra . P a tro ns a nd pat ronesses were Miss Pcrmeal J. Fre nc h, Pre ident a nd Mr . Frederick J. K elly, and H onorable a nd M r . H . C. Baldridge. D e pile the form ality of the occasion, everyo ne pre ent wa a mply enterta ined and enj oyed himselÂŁ thoro ug hl y. Practicall y every senior to whom in vitatio ns were se nt attended the h a ll , and with the nece sa ry limit of a t tendancc t he dance was more than ever a strictl y senior class f unction. Clair Gale ac ted a general chairm an in charge of t he b aH. Other sub -committees who worked "ith Gale were: Orche t ra a nd Floor, Oscar Brow n a nd M arylo u Craven ; E ntertainment, Doroth y Fred rickson and Maitl and Hubbard; l nvita tio ns and Announcements, J essie Little and E dward Coon ; D ecora tions, Phil Du a ul t and Lu cile Gli nde man; Fi nance , J ohn Gla e and D an McGra th.


George fluber, Cltu irman

The Class of 1930 spent b y far th e full est day of their lives on May 21, the da y of the annual Senior Picnic. All Seni ors had been promised a da y of novel entertainm ent and an opportunity to get away from th e stead y grin d of dail y classes, and they were far from being di sa ppointed. Arising at an earl y hour, tbey left their respective houses and dormitories and met at tbe Blue Bucket , where they breakfasted in a body at fi ve o'clock. Immediately after the breakfast the class hoarded a special train whic h had b een chartered for their use and promptly left Moscow for Ha yden Lake, just out of Coe ur d'Alene. Reaching the lake about nine o'clock, the seniors spent the remainder of the morning boating, p laying golf, and enjoying the beautiful lake scenery and surroundin gs. Luncheon was served to t he entire class in the Bozanta Tavern at noon and the morning pastim es were again taken up during the afternoon. Boarding t he train again the class returned to Spokane and dined at the Davenport Hotel in the Queen Anne room, whjch had been reserved for th eir privat e use. A show and an informal dance lasting until midnight completed the program, and a tired and somewhat disheveled group of seniors left Spokane shortly afterward on t he homewa rd jow路ney back to Moscow. Everyone agreed that it had b een a perfect day and one well spent, but som ehow home and b eds looked unusually b eckoning. George Huber, who acted as chairman of the picnic committee, need not have worried as to th e success of thls one last Aing of the class of 1930. Other members of the committee who ably assisted Huber were Jessie Little, George McDonald, and Frank Winzeler.

Page 49


Run 1~ n T A II,S III E, B. A .

Cu!'lll' d' llenr lliglr St·huul

Fr,ovu

E Ll

LJJG HT

·o , B. S.( I\fin. )

(;Q(•ur d'Alene lli glr St·huul H ~: t u Chi; ig m a Gamma Epbilo n; tl(•nl, I; Varsi t y Tennis, 2-3.

c \llOL

F.

hLE~ ,

/Jui SC' If i fAir • 'druul Kuppn igma

SArtA

A s~tociu tctll\ l i n c r,., Prc~i·

n.. (Pre· \l ed.)

M AR I E A LLI SO ,

B. S.( II. Ec.)

V•11•is and Clark ll iglr Sdwof, S pulmttt• (ntit•Nsity of Cul~{omia, L. os lttg<'lt•,,, California l>l'ha D elta Orlta: ll o nl!' Economi!'!l C lub; \\ .A.A.; Kuppu l'hi ; Busl..ctball, 3· k Babl'hu ll, 3-1; Volley b all, 1. CLYI)E LEUOY

OER ON,

D. . ( 1\ gr.E.)

Ricks Jligft Scfwol, Rexburg, It/aha Ta u \l !'m kph ; \ . . C.E., Presiden t, I. Cr.E \IE~T

R ENnY \ l, LT, B.',( \ g r. )

II MI'PII II iglr clwul, On·gmt T uu K app a E psilon.

JI A • All So 1•11r A BAcKL U

IJ,

U.A.

J\-lnlltllt 1/iglt Sclruul Fornt' ) II ull. T II 0\1\S On\' ILLE B\lltu,

H.A.

Colfax H igh clwul, II u~hittgtmt T au \l e m .\leph: D elta S igm a Hho; 1~ 1{'\E ST C \ltL 1:3 \LKO\\, Spukatw, II ashittgtun

K I•:

13. ' .( E.E.)

ET II H AP LI AE L .Ui\IIIIET'I',

l'ucatellu High Sc/wul Sigmu Alp ha Epsilo n ; FootiJU II, 2-3· Rt;uY E LL''

ar.,i t ) D e bate, I.

B.S.(Ed.) ~;

" 1" <.:lull.

BALEn, B .. ( ll .Ec.)

'/'!('ill /•'oils lli f.lt School

Albimt SUttr \urnwl 'clwul F orney H ull; ll o me Eco no m ics Club. F\E 8\U SC LiER ,

B .. (Ed.)

Fairfield High clruul Forney n ail; W.A.t\.; DulcLh T e tlt Gi mmcl. K AT II I> lll

WCIIIII' II 't!

" l " C lull; Kappa l' lt i;

E ELIZABET H BEAJI , B.A.

M <•ridiun ll iglt 'cfroul D elta Gamma.

Cr::oncE WoLcoT·r BE\HD\IOrtE,

B .A.

Priest R it~r High drool igmn Alpha Epsilon; Tnt<" rfru t <"rnity Cou ncil, 3-l, Treas· urcr, I; Baseball, l-2·3· ~; HiRe Team, 2-3.


\ltC \R ~'I' CL\111~ B EC I\.J.m , CPIII'SN' II ip,h School

f

B . . (\ I us.)

\lph a Phi ; English Cluh; Sigma Alpha Io ta, Trcas urt'r, 1: Pi Lamhtla Thrta; Trt'b lc Clef Club, 2-3; ''' .A.A., 2.

Cn1;;conv TROUPE BELSHER, B.S. (E.K) /Jois<' 1-ligh 'drool Lindl<-y llull; A.A.F:.; A.LKE.; Tire Idaho l~ngillct•r, -\lum ni l•:ditor, I; Track, l-2-1. NTO

BE

10 UE L AnA

' LIRO ,

B.S. (Ed.)

/Jroadii'IIY llip,h 'clr ool, SeoiiiP, Wa s/ri , gto/1

Cosmopolitan C lnh; Filipino Club,

ELLI S

MAIIJOiliE

Presid ent, ~~.

B LOOliJ,

B.A.

ol'llt Ct•fltrnl 1/iglr School , S poiWII I', Wu shingum

(;nmmu Phi Rc tu ; En9lish Club; A.\\ .S. Executive Buurtl, :J; Chuirmon Scuior GrCt Commillcc.

J\1 \II G \111-:T K N

USON llOLI N,

B.S. (Ed.)

Mos<·uw lligh School

S \lt\11

EI>ITII

BR\I)SH.\W,

B.S.(Ed.)

l'a_Yell<• IIi (!.h School

l><•lla Gumma; J'i Lambda Theta, St'cretur y, tur), I; Eng libh Club; Highest Honors, 2- ~.

JI O\IEn C l, \llE..,. CE BROCK, 't.

~;Club!!

S<'Crl'·

B. .(Bus.)

\lari<•s lli f!lt School

Sig ma \lplra Epsilon;

W I LLI \\1

Bu ~cha ll ,

'pE

1.

CElt BRO NSON,

B .•\.

C:raip,mo111 Jligh School

RouEH 'I'

l•:uc..:

~;

Buo" , B.A.

"I rcu IIi p,h Sclwol U.S. tttl(tf l l mflt•my, A ntwpolis , J\!faryla11d Plti Dc•ltu Tlt!'Lu ; Plti Alpltu DelLa; Bench and Bar Ass'n; Drumuti c~, I; A.S.U.J. Execu tiv e Boa rd, 4; CIIUirmau J unior \\ <·ck, 3.

n

ll 'niUit C K I G il ;\ u , i\1 oscow IIi glr School

0\Jt\\I C\

KILBUitN

B.S.( For.)

Ouncnen, B.S. (Ed.)

R 11 pPrt IIi gh 'duwl Bt·tu Thct n Pi; Silv!'r Luncc; Blue K ey, President, 4; " [" Club, l'rr~idcn t, 3: Foothall, 1-2-3-1, Captai n, 4; BasL..c thall, l-2-3- ~. Cap t ai n , '~; Trod., 1; Class President, 4.

\1 ARY K

\THEill'-' E Bvno, B. 1-t•wistotl 1/igh School 1-t•tl'iston Stat<' \ ormctl School For II<') II ull. C\TIIII\ '\

• C\LL\W\Y,

B.A.

CalclttV'll IIiglr 'clwol Colll'gl' of ldulto, Caldu'l'll, ldalro

lla ys IJ ull ; The ta Sij;mu, St>cretary, 4: English Cluh; Arf$o· tn/T, 2-3- ~; Co-ed Argonaut S tu IT, 2-3-4; Cup t um , Fres hm an Oircc tors; C!'m of tlrl' J\,fou11tai11s Stu IT, 4.

Ill/Ill

HuoO LPII \V \LFRED

CAUL ON,

B.S.(Bus.)

Moscow lliglr 'clrool

Page 5 1


C HARLES EATO

CA R EY, l3.S.(Ch.E.)

Boise High School Bet a Chi; Varsi t y T ennis, 2-3.

VERA J. CHA DLER, B.A. Boise High chool Deha Gamma; English CluiJ; Cem of th e Aifounwins S taff, l-2-3; Argonaut Staff, l-2; Y. W.C.A., Secre t ary, 3; VicePresiden t Class, 3.

LILA MAE CIIARrTON, B.S.(Ed .) Coeur d'Alene If igh School Ha ys H all; Westminster Gui ld.

MAUR I E C n ERR r CTO , B.S.(Ed.) Leon High School, I owa Iowa State Teachers· Colle!Je, Cedar Fulls, l uwtt Drake University, Des J\l!otttes, Io wa Alpha Phi; E nglish Club.

s. CA ISHOLM, B.S.(C.E.)

R AYMO 0

Burke High School Senior H all; T r ack, 3-4.

LAURA CLAUK, B.S.(Mus.) Filer High chool Alpha Phi; Mortar Board, Presid ent; Sig ma A lpha l ol a, Vice-Presideul, 4; Spurs; Y. W.C.A., Preside nt, 3; A. W.S., Secreta ry, 3; A.S.U. l. Executi ve B oard, 4; Chai r man Song Co mmitce, 2; Treble C lef, 2, 4. ) ENN I E~l r\E

CLARKE, B.S.(Ed.)

Lemhi High cltool. H ays llall; D eSmet Club.

L E A CATII EHI

E

CLLFFOHO, B.A.

Pocatdlo ll i gh School Unhl('rsity of Idah o, Soutltcnt Branch Forney Uall.

JvA

MAXI

E

Couss, B.A.

Nleridian High clt ool Coll<'gc of ldalro, Cah/well, hlaltu F orney H all.

H E RY WEST Coout 'GTON, B.S.( Bus.) Washington lliglt School, Portlwul, Oregan Lindley llall.

CLA IHE BARTO

COLLIEH, LL.B.

forth Central Tligh School, Spokane, Washington Del t a Chi; Scabbard and Blade; Bench and Bar Association; RiO c Team, 3-4; Cadet Colonel, R.O.T.C., J!.•

M tLFORD EowtN CoLLI •s, B.S.(E .E.) J\1oscow High . chrJOL Beta Theta Pi ; " 1" Club; A. I. E. I~.; FootiJall, I ; Basket ball, 1-3-1; Track, l-2-3- ~. Ca ptain, 4.

J.

FRA K

Co

E,

B.S.

Parma High School T a u Mem Alep h, President, 4.

E owARD ALBERT Coo , B.S. (Ed.) Boise ffi glr School Sigma Alpba Epsilon; Blue K ey; Intercollegiate Kni ghts; Class President, 2; Cem of the )\!fountains Business Manager, 3.

Page 52


MA itYLO U CHA V~ ' B.S. ( J•:tl.) S t. llfargarN's SC'hool , lluis1•, Ida ho l'i fkta Phi ; Secretar y, ~ l nr ta r Board ; Pi Lamlocla Tlo t• t u; S tnorll, Vi ce-President, 2; \\ o nw n' 11 " l " CluiJ; \\ . \ . >\ ., S<·c· r('[ ar), 3; ~l a i d o f II on or to l\1 a> Q ut'e n, 3; Cl as~> Sec n· t u r ~, 2: Tr!'ble Clef Cluh, 2·3: Pa n- ll cllf'nic \ ssocia ti ou, 3- ~; Bo ~ Si~ l<'r Captain, 3; Engli"h Club; R ifle Tea m, 1-2-3- 1; \lan agt· r, I. VIR G IL

T

\It T C ROSS,

B.. ( \ gr.)

CoodiuJ!, lligh • 'cloool

PA L RouEtlT C HOY , B.S. ( fo:cl.) Cla rk ston II igh SC'ltool \\ ing<·tlllf lmc t, Vicc- Prc!!iol <· nt, rl; Hille T cuon , 3-1. MAR CAH I~T F. l. t ZAIII~TII C U DI>Y, 1. 'l'<n•sa' ., A rml l'm)'. /Joisc, l dulw

U.S.( Jt:cl .)

l>i Beta Ploi; Pi Lambd a T het a; DrS m<'L C luh; Eng li;;h Club; Co-ed lrgouaut tuff, I ; Highes t llo nortt.

Lw-.o J. D\\1. IL .( Bus.) Suudpuiut lligh School \lph a T a u O mega; 1\ lroha Ka 1•pa l'~>i, Prct.id t• nt, I ; l'rc, i· de nt AKsocia tctl Bu~>in t'sl'\ S tudr nts, k

o' E \ Su.u , B. A. RnpPrt 1/ip,h School Sig ma Alpha l': psilon ; Blue Key, ecrct nr ), I; Sil vt' r Lunct·; 01'1La Sigma ; Scu ltlturd and Blade; . lrp,t~~wut S t uff, 1-2, l anaging Editur, 3, Ed itor -in-C hi l'f, 4; 1-:ngli Rh Cluh. CEDRI C C oi)FttEY

CottO 'iA D E " EY , B.\ . ."it. 'l'f'r<'sa's ·l cad('my , /JoiM·. l tfalw

Delt a Ga mon u. C ucL

\ I \IU O '\ Dt<; l-; , B. . ( \l e t.)

Pomte/111 ll igh Sdwol Dl•: \'i L E ttO Y 00'\\LI>SO '\ , M oscow High School

B.'\rclt.

El)\\ \Itt> D o NJ.O , B. S . ( I~ .K ) l'omlt•llo ll i~lt St·lwol Alploa T uu O nH'gu; Sigm u T au ; \ . I. E. I~ .; \ , \ . E.

Jo u

ELJZ\B ET II \ C '\ES Otti SCOL I~, H.\. (..rsuli•u• A corlf'my, \lo~cou•, l doho \11.•ha . C hi (~mega; tum,: l>f'Sm r l Club; Eu gli~l• C luh;

Y. \\ .C.A., 1-2.

Lo

1

e

J na Y D u '\L\P, B.A.

l da m .~ lligh 'duJOI, Clo rk~11111, II 11.~ fo . Alphu Phi ; E n~li11h Club, Secrel ur ), ~; Pugt· lH M U) Quee n , 2; A rgouout S taff, I.

C lw rh·.• J•'rou t'i.,

PutL E. D uSAULT, B.S. (Arch.) M o.1cow High School Sigma C hi; ca bburd und Blad e. ELIZ \B ET II

\1 \IIY E \ ST\l \ ::\', B .. ( Ed.)

Boise ll igh 'c/HHJI. Ka(l pa 1\. up(I:O Ga mma .

Page 53


F. oJTII M I L Dneo E KL N o ,

13 . . (~ d. )

/Jurley ll iglt 'clt uul Forn ey Jl a ll ; Pi La mbda The ta .

J ES

Ec u RROLA ,

B . . (Bus.)

B oise High School Be ta Theta Pi; Blue K ey: Basl..e tbu ll l gr .• 2-3· k C h air· mau J uni or Parade, 3; th lc tie M anu ger's Clut., Viee-l>residcn l, 4; Bltu• JJII(·k1'l S ta iT, 2 -3A; ll u mor Editor, 4; Cem of th e M ountains S ta iT, 3; C bairman Senior Asse m bly, 4. O LI V ER W I L LI )1

E

PE,

B.S.(Agr.)

/Iii/yard High 'd•ool, . p olwnC', W ashington T au Ka ppa Epsilon: 1\lpha Zeta, P resident , '1: B usiur sb I daltn A grintllurisl, i\1a uager ; Geucra l i\1ana ger " Li Ltle J ntcrn a ti onal": O uir y Produc t'' J ud ging T ea m, 4 . Hu ooA L OU IS E

EvA 'S, B.A.

Downey lliglt 'clt uol

n

T H JEA ° F ,\ NN I NG,

J3.. (Eel.)

M oscow lliglt . 'clt oo/ l ~oss,

E oWA JW

B. S.( Bus.)

IA•wiston Higlt 'cltoo/ L En OY C u E T'\I~ Y Fow L E it ,

13.

lr'ellllell 1-liglt 'clt oul DoROT H Y FREDH t CK S O •,

B. A.(M us.)

M <tlod lliglt clwol \l pha C hi O m l'~a; i\l ort ar Boa rd ; Sil-\"ma Alpha Io t a, Prt·side n t, 1: purF, I'<'TI'lllr) -Treasurer, 2: C h airma n Big Sis ler i\l ov<> mcnt, 3; Trdole Cll'f Cluh, 1: C ha ir man Cln,;s Song, 3; Class Treasurer. 3; Pan- Helleni c A s~ocia t ion , 3 - k II OLT l<' ntTCll\1 \ N,

13.S.( For.)

lja yNte lliglt . d um/ Larnf~tl a C hi lphu : Associa ted F c>res tcrs. C LA IIl ED\\AH O c ,\ L I':,

B . . (Bus.)

1-<'wis and Clark 1/iglt . elton/, S pokane, Washington Phi l;a m ma D<>lt u; Blue K ey; C urL uin ; Drama t ic~, 1-2-3; A~sis l3nl J\la ua~c r Dra ma Li cs, 2; M anage r Orumu t ics, 3 ; Glee Club, 2 -3 : En glish Cluh; I n l<>rfraler nity Cou ncil, Vice· Prcsic lr n t, 4; C hairn111n J unior C abaret. 3 ; C hai r ma n Sen ior Bull, I: Pep Band ; Orches tra, 2-4: C huirma n Ll o mcco mi " " D ecora t ions, l ; C hairman Class ong, 2. "' FRANCE

MAHIO N G A LL E'!',

B.A.

Hoise H igh 'chool l'i Be ta Phi; Phi B ela K uppu; IO: uglisl• C luiJ; A.S. U. I. E xecuti ve Bourtl, 3 : A. W.S. C abinet , 3; Oru rn a ti cs, 3-4 ; A rgonaut S ta iT, I; Co-ed Argonaut Sl aiT, I. K AT B L EE~

C E:

Garfield fli gh F orn ey H all Jo u

C.

GLA

e,

'E

c \ R NE'I'T E, B. A.

cltool, Washington

B. S.(Bus.)

B oise II i gil rhool BeLa C hi ; Sca bbard and Bla tl e; Al1>ha Kap1)(1 Psi, P resid ent , 4, Secre tar y, 3; Liculc nunt Colonel, R.O.T. C. L UCI LE H ARRI ET G LI NO E\I A '1,

B. A.

Coeur d'A lene 1/iglt cltool Forney II all: J\ l ortar Board, Vi cc-Prcsicle n t; S p ur~< : Orcltcijtra, 1-2-3-4; RiAe T eam. 3 -'~; Big Sist er Cap t ai n, 3; ar ll1ex T a ble. 3: A. W.S. Co uncil, 3; A.S. U.l. E xecutive Board, 4; E nglish Club

P age 54

~-


J~ J) ' ' I ' \ \ Gonu, '/"roy II iflh Srlwal

B.S. ( Ed.)

K EN "\ ET H ~l cCov G RAB 'ER ,

B.S.{Ed.)

fo"ruitlaml ll igh School T au Kap pa Epsilon; Glee Club, 3-4.

HuTu

\11~ n1

"' GnA Y, ll .A.

(;old 11'<'11 II i gh Sehoul F urm· y ll ull.

T u 1-:o no1n : .J oE Ctt l l!:s t::u,

ll . S. ( I~ . K )

M oscow ll igh School CEC I L

II AC IO:N, B.A.

L<•tt"is and Clark lligh S('hool, S p okane, Wflshington il(lli U Chi; Sil vf' r T.an ee; Blue K ey, Secre tary, 3; Delta Si!!ma, Sccrct ur ) -TrcaRurer, 3; 1\l pha Ka pp a Psi; l rgoll tlltt St uff, 1-2-3- 1, 1\1 a n u,:;in ~ Editor, 2, Ed itor -in-Chief, 3; S Lud!· nL ll umlbool.., l::ditor, 3- ~; U ig hcsl H onors, 1.

A

' ] A E H ALEY, B. S. lrlttlw Falls H igh Sclt ool ~ " 1'1'" AltJha The ta .

C \T II E ili ~E

R.

H \'I SO~ .

B.S.

(;rclltblf't"ilh· 1/igh School ~ a pt•a Alpha The ta.

VEtt ' Luc ll,l,l!: II \llUlNG, B .S.{Ed.) \ t'ZI If'rt"t" IIi gh School l'i Be la Ph i.

Ett

EST

II

\ T C II ,

U.S.( E.E.)

II 1•iser II i glt Sc·huol S1·n ior ll ull; A. L. E. K ;

A.A. I~ .

W u , LA UE LL E M An Y 11 ATC II ,

B.S.(E d.)

l.t•wis un fl Clork ffigh School, Sp okr11w, ll''ushi11 gtun Furney Hull ; T rclilc Clef Cl uli; English Club. J U t ES

\V.

II A \\~1

s, B.S.{P re-M ed.)

Cm'ltr d' •Ilene lfigh Srlwol T a u Ka p pa EpKilon ; Pep Band, 2 -3- ~ ; Orches tra, I ; Pn·\ l cd Clu b; T racl.., 1-2-3- 1; Cross-Co untry, 4.

J E.\

J>u n VE Jl A WKI NS, B.S. ( Ed.) /,eu•isto/1 II ig h . "drool /,('ll'tslon "wte \ orm al School \ lt•h a Phi.

JI ELE N lL\IHliET Jl E I\1 OTH,

B.A .

Couu cil lfiglr d 1ool Forn i') ll all; English Club; K a ppa Phi ; W. A.A.

M \ x L eo II ENNEN, B.S.{B us.) M oscow Jligh School

Page 55


ITE L EN E

W.

iliLFI KER,

B. S.(Ed. )

Filer High School A lbion State N ormal d rool F orn ey HaJJ; W. A.A.: Baseball, 3; Volley ball, 4; Baske tball, 4; Rifl e T ea m, 3-4, Ma nager, 4 . TOi\Uil E B ,\BB Tll X,

B.S. (Ed.)

Steamboat Springs High School, Culor(/(Lu Hays H all ; Cosmopolitan Club, 4; E nglish Club, iJ.•

B.S.(C. E .)

RoBERT A LB E R T Tfocc ,

Payette H igh School L amb da Chi Alpha; A.S. C.E ., Treas urer, 3, Vice-President, 4; A.A. E.; Idaho Et~gi11eer, Associa te Etlitor, 3 -tl·. R O YA L WIL EY IlOLll AN,

B.S.(Bus.)

M oscow fligh Sehoul Varsity Swimm•n g, 4 . COSTELLO CA RP E T EU liOLi\t ES,

B.A.

Payette High School 'Be la Thet a Pi; Interfraternity Council, tl.; Cem of tire M orurta.in s S ta ff, 2 -3. JOHN M A ITLA ' 0 JlU BBARD,

B.S.(Ed.)

M oran H igh School, Washin gton K appa Sigma; Curtain; E nglish Club; Glee Club, 1-2-3. GEORGE

L.

ll UBER,

B.A.

K ellogg lfiglr School Sig ma Chi ; Rh odes Schola rship, 1930; Blue Key; Sil v<:r Lance; Scabbard and Blade; D elta Sigma Rho, President, 4 ; English Club; Cha irma n Fres hm an Glee, I : Class President, 2; Interfra ternity Council, 3-tl., Vice-President, 4; Va rsity D ehate, l-2-3; Assist ant Man;lftcr , 3; A.S.U.L Executiv e Boa rd , 3; Vi ce-President A.S. u . r., 4. ORVIL L E LEROY H U LT,

B.S.(Ed.)

Burley lfi~lr School Sigma C hi; ' [" Cluh; F oo th all, 1-2-3-l, Ca p tain, 4. E R

ES T FRA ' K

Ilu

T,

B.S.(Pre-Med.)

Boise High "clw ol i\llontana S tate Colle~;,(', LJo:eman , M ontana Sigma Chi ; Pre- Med C lub, 2 -3-4; Athl eti c Managers' CluiJ; President, 3; Basketball 1a nagcr, 3; B aseball M ;tnagcr, 3; F oo tball Manager, 4. EuGE N E CHARLES I vE RS O N,

B. S.( M in. )

Kellogg High School University of M ontarw , Nfi ssuula , M unttwn ALLE N

S.

J A SS E ,

B.S.( Arch.)

Boise lli.glr chool B e ta Chi ; Sil ver Lance; Blue Key, President, 3, Vice-President, 3-4; Alph a P si; Secre t ary, 2; lligh H onors, 1-2-3; Class Treasurer, 3; Class P res ident, iJ.; Trllerfraternil y Co uncil, 2-3, President, 3; Gem uf tire Mmurtains , Art Editor , 2 -3; Associate Editor, 3; Editor in-Chi ef, 4; E nglisll CluiJ; A rgonaut St a ff, 1; Chai rm an Seni or Announ cements Co mmittee C hai rman Homecoming D ecor a Li ons, 3. MYRO

ALTO

}EPPES E

' B.S.

M oore High Srhool

AMNE B. Jou so , B.A. P ocatello Hislr chool Un iversity o) Idah o, Soutlwrn Branch Alpha Chi Omega; Curtain ; English Club ; A rgonunt S ta ff, 2; Dramatics, 2 -3-4 . FR E D

M.

JoH

so

,

13.S.(C.E. )

Craigmont High School Sig ma T a u; Iduho Engineer S taff, 3-4; A.A.E.; A.S. C.E., P residen t , 4 .

Page 56


B.S.(Agr.)

GEORGE \VrLLlA ' f }OII NSO ,

Coeur d'Alene High chou/ B et a Chi ; Alpha Ze ta , Secrc tn r y, 4; l ntt'rcolleginle Kni g ht~; Ag C lub, President, 4 ; Dairy Produc t~ Jud gin g T e um , ,~,. R u TH Y1VIE

B.S. ( f us.)

E Jou NSTO ,

King llill lli&h School Delta D elta Dt>lta. KE N ETII PAuL Jo ES,

B.S.(F.d.)

Emmett lligh chou{ Kapp a Sig ma; Scabbard a ntl Blade.

RussnL Jo u o, B. S.(Agr.)

Coeur tl' A letw IIi B'' Sclwul Tau Kapp a E psilon: F ootiJ!III , 1-2· 3· k GEOlWE LAWRE C E KALO US EK,

13.S. (C. E.)

I:Juhl II igh S rhoul Sig ma Tuu; ftlaho F.ngi11t>rr, Busiu css M an nger: Presiflt'nt, C he mi sts' C luh, 4. MARY MARGARET K EAR S,

H.S.(Ed.)

S pokan e, Was~ington Alpha Chi Omega DEA N PntTCHARO K E LT.EY ,

B . . (E.E.)

ltloho Falls High chool Alpha Tuu Omega ; Sig ma T au, Presiol cut , 4: A.l.R.f:. ; A.A. E ., Pro•sid cnt, 4.

Lm s

Gonoo

KEN

EOY,

B.A.

Frances . ·himer Junior College, Mount Carroll. Illinois Ocllll Ga m ma; f:nglish C luh; Dramatics, 3 -4. H ELEN KERR ,

B.A.

M oscow 1/igh chool Kappa Alpha T heta: M ortar B oard ; The ta S ig ma, Prf'sidf'nt , 4; Wi nged flelmet, President, 4: '\ .A.A.; En glish C lub; Ull(ler tTw H elmet, ~ditor, 3 ; f:ditor C o-ed A rgonant, 3; Ma~a g i,n g EdiLor C o-ed Argonaut, 1 ; Argonaut S taff, 23-4; .RtOc r eam, 1, 4; Basehalf, I. W I LLIAM L. KERSHJS ' I K, Burley Ji i~h S ch ool

B.S. (Ed.)

ig ma Chi; • I" Club; Foo tball, 1-2-3-4: Truck, L-2 -3-4.

DoROTHY M I LOR ED KIE NROLZ,

B.S. (Bus.)

Moscow High dwol O aleth T e th Gimel; Phi C hi Theta; Oclta S i ~ ma Rho; Kappa Phi, President, 4; W.A.A.; Women's • I"' Club: Varsity D e bate, 2-3; President Associuted Busin cRs S tuflcnts, 4; \\ el!ley Foundutio n, President, 3. MARGARET FnA c E

K 1 •c ,

B. S.(Ro.)

M oscow High School D uii'Lh T e th Gimel; Kappa Phi. H AROLD L1 ' COL • K t RKLI •, Wallace J-1 igh School

B.S.(Mus.E d.)

L amhd a Chi Alpha. M ,utCELLA EvELYN KllAEM E n ,

B.A.

Plummer lfigh School D elta D ella D ella; S pur~; Orches tra ; Pan-Hellenic; \~' .A.A. ; Basketball; D eS met C lub.

Page 57


ALVTN FRED KROLr.,

B.S. (Met.)

Cot?ur d'Alene High chool Senior ll aU; Football, 2-3-4; Wrestling, 2-3. WrLLTA.\1 T H EODO RE Knu~nms,

B.S.(For.)

Boise High chool Tau K a ppa Rp!!ilon; ' i Sigma Pi, Prel!ident, ·~ ; lntcrfru ternity Coun cil, 3-4; Associa t ed Forcstr• rs, Vicr-Pr<'sitl c> nt, 4 : Idaho Forester, A~sociat<' Editor, 3, Editor -in-Chil'f, 4. NvoL ELWI N LAK E,

'B. S.(Ed.)

/Jlatl.foot High Srhool Sig ma Chi. C R An LEY ] OSEPH LA GE R,

n.S.(For.)

l.ewi.~ton

II igh . 'clrool Associa ted For<·Rlcrs, St?crrlary-Tr.-.asurcr. 3, PrN<idl' nt , tl.. ] U t i s ROB ERT LA S ll lmnv,

n.A.

Cofr,illt? lligh School T uu Ml'm Aleph ; English Cl uh.

Lour

EL rE

r, L ARS E ,

B.A.

Moscow High . clrool

' RA.

] A ME S K E NET II LAHSO

Malad fligh St·lwol

R uTn VA R'IF.s L\RSON, l~dPn

B.A.

IIi ~h School

ROBERT LOUIS LF.C IIOT,

B.A.

Boise High chool Alpha Tau Omega. CA RL GEO RGE L EO 'I \HO ,

n.. (Agr.)

Filer High . 'rlwol Ricl enha ugh II ull.

]E

I E LITTLE,

B.. (Ed.)

l~mmett

Hi sh School Delta Ga mm a; '\ .A.A., President, J!.; A. \'\'.S. Exl'cuti,·e Boa rd , 3-4; Class Secre t ary, 3: \Vomen' R" I" Club: arthex T able, 3; Pa n-llcllcnic, 2-3-1.

Co

ELL

LEnov LuKE,

n.s.

Moscow High 'clwol Lambda Chi Alpha. C H ARL ES TH OMAS LY C R ,

l3.S.('Bus.)

St. Anthony High School Albion State J ormal School T au I em Aleph, Treasu rer, 3, R ALPH

J.

McCABE,

V i ce- l'rc~itlrnt,

B. A.

Colfax If igh 'clwol, JT7(J.dlington D elta Chi.

Pagr 58

<k


WAY ' E ALEX\ ' DER McCoY, 13. .(E.K) Arling 1/igh rhool GEORGE McOo HO,

'B.A.

Lincoln 1/igh School, Portland, Oregon Be ta Theta Pi ; Rlul' K ey; Delta Sigma; l•: nglil!h C l ub ; CPm A~<Roci atr Eclitnr, 2, Editorin-Chief, 3; Gl'rwrul Chairman llomo•comiug, ~; Argmwnl S t aff, 1-2-3- ~; Chairma n Sl'nior J\1 ixer Commillce, 4; Orumatiei!, 1-2; L'n·· LI'go l \ !t~oeiation, 1-2, Prl'~i d cnt, 2.

of the Mountaitls Stu IT, 1-2-3-4,

LUELL\ McFADDE~, 1/aih•.r lfigh . 'chool

B. \ .

ll uys II all; "oml'n's " I " C lull; W.A.A.; Eng li;oh Clulo.

A ' McCON ICLE, Spokane, If ashington

MARro

B.S.( II.E1•.)

KapflU K appa Gamm:t . FnA ~K M c:Ctt\'IE,

H.S.( ll uR.)

f:rtlltllf't'illt> lligh School Linol lc·y ll ull.

DA

McCn

\T il ,

B.A.

II allm·p 1/igh Sdwol Sigma Chi: ilvl'r Laucl': Blue Kl'), Trl'aRurcr, 3-1: Cur· tain: I nlereolll'giatc Knights, llonorahlt• Dul.. t•, 3: l•: ngl i ~ h Cluh; Oramalicil, 1-2-3- ~. \ ssis taut \1 auag1•r, 3. I\I anagc·r, ~;Argonaut Sta ff, I, 3-1; Rh ode!'. eloular Cun<lidate, I. LEL\ M \E M cGnA TII , l.apu~ti lligh School

n... ( I LEe.)

Dt•ltu Delta l)l'lta ; Sp urR; ll unw l•:conomics C lul..

Ftt \NK

McM ILLI

'

n.S. ( BuR.)

Pocatello II igh School Phi Gamma Dl'hu: Sil \l'r Lane!': Alpha K a11pa PRi: " I " Cluh,

Sl'c rNary-Tre<l ~urrr,

1: BaRI..I'lhull, 1-2·3· 1.

M \HJon"' M e AucuTo'l, n.S. (Ed. ) Coeur d'A!Ptu• High

dum/

ll uy11 ll ull.

L

\URA ' CE nol)\1 \ N ~ I ANN INC ,

II.S.( BnR.)

lshton lligh s,·/wol Lambda Chi Alpha. PIIILIP CLHR

:M .\N N I'\C , B. S.(Ed.)

1'/umuwr IIi glr School BNa Chi; Kappa D e lta Pi; Rinr T eam, 1-2·3·1. MARY

A'

IE L AUR I E MARSII \1.1.,

B.S.(Erl.)

Lcwisto11 II iglr St·lwol Letciston Swte \ ormal • 'clrool K op1>a Alpha Tlrt"Lu; Eng li s h Cluh.

LO\\ EI.L

WE LEY \,[\ SO !'I, II oudlo11tl lligh dwol T au Kurra Ep11i lon.

B. . (Ed. )

E ELLEN MATTE , B.A. Vrauces Shimt>r St'lruol, J\1/ount (.'(lrro/1, 11/inoi.f

KATBETH

Pi Beta Pili; Thl'lo Sigma; Engli8h Club; Pan-llellt>nic:

Argon(luL S taff, 3-1 ; Co-ed Argo11a11t • tofT, 3--1-; Gem of t/t(• Mountains tafT, ~; llighrst H onors.

'

Page .59


ALFRED NIEL E

MAUCilA ', W eston High School L.D.S. Inst itute

n.. (Agr.)

E\II. EN GR ISWOLD MAY ,

B.S.(Agr.E.)

A rro lliglt School Uuir•l'rsity of ldolto, outhl'r/1 Bran ch Rid <'nhaugh Hall ; Glee Cluh, 3: Ag Cluh, 4 ; A.S.A.E., Sl'c· rcl ary-Treasurcr , 4.• WI IFll EO f ELCA JW, B.A. M oscow High . drool Kappa Alpha Th!'la: Phi B('La K appa: English Cluh: Dah•th T e th Gimcl.

li E J, E

EAllL PRANK ME. NET,

B. . (Ed.)

Leu'i stall IIi gh rlwol Lamhda Chi Alpha.

DonoTn Y ELIZAilETII ~1E SENC ttn , n.S.(lJus.F.d.) Moscow lliglt Sehoul Kappa Alpha Tlo<'la

GEoncE

w.

M •Lun ,

n.S.(E.K)

flo gernwu Hill High School Senior ll all: Sij!;mll Tau ; A. I.E.E. ; A.A.P..

DoROTHY l\ h ~CI': Il, B. Boise JJ igh School Pi Bl'ta Phi ; English Cluh. CN ES CAY MoonE,

n.S.(Ecl.)

Co(llling 1/igh School Kappa Al1>ha Theta ; S purA; Y<'ll Quee n, t. W I LLIA:\r C 1. 0

o

(oonE,

B.S.( Bus.)

wrgis High 'drool, Soskatclrewa11, Ca11wlu Lindley Hal l.

A COLAS, B. S.(B us.) Filer lligh School H ays ll all: ''t'esley F o undation; Kap1>a Phi, R ec. Secretar y, 3, Corres. ecrclary, 4; Col'morolitan Club, Vice President, 2; Secret ary, 3-1; ~<sociatcoc Businrss S tn(lenl!l.

E DITII MARI E

TfERi\lA

W t LLJA)l

GrongPr Tli/1 lligh Ritlenhauglo llall.

ASS, B.S. ( Ous.) drool, Woslringto11

DoROTHY

r EAL, 13.S. (TT.Ec.)

M eri<iiou J-1 igh drool Alpha Chi Omega; Phi psilon Omicron, rcrctar y, tk Women's"] " Cluh: \\. A.A.: A. \\.S. Ex<'Culivt• Board, 3, Vice-President, 4; Vicc-Pr<"sidcnt Class, 4.

l i AROLD T.

ELSON, B.S. (C.E .) WollacP High "clrool Lambda Chi Alplra; Sigma Tan; A . . C. E., Prrsirl<'nl, 3: It/alto F:ngit~Per, Editor 4; Sigma Tau Scholarship M<'dal, 2; A.A. K; English Club; HighrRt lion orR, 1-2-3-1. vIDA

D ER FLL'< C Ell

Mos<"uw ll iglt School

Page 60

·v-

ETTLET O '

B.S. (M us. Ed .)


ZELDA NEwCOM B,

B.A.

Santa Cru; ll igh . chool, California San Jose 'wte College, California Kapy a K a pf!R Gamma; Mortar Board; A. \'t .S., President, 4: E ng lish Cluh, President, 4; Dra ma tieR, 3- ~; Argonaut S tuff, 3. n u·r B 1n E E N£W II OUSE, B.A. Kuna High . rhool KnpJlU Alpha Thf'la ; M ortar Boord: Sigma Alpha Io ta, Sl'crNary: Spurs, Pr1•sident, 2; A.\\ .S., Treasurl'r, 3: Class rcretu r y, 2: Trl'hlf' Clt'f C lnb, Prl'sitli'nt; Strin~ Quarll't. CRACE

I XO

', B.A.

Clarkston ll i(l,h School, Washington ll ays Hall: En~-:l ish Club; Argonaut Staff, 2-3; GPm o{ tlw M ountains SuiT, ~; Y. W.C.A.; a rtlwx Tuhl!•, 3: Cl u~<q

TrPa ~<urPr,

I.

Fn \NCI

Vt'ITO

O"' JN J.

B .S. ( Ed.)

Mudwy High Srlwnl Li ncllt•y llull; KupJlU D1•lta Pi.

Jo u

EAilL NonMAN, n .S.(Gcol.)

II a/lace Ifi gh School

• igma u; Foo tb all, I, 3, 1: True!., l-2-3-1; " I" Cluh: i\ Rsocia ted ~l inl'rll. R OLlEilT W I NSLOW

OL! , B.S. ( E.E.)

C:nltlt•Mtc High School

OwE s, B.A.

M .\RGARET

Tn·in Falls ll igh . rhool CollegP of Idaho, Caldn¥'11, Alpha Phi: T rl' lol t• Cll'f Cluh: Engli;;l1 Cluh. C L A R E cE

11 En utw T

OvLEA n,

n.S.(Ed. )

Mt·Cn/1 High Sclwnl

ARLIE

AUGU T PARD E, f:ruigmnnt II igh . chool

B.A.

I CE A LDE E PARI S H, B.A. /Juhl II igh Sdwol Gammu Phi BNu: English Cluh; \\.A.\., Reeortling. ecrl'· t ary, 3: Basketball, 1-2-3- ~; Y. \\.C.\.

B En

P AU L M Aili O

P ARKS,

B.S.(Ed.)

Culrlesar ll igh School Tau K appa Ep11ilon: Glee Cluh.

Gu;

OuvER

P ATCHEN,

B., .( \l. E.)

Co(•ur d' AIPIIP 1/ip,h School Tuu Ml'rn All'p h ; A.S. M.E., Vici'- Prt'Mi tlc•nl, 3, Prl'sicll'nl, 4. LA wRE cE LA v

n..

E PEc K , /Juhl High Srhool. Ri lll' nhangh ll nll; Class Vic~>- J>rl'~id r nt, 4.

G t. ADYS T AY L OH P ENCE,

R.S.(Ecl. '

Poy f'/te High School Dl'lla Ga mm n

'

P agP 6 1


El>\\

\RI) PETERSO'\, 1\ rllogg II iglt 'rhool

B.\.

~igma Al1lha Ej>Si lo,n; Cla.s~ Prt'~id e nt, 3: Chair m an Junior

I rom, 3; A. . U.L Excculov!' Board, 4.

to 1s J>1enne, B . .

WALTER l•(•r~;us

County lligh 'chool, /,eot'i.<ltm•n, \lo111ana ( flll't'rsity of \lmoUIIW, \lissoula. \lmlltlllfl Sigma -\lpha F:p•ilon. El. \ I E

\ I \Y

Pl'l'T\\001>,

TL .(Ed.)

Omfiron lligh . 'drool KJ-: '<1'1ET II

n \LTUOilF

Pr.\TT,

n... (A gr.)

C:Nreser IIi gh Sdwol Alpha Z!'la; ldalw Agriru/turi.• t, Etlitnr, 4; Anima l li n ~· hanclr) J nclginl-( ' l..·am, :1. ~; Cro•~-Cnnntry, 2; llillt- To• a en, 2-3: Var~il) l>l'hall', I. RoY

G. Pu

IJ .. ( Ed.)

\ILF.F..

Hurl.r• ll igh • 'rhuol l.in•ll•·> II all; cahharol a nd Bluole.

EH\\IN Pos-roN, B.S. ( Rw~.) 1•:/1.· Grot'<' 1/iglr Srlwol, WI.· Grm¥•, f:alifomia. Sacramento Junior <:allege, Sut•rt/1111'11/o Phi Gumma Drltu; lnterfrutcrnity Cou ncil , 4; Track Mnn· ager, 3- k \thh·ti c \l nn ag!'r,· Clnh: J\,~ociatec.l Bu~inr~<• St ud en t ~. Trt·a ~ urt'r, 1: Gem of tlw \lountains t afT. I. EL\IEH

Ell\\ \llO

E.

POI.ILTO'\.

LL.B.

Hurlry II igh . 'c-hou/ Phi Gamma Ot'lta ; ,\Jph a KapJlU Psi; P hi \ lpha 0f'lta, C hic·f J nMtiC'r; Bluf' Ke y, l'rc•!<iil••nl, 3: ScuiJiwril unci H luolc•, Silvc•r l.unC'c'; I ntcrfrulo•rnity Cnnncil, l'reMidc·nl. tl: Chair· man, Group Presiclt•nts' ConoH'il, k Be nch uml Bur i\R~cwia. limo, Chil'f J us ti c<·, k H.O.T.C:., Colono'l, 4 . •\ l vnTLE I111': '\E

R \ C H. 13. .(Eel.)

\lose-ore lligh Sdwol \lph a Chi Omega; Pi Lnmhda Tlwln. RtTII \-<'H R\\t ST imT, B. . (Ed.) Moscow IIigil . cluJOI Gummn Ploi Beta. CNE

K\Y H\ N J>\ T.L,

U.S. ( Ed.)

t rsulinf' l nult•my, \loscOII', lrlfiiHJ O cltu Dl'lta Dc•lta: l)alcth Tcth Ginwl: (;,.m of th f' \ltmntaius tafT, I.

\n c111t-:

Eo\\JN

Rt

E ll I. E,

13 . . (Physirs)

l'ort Tmt•nsr•ntl lligh Scluml, II ashing/Qn T an ~h·m All'ph, Sccrl'lur) , I; English Cluh.

Do

ALO

l~eubNts

VF:H\ \fiLDREO

R \Y\IO'<o H

ELL,

TL .(E.E.)

II igh School

\Ch.l~'l'T.

13. . (Ed.)

Ttc ;, Falls lligh . drool Deltu Delta O!'lta; Pi Lum hrlu Tlocta, CLAil E CE

II.

\\1 PLE,

Trca~urrr,

I.

B .. (C. K )

Meriditm lligh Srltool. Beta Cloi: I ntrrcollrgiatc Knig ht..,: Glee Clnh, 2-3-1; ~I nlr Quartet, 3-1.

Pagl' 62


EvERETT CLAUDE

Rathdrum High

SA

R.S.(Ed.)

DER ,

chool

J.

HowARD

SARGEANT,

13. . (For.)

Cra ugl'r 1/igh Srhool, lf'ushiugMu LindiPy II all; i Sigma Pi. c .,nnoLL GnA ,,.

u.s.cr.:(l.)

n AWEN,

Poml'my 1/igh Srlwol, IVushiugton J.inclll'y ll a ll.

J F.ll A T" DYNE

CAno r.r~E S m~ nFr~Y,

B.S.(Mus.)

/Juhl II igh . 'clwul Forney ll nll; E nglish Cluh; Dra ma ti cs; (;J,•e Cluh.

Tl ERnEttT lT

e n S n ooK,

13.S.(Gcol.)

S andpoiut lligh Srhool. Alpha Tau Omega; Sigma C:amrnu Epsilon; Associatecl M iuers, Tr(':lSnrcr, 4. D OROT II Y

T.

S rmiO NS,

n.S.(F.(I.)

K<•llogg lligh School Ga mma Phi Be t a; Phi Chi Th(· lu, Tr('asur('r, tl.. FLOR ENCI;; M ,\E SK t N

En,

13.S. (13us.)

1/ermiston lligh Sf'ltuul, On•gon Dale th T (' th Gi nl('l ; \\ .A.A.; \X om(·n·s " I " Clnh, Trensnn•r, I. EDGAn D AVTS S r.ATE, lJonut'r.~

IJ. S.(G<'ol.)

Ferry Nigh School

0 AROLD GEORGE S mTH,

n. S.(Bus.)

Idaho Foils lligh 'chool BNu Thet a Pi: Scabhanl and Blade; Bench and Ba r: Cadet Major, H.O:r. c., 4; Foo tba ll, I: Ballkct hull, I ; Truck, 1; B us('ha ll, 3-4. MAns n A LL R r LEY

s,HTII, n. S.(Ag•·. )

Cootling 1/igh 'chou/ MAnY SNo w ,

B .. (H.Ec.)

Nurth Cf'ntml 1/igh School, S polwnf', Washington ll uys ll ull. WESLE Y Roo s EV ELT S r• ENCEn,

13 . . (Agr. )

Nlissonla High School, Montana T an M cm Aleph; Ag Cl ub; " Lillie lntcrnu ti onul" S taff, 2 -3-~.

R uTH SPYRES,

B.S.(H.Ec.)

Bur/a> 1figh School F orn ey ll all; H o me Economi cs C lub; Kappa Phi. BEATIH CE S TALK E R,

B.S. (H. Ec.)

L ewiston H igh chool Delta D elta Delta ; Mortar Board; Spurs; Phi Upsilon Omi cron, Secre tary, 3, Prt>sidcnt, 4; Na rth ex Table, 3; \X'.A.A.; Class Seerc t ury, 4; A. W.S. Executive Boord, '~; Uomc Economics Club; Gencrnl C hairman Co-ed Prom, 3.

'

Page 63


WtL~'ItEO IA-tl'i~

B

ll~ll ' " , T\ '\I.EY.

B.. (For.)

am/ Clark 1/ip,h Sc-hool, 'polwue, II o~hiugttm lll'la Tlwta Pi; co bbard a ncl Bind<·; lntcrcolll•gin ll• Knig ht ~: Lil'ull•unnt-Colo ncl, R.O.T.C., k

HouF:wr "\ ru c wr

T. CLAtn, B. \ . /tlaho Fall$ ll igh School I' hi l)('ha Tht• la; Curtnin; Blu<' Kl'), Trl'a~ ur<' r, 4: J nlf•r· collegial<' Knight-.: \thlcti c \lan ag<· r~· Cluh; Ba~d•a ll \I au· ag<'r , ~;D ra m a tic~. 1-2-3-1: lntt·rfrall·r nit > Connril. s,•,•r•·· t Or ), ~; Bn ..l..<'l ball, I. \f\ltY C\TIIIm t ~r;; , TEg r.Jo:, 0.1\. / . II . J\1. lmd<'my, CoNtr tl' llt•m• Cam111n Phi Bl'ln ; fo: ngli'lh Cluh; l)t>S nwl Cluh. MERit i L I. Pt ii LLII' , 1'1'\E \1 \T I·:s.

IL .(1\gr.)

\,/ osrolt' IIi f!,h Sduwl \ nTIIIJR , TO\\ \ SS I-:Il, B.• . ( BuR. ) CoNtr liNt<• High Srlwol Ridt>nho ugh ll all: \IJlha J... oppn P~i: Pe p Band, 1-2-3-1. \Lt.E '\

,r

CLARE[';C£ EO\\ \ll n , TOW \ S:O:E it. Coeur tf ll<•m• llip,h Srlwol Ri1l t>nhaugh fl ail. CF.ItTIIli>E

'"'=" ' TH I '\GEH,

B.S. ( For.)

B.\.

II t•ist•r II ip,h Sduml Alpha Phi.

B. Sti\1\II, HS, B. <\. Sa/mmt IIi p,h s,·fuml

t ST I "'

Erl'\' Fn ''\ CE

" ' '\ $0 '\.

B. . ( BuR.)

Troy IIi [!,It . c-hool Phi Chi Tlwto;

ll i g lw~ot

llonor.., 2.

SAM EL F. , " \Y E, B .S. ( BuR. ) Melba II i gh Srlwol Tau \I em \l r ph, Trea~urrr, 1: \\ r•·"~lling Tt>am. k

CoLon-: \ t oonE T'cc un, B .. (Ed. ) Tt•lwa lligh . 'drool, II ashirrp,tmr L OO

T \ L I..

B. . ( Pre-M ed.)

!Hgby lligh . rluml Lindley II ull; Si h rr Lane<'; Blur Kt•). Vice-Prci>idl'ul, 3; Pn•sident A. . 1.,.1., k . . . 1. E.:••t•utivt• Boa rd. 3-k Pr Jl Ba nd , 1-2-3- 1: OrclwRtra, 2-3 -1.

\ s \1-:1.

T\LL,

B . . ( Pre-\l ecl.)

RigiJ.Y lligh . drool Lintllq II all; C la11s ic<'·PreRitlt•rll, 3; Pre- \l e< l C luh , Vic!'· Pr~·~i tlt•nt, 3; Vice-Chairman GrmiJ> PrcRi d•·nl ~' Coun ri l, t; Orcht•H tru, 2-3-4.

RrcnAno lllm\1\~ T\YLOn , B.. ( \ l in.E.) 'wadpui rrt llisfl Srlaool K npJ>a igrna; Engli~h C luh: .Jr~Q/111111 t ofT, 1; lrlfllao l~u~i. ueer S taff, 2; C<'m of tlw ,\fowWtius • tafT, 3.


Gn \ C I~ l .. LC ILI~

Tuo\1 \S,

B.\.

hfttu11 II ip,ft Sehoul l'i Bc· t a Phi; K a ppa Phi: Treble C lef Clu b. 011\lO N O

J.

B.!:>.

T II O \J A '

Costlt'funl II iglt 'drool Lirullc) ll all. H 1c 11 \llU , • T n O \I AS, B.A. If ullu II ullu II ip,lr Scftool, II aslri 11/!,tou

Kuppu Sigm u; " I" Cluh; F'ootball ; Wrl'stling, I.

M AII C

l~ ll lTE LUCILLE THOMETZ,

B.S.( Ed. )

'l'wi11 />'ails 1-lil!,lr Sclroul K uppu K uppa Ga mm a; Pan-H ell <• nic ARsociution, l'rc8ic lc•nl, I; Secr!'lury, G r oup Prt•sidcnts' Cou ncil, I. A"n n En

\LLEC K TnO\I SO~,

II

B.A. (Econ.)

M oscou• ll ip,lr Sclrool Si~ mu u; Phi Bc·ta Kup1w; Sigma G a mm a Epsilon; D!"lta Si~ m u; lrp,o11011t tafT, 1-2-3, Sports Edi to r, 3: Chairman Junior \\ l'l'k l'ublicil), 3; Eng lish C luh: F: pi ~co1•a l C luh, l'n·•iol!"nl, 3; llig h<"st ll o nor~, I, 2, 1: R hodes cholarshi p Ca rltlida t l', I. H ouEttT Tuaoc K:\IORTO~ , B.S. (C.E.) U 11 p!'rt 11 i p,ft School / do/to f~'ugin!'er tafT; A. . C.E., Vice- Prt'~icl<•nl, 3, Sc•(' rt'·

J.

Cros~

tar) -Tr<•unun·r, I; Va r$it) 1-:ngi nl'<"rn, \ icc- Prceitlcnt, -J..

\ I \IIJOIIIE 'l'u·i 11

l'u/1~

TIII{()C "'l 0 1lTO-..,

Countr);

\ s,O<'ial!"cl

13. . ( Ed.)

II ip,ft School

V r o t, ETTE

\I

\ E TrT ~;s.

B.. ( Ed. )

U 11 pt•rl IIi p,ft Sdwol 1\. appa Kapr>a Gamma: 'l'n·hlc Clt'f C luh. At.M \ S GIFFon•> T onGEHSO'¥,

B.S.( Ed.)

Juliw•llu ll ip,lr School WAYNE I VA

TRAV I S,

B. S.(C. K )

Cat./11'<'11 llip,lr Sclr oul La rnhda C hi Alpha; Sig ma Tau, Vic!"-l'rt•sido·ut, I; A.S. C. K ; / do fro l~ngin<'l'r Stall', 3; Al!socialt•d En~;i ne(•rs. Jo s r; pn l•: o\\ \Ill> TLtt'\~; n , B. S. ( Bus.) C:on:uga 1/ip,lr Sclruol, Spokorw, Jr uslriiii!,IUII

1\. appu Sigm a; A IJlh a Kuppa P si. L t~S LI~; R OilE ilT V .\ '\CE. IJ<•Il(•ltl(' II ip,lr . '('/roof

U.S. ( Gcol. )

Tau 1\. u[I(IU E(ll-ilon: igma Gamma E p,ilou; lntacullq,:iall' Kni ~ht~; i~mu T a u. ' I I I G I'\ I \ H L>T II \

\ '\l>l>ltiiOFF,

B.\.

lltwl.fur<l 1/iglr Scluml, 11/iuois \1 inmi ( llh<'rsity, o.~Jurtl, ()frio

ll u) s II all: Orclwntr u, 3-1; English Club. P ATHI C I\. II E'IRY WALKER ,

B.

0

II a/l<l('t• II iglr S('/ruol K uppu if.i.,mu; cuhhard urHI Blade; R!"nch an<l Rar; l rgotwut S ta , 2: 11/tt(' Bu('k<'t t uff, 2-3, Buhi ness M anug(•r, 3; C luss Trcusurc r, ~; C hai rman Junior ~I ixcrs, 3.

Pug/! 65


Lo t s WALT~n s,

B. A.

Colduw/1 lligh School Mills Collegl', California Delta Gamma. AGNE

I DELL WAnLtCK ,

H.S. ( Ed.)

Peck II igh 'chuol I? n A K

A.

WAnNER,

B.S.

Boise High School Phi Gammu D elta; Pre-Med Club; E pi ~co pal Cluu, l'rciji de nt, 4; Argonaut Staff, 2 -3; Track, I. H An OLD

A. \V AT.E RS, JJ. S. (Agr.)

Moscow lligh 'chool T au Kappa l~ psilon ; Alpha Zeta. MMlT JJ A

Ro

ETT.\ WEDl ' ,

ll. S.( II. Ec.)

Moscow lligh School Dulcth T c th Gimcl; Kuppa Phi, Economics Clul>.

Vicc-Prc~idcut,

VJOLA C u nt STINA WElD.\ f AN,

Boise Fligh School Englisb Club; Chairman Hou EHT

Sumuw

WELLS,

Colville 1/igh School,

Clat~t!

3; lforn e

ll.A.

Stuut, l; Volley ball, J.

H.S.(M iu.)

rr ashington

UlC II AH I) STA

LE Y WElt ' E H,

13.S.( Ed.)

/Joist• Uigh 'dwol D A ' A Jl o)t ~ u W111TE,

13 .. ( 13us.)

/Jonners Ferry lfigh School Sigma u; interfraternity Council. Fn EDA V m C I N IA WuiTE,

B. A.

Buist" fl igh . 'chool Alph a Phi ; Wingc•c l ll cl mct; En gli ~ h Cluh: l'au-l lcllcu ic ssociation, Vicc- Prl'sidcnt, ~;Gem of thl' Mountain.~ S taff, 3A; Argonaut Sta ff, 2-3; Co-ed Argonaut Staff, 2-3; ar th ex Table, 3; A. \~· .s. Executive Boaril, 3.

H us

ELL Co nw ELL W n tTE,

B.S.

Salmon High Sehoul GRACE ) A I

W ICK·,

B.

GPne.5ee Jli gh 'clwul Alpha l' hi; Sigma Alpha lutu; \\' iu:;Ptl llclcuN; l~ u gli !lh Cluh, Secretary, 3, Prcsitlcn t , l ; Co-eel l rgnna ut SLttff, 1; Gem of the Mountains S taff, 2. DA V!D LO UIS WTK , B.S.(Ed .) Coettr d'Aieuc High chou/ Tau Kappa Ep silon; Cr oss Country, 3- 1~; Track, 3-'L ELIZABETH R E BECCA WiLLIAMS,

Buise fT i gh Sclwol

Page 66

.B .S.(Ed.)


MALtCE LLA J~en ICE W t T Ell, B.A. Ricks 11i gh S ri/Ool, Rexburg, I duho

F orn ey H all; E nglish Club. Frt AN K

L.

Wt

ZELEil ,

B.S.(Bus.)

M eri<lia n High School B et a Chi; Sil ver L aucc; Blue K ey, Vicc-Prcsiclcnl, ~;A lpha Kappa P si; Ath le ti c Mana"ers' Club, Prcsi<lcnt, 4.; Poo lh all M anager , 4; Ch airma n '!unior Assembl y, 3 : Associated Business S tudents, Vice-President, 'I·; Chairman Ne w Stuclent Drive, 3; Interfraternity Co uncil ; Gem of lltt> Jllfountains, Ad vertisi ng Ma na ger, 3. D o nE

ELLI S WooDWA RD ,

B .S.(For.)

1orth

Central High School, S p oka ne W oshington Lindley ll a ll; Associated F ores t ers, Secreta r y-T reasurer, .k L• t~LIA N G n t T MAN W o oow o RTH , B. A. Moscow Tligh School DelLa G a mm a; Mortar Boa rd , Secret ar y; Cu rtain; Spurs;

" 'omen 's " I" Club, Seeret ar v, 3, President, 4; l~ ngli sh Club; W.A.A., Treas urer, tJ.; Big Si::;tcr Ca ptain, 3; Uigh es t l lonor!l, 1-2 -1. WtLn u n L EV IS YEA ilSt,E Y, M oscotv High School

H.S.(Bus.)

Phi Ga mma D elta. H E L EN M A 0 VEASEY, 13. A. Hy<le 1-'u rk High Sdtvol, Chit·<tgo, Illin ois

Gumm a P hi Bet a; "ingcd ll <'lmcl , J'rcHid t· u t, 3; -lrgonuut St aff, ] -2; Co-ed A rf!o11uut Stu IT, 3; Bltw Bucket Stu IT, 2; E nglish Club ; Y.W .C.A.; Gem of the M ouutu in s S tuff, 3-t W tLLI A M H.onE nT

Mc Bm

E Y,

B. S.(Agr.)

BoiS<' 11 igh .School Be t a T heta Pi ; Ag Club. EntCJJ THt~O DO R R I C II T J~ H , B.S.( Bus.) L t•wis a11 d Clark lligh School, S p ok w tl', Washington Bet a Thet a Pi; "The L ig h t on th e I ountuins," 1; Swim-

min g T ea m, 3-1.

P age 67


N ational Honorary Society for Senior Wom.en I daho Chapter lnstalled 1923

()()~()TIIi.,

lf~t:V~ I CIKI().'-1

li I: LIEN I'\ IE~~ ~UTili

~ IEWIIi ()USIE

DIEAT~ I CIE STAL~ IE~ MA~.,L()U

C~AVIE.'-1

LU C ILlE t3LINVIEMAN UU ~A CLA~~ Z IELVA ~IEWC()MI3 LILLIAN w()()I)W()~TIIi

Page 68


Local Ilonorwy Society for Founded 1923

enior 1U en

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A I)TI1UI) ยง()WI)I:~

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1)4"" McGI).&.U "i

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f71:()~61E

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Page 69


did you get your card yet- provided you pass in all the credits you, are enrolled in nowlast class- last eight o'clock- senior privileges-have you a job for next year- three hours and the union pacific will pu.t us in hayden lake-veni vidi whoopee- i second the motion- hear we may not have to take senior exams ~we did- class spirit- not enough girls to go around- senior mixers -senior announcements- ordered two, one for the folks and the other for the memory book- hate to leave this place in a way-goodbye and good luck-see you at homecoming next november- i pass

Page 7U


••

-·----1

I "U~I()~S

I


Kelley

II ulde11

l<uliy

Axtell

T he present junior class was ushered into Idaho University life as some six hundred eager and ambitious freshmen in the fall of 1927. It embodies all the joys and ideals of a college training, enriched b y the humble submissiveness of freshman days, b y the struggle for some recognition as sophomores, and b y showing themselves, as juniors, to b e real leaders and able t o fill t he places left vacant b y even tb e most revered and retiring seniors. The first class function as freshmen was the election of officers, at which time Charles Gra ybill was chosen for president; Lawrence Thielke, vice-president; and Grace Parson s, secretary. Then followed the posting of the edicts by the sophomores and the class fight, and fina lly the Hulm e fight. The freshmen came out good losers and buried all enmity in the Bury the Hatchet dance held that year in the old gymnasium. The Frosh Bonfire of 1927, under the super vision of William Renfrew, was, according to custom, of record-breaking size and brilliance. Second semest er officers of t he freshman class were: Bud Rutledge, president ; Jack Brooke, vicepresident ; and Thelma Blayden , secretary. The Freshman Glee, scheduled in the spring, was ver y successful, with Romer T ell er as chairman of the committee in charge. The Song and Stunt Fest was a windup of the freshman class events. The stunt presented was •• Free Shines in •A' Flat ," a minstrel show composed of novel songs and jigs, welJ executed by the make -believe darkies. The feature song, •• Memories of Idaho," was composed b y J oe P earson. As sophomores, free from the oppression of the green cap and threatening paddle, the class enjoyed a success ful and happy year. The first semest er activities were piloted b y Eldon F . Hat fi eld, president; Gerald Grimm , F rosh Fire, 1927 vice -president; Anne Louise D ay, secretary; and Cath-

Page 72


Graybill

Mitchell

Melgard

Thompson

erine York, treasurer. T he preliminary fight with the freshm en was elimin ated through th e hasty postin g of edi cts b y a few members of the class. The Tiulm e fi ght , however, was won h y the sophomores, an d their authority thereafter was unqu estioned. Tn office for the second semester were: Edward J arboe, presid ent; .Tack McQuade, vice-preside nt; Vera Bryant, secretary; and Anne Martinson , treasurer. On J an uary 23, 1929, the first sophom ore class mixer was held, designated a ~ the sophomore " Roundup ." with about one hundred and seventy-fi ve in attendance. The precedent established thereb y has b een follow ed b y the succeedin g class. In charge of the sophomore song for th e Stunt F est was Harry Walden. The stunt presented, " CampllStry 1313," a rranged by R alph Hagan and Vera Forbes, was very amusing and well received. The Sophomore Frolic was an enj oyab le a ffair und er the able guidan ce of Wa rre n Gochenour and bis committees. W ith such a background, the class as juniors, began the year with a surplus of p ep. Class officers for th e first sem ester were: R ay K elley, president; Harry Wa lden, vice-president; Prud ence R aby, secretary ; and Mildred Axtell , treasurer. Harry Robb was in charge of junior mixers, which were held on the average of once a month. In anticipation of Junior Week, with its girth of junior events, t he class elect ed the following second semest er officers: C harles Gra ybill, president; L uti e Mae Mitchell, vice-president; Thelma M elga rd, secretary; and Vining Thompson, treasurer . .Jo hnnie Soden was appointed general chairman of Junior Week, the dates of which wer e April 21 to 26, inclusive, and the class set b efore itself the task of planning a schedule of events that would far surpass in brilliance a nd gaiet y anything of this nature that bad ever been given prev Hulme Fight, l928 iously by a junior class in the U niversity.

Page 73


J ohnnie Soden, Chairman

HDown with drudgery" was the prevailing pirit of Junior Week, April 21 to 26, inclusive, during which the peak of college social li fe wa reached in a rush of class stunts, parties, and dances. ale of junior caps began Monda y, April 21. On Tuesday night the Junior erenade, fea turing livel y, popular college and cla s songs a nd orchestration b y a te n-piece junior class orchest ra was well received by the groups of the ca mpus. The assembly on W ednesday marked the official opening of the activities of the week. A varied program of va udeville numbers, in cluding clever tap dancing, a very weird and mystifying magic act, a Taps and T erpsichore Lake-off, and other acts, as well as class song and orchestra numbers, received over whelming applause from th e capacity a udience. On Thursday the Junior Parade, a motley and clever procession of take-offs, cos tumed characters, vehicles, etc., t erm in ated at the Blue Bucket Inn , where the Junior p arty proved a riot of fun . On F ri day evenin g, the Junior Prom, th e long-a nli cipaled dan ce of dances, was a ll tha t cou ld be desired in the exclusive a nd ultra-forma l. As a climax to the week of events, the Junior Cabaret , on Sa turda y evening, left nothing undone for the rounding o ul of the cycle of perfect enjoyment a nd gaie t y. Committees in charge for the week were: Johnnie oden, general chairma n ; Prom, Dale Gros , chairman; Cabare t, W. Cadigan, c hairman , L. M . Mitchell, K. O' Lear y, K. Dick, W. Reiniger, J. Amon on, 11. Coffin , P. Raby, and J . D odd ; Asse mbl y, R. Haga n, chairman, H. Carpenter, H . Robb, R. Ormsby, P . P aterka, and H. Dauber t; F inance, V. Thompson, chairm an, W. Blair, E. Springer, and J. Mitchell; Publicity, R. Walli , cha irma n, E . Warm, C. Barret t, and E. M yer ; Parade, P. om mercamp, chairm an, G. Shern, and C. Raidy; Party, Grace Parsons; Entertainment, S. Kimball ; Music, H . Sim ond.; R efre h ment , K. West , chairman, a nd R. M iller; Serenade and Orchest ra, II. P acker ; a nd Mixers, H. Ostrander.

Page 74


Dale Goss, ChairrnatJ

T he Junior Promenade, one of the most outstanding formal dances on the University social calendar, was held at the Elks' T emple the evening of Friday, April 25. About one hundred and fifty couples were present. Decorations were carried out in the motif of a spring garden over which a l arge moon, seen rising through trees in one corner, creat ed a most romantic effect. Large lamps in the form of square white pillars, placed effectively at the sides of the ballroom, and colored spotlights, playing upon the dancers, added a soft and shimmering beauty of blended color to the atmosphere of spring. Lattice work formed the garden wa lls on which flowers and cherry blossom s were strewn. A rustic fountain of stones covered with moss and flowers and throwing water high into t he air f urnished a beautiful centerpiece around which couples danced and loitered at will. P rograms were in keeping with the spring motif used, having a drawing depicting a man and woman in a garden worked out in five colors on parchment. Music was furni shed by Rosie Layne's ten-piece orchestra. Patrons and patronesses of the affair were: Dr. and Mrs. F. J . K elly, Dr. and Mrs. I. W. Jones, D ean and Mrs. I. C. Crawford, Ron. and Mrs. H. C. Baldridge, Mr. and Mrs. W. K . Vincent, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Easton, Mr. and Mrs. Ashur B. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Huntington Ta ylor, Mr. and Mrs. J, G. H . Graveley, Mr. an d Mrs. Clency St. Clair, Mr . and Mrs. J . E . Turner, Mr. and M rs. C. E. Bocock, Dr. and Mrs. John R. D yer , Miss Permeal French, Miss H elen K ersey, and M iss Ethel Red field. Members of the committee in charge of the "Prom were: General chairman , Dale Goss; D ecorations, Harry Da ubert , chairman, Ralph Hansen, M erle Frizzelle, and Charles H erndon ; Hall and Music, Frank Warner, chairman, and Harry Walden; Programs, Vera Bryant; Entertainment, Oscar Brown; R efreshments, Willia m Hawkins, chairman, and Violet Bohman; and Patrons, Doroth y Rouse.

Page 75


0. CONWAY ADAMS, LL.B. Spokane, IPashington

C LARICE A DERSO , B.S.(Ed.) Moscow High School D elta D elta D elta; Dalet h T c th Gi mel, President, 3, Treas路 urer, 2; English Cluh; Croup Prc>siclents' Council.

ITELEN HowARD ATHERSTONE S pokrmP, Washington

MILDRED MA RTON AXTELL, B.A. Moscow High School Kappa Alpha Theta; Dale th T e t h Gi mel, Secre t ary, 2, Treas urer, 3; Highest Honor~. l-2-3; Treble Clef, 3; Argonaut Staff, 3; Stunt .Fes t, I.

CHARLES

EWTO

BARBOR, B .S. (Bus.)

Lewiston High School Sigma u ; Managc r11' Club; Sophomort> Baskt> l hall Mnnager, 2.

ARTHUR CLAJR BARR ETT, B.A. Pocatello H i~h School UniiJCrsity of Idaho, outhern Branch Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

SoL A. Br<:Ao ER, B.S. (Pre-Med.) Boist> lligh Sehoul R i;lt>nhangh H all: Manngt>r 's Cluh; Prt>-MPtl Cluh.

HOBERT li OMER flELL, B.S.(P re-Med .) Moscow, Idaho

V INNIE JOHN BELL, B.S. (Ed.) Farmington lligh Srhrw/, Washington Ritlt>nhaugh Hall.

GLEN

LAMON BEU .T GER, B.A.

Wal/(ltt>, ld"ho

MARY ELTZABETn BEYMER, B.S. (H .Ec.) Rupert High School Kappa Kappa Gamma.

MABEL J uLIA B ITHELL, B.A. Firt.h High School University of Idaho, Southern Branch Alpha Phi.

WAYNE F. BLAIR , B.S.(B us.) Boise High School Phi Gam ma Delta; Blue K ey; Alpha Kappa PAi; Argmu11tt, I; Gem of the Mou11tains; Photographic Editor, l, Co mposilion Editor, 2, Associate Editor, 3.

}AMES BRUCE B.LAKE, B.S. (Ed. ) Orofino High School

Page 76


RuTH VIOLET BOHl\IA N, B.S. (H.Ec.) Troy High School Kappa Kappa Gamma; ITo me EconomicR Clu b; Treble Clef Cluh, 1-2 ; Gent-ral Chairman Co-ed Prom, 3; Stunt Fl'~t. 2; Cia~!! Tr('asurer, I.

H ELEN MELlSSA Bono£ , B.A. W est Valley High School, Millwood, Jr'o.<hinf!,lnn Ha ys H all; Englil!h Cluh.

DouGLAS BIXBY BRADSHAW, B.S.(Bus.) We11tlt>ll H igh School Phi Gamma D elta; Alpha Kappa Psi; Sigma Delta.

Bun NTS BURTON BRIGHAM, n.S. (Ed.) GPnPsee High School

WILLIE An OLO Bnoss, n. S.(C.E.) Rurley lligh St•hool

OscAR LEE BRowN, B. S.(F.(l.) S t. Marit•s fligh Srhool

RuTrr ELIZA BETH nnow , B.S.( Ed.) Boi.<<' 1-1igh School DPlta D Pl ta D elta.

VEllA ET"LEN BnYA T, n.S. (Ed.) Oroji11o High Srhool Kappa Kappa Garnrna; Spurs, Secretary, 2; Y.W.C.A., Vice-President; Pan-J lf'llcni c Associa Lion ; Class Secn•Lary, ~-

BRUCE MAXWELL B UN KER, B.S. (E.E.) otus High School

R ussELL Jo1-1 so

B un s, B. A.

PncatPlln lli8h Srhnol University of Idaho, Southem /Jrrmrh Sigma Chi.

WILLTAi\1 GoSNALD CADTGA , B.S.( Bus.) Lewis und ClarA· High School, S1wlw11e, ll"ushi11gtou Phi Delta Tlleta; DeS met Cluh; C hairman , Ju nior Cah· aret, 3.

E sTHER M ALI SSA CALLE DER, B.S.(Pre-N urs.) Boisf' High Srhool · Forney Jl all; A lpha Tau Dl'lta.

H AROLD D EVEHE CARLSO ' D. S.(M.E.) KPIIOB!J High St·hool Bela Thc lu Pi; Blue K ey; Sigma Gamma Epsilon; " I'" Clnh: J!' oothall, 1-2-3; Basket ball, l-2-3.

MTLDR EO R EGI NA CARLSON, B.S. (Bus.) Moscow High School Phi Chi The ta.

Page 77


11 U BBELL

CARPE ' 'J'E R ,

13 .. (E.E.)

fl ollywootl High School, California RNa Theta Pi. C n ARLES G R A ll A \1 C HF. EV,

B. S.(Hus.)

M ontpdi1•r /figlr School igma ' u.

BE

B.S.( ll.Ec.)

SJE CLA R E,

Combritlg1' High School lp ha Phi: \\ .A.A.: Home Eco nomics Clu h; Voll r) h all, 3: B at~ketball , 1-2; Y. \\ .C.A.

V tnc r ' I\ lT ELE'I CLA R K , B.S. (E cl.) Coodi ug I figh • dum/

J"

' r Es Fn A K CoNE,

B.S.

J>ormo II igh Sclroal C L AR E CE Eo w \IW Co

WA Y,

B.S.(F..E.)

Boise II igh 'clwol

LuCI LLE C RIST,

B.S.(Jl.Ec.)

/Jritlger High dwol, Montanu \lonlarw Stote College Forney ll ull ; H ome Economic'! Club. EowAno Geonc., C n o

s, L L.B.

Rit:.:ille lligh dwol, Washinp.wn Delta Chi; Phi Alph a Delta. S tll llL EV D EE

c

I NCH A "

· B.A .

1/ai!Py lligh chool Delta Gamma; Thet a igma; E nglish Cl ub: \\ . . \ .; l rgonaut Staff, 2-3; CPm of the ,\fouutains St uff. 2-3; \\omen's " I" Cluh ; T ennis; Volleyball Ma nager, 3: Dramu t ieA, 3. B LA~C II E M ART II \ ClliUUI·:, Pocutello IIi gh Srlwol Pi Beta Phi.

H

T il

c

ES

\foscaII' If i gh

D\

' I EL ,

B.S. ( Ed.)

B.S. ( Ecl.)

clwol

li ARH Y

E.

D AU UEHT,

B.S.( Ed.)

Colfax 1/igh choal, Washit~gtun Alpha Tau Omega: Glee Club , 2-3.

A "1/NE

L ours£

D

\Y,

B . . ( II. Ec. )

IA>atV'IIII'Qrth H igh Srlwol, II u~hingt011 Alpha Phi;. purs; A. \\ . . Finane<· Chuirrnnn. 3, ExC'h a n~e M unager , 3; ll omc Eco nomics Club. ] AME

M ORRI S O EVERY,

Reubt•ns lligh School

Page 78

B.S. (Bus.)


GERTRUDE

D~>Wt NTim,

n. S.(Ed.)

Kendrick I-l igh School English Club; D nlcth T ctl1 Gi m el.

KE

J>TH A onEw DtcK, R.S. ( Bus.)

Mountain 1/omr 1/igh c/JQo/ Lambda Chi A l[>ha; lpha Kappa P~i ;. rahhortl a nd Hl:ule: Jl ighesl ll onors, 2.

IlARINDAR Sr ' Gil DIN A, B.S. (Agr.) j ulluudur, Punjub, India

JOHN FnA CIS Do OVAN, B.S.(E.K) 1/opr 1/igh School Sigma A lphu Epsilon; A.l. E. K;

H ELEN DonOTIIEA DouGL\ ,

A~socin l l'cl

EuginN•rs.

B.S. (Pre-~fed. )

St. J\1aries H igh . 'rhool Pi Beta Phi; Dehatt•, 2; Episcopal C lub; Pre-J\1 ed C luh: Pan- Jl l'llenic Association ; Ct•m oj the Mountains Staff, 3.

H uGH Jo EPH DuFFY, B.A.(Arch.) jerome 1/igh Schaal Sigm a u; Baskt'tiJull, 1-2; Basehall, 1-2; "!" C luh; Pep Band, 2.

Du BAn, B.S.(IT.Ec.)

OPAL H ELE

Comstork High School, ebras~·u Cracelaud Junior Colh•gt•, Lamoni, I owa Pi BeLa Phi.

E LY\ K \TIIllY

D

CA .. 'B.A.

heriflan 1/igh . 'chool, Wyoming Tlays ll all; Trl'ble C lef Club, 2; Argonaut S t olT, 3: CPm of thl' 1\founwini! tafT, 3: A. " ' .S. F:xecn ti\ e Boartl, 3.

SA

' A }EA

EomSTO'<, B.S. ( Chem.)

LPwis and Clark lligh School, Spokane, Jr ashingllm Dale th TNh Gi ml'l; English C lub ; \\'.A.A. Rxecutive Board, 3; Univerllity Orchestr a, 1-2-3; Treble C lef C lub, 1-2-3; WestminRl!'r Guild, 2-3; Y. W.C.A.; Ten u is; lligh ll o uors.

V tVtA

VmG t JA EDMISTO , B.S.(Chcm.)

Lfowis and Clurk High drool, Spolwnl', Washington Dale t h T e th Gimel; English Club; l nivrrKiL) Orclwstra, J -2-3; Tr!'blr Cl('( C lub, 1-2-3; \\I'~ I minllll'r Guild; Y. \'L C.A.; H igh ll onors.

KEN ETH EGBEitT, B. .(B us.) Meridion High 'chou/ BPIII C hi ; Bhl<' KPy; M anagers' Cl uh: Junior Rnl'r ltnll i\1unogc r.

LE

AllT EKLU o, B.. (E.K)

Burlt•y lligh School

IIESTEll ADELIA ELLIS, B.S.(Ed.) Jefferson H igh Srlwol, Portland, OrPgo11 Ore!JO" Normal Sduwl, ,\loumouth, OrPgon Lnrll(>rsity of On•gmr, 1\up,Ptw, OrPgon Pi Reta Phi. ] A \I ES ICIIOL\S /Joisf' II igh Sdwol

E LJ.IS, B. \ .( rrh.)

'

Page 79


VmG rL E uGENE E TE , B.S. (Ed.) Moscow H igh chool Kappa Sigma; Scabbard and Blade.

Gu

' Ert Oowt N FACEHL NO,

n. .( Por.)

Rolla, Vorth Dakota

BOYD FA LKNEn, B.S.( gr.) Blaci.Joot Tligh 'chool

n idcnh uugh rr all.

C n ARLE EDWARD F tFt ELD, B.S. (For. ) Swift Current Cofll'giatP Sdwol, Lindley ll nll.

Sa.~I.·Mdu•wttll

MAnCArtET Foss, B.S. (Ecl.) Pn•sto11 Nigh School Forney ll all

F LOR A RosE FnA co E, B.S. (Ecl.) w11 fJC' IIiglr School H ays B oll.

ALBEtr r W.

FRICK E,

D.. ( Bus.)

Ru11€'rt High School lJniw rsity of lrlaho, . outlrem Bra nch Senior ll a ll ; Varsity Track, 3: Argonaut St aff, 3.

LlLLt E GALLAG HER, 13 .. (Bus.) Burkl' lliglr 'clwul Alpha Chi Omc,t;a: Phi Chi T heta; Ce_m ofthe Muuntain s St aff, 2-3; Argcmam ;:,taff, Society Rtl itor, 3; EngliAh Cluh; DeSmet Cl u!J, Vice- President, 3.

n TH FRA ' cE s GARv e n, n.s. (Ed.) Bo i SP IIi glr SchotJI Kapllll Kappa Ga mma.

T YLEil S11Enwooo GILL, 13.S.(For.) /Jp({ 1/iglr . 'chool, Atlams, 'Fl'ntH'SSf!l' Lambda Chi Alph u; Interfrutcrnity Council, 3.

MAllY CA llOLY

GILLESPI E, B. S.(Ed.)

Cl'l1tral l'alh:Y High . 'clwol, Vpradall', l('ashin gtnn Delta D.l'h a D elta; Kappa Phi: Baskethall, 2-3. LOTS

LYDA GILLETT, B. S.(E d. )

lo fosrow lligh

rlwol

LEE R NDOLPH Gn.LE1"rr-:, Jn., O.S. (Bus.) lr'l'natcheP High School, Washingtun Sigma Chi ; Rnglillh Club : Argonaut St uff, 1-2; C lalll\ Stunt. 1-2.

DonoTHY CAROLINE Goocu , 13. Clnrl.·ston High . 'rlrool, lVaslringto11 lTays H all.

Page 80

-~


M ARY ) A NET Gooo1 c,

B.S.(H.Ec.)

Weiser lligh Sehoul C H A R LE S LILLARD GnA YB JLL,

B.S.( Bus.)

N ampy High School Sigmn Nu ; Blue Key; Al\l ha Kappa Psi: Sigma Delta; A.S. U. L. l~xeeuti ve Boa rd , 3; C ass President, I, 3; Cbairrnan Sopho more Mixer Co mmittee; E nglish Cluh; Interfraternity Co un cil, 3. G EO ilGE Jou

GREIS ER ,

D.S.( Ous.)

Genesee ll igh School Lindley H ull. GEn ALO GILB E RT Gn i MM ,

B.A.

Boise High School Beta ThMa Pi ; Blue K ey; Sig ma Delta, President, 2 -3; English CluiJ; Class President , 2; Ra se hall, I ; Rlue Bucket, Editor, 3 ; A rgonaut S taff, 3; Gem of the Mountains Staff, 2; Yell Duke, 3: Juni or Baske tball M anu gcr; T ennis Manager , 2-3; Swimmin g T eam, 2-3; LntcrCratcrnity Council, 3; Juni or S tunt Fest Chairm an. LEO ORE GROS JE AN,

B.S.(Ed.)

Montpelier Hi.gh School Ha ys H all; Treble Clef CluiJ; Scxte tte. ETHEL MAUC ELLA GRO VE,

B.A.

M oscow High School AROIE G us TAF Gu s T AF SO N,

l3.S.(Agr.)

Moscow High School RALPH M I LTO

HAGAN ,

R S.(E.E.)

Brookly n T echn ical lligh - choof, ew }'ork Sigma Chi ; Sigma Delta; Chairman Sophomore S tunt; The /({aho l~ngincer St aff, 1-2; A rgouaut St aff, 2-3; Blue Bucket St aff, 2 -3, Feature Editor, 3; A rgonuut Board, 3; Chairman J unj or Asse mbl y. GE NEVA A

N H AN DY,

B.S.(Ed.)

Hugemwn H igh School D elta D elta Delta ; \V.A. A.; E nglish Club; Intramural Athle ti cs; Intramural Debate. H ELEN ETH E L H ANSON,

B.A.

Boise H igh School P i B eta Phi. ) AMES CL I FTO ' HAUGRO VE ,

B.A.(Bus.)

W eiser 1-liglâ&#x20AC;˘ School Sigma Chi; Glee Cluh, 2-3; Uni versity Orches tra, 3; ChtijS S tunt, 1-2. CA MILLE H A RUIS,

B.A. (Arcb. )

Baker High School, Oregon Ha ys Hall. C u AHLE S OwE N H AUCK,

B.S.(P rc-Mcll )

Montpelier High School GoRDO

W AL'r E R H AUCK,

B.S. (M.E. )

M oscow H igh School Lambda Chi Alpba ; A rgonaut S taff, 2; Idaho Engin eer St aff, l-2 -3; Associated Engineers; A.S.M.E., Vice-President, 3.

Page 81


WtL I, I \ , . T\RK II \" t..I'I S, CfX'ur d' Item• If iglr . 'r/wol

LL.U.

T a u Kappa Epsilo n: l nLercollcgiutc Kni ght.-; R(·nch a nd Bur. Cl!'rl.. , 3; Univcrt~it) Orchestra, 1-2. CHAH LE WOJl TII H t<:ATII , ltlaho Falls If ip,lr chool

·

n.. (

gr.)

Bet a Theta Pi; " 1" C lub; Cros11-Coun tr y, 2-3, Cur,ttein, :>; Trael.. , 2-3.

~ 11, 1, 1 \'I

TAN LEY \ !'lsou lligh chool, Hitl!'nbaugh l l all.

J I EP IIER, lJ .. (For.) JJriti~h

Colu m bia

J o t-t N C u Ant, Es II En 'a/moll II iglt . 'dwol

oo ,

B. .

Sigma Chi: Scn hbard and Blatl <'; l)chatc, 2-3; Gt•m of till' ,\ (oufltaius to fT, 3; Baske tball, I. \Ill) BR E "\ E t "E ~ ll tLL, B.. (For.) f>asro lligh chool. Ka11sa~ City, Missouri

Eo"

Tau i\l (' m Aleph; tion, President, 3.

ssoeinL!'tl Foresters; \\ ChiC) Founda-

Eowt C\SPEil ll tLL, Ashton llip,lt 'cltool

B.. ( Bus.)

Tau i\l c m Afcr)h. LEO'> \llO :\l ATTIIE" ll tLL, B. . ( Uus.) lshtou ll iglr clwol Tuu ~l c m Afcph; Alphu Kap1111 Psi. CEOilCE v.~c·~ ' T HJOU'l', B. ' . ( l•'or.) Koosl.·ia lliglr 'duJol Alpha T uu Oml'~a. EuzABt::Tu ll oL,tE , 13. \. JJulrl II igh . drool Ka ppa Alpha Thc tu; Engli Hh Cl ub; " ' .A. \. ; Ka i'Pa l'hi; Orcl•cs Lra, 1-2.

DoLonE

E RL II OOVER, B.. (Bus.) I dalto Falls II i[l.h 'chool

] VAN

Un it'<'rsity of hlolto, RE\. Pom:: ROY ll o" \RO.

outltem /Jrouclt

13 •• ( Bus.)

l'tJCatellu IIi glt 'drool Phi Gamma D ch n; Varsi ty Bael..e tball, 3; Engliell C lub; " l " C luh. OLIVE LOl l S" ll t.. GIIE ·, Goodin!{ lli[!.lt School

B.S. ( Ed.)

Ka ppa Kup rla Gumma; \\ .,\ , \ .

Do'"' '·'· ll o oc E Il L,,., B.. Colfax lliglt 'drool. rr o~lriugtorr

T uu \ t r m Al eph ; A thle tic \ l un agcr, 3. )ULTAC LE II NTE U, JJ.A. J'>loscuu• Higlr . 'drool

Gamma Phi Bl'lu: Delta i;::rna Hlu>: E nglish Cluh, iccl'rc~i d c nt , 3: Dal<'lh T c th (,inl<'l, <'Crl'lar>, 3; Chairman \\ o men'~> lntrumura l Deba te.-, 3; Varsit) Debalc.

Page 82

·T·


GEOR GE MER E DIT H J ~M I SO , po~·a 11 e,

B.S.(For.)

Wa sit iu gwu

Sigma Alph a E psilon.

' B. A.

CO RA MILLISSA )E SE

Twin Falls J-liglt Sehoul Kappa Alpha Th eta; E nglish Club. EL\IEil liANS J OH NSON,

B.S.(Ed.)

11urvurd High School

Ou vER Jou Nso

JoH

,

B.S.( Bus.)

Coeur ti'Aleue High School Sigma Nu.

MAUGARETTE LUCILE

)OH

0

' B. A.

ezperce H iglt School llays Uall; l~ n g li sh Clu b; W.A.A. 1

M ARGARET E LIZABETH KEEGA , B.S.(Pre-N m s.) Burke H igh School F orney llall; Alpha Tau D elta.

HAY JL\

' SE

KELLEY, B .S.(Pre-Med.)

I rialto Ji'alls lliglt School Alpha Tau Omega; Scabhard and Blade; Class President, 3; .Pred-Mctl Club; Pep Band; Glee Club, 2-3; Univ ersity Orechestra.

ALECK PETRIE KETCHE •, B. S. (M.E.) Boise H igh School Phi Gamma D elta.

STUA nT FAJRClllLD KmBALL, B.S. (Bus.) L ewis and Clark H igh School, Spokane, Washington Bela Theta Pi ; Blue K ey; Intercollegialc Knights, R oyal Scribe, 2, H onora ble Duke, 3. J osEPrn E

MAY K• CA ID, B.S.(li.Ec.)

Lewiston High School Alpha Chi Omega; Phi Upsilon Omicron; A. \V.S. Cabinet ; H o me Economics Clu b.

\Vt

ETT E

FnA

CES KRE BS,

13.A.

audpoiu.c High School lla ys Ha ll.

CARL

K YSELKA,

B.S.(Chc m.)

t'Spt•lem, lr'ashi11gton U11ivt•r.1ity of hlaho, South ern Brauch Alpha Tau Omega.

lJ E

R Y AMB RO S E L ACEY,

B.S. ( I. E.)

Buhl High School

Hidcnbaugh ll all; AijijOciatcd Engineers. KYLE EM\JET't'

LAUGHLIN, B.S.(Prc-M etl. )

JWoscQtv, l dulto

Page 83


CL.\ H E~CE r. Ln ;-,E, Bultl High 'clrool

U.S. ( Bus .)

lpha T a u Omq;u. C L\ L OE \l o n C \ N L \Y

E,

B.S. ( Bus.)

/Jultl II igh 'd tool Alp ha T a u Omega. S I~LL K t-: ' ET II Lt-:13 \lt HO , U.S. ( Fo.-.) BismorcA·, North l )ukottt

Ru

PA 'J'lt i C IA I•: IH T II LE E, /Joist• II igh 'dtuol

U. S.(Ed .)

fl a ys ll ull. \1.\ll Y C ll \It LOTT E L E VEVE H, B.A. wscndP H igh . 'dtool Al p ha Phi ; \\ o tm·u·il ' 'I'' Cluh; \\ .A. <\.; English Club ; Y." . C.A.; Gem of tht' \louuto iu s ' t uff, 2-3; Pan- Hclleuic

Association ; Volle) Ball, 2; Ba81..Nha ll, 2; Base ba ll, 2. OTT O L JC II T I ,

B.. (Ed.)

l ploud, Calijomiu Sigma \l pha E psilon ; Foot ba ll, 3; Babeball, 3. C \TR ER I~ E F\BEit LE I:TE,

Pocatello II iglt ScltMI D elta Ga mm a; 0 <· ' met Cluh,

B .. (Ed.) ccrdar y-T rraburcr, 2.

J \ C K II O\\

\ltl> I..J,;\ B oi St' IIi gh Sclwol Phi Gu m ma Delta.

\ ~O I~ It , B. . (Ed.)

DA

J EL J . LO J' EZ, B.S.( Bus.) Jlferidiau lli gh S c/wol Uui w rsity of Idaho, . 'outlll'rll llrtlltt'h Li ndley Hull; Foo t hall, 3; \\ rc8 t liug, 3; T ruck, 3 .

i\11 \E M c A u STJ~ Jt, n .S. (Bus.) Amt•ri!'au fo'ulls ll igh School Phi Chi The ta.

ELLA

Do no·m y E L'' "

M cCAL L E Y,

B. . ( Ed.)

M oscow ffi gh School

1\1 \ ttJ O Jtt t-: 1\t.JCE ~ l cC L' ' " · U.A. ) os••ph 1/iglt Srhool , Ort•gott L u itwsit y of Ort'p.ou, l~ugt•tw, On•gmt Jl ays l luli ;' English Club. C B \ltLt::S \ l cC0'\''\1-: LL, U osrou· II i glt . ' rltool

B. \ . ( o\rch.)

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Pep Ba nd, 1-2-3-1.

EL

I E P llt L E"'I '

l c i\1 JLLI N,

B.

P o<'(t/('/lo 11 ~ · lr Sdrool L'nit¥'rsit y o Idaho, 8 outhPrn IJram :lt F orn ey ll all ; u r~it y Dt'IJotc, 3.


\VA LLACE Fn1~ 1>1m IC"- 'I <: PIIIL LA ' ' EY, Sheridn11 1/i gil S chool, II ym~ti 11g

B. '.( K K )

Hitlenbuugh ll ull. J AC K l"lt \ 'iCI S

McQ

n. \. ( Pre-Legal )

Al>E,

PQ<'aU•Ilo IIi gil School

LindiC) II all; Scabbard and Blade; (;lab" Vi ct'-Presitlt> nl, 2 1\uutE E.uEL I ~ E

I

\llTI

,

B.. (Ed.)

IJroudrvay lligh S dwol , 'eullh·, If ushi11gtu11 Pi Be ta Pbi ; \\'.A.A. JI ELEN MAIICUI~ H I 'l' E MATS O ' U .S.( I•: t~. ) l~oselwrry

1/iph, S ch ool

Ddtu DciLu l>t'l t u; Engli ~ h Club; \\'.A.A. Hille T eam, l ; lu) Fete, 1-2.

J '\IE · Bovu \1

\1'1' 111-:\\ ·,

B.S.(llus.)

ColduV'Il High . 'chmJI

Beta Chi;

lntcrcollt'~ial<'

Knight!>.

~1 \HY 1\1 El · ' EH , Moscow 1/igh S ehoul

Jl \CIIEL

TIIEL!\IA SOLVE IC

U.S. ( Ed.)

M I~ LCA IW , D. A.

Moscow High School

Kuppu Alpha Tht> ta; Delta Sigma Rho; Vurt~ i ty l> t•loul(• i\l unager. 3; Var~>il} \\ omcn'tl Debute, 1-2 -3: Clatlb St'crrt ary, 3 ; Treble Cld, 2-3; Englihh Club: Daleth T c th Gimr l; IJramalics, 3. VIRC J I\1' J\CI\~;s MEnRIAll, If ulluct' lligh School

B.A.

D elta Gamma; l<: nglish Club; llighcb t Honor&, 1-2; \\ . A.A. liEoLu~o \1JLLER , B.S.(Ed .) /Jrowllsr:ille 1/if.h School, Orego11 Orego11 Swu• 1\ormnl SC'hool, Mo11mouth, Oregu11

Eu;-;'

MA n Y GEO Jt Gt-:TTA MILLER ,

B.S. ( II. Ec.)

Yamptt 1/igh S rh ool

lpha Phi; Spur; !l ome Ecouomic11 Club. LOIS AILE N E l\liLLEJt, \Toscort• lfiJJ}o • 'clruol

B.. ( Ed.)

DelLa D elta D chu: ' pur;,; l ntrumural Oc!Jale; Vurbil) Debate; Kap(>U J>h i.

n

Ttl

N ' ET'I'

i\11 LLtm ,

B.S. ( Ed .)

Hoi.H• 1/ip,h S t·h ool

Delta Delta lklLu; Spurs. RI C HAHO

B\

En

M ILLEIL, B.S.( For. )

S almon High St:hool

Hit.lenbaugb liall.

Fa\

' CE , E•-"' MI N EAR , B .. (Ed.) Gooding 1/if!./r . 'chool Ha ys H a ll ; \\.I\ . \. ; . trgonaut S taff, 2-3; Co-ed Argmruul, 2.

Page IJ,')


E STH E R FtS K MJTC II ELL,

B. S.(Pre- urs.)

Moscow lligh 'chool

L

T I E MAE MITCHELL, .B.S.( 1us.Ed.) Ne:p<'rr'f' High School Forn ey ll all ; Spurs; TreLic Clef CluL, 2-3; Class VicePresident, 3. JAM I::S

Mon 1u s MtTCH ELL, B.S.( Bus.)

Parma Tligh S rlwol Sigma u; rntcrcollegia tc Knights; Managers' C lub; Ultu• Buc/;<'L S taff, 3.

J{onEnT CL\IH J\ll rrcu~::LL, B.S.(Ed.) R 11 p ert fl i gh School A lbiou S tau• Normal Beta The la Pi. J A .H ES A RTIWR M OORE,

LL.I3.

(;uttou wood H igh 'chool

On\IO

'0

JoH

Mos .\tA ,

B.S.(Agr.)

G('llf'Sf't' High School

E STH E R E LIZABETII MOULTO '

B.A.

K<'IIII('Wick lligh School, II ashiugtoll Delta Gamma. MAHY E LI ZABETH M URl'I-IY, B.A. Frau/diu High 'c/wol, S<'allle, II ashi11gto11

Gam ma Phi B etu: \~' inged llclmct; The ta Sig ma; The C urt ain; English Club; A rgo11aut Staff, 2-3; Co-NI Argonaut, 2, Editor, 3; Gem of tlw Mou11tains S taff, 3; Dra matic$, 2-3; Stunt Fest, 2. MARY E LIZABETH MY E HS,

.B. S.(Ed.)

(;a/dwell High School College of I daho, Calrlwell, Alpha Phi; Y.W.C.A.; Kappa P hi. VEL~JA FRANKIE MYERS,

B.S.(Ed.)

S prague High chool, lf'ashiugtu11 Daleth T cth Gimel; W.A.A., Executive Board, 2; Basl..c t b all Manager, 3. MARJORIE Il ELE

NEALE,

B.S. (Ed. )

Twin Palls High School Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washi11gton Alpha Chi Omega. FRED RI GGLE

1

EWCO~I ER,

.B. S.(For.)

S heridan High chool, Wyoming Ridcnbaugh H all; lduh o Forester S taff, Ass is tant Bu sin c~s l\lanagcr , 3. N 1 A KEL SO NEWMA ,

B. S.(Mus.Ed.)

S hoshone H igh School Alpha Phi ; Co-ed Argonaut, 2; Gem of th e Mou.nwins S taff, 2-3; niv ersity Orchestra, 1-2-3; Base ball, l. H AROLD OuvEn NIEDER!\1EYER,

Post Falls High School Sigma Chi.

Page 86

B.S.{Chem.E.)


"I·:N '\ I·:Tu \\ ..:ns·nm

O' LE\R\, LL.B.

/Joi "' IIi p.h .•....lwol Si~ma Chi; Rlu1• K;·) : Scahharrl and Rla1lc; Drlla Si~ma ll lw; Si~:nw l>•·h u; lntrrfru ter nil) Council, 3; I n tercolh·gia Le II. ui g h l~; Vur~i I) l>ehu tr, 1-2; Ct>m of tire .\fountains. A~Ki~L­ ant Bu~inr11~ \1 anag•·r, 3; H.O.T.C., Captai n; Englisl1 Cl nh; S tunt F 1·KI, 1-2.

H \L.I' II ll o m m

O n \J S IJY,

B.S. ( Bus.)

Tu•in ,..11/f.~ llip.h Sl'hool ll. uppn Sigma; Yell Kin g, 3. I<: \ III . Y II EHN ICE

/1o;,,,.

Os coou, B.S. ( II. Ec.)

II i gh Sl'iwol 1-. uppu Alp hu T l1i'lu. u OsTH \ ' D E H , B.S.( PI'c· ~ c d .) \nrth C••ntml ll iJ.lh Sdrool. S[IOk((lll', II 11shingto11 \lpha T uu Omt•ga; Prc-~l ctl C luh; Chair m an SLUnl Cumlui ll t'l', I.

11 \lto i.U H AY \I O

II

\11 11\ St 'l'l' ll l

0" El\s, ll.S. (Chem.E.)

Honfllf'li;•r lligh Scht>ol Hid•· nhuu~h ll ull: Sigmu T a u ; Idaho Enginl'l!r Stuff, u~:in;: Etlitur 3; h "ociutetl En ginl.'cre. II I~ IIIIEHT EY\'\' 0\\E'\"S, Twin fo'alfs HiJ.lh Sdwol

~ l uu­

13.. (Ed .)

ll. nppu Sigmu ; ' 'I'' C lub: F oo tball, 2-3 . .:\ ~: 1. 1.11; \I " <hLJ; \lt , Onturio, Ort•J.loll

B.S. ( Ed.)

J oy P \<:1\. E 11.\\J , B.\. lloi st• IIi gh School ll. appa lphu Theta; English Club; Gem of thl' H ountaius S tuff, 2. B WI' II E I.

II

\ HOLU V 1; 1tNON P ACKEH,

B.S.(Mus.)

' ""'!"' llip.h Sdwol Sigm u Nu; Till' Curtaiu ; Glee Clul•; D ra m atics, 1-2-3;

\\ in· nivc rKit y Atwuter Krnt Hadio Audi tion, 3; Mixrcl m•r Quurtl'l, 3; Eugli Kh C luh. R EI>MO

I)

J A\I E S PANGIJO R ' ,

B.S. (E. E.)

/, incoln lliglt Srhool, Tacoma, IVushington ' i ~o: mu 1\ I plra Epsilon. Gtt\CE ~ I CCL I '\'TOCK P\ll 0'\"

' B.A.

\1 o.~l'lllt' IIi p,h School D!'ltu (; u mmu; English Cluh; The Curlai n: Spurs: O r a matich, 1-2-3: \\ . . t\.; Epi~co,lal Cluh; C lash ecre tar) , l; A. . L.l. E,t•cul i\(• Hounl, 3; I i g hc~l ll onors, l-2-3; A.\\ . . Exccuti'c Board, 3.

II

\IIOLD C ll \RLES

p

\R 0'<

' B . . ( \ I. E.)

lluEo'l'rm;w llip,h 'ehool Hitlenhu ug h ll ull; \ »l!ocialctf E ngineer;,. LO IS \LL EilTO" P\TC II , l'uy('t/(' If i gh Srlwol

B.S. (Ed.)

h.upl'" S igmu ; B/u;• llu cl.-rl S taff, 3; Track, I. LI "E II \RHIET PATEilKA , B.S. ( Mu s. l~ d. ) R rpublic High School, II ashington h.uppu Alphu Thctu; Treble C lcr, 1-2-3; Scxlcllc, 2.

p,

l'agc 87


VJRCI ' l A I ADI • ~:; P ~:;c K , B.S. ( Prc -~ l cd. ) M n.s mw IIi gh Sd10ul Della Drlla Del La ; \~ .J\. .: Alpha Tau DriLa; Basketball,

2; Pan-Ucllrnic Association; Big Sis ter Captain.

FnA

PuiLIPJ, B.S.( Bus.)

C ES ELEANOR

Lewiston High S ehoul

Dono·ruv

KEN WORTHY PIERCE,

l3.A.

Trvin Fnl/s High School Kap[l8 Alpha Theta; C urtain ; Englis h Clnh; Dramatics,

2-3. Pt ERCE ,

THELMA D A WSO

ll.S.( H .Ec.)

T win Falls High School Forney llall ; Pili Upsilon Omicron. H u sY

ELL£ · PooL, B.S.(l i. Ec.)

Day ton High School, Washingto n Kappa Kapj)8 Gamma; Phi Upsilon Omicron ; ll omc E conomics Club. GLE

' WILLIAM PHAl'T,

Firth High School ]~ idcnbaugb Hall; 1dalw Editor, 3.

Pn

DE CE MATILDA RABY,

B.S. (Ag.)

A griculturist S Ia IT, Assis Lanl

B.S. ( Bus.)

1-'ay etU! High School Forney !I all; Phi Chi Tllc La ; ClaijS Secretary, 3; \\.A.A., Viec-Prcsidc nl, 3; Big Sisl er Captain, 3; Trelile Clef, 2; Women's" I'' Club. RuTI:I MARIE RAGAN,

B.S. (Zool.)

Lewiston High School Delta Delta Della; \V.A.A.; Hille, 2; Base ball, 2. CLYDE W I LLIAM HAIDY,

St. joseph's High Sigma

B.S. ( Bus.)

c/wol, Pocatello

u. A;\J U EL RA N DALL, LL.B. L ewis am/ Clark High drool, S1Jolwne, ll''ashinp.t.un Alpha Tau Omega ; Blue Key; Bench ancl Bar; Phi Alpha Della, Vice-Jus Lice, 3.

RusS ELL

GRA CE E S TIJER lhP HAEL, Jr'ciser II iglr clwol

l3.S. (Ed.)

F orn ey Hall. LEONARD ]I E RY HE I ICEit , ll.S. ( U u ~> . ) Rothdrrun lfigh School Be la Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi. WALOE

QU I CY REt N ICER ,

B.S.(Bus.)

Rathdrum High S clwol BeLa Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi; lligh es L llonors, 2; P ep Band, 2. RoBERT REED REY ' OLDS, t. Maries High Sclwul

B.S. (Chem.E.)

Sigma Chi: Idaho Engine(•r S taff, I , Circulation Mana· ger, 2, A ssi ~ Lanl Business Manager, 3.

Pugc 88

'f•


P AUL LA VERNE RICE, B.S. (Agr. ) Parma High School

Tau Kappa E psilon; Glee Clu b; Quartet , 3; Ag Clu b; I nterchurch Council, President, 3.

EDNA MAE RICHARDS, B.S. (H. Ec.) Moscow High School

D aleLh T eth Gimcl: Phi Upsilon Omi cron ; H o me E conomi cs Club; E nglish Club; Treble Clef C lub; Na rthex Table.

FREDERICK FEZER ROBERTS, 13.S. (E.E. ) Parma High School

Tau Kappa E psilon ; A. I. E.E.; Cross-Countr y, 3.

LYDIA JA E Roni so , R. A. Logan Acadt>my, Lo8!:w, Utah

Pi Be ta P hi; English C lub.

MARTIN BEn ARD R oSELL, B.S.(Bus.) B!l.· R iwr lligh Srhool Be ta Chi; Glee Club, 2-3.

DoROTHY IlELEN R ousE, B.A. Pocatello I-/ igh . chool Alp ha Chi Omc:;ja; Spurs; t ary o( th e A.S. U. I., 3.

l~a n·ll elll'ni c

Association; Secre-

F LORE CE MARtE R o DGER, B.S. (Ed.) Cambridge High School

Hays J:la ll; \V.A.A.; Wo men 's " T" Club: Vollt>yhall, 1·2-3: Baske tball, l-2-3; Baseball, 1 -2-3; Hiking M anuger, 3; llorse back Ridin g and Winter Sports Manager, 2.

CECIL ALBERT SA NDERS, B.S. ( F:.K ) Pocatello 1-ligh School

Alpha Tau Omt>ga; Al!sociat.ed

EnginPPr~.

S tmLDON CLYDE SA DERS, B. S. (Agr. ) R oberts l-ligh School

JonN ARTH UR SAN JHI EYER, RS. (Agr. ) Huh/ H igh School

Tau Kappa Epsilon ; Alpha Zrta; Animal II usbandry T l'am.

L AWRENCE WELDON ScnurKE, LL.R. 'l'wiu /•'ails 1-/iglt School

l.indiPy ll all .

MIR IA'f BEll ICE SCHW ER OFI ELD, B.S. (R •L) Colville l-liglt School. Wa shin gllln

Pi Be ta Phi. LE~fO SCOTT, /Joise High Schoof

NATI-lA '

B. S.(B ns.)

Beta Chi; Alpha K appa P si; R.O.T. C., Second Lil' nlcn:mt, 2; CPm of thP Morwtoi11s S taff, 2.

ZoA LouRA A S nAw, B. S.(Ed.) CuO<Iing High School H ays ll ull; E nglish Club; RiO e Teum, 3.

Page 89


n..

GLE~N LEFOREST

II ER", (Bus.) d'AienP 1/ip.h • 'rfwol Beta C hi; lph a K upp a P l'i; Engli, h C lub; Jnt<'rfra ternity Cou ncil; Argonaut tuff, 2-3; CM1 of tlu• \fountain s l aff, 3. C~ur

Jr \RilY IIOW \LTER , :'\ wn po IIi gh . 't:hool D elta C hi.

T ED

13 . . ( \ f. £ .)

Sti~ W E llT, B.S. ( For. ) Central High . chool, Oultllh , Mirrne.~oto LambcJa Chi Alphu; Foil and J\ l u81.. C luh; Associatl'<l Fores ters.

GEORG E W EE K

HAZEL MAllCUERTTE

I MO OS,

B.A.

flo111wrs 1-'t•rry IIi gh Sl'l1oof Pi Be ta Phi ; Thrtu Sigma ; \\'.A.i\ .; Enu lis h Cluh: \\' in gc• d lh·lm et ; Kappa P hi ; lrgonn ut S tuff, Ei tcrary Edi t or, 3: Cn-l'cl Argon1111t; Tl1clu igma lrp.ontwt: A rgonaut BcHi rd , 2: Cl'm of tlw \lm111tuin s S taff, 3. ELIZABETH T H ERESE

l\I PSO '

B.. ( Ed.)

M ost:on• lligh Sr/l()o/ WALTER

RT II R L\UC JJ TER . B.S . ( Bus .) Tn•in Fulls II iBh School Tau K a/>pa Ep~ilon ; Dl'lla igma Rh o; \lph a Kapp a PAi: lnlcrcol egiulc 1\.nights; Dt>halt', 1-2, \t anager , 3; i\l id" t'Sl t'rn De b ale T ou r, 3; I nlra mura l De hale \tan ager, 1. FRA~K DEL\IORE ' \ I l l , ,

LL.B.

A shton lligh St'hool lpha T au O nwga; Scuhharcl und Bl:ult'; B l'neh and Bar: Gem of the '\lourrtn ins, Bn l'inl'~'> \lana ~to •r, 3; lntc•rfrull'rnil) Cou n<'il. M\RVI

" '' ' " WrJJ . OOEHQl1J.T. n.S. ( E cl. ) ldalw Falls 1/igh St·lwol Alplu1 Tau Onwga.

0 RI>C I ALl> SOC \IW, B ... ( BuR.) Culrlesoc IIi gh .Sdwul S igm a Nu; l nlercollt·giuto• Kni!;hl~. VE il

JAMES PEY'rO S0\1\IP.HC\\I P , B . S . ( R n s . ) II l'i.ot•r IIi gh School

Kuppu Sig mu; Sigmu D o•hu ; \.S . . 1, Execu ti ve Board, 3: l nterfra tc• rui l} Cuun cil; Fn111hu II, I; Chairman .I uninr J>anuh•, 3.

n.. .

Cu \IlLES

El)\\ I N S I' III" C EH , ( ll uA.) Boist• IIi gh Sdwol Alpha Tuu Omegu: lnl!'rcnlll'gia lo• h.ni;::lll -.; (;,.m J\lountui11 s, Cir<· ul u ti un i\lunul(c'r, 3.

nf thf'

KE,,t-:Tit . T\llK, B. .( BuR.) Ogdt•n SNrior 1/igh St•lwol, l wh Bl'la Chi: Gem of the \lmu11ui11s . luff, 3.

DO"\LJ)

TELL\ION, D.. (Efl.) \ e:perCt' IIi gh Sclwol Jla) !\ Hall ; ' pur~; \\ onwn'., ' 'I'' C luh; Big . i ~ l l'r Ca pl ain. 2; \\ .A.A., V•ce-Prc~idcnt, 2. HAZE L

WILLI \\1 l -ESTI': H STOKE:";,

J\i11g //ill lligh St'hool

Jloge 90

·wr

B.S.(l\f. E.)


DoROTHY AR NOLD STUART, B.S. (Ed.) Kamiah High School

FLOYD Louis SuTER, B.S. (Bus.) Coeur ti'Aieue High School Beta C hi ; P ep Banll ; U ni ver~ity Orchrstra.

GEORGE ROBERT Sw1 ' DA::\IA , B.S. Burley High School S igma Alph a Epsilo n ; Scabh anl a nd Blade.

CATHER! E ELlZABETil TALKINGTON, B.A. Lewiston High Schnol H ays H a ll.

T noM'A S JvA

T AYLOR, B.S.(Chc m. E.)

Rigby 1/igh . chou/

ELMO BE

N

T UO)JAS, H.S. (Ed.)

Kellogg lfi§h School Beta Theta I i; C lass l>rrsidrnt, I ; Track, 1-2-3.

GLADYS M ARGARET THOMAS, 13.A. Castleford High School Fom cy ll ull.

C1\RYL FLOR ENCE T nmrPSON, B.A. Post Palls H igh School A lph a C hi Omega.

JosEPIII

E

CECELIA Tno\rPSON, B. A.

Holy am(' Acat/('my, Spoknm•, II ushiugl011 Gamma Phi Be ta ; l~ n gli sh C lu h; o.. S mrL C luh.

Vr INC CLYOE T u OMI'SO , B. S. (Bus.) Lewi.s aud Clark lligh Sclwol, S pokane, Washington Lin rllcy ll ull; Scu hl1urtl and Bhull'; C luss Treasurer, 3.

EurEn

0LUF

Tuo n

E ,

B. S.(Agr.)

'e:perce H igh S dwol Tau M em Alep h; Ag C luh; D rhatc.

J u u A D RLORES VAUAR, n.S. (Rus.) . Pomtel~o .High S dwol P1 Be ta I h1; W.A. A.

ROBERT Wn.LA RO VA CE, n .S. (Chc m. E.) Boise High School Be ta Theta Pi

ROBERT ELLWOOD VOS HET.L, LL.B. Colfax lfigh School, Washington D elt a C hi: Phi Alpha Dt•lta ; Bench a mi Bar.

Pag(' 91


HARRY Atnu uR WALDEN, B.S. ( Mus.Ed.) Bonners Ferry High chao/ Sigma Nu; Blue K ey; Class Vice-President, 3; P ep Band, 1-2, Director, 3; Glee Club; University Orchestra, 3; Chairman Song and Stunt Fest, 3; Chairman Song Commiuec, 2.

HARRY RA DALL WALLIS, B.S. (Pre-Legal) Blackfoot H igh School Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Publicity Chairman Juni or Week: Cern of the M ountain s, Snapshot Ellitor, 3; interfraternity Co uncil, 3.

ELSIE ANNA wARM, B.A. Northwestern High School, S polwne, IP'ashington Pi Beta Phi; Spurs; Theta Sig ma; English Cfub; W.A.A.: Rill e T ea m; Debate; A. W.S. Ca binet; Argonaut, Socit>ly Editor, 3; C hairman Publicity Committee for T aps a nd T erpsichore, 2.

WILLIAlll FRANKLIN WAR ER, B.S. ( Ed.) Mala.tl High 'chool Phi Ga m ma D elta; Pe p BmHI ; Glee Cluh.

MARGARET CnARLOTTE w ,,Tso , B.S. (Ed.) Pocatello High clroal Kappa Alpha Theta.

MA RJonrE WooowoRTH WEBER, B.S.(Ed.) orth Central H igh clrool, S pokane, 117oshin gton Gamma Pbi Beta; Girls' Rille Tea m, 3.

ARTHUR VINCENT WERNER , B.S.(C.E.) Moscow Hi glt School

ERvr

LAVER

WERNER, n.S.(C.E.)

Moscow High Sdwol

PA UL EVEllETT WER NER, B.S. (C.E.) Moscow High School

VIOLET MvnTLE WEn En, B.S. Mo.~f路ow

High School

NORMA lTI GGS WEHHY, R.S. (F.d.) f:Jellevue High Schoof Kappa Alpha Theta

KATHRYN H AZEL WE

T,

B.A.

Holy 1111w Acwlt>my, S pokan e, Washington Ga mm a Phi Be ta; Spurs; Phi 路 Chi Theta; Pan-Ucl l!'nic A~sociarion , Secretary; W.A.A.; DeS me t Club; .Rillr路 T <'am.

MARVI

BOOTH WILDE, B.S. (Ed.)

orth S ummit High Srltool, Coalville, Utah L.D.S. Dorm itory.

EnMA Jo 'A WILLIAM S, l3.S.(Ed. ) Pocatello f1 i gh S f路 hoof Pi Beta Phi.

Page 92


GALE

E BIT WILLI .,

B. .(Bus.)

ULIJJt'rl Hi glt School Beta Tlw t o Pi; Gem of tht> Mountains Staff, I. BETTY } AN E WILSO ' Ttvin Falls lli$h School

B .A.

Delta Gammo; bnglish Clu b; Fri'Rh man Commission Prrsiclt'nt; Class Trrasurcr, 1; \\ .A.A.; Spur~, Prel!iclent, 2, 1ational Treasurrr, 2; \ .\\ .S., Secrt'lnr), 3. J,,m~

M .\

RICE Wu.so~,

B.S.

1\ urw II igh School

La mlHi o Clai Alpha. WruARO

Fn \

C l ~ WILT<\'\ItlT ll ,

n . A. (Agr.)

Hlorl.joot fli(l,h Srhoo/

I NE7. L \ NE LL E Wr~~. ltuhl lligh School

n.. (Eel.)

C HARLES LEONAilO WTSEflfA

,

O.S.(Agr.)

lligh School Tau M em All'ph; Ag CluiJ; Jud gi ng T Nt m, 3. f1 u11SI'Il

J o 11

W\Yl"E WuRSTER, B. . ( Pre- fNI.)

/Juhl ll igh . 'chool

Knpp u Sigmu; Pre -Meol Clult.

J H I ES

lTARO LI) W\YL\

o,

R.S.

IJuise lligh Sdwol Lindley ll all; Sigmu Tau.

Yon", n .S.(B us.)

CAT il E RI E DEL''" l:Joisf• IIigh School

P i H('ta Plai; Spurs; Phi C:la i Tl wt o; A. " .S. Exc•c· uri vl' Cou ncil ; Ep iscopal Cluh.

AN ' Yot ~c, Uatlu/rum lligh Sl'lwol

H ELEN

B.S. (EII. )

Pi IJc:ta Phi ; \\. \. \. W II. F'Ofl()

RoscOE Yot

NC,

n. .(Bns.)

dwo/ Sigma Clai; Alphu Kapp u 1'11i; Him~ Kt>y; lliglal's t ll ouor11, 2; Mun ug1•rs' Club; Foothull Munug{'r, 3; Bu~d • u ll Mun ugrr. 1-2. Hfllhdmm II igh

LY\L\

GusTr

Yot

'ICS,

U.S. (C. E.)

Moscow lligh Sehoul

RonEnT AN'rno •v z ,n,cK, LL.B . Sarrrllllf'llto, California Plai Alpla u Del t a

K \THEnr St.

E HELE

RoE, B.S.(Ecl.)

!11argarN's Srlwol, IJoise

Pi Bt>ta Pf1i; Epi8<'0f)lll Clu b ; \\. \. \ .; Tt>nnis '[an agrr, 3.

Page 93


bu siest class in school- junior mixers- junior week- junior parade-j unior prom- et·ery word begins with junior- my course is getting tougher too- great to be an upperclass man- never imagined those sophs would be so hard to handle- when are y on going to lewiston again , bill- seniors hat•e altogether too much time with nothing to do but graduate-on the other hand we have to put on our j 1111 i or weeh·- comm ittee reportscords and whipcords- both get elirty too much wrangle-authority - acti l'ities galore- at last th e tong is prond of me--this has been the best year yet

Pagt> 9 'J


•-

·----1 -

-


Comeil

t=

0/m&tead

Clark

Mikkeuorr

our hundred a nd six ty -eight of las t year's freshm a n class- ha vin g Burvivcd the exp eriences of the fir st year- re turned to t he ca mp us as sophomores in Septe mber. The first activity of the clas wa their uniting against the fre hmen in the a nnual Hulme fi ght held durin g the first week of school. The sophom ores won t he fig ht, a nd the fres hmen were required to wear the traditio na l green cl inks until C hri stmas vacation. The first cla s mee ting of t he yea r was called oon a fter rcgi tra tio n for the business of organizin g t he class a nd electin g offi cer to S('rve the fir t se mester of school. Officers elec ted were: Phili p Corneil , presid ent; Ralph Olm stea d, vice pre id ent; Ruth Clark, secre tary; and Ka therine Mikkel on, t reasurer. t the beginning of the second em ester elec tion were again held and the foll owing offi cer were select ed : Li onel Campbell , president ; Willia m Ennis, vice-president ; Aust a White, secre tary; and L a Vernon Thom as, t reasurer. The first cia. s ocial functio n occurred wi th the annu al Bury the ll a tc he t dance sponsored the ni gh t of th e Hulm e fig ht to end hostilities bet wee n t he underclassmen. During the course of the ) ear th e sophomores ca rri ed o ut the precedent set for the m t he previo us year a nd enj oyed a mi xer held a t tlw Blue Bu cke L, in s pite of an attempt b y uppercl assme n to interfere. It was revealed th at cer tain uppcrcla men held the o pinion th a L such a fun c ti on as a cia mi xer sho uld be enjoyed onl y b y th eir own cl asses, when a p arty of juniors a nd seniors t or med the sop homore mixer. A ncar riot ensued a nd onl y a fter a hard figh t were t he upperclassmen led to believe tha t such a fun ction mi ght a fter a ll be per missible for sopho more to sponsor. At a ny rat e, it is fairl y safe t o a umc th at the undercla e will be permjtted to give mixers in the future with a minimum II ult Gillesp ie, Stunt a mount of resista nce on the p art of uppercl assmen.

P age 96


Cam.pb<'l l

g ,11is

White

Th omas

The sophomores' part1c1pation in the annual Stunt F est resulted in a snappy song and an amusing take-off on two University professors and their methods of cond ucting classes. Walt Gillespie acted as chairman of the Stunt Fest for the class and Sidney Walden wrote the class song. The social activities of the class culminated in the Sophomore Frolic, a gay, informal dance given late in the spring. Committees for this event and others sponsored b y the class during the year were: Frolic, Peter P ence, general chairman; D ecorations, F lora Corkery, John Middleton, Warren McDaniel; Music, Ruth Crowe, Harry Angney, John J enny; Programs, Florence Rohrer, M elvin St ewart, John P ohlman; E ntertainment, H elen Benson , Robert Nixon, Eugene Reid; Mixer, Kenneth Jensen , chairman, John McDonald , Helen Geddes, Jay Kendrick, Jay Hulbert, and Esther Johnston; Stunt Fest, Walt Gi llespie, chairman , Eleanor Berglund, Bess Loui se Hogg, Roland Sturman, Marvin Holm, Beatrice Gibbs, George Gray, and Frank Honsowetz; Song, Sidney Walden, chairman, Lois Thompson, Robert Gran t, Jack unemaker, E lton Reeves, and Margueri te McMahan. Apart from the activities of the class itself, members ha ve contributed much in the way of participation in general ca mpus activity. Particularly have the sophomores furnished material for varsity teams, as footba ll, basketba ll and track. Howard Berg, sophomore varsity letterman, was elected captain of the footba ll team for next year. In addition the class of 1932 has been active in school debating, music, theatricals, and on ca mpus publications. Containing as many outstanding men and women as it does this year, the cJass should return next year to give an excellent acco unt of themselves as Peter Pence, Frolic juniors in the University of Idaho.

Page 97


R. McCauley

E. Hurley

E. Uuwk W. Stenton

E. Hac C. Yanik M. Ho lm L. Womack

J. L<:c

C. Jucklocck H. Simmouds

Puge 98

P. Lurtsson

J, Crema ns

M. Williams

E. Finch

J, Je nny G. Hodge 1{. J.l c llridc

V. F. E. 13. C.

Curtis Garrisou Oell Koester LeMoyne C. Woo•l•

W. Ennis

J . Patch

R. 0. K A.

Hailey Simmous "lcLcotl Hoffman

C . Adams L. Carnl>hcll Z. Waller W. 1-"'na hm S. Wuldcn M. King


B. Lerup H. Kurd y g, Whitting to n N. Coldwell II. J. Jneob8 Y.Atlame

A. Ra ms ted t P. Marlin

J. J ohnson B. Mile•

W.

S imm on d~

0. Wolf

S. tl alc L. Wc81cr A. Spaugy P. Flore""" O. Anc.lcr86n T . David&On

L. Uu«be.o C. Holm B. Moore G. Jullion A. Reid M. SLewarl

L. Tboma8 H. Beulcy C. S milh J . llorri• J . Mc Donald A. Mellinger

1-1 . Young W. Farley H. Crowe P. Corneil 0. Cra ven D. £ t1UOIS

Pup,e 99


"' . '"'''0111

J, AI iddle1on M. 11 om•• II . Oullifr J. Nuue•uult.cr II . :i1c 1lcr

Page lUU

W. llosuc II. Burne ll ..:. ll amptou 0. lion A. Nielsen J, l'uhl

L. eo.. 8;u J , ( :illtll

11. Rkhardo \1 , Criffi1h G. Smith 0 . Ra)

II. s, .. ,u ' I''· Pitrce

K. Kearu"

l), AII~IIC)'

1•'. Hoffman

M. Thumptwn

C. Lee C. Rotlo .. ell n. Nixnn 1'. l'euce 1). S1>erry (;, lluys

M. Darlins W. Burke M. Thomas L. J oneo 8. Wood W. Cilles1>ie


p

R. D. U. V. P.

Moore Sanfortl Hall L. Wiii!Ou Wnh ere

C . Giuu

B. Me•~~• r M. Mc M ah• n L. Hahn ]. Hulbert II . Parroll

Y. Kildoa

F . ll ul•er K . Sa l•kov

E. F.:vereel

G . Oawoon M. Axel~eu J, ll ru.num

A. F ulto n G. lns lo

A. ~1 e K iern a tt S. Ruoho

F. S J>oncer J . Filseth

H. J acob• D . Mc Farland P. J on•• J . M ahle R. Maxfield J, Dunn

II. Flack

w.Pc"lt•"r80n I. K. Mikkelson D. Moore> J. A. Wh ite

Page 101


P. LyQII8 T. Bell L. Frazier H. Sturman i\ I. G roho•k y

C. Hatcliffc

Page 102

R. Ahlsko~ 1':. Gilmore M. Coonrod II. S teele A. Abitz II. ~ngcn

M. Clare C. Scltneiter W. 1\·l c Danicl H. Froyer A. Lc)rcr H. McClusky

H. Berg A. O'llnra

J. Fredric

\. l>anlue

P.

JtUIC8

F. Kerby

M. S 1euart

J.

Turner

F. R edmond

n. u.n

W. Pierce 8. 1). Murdvck

E. Morganrotb I. Colvin E. Bartlell T. Neilson G. Craig H. Mains


) . Sper,cer l\1. E. l'roclor J. Sweeley Jo". llohrtr J. Kentlrick II. Kelly

M. Hare R. Rumoe

E. lJoumnn F. }'ishrr

A. B"ker V. Wolff 0. Torgcr~KJn II. Erwin

M. Broi'nun

II. llilfoker n. Gibbs U. Mount

R. N. E. R. \'. lt.

A. Des Marais M. Fikkon

Dunn Alvord Frost West

l\1. Eatco F. Larwn

A. J ohnson

A. Moore M. Hcnlfro

Lci~h

J. Tedford

V. L'lleri811<>n G. 'l~honw~ J\1. Thornhill J\1. Cr .....u

J. wm;...,.

l'agtâ&#x20AC;˘ W3


..;. Wtllhou ~n I. ll arri• 1>\ ll arrnon C. ll olh il 1•• J.·r~tlrid;I'4H1 j\, A lmquil4t

Pt~gt· l Ot

A. E. R. L. T. E.

••h G. Pe1ereon Cood .. in Bailey Raide Smilh

T. L. Neher L. Code F . l)rau

J . Pohlm•n

A. LaXIon .t:. M•> mml

ro.. Con8don

0 . T a le R. Olm•lead

II . Cray \ . ll a&en M. Nordby L. Jo.ni&hl

..:. Davia

C. Trf:nar.)

\1 .

Pa1 ~hen

j . t\l ellin &er

L. S milh

II . Cline

i:ll. ~:r~~:. Vincent D. Ja nsse n

L. Thomi'&On


0. Miles

II. Seifer&

K. Well•

C. Lci&he

0. Hanaauer W. Peder10n 1•• Por&erlield

II. Jcn8en C. Warren C. Wendle

8 . Rarlenbowu

L. Mix

11.

Bc:n~n

ll. Grant

E. Thorn 1).-on K. Jensen f. Corkery V. Dooliulc

F. lfawc II . lleicr110n F Honoowe&z

E.

Johnllhn

F. Wilkie ll. Miller

•'f

J. York C. S mith F. Sco11 l.,, .t\u81 C. von Ende M . Jonee

F. Hobert• U. A~hworth M. Henfrcw n. C lark

K. Hart L. Handall

Page 105


m•rer saw such dumb-lool.·ing frosh- when we were fros h we put orer plenty - i'll say 111 fact u·e u:ere downright clet'er- not mttch recognition f ront the upperclassmen this yearsophomores and their mixers-senior guests always welcome, especially such headlights as came one et'ening- net,er had quite so mu ch expensire f un all at one time- please send bill to blu e ke_y, senior class, argo naut and gem of the mountain s- sophomore f rolic- it tms a good party - u'e must prepare f or next year as juniors - the class ereryonef orgot from the poi 111 of importance- wait until next year

Page Z06

'


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W ilson

0' Oar111 ell

Eldridg~>

Id eal fall weather and sunshine prevailed for the advent of the freshman class, who, over fi ve hundred strong, roll ed into the m ys teri es, traditions and customs of the Idaho campus with all the happin ess, zeal a nd enthusiasm possessed b y the reverent and mighty seniors. An election marked b y spirited nomination speeches and close balloting brought th e fres hman c1ass together for the first time. George Wilson was chosen president; Morris O' D onnell , vice-presid ent; Grace Eldrid ge, secretary; and Wilson Hall , treasurer. Friendly ri valry b etween men of the two underclasses reached a climax on Saturday, Septe mber 21, when th e edicts were post ed. The Hulme fight ensued and a lost battle caused t he defeated frosh to don the distinctive green head piece. The Hulme fight was soon forgotten in the whirl of a freshman mixer, wh ich had the distinction of b eing the first mixer to h e held in the M emorial Gy mnasium. The frosh bonfire on t he eve of H omecoming was, as Lh e ch airman had predicted, ••a great fire" and was acclaimed, as is customary, the biggest and best conAagration in the history of the institution. Freshm an athl etics came in for their share of attention , even though the fres hman foot ball eleven went down to defeat oftener than they rose to victory . Stati stically they outpla yed their opponents in all phases of the game, hut t heir weakness la y in the lack of scoring power. The opening of the basketball season turned the tables. The frosh quintet were the victors in eleven out of a total of fifteen games played, and gave Coach Jacoby just cause to be well p leased with the work of 1-larold Snow, S w nt his proteges. M embers of t hese t eams should constitute a v aluable source of Varsity material next year.

PllgP 108

•NI!f


Bai/('y

Party poli tics wcrr firml y establi shrd h y thr second scmrs tcr, and the balloting resu lted in the election of Harry Dr wry, prrRidcnt; Ca rl West er ber g, vice -president; Ronita Bailey, secre tary; and E lea nor Ja eobs, Lrras urer. Participation in the annual S tunt Frs l displayed freshman tal ent a nd ability through the untiring effort of Morri s O' Donn ell , chairma n of the o ng co mmitlee and compo er of the freshman song, an d lT arold now, chairm a n of the Stunt co mmittee. The freshman entry, a fight song, .. Go, anda ls, Go,", ung by a male chorus accompan ied by a fourteen-pi ece orchestra, made a d rcid NI hi L. The stunt, ••A Drea m of Collcgr," was a clever dramatization depictin g a ho)' 's ideas of college li fe, his disappointm ents and surprises. The Freshman Glee, held at the Blue Bu ck<·t Inn during th (' lall('r part of May, brought to a close the activities of the fre shman class. T he last function of the class for the yea r, the dan ce was well attrndrd. Howa rd Altnow acted as ge neral chairman in chargr and was largel y respon. ihlc for the success of thr a ffair. Although a class of somewhat smallr r pro portions than previous cla s es, the fre shman class shoul d lw "ell satisfied wi th its record of achieve mrnts this rear. Not onl y have its members participated in a thl t> tic ac ti vit) successfull y; they havr e videnced interest in cvr ry form of campus activity at t he University and ha ve r ndeav ored at all times to uphold and perpetuate idah o traditions. Significant is the following: .. As fr es hmen we have tried to hr mos t humble and ohrd it> nt, real izin g that the freshma n year is one of training. We arc looking forward to the o n-coming year ,dth hig h rx pectations and hope th a t we ma y be of cvcr-increasing service to our Uni versity and a class of \\ hi ch she may 1/mmrtf A/wow, Glee jus tly be proud in the years to come."

·Nft

Page 109


\ . Pence (;, T orbo~ C. Whterbul II. Friend l\1 . O'Donnell G. llico

Pagl' 110

\1 . Smiolo II. llur.t \\ . llobb K. Orod•haw II. lh wkina

D. Wllcos

C. Snidtr C. Dol> II. Lon«•lon L. De\\ inter t'. Ooerrio 1\1, Mis

E. ltafoer

c.

\lor~u•

\. \\ ol...,n J . Menord J . Keller N . Saober

Nft=

J . Do>le C. '«"ii.&On W. Ua ll P. Dufford R. Walker L. Morley

C.

Ju1tua

L. \1onit L. Cannon M. Harton M. IJ uJI William•

n.


D. Oavi& 0. Fryo 1 • Ch:onoller ll. Dunn W. Pou• S. Wel1Jerl

H. CromiJie E. Da vis

N . Green V. Groner" "' R. Ronald J, WarMr

G. Mor•c L. Whitlock J. Oovidoon t'. McKinley 0 . Dailey R. Collier

1'. Koil

fo:. Oeckm3n W. Jons&en to;. Schmitt M. Norby C. Edyveao

II. Hoover

J. Torrey

I. Lintula

1'. llouscher

J. ll "nson

II . Loncloy ] . Farria W. Sunblodo

If.

8r0¥~' n

II. Dunn C. Jobnaon) R. Towle

Page 111


G. Vuuftlut t>. Fikk11n

II . Stede J. ·1·rueman }'. T rail F. Fairu

Page 112

ll. Weipert C. Kahn 1~.

F.isin«er

J. MeCor,

M. McC uns N. T . Carter

J . Ned> L. Moor~ J>. Miller II . Johno • Fowle~ M. Geddet

0. Crayot

II. Hanoon G. F.ldrid~t 0. Uuchanan M. Bera

J . Cofl'r

II . MeBirncy t•. ~; n.wortlt L. Bellinger t:. Stein H. Baldridre 11. Ma nnina

II . Ahnow T . Chefllnut ~-. Duell L. Witlm11n J. ll all M. Dunn


J . \l cCabe

\1. Sackell

L. R.

II.

\'i~:ue Krau ~ \filljun ~ton

C. \\ a lker

\ . I)O>idoon

o. ~:.

w~t'O"

\\ ood C. So.. der C. lhll 11. we

J . \litrhdl K. LaHert) B . ~1artin I I. e~mau II. ll arlman F. lleed

J.

wi~ hton

n.

IJe~lon

W. Boll

ll. Oohooon II . Mooney

E. ' eloon

I. LaoL•y

F. Jr\4in

L.. Adamw \ 1. Lon8hrt) J . t;il-an J. Bauma n

0 . Bi ~bie A. Gallo"•> R. Bell E. O•troot F. S 1>encer

A. Jacoboon

Pusc 113


H. A. C. C. H. G.

Mc Hac Auc.lereon io:\ iU1 8 .f'ruY.it r Cnonpbcll Matw n

Page 114

0.

C h U IH113 U

F. Malcom&<>n F. Jolw&to u

~'.

Mc Monigle

J. lluurn gnrtue r

J:.:. S t C \ 'CII&

C. Drinck M. Patl e reon H. O yer \1. Crocke u n. ewlum&e C. Ucotrdmo re

A. Ho rt o n H. De<kcr T. ~ . Cu rte r W. Blnkc A. WooJ

L.

Loui~

•*If

ll. De n•on H. J anda E. C(UII t.r

n.

Sessio ns

L. Ha wl~ A. AIJ cn

t\. Are hart

F. Sbi88ler fl. Wiscuuw A. Lockcu F. S wnu Ll. Luno.l greu


fII. ~i.f~" Unnuell S. Mulculm F . 'i< loitc U. Young

I. Hodc mack

] . Cook

I . Hohrer fo: . llmct.o AI. fo'leming Ill. Uaird

II. Whit ehouse C. l..emo n F. Cu Ue ndcr I. S her., ood II. ParkA ) . Morg" n

II , Kin ney II. A•scudru J) 0. J»aJmer K . Collins

J.

fo~ ntaig n

0. L:ocy

O. Pur<:cll E . Hulleba ll M . M orro''' E. To 1ulineon G. (; reeu U. Williuno•

IJ. & broeder K . Goodwin D. ll orris \1 . (;ullo" '" Y

T.

5 \\UU 8011

L. ltauocy

Pug(' 115


V. Uorker \1. 01-on

J. lluu·lain"'on 1•• \l ou J . Kdl> U. \\ ri~ht

P<tg<' I 16

F:. T<>he> A. Chanier L. llalvtrwn

J. Jon('-. E. Cho~~tller Ji. S aocncer

\1 . Wallor l.. llolltnbetk II. Ooile> \1 . Tann ~r

C. \.

llc.ldin~

"r~ht e rma u

J . Oret ke

n. r.o..

II. Dry.do le I . Stanl<) II. Kco•rn• II. Mor.c

Lind ..ey V. S tewa rd K. ~ewcomb

1).

II. Tdlifuo

\1 . Turner

'.

l.on~eteig

K. Killion L. lla ll

C. ll unl S. La idlaw C. S haw

'l'". Munwn


J. l'orteoua

:.M.

Lo\<1 i!i />1. Gouliet. L. Ourneu .E. Schroeder F. Snow 1

E. Husho 1'. Glodharl

1!:. Weidman 1!:. l'hillit>8 E. Smilh JJ. Uodda

. Pcarco 0. Orokc

S. llarri•

. M. l::idcn ft. Turner . V. Ca1100ignc

L. Bodily W. Ingle \1. Ond E. Shoemaker K Scou G. Toii>Ol

1). O nio If. Lo.oc••

_F . Laing 0. LeMadtcr A. Snow M. ll ichurd&on

I. Von~ W. I I cuder&On

K. OouRI•o ~;. Jock

KAbel M. Cox

Page 117


D. \1 erriam

N. Frit c hman M. l'r> (;.Snook M . Oi•ht~l> J\1. Adorn•

Page 118

J. Roo•e

1. n.....,u L. C uring ton

L. JllcCorrnick

G. 1Jro88ard f '. Cordon

T. Connausbtou J . Yturri J . lllaedonuld C. l\l c Pheraon ·r. D avis

E. Juooba

C. Schmidt J, M a~lon f:. Brown 0 ...:va ru' J . lll cCoy 1). Luckoy

[., L•riiOn

IJ. L. E. II. E.

D etwiler \1ulliner ll oover Ue nfer M c Millan

L. S ha nk E. Shaw 111. Scott 0. Wilkerson U. Porterfield M. Stone


E. M. Hoover M. ll ownrd n. Reed L. Unr~eM II. A 1her &lonc

E. ll ccd

~t.

Obermeyer

C. O'Brien

J. Smi1h

0. Sweeney 0. S 1>oor

V. Kuec ' eil J. Fl>nn M. Simonto n

C. t il tOn 13. Orill

c. o·

R. Oriat1a 0. K a lbHeil!<:b M. Hankin ll . llu oh A. Po •ul T . Wuhl

r. Lonac M. Meadows n. Bell t:.

Andersen

1". Pe u ibonc

E. ll udti&On

n.

Jlrusscmuu

C. Miller

M. Young II. Clark ~1 . Kjosne••

Page 119


who are those guys with paddle 路- lots of nice houses on the campus- you ought to see the ones in the california schools - had four o.lfers to pledge but my rnother was a kappaseems to m.e i had a distant relative who was a pi phi howet路er- fraternity Ufe great untilwait until i am, a senior- had to get up at five o'cloch路 yesterday morning to wash the windows- probation- study table-coeur d'alene is going to win the basketball tournament- 1 know because i /mow all the f ellows who are play ing this year- pay attention - must get an activity - frosh sneak dates- senior men rough week - initiation - guess we're not so dumb


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FRANK WINZfL~R

HORGE HUSER

JESSIE. LITTLe.

OALE 60S"S

~oS

Page 124

BROWN

lUCILE GLINDEMAN

8EATRICE STACI(£/t

CHAS. 6-RAYBilL.


ZELOANEWtOMS

o~RWIN BURGHER

f--t

A£1101'1 }Au...

::JoHNNIE SoDEN

8t>t1NY WAU(ER.

flt:.lftl I<ERR

AllEN JI\MSSEH

Page 125


EO POULTON

SETTY

WILSON

CI.AIR GALE

MARY MuPPHy

SoB ST. clAIR

HARRY WALDON

ce.c +IAGEN

Page 126

< " ICK30I( POROTHY FR"Of"

MURTI'IA (LINE.


••

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familiar scenes mark the a,dvent of a new year- Science Hall, one of Idaho's newer buildings- along the walk to picturesque Ridenbaugh- and many more like therrlrattled in that day-the same old cords, the same old faces, the same old room.

Page 128


the lowly fro sh cotne into their own thP first picture of one of these before-and-after combination s- part of the crowd at the annual Jlulme fi ght held on the Unir·ersit_y campus- freshman t•ersu s sophomore a fight to the fin ish.

Page 129


opening scenes on MacL ean field- thefirst f ootball game of the year- On Old Idaho - Bradshaw entertains the crowd- Phat Stevens gives the press box the dope- and then there were the uninitiated who forgot to wea1路 I cap s.

Pc1ge 130


off to Portland by bus for the Oregon game- Idaho yell dukes take five-a short resp he on the long journey to Portlandmembers of the I club offu;iate again- a loyal 1daho stndent body watches the garne by gridgraph.


the frosh bonfire- some of the boys gathering wood to swell the pile- a bit of plagiarism on Chic Sale- the lntge collection of this and that nears completion- ahoy, mates, ahoy .

Page 132


scenes at the rally on the night of the big game steady, there, steady - one of the campus buildings which were so beautifully illuminated- the biggest and lxm conflagration in the history of the institution.

Page 133


Homecoming decorations swpassing those in the past- Phi Delta Theta, winner of the cup- one of the th1路ee castles- La1nbda Chi's talking picture- Gamma Phi coverall adit seems the Fij is were boiling mad.

Page 134


H omecoming decoration s seen by night and day- Beta Chi's bulldog pound- Alpha Phi's clet路er entran ce- Kappa Alpha Theta , tcinner of the women's cup- Kappas also guard their door- Delta Garnrna's unique u:elc:ome to old grads.

Page 135


the Hom ecoming game-some of the high lights- the takeo.ff on the Pep Band as the Idaho stunt between halves- Yanik versus T ed L ewis and Paul Whitem an- the kicko.ff-Onward Christian S oldiers-the presentation of decoration trophies.


football here and there- mostly there-Oregon State entertains the Vandals at the B eaver Homecoming- Grimm and Bradshaw in a bach:flip- tlte Southern California rooting section- their slltnt between halves - Calland gives Pete some pointers.

Page 137


activities of the late fall- fraternity football - B etas vs . Beta.frosh, in which a great end was made of M cDonald-another encounter - Mrs. Scott, dean of housem.others-some of the Delta Gamma pledges-the fire at the Eldridge home- fluber gets a .free ticket to lhe firemen's ball.

Pag(! 13/J


the Christmas sp ecial- the crowd of eager swdents gathers early - impatience reigns as the train is put together- one of the boys decides to walk- Dean French and President Kelly wish every one a merry Christmas - ready to go an hour ago- at last the sp ecial pulls out, bonnd for the sunny south.

Page 139


winter, bleak and cold- the first snow finds the Phi Delt and B eta frosh at it again in their annual snow battle-somebody simply had to hal'e their fun-who makes the first 1nove-the annual battle between the Gamma Phis and Sigma Nus-the crowd disbands agreeing that it was a good fight.

Page 140


sleigh riding as a pastime-down, down , down the first spring picnic date on JlJosf'Ow mountain falls through- King Winter rPigns supretne- one of the beautiful sights that ll'<'r e beheld on el'ety side- don't laugh, y ou probably looked equally as cold ami at least 1 wice as .foolish.

Page 141


I:VI:~Tยง ()t=

Ttil:

..,-.:A~

first signs of spring- A ldon Tall and some of the members of the Executive B oard- the golf bug bites first- the horse and buggy is resorted to by members of the fair sex to transp ort their dates to the Sp insters' Skip- tennis for the menoutdoor baseball f or the women.

Page 142


路-- --------- --------

more signs of inel.'itable spring- a clet路er pose from one of the dances in the annual Dance Festival- women allowed to run wild on the campus are as apt to play leap frog as baseball- early morning military again reminds the cadet of that old gag herman pulled about war- Th etas sowin g oat tneal bushes.

Page 143


Junior Week and its full prograrn of events- the Junior Parade as the best ever- A. T.O. 's bathroom episode- Pi Phi's co mic strip - th e spirit wi t h which Tri Deft entered the p aradeSigma N u's hearse and pallbearersand li'llasses shall lead them.

Page 144


the parade winds its way about the campus toward its destination at the Blue Buck et- th e .A. E. chariotAlpha Chi's clerer float introducing something not·el in the way of entries/h e hick band that slarted et•e rything - B eta's inlerprelalion of the famous radio pair.

Page 145


Camp us Day, 1929- J\Ifortar Board and its pledges- R uth S tory as May Queen- the queen and her page- one of the beautiful dances given at the pageant.

Page 146


ih·er Dance and its 7929 pledge ·- th e wastepaper basket receit•es its annual unburdening he who does not work must pay the price \lortar Board and the procession of senior women.

Page 11>7


Corn m encem ent, 19 2 9- the nnveiling of the memorial to Idaho's war dead- Board of R egents and General Bullock- at the head of the procession- the gmduating class enters the Memorial gymnasium..

Page 148


th e academ-ic process ionIdaho War Mothers preceding the ceremony - the senior processional- the commencentent address - another year has closed in fitting tribute to those who shall return no more.

Page 149


AN()

Page 150

til:~l: WI: tiAVI: I()Ati() •••


ATiiLI:TICยง


••• of Southern California grid iron and coaching fame, who began his ca reer as head football coach at Idaho last fall. He is alread y recognized and respect ed as a tutor by far west ern coaching staffs.

Page 153


Rich A . Fox

T he athletic program at Idaho has been undergoing a series of radical chan ges in the course of th e last few years. Coach Rich A. Fox, who was in charge of this work previous to Coach Ca ll and's adven t t o the cam pus, has been instrumental in outlining the new program and ha s been given far too little credit in the past for his efforts to p erfect it. H e bas done much to pa ve the wa y for Calland and has b een a distinct asset to him this year. To Coach Leo B. Calland, serving his first year as physical director, goes th e credit for Idaho's new physical education program. After the successfu l year just passed, minor improvements will undoubtedly be made, with the result that Idaho will have one of the best physical education courses in the West. Under tbis program intramural sports have come rapidl y to the fore and the same ma y be said of intercollegiate athletics, for no better m eans of uncovering hidden talent is recogni zed than by the com petition this schedule offers. P erhaps the foremost addition to the program h as been the required one-half credit in sports for underclassm en. Track sport.s were given in the fall to all freshmen s tarting the course and average records maintained of some of them. During the winter and spring mon ths basketball and indoor baseball were played with the re sult that each man was given a knowledge of different sports and a varied recreation throughout the entire year. The sophomores were given the same credit, but were a1lowed to choose the sport they wished to engage in for the sem ester. For juniors and seniors with a major in ph ysical eduction the U niversity now offers a complet e school of numerous gymnasium and lecture courses. The m en who benefit from this training will bring to high schools throughout the state a thorough knowledge of athletics and will be a distinct credit to the University.

Page 154


Co/laud

Hutch in son

Fox

Jacoby

Anderson

Burgher

T he general shakcup in the athletic department last year resulted in an excellent group of coaches caring for every major sport represented at Idaho. Leo Calland was brought from Trojan territory with an enviable reputation, and much is exp ected of V a udal gridmen under his able tutelage. Otto Anderson, head track and assistant footb all coach, came north with Calland and will undoubtedly do his share toward developing athletic material here in the future. Rich Fox served his third year as head basketball coach, and as every Vandal follower knows, is unexce11ed b y an y court mentor on the coast. In addition, Fox has been coaching the Idaho diamond team s in the spring with no small degree of success over the p eriod of years he has been at the University. Ralph Hutchinson, fami liarl y known as .. Hutch ," holds the position of head trainer for all varsity athletic t eams. ~~ n utch" was transferred from the Southern Branch and has comple ted his second yea r conditioning Vandal athletes. Freshman athletics are coached by two former Gem State le tterm en, Darwin B urgher and Glenn Jacoby. These men round out the coaching staff, and have been instrumental in developing varsity materia l. oel Franklin and James O' Brien, student instructors in varsity wrestling and va rsity boxing have developed first class squads during the past year which have been capable of representing Idaho in competition with other schools in the northwest .

Page 155


Senior /nnior Sophomore Freshman -

Senior Junior Sophomore

Senior ]twior Sophomore Freshman -

Senior /wtior Sophomore Freshman -

Page 156

FnA K 'VI NZE LER W I LL YouNG, SoL D EAL> E R, BARTLETT Moss EIL RrCHARDS, R o.aE n T Vr CE ' T, MILO AxELSEN, JESSE S P ENCER P HIL FIKKA , I!AROLD STEELE, I RA RoaRER , EucE E ScOTT { WALLACE BAKER, OLIVER FRYE, RoBERT KRAUSE, J oH TnuEMA

QuENTIN MACK, MunLY

J ESS Ec URROLA GERALD Gn1 M~I McCALL, li AR RY CAMP

ROBERT ST. CLAIR - VI INC TIIOMPSO ' KEN ETF! EGBEUT WAY ' E FARLEY, MEnCER KERR, ROBERT GRANT MoRRIS O'Do ' E LL, WAnRE Su ' BLADE, H A LEY MonsE { GERALD TALBOT, F RED FAIRI~ S, HAnn Y Bnow

EL,TER PosTo LEo ARD REI ' IGEn, OscAR Bnow MELVI N Coo Roo, ALDO H oFFMA ' ,VIRGI L WTLSO , WALTER G I LLESPIE NEIL FRITC R illA 'JAMES FARRIS, .l ACK BAUliiA { LA WRE ' CE TROUSDALE, KE ' ETH BRADSHAw


The .. I " is given to all men enrolled in the University who have complet ed the require ments specifi ed in the student body constitution rega rding intercollegiate competition in tbe four major sports, football, basketba ll, ba seball and tra ck, and cross country.

.=()()TI3.ALL Willia m K ershis nik Les ter K irkpa trick Orville Jl ul t Walter P rice Kenneth Barrett

Waldem ar Pederson llerbert Owens H oward Berg Fred Wil kie

C larence Di tlm an William Bessler J ohn Corkery George Hj ort

Harold Stowell Frank McM illin Darwin Burgher

Edward Hurley R ex IToward

Wall er P rice Hugh Duffy

Frank McMi llin Carl K ysclka M eni tt Greeling

Harold Stowell David Wiks

W illiam Kers hisnik M ilford Collins Charles TT ea th

Fred Robinson Darwin Burgher H arold Carlson Stuar t IIaiUd ay Richard Thomas

13.ASI\I:TI3.ALL Wesley Shurl liff M ilford Collins

Harold Carlson Troy Thompson S 1an1on Hale

13.ASI:I3.ALL Stuart Halliday

F. Imer J ohnson

T~.ACI\

C harles Heath

Theodore Jensen .T ohn Norman

David Wiks

Page 157


Grimm

Ormsby

Brudshaw

T he yell Icing, R alp h Ormsby, and his du kes, Bus Grimm and Bus Bradshaw, ably filled the shoes of last year's famous pair of lea ders, and proved the most in t eresting set among the schools of the orthwest. The two Busses won hearty applause b y their sp ectacular tumbling and clownjng during each home game. Favorable comment was given them b y Portland newspapers for their work at th e Oregon ga me. Great credit is due these three m en for their abili ty in keeping Vandal pep running high wbenever they were in charge.

' The big rally before the W. S. C. Game

Page 158


-•

I J=()()TIJALL

I


Leo Calland

VAI?SIT"' .=UUTI3ALL

Coaches

The 1929 football season at Idaho, while rather disappointing in games won and lost due to the change in the system of play and the lack of sufficient reser ves, will always be remembered b y Vandal followers as one packed full of thrills and traditional Gem State fight. However, an exceptional coaching staff and the excell ent showing of anumb er of sophomores will undoubtedly p rove t o be bright lights leading t he way o ut of the present dark situation, and Idahoan s ma y well look forward with confidence to successful seasons in the near future.

1929 Varsity

Page 160


Fran!. IVinZ(>/er

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}wriar Managers

Fresllmatl and Sophomore Managers

Page 161


VA'\ I)\ L FOOT Bt\1 .1. CA PTAI '

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Va111lal interference fwrctianing pt>rft>rtly against Montana State

I [)At-1()

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M()NTANA STA Tl:

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Three m inutes after t he opening wh istle of t he Montana Stat e game Idaho was out in front w:i th a six-point lead , due to the excellent ball ca rrying of Pederson. H e duplicated the feat four minutes later and Idaho led 13-0. Coach Call and used five quarterbacks during the ga me, and all worked big gains time after time to score 39 points. The Bobcat s' lone score ca me in the second half on a brilliant passing attack, which ended when D eFrate went over the li ne on the receiving end of a doubl e lateral and for ward heave.

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A 11 I.!:O:<'t>ptional try for a pass by both team s i n the Wh itman game

11).4t1() Wt1 1 TMA~

K erslr isn ik

hHIIO \\ ltiYM \ '

Page 164

7

The li ght Whitma n S<fu ad cam e to I daho fuJI of confid ence> a nd le ft the sa me nig ht nursing num erous bruises and a n ov â&#x20AC;˘r whelming defea t at the ha nd s of th e p owerful Vanda ls. Pederson , Ow<' ns a nd B arre l l each placed the ball in . corin g t urf fro m the q uarter positio n, with P e te scorin g fo ur times to cop c hief honor . . T he 'Mi io naries showed Y('l' ) lit tle power a nd were da nge ro us at no Lime d urin g the ttflernoon. The greates t thrill o f the ga me came when A ppl cga tc, fl ashy Whi t man back, raced 64 yards t o a t o uchdo" n.

lolCOII E II ) QU \II'n: n s

Martin

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Kirkpatrick


Idaho

np:~ets

the dope in Iter first conference game with l\1ontana

Idaho opened the conference season against Montana and garnered 19 points while the Grizzlies went scoreless. The Missoula boys brought a powerful team to Moscow, fre sh from a tie with Washington's lluskies and received the shock of their lives when the Vandal offensive netted a touchdown ten minutes after the game started. The play seesawed back and forth until the last quarter, wh en Owens scored through the line and later Big Bill K ersbisnik intercepted a pass and ran 35 yards to complet e the day's total.

Owe11:1

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Page 165


A determin ecl Vandal defensive holds Oregon on Multnomah Field

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Page L66

34-

Oregon's huge Green mach in e, led b y Johnnie Kitzmiller, showed a powerful passing attack that proved too strong .for the Vandals an d sent the Idaho wa rriors h ome with the short end of a 34-7 score. Calland's men continued their custom of brilliant starts and scored first, only to remain well checked from then until a final desperate drive j ust b efore the game ended. The Webfeet were ineffective except b y the aerial route and continually lost yardage on plays through t he line, garnering a total of only four first downs to Idaho's nine.

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tate's llom('('oming ga me

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Idaho journeyed to Corvallis for the third conference game and proved powcrles to slop the flashy running and passing attack of Oregon tate's veteran team. The Vanda l held the Orange men corcle s during the first quarter, and onl y succumbed after K er hi nik and Price were injured and carried ofT the field. Oregon outplayed Idaho in every department of the game, but the hard dirt field made it difficult for the fast Vandal backs to secure a foothold, weakening materially the Idaho offen sive pla y.

Didll

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Page 167


l lluho starts

lt

loug clriue dowu the f ield i11 th e utwuul IV. S . C. clash

IVA~ V WAS ~ IN ~TV N

Ida ho held a migh ty \Vashington Sta le grid mac hine t o a tie the fi rst half, onl y to crum ple before the impressi ve arra y of Cougar reser ves in t he second fra me. Wilkie and P ederson chalked up fi ve first downs in succcs ion at the start, and near t he end of t he second quarter p unched the ball from midfield to the end zone t o t ie t he core at 7-7. Corkery was o ut standi ng in the line until an injury t o his knee forced him to ret ire. Barrett's passing was effective, and in spite of the ru b of W asbington State touchdowns, proved the Va nda l chief t hreat during t he last qu arter.

JVorm cm

SCO itE BY QUA ICT E US

Corkery

Page 168

7 STATt: 4-1

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Diumwt stwres a long On(• in the Jlomec:oming gaml' aguiust Gonzaga

I VA I-I {) «;() ~ ZA C7A

1 4. 2()

The annu a l H omeco min g gam e played with Gonzaga on McL ea n field h ad no sooner begun when llu lt fe ll on the ball behind t he Gonzaga goal li ne and chal ked up si poin ts for Id a ho. T he i tu atio n became tense and later desperat e when the B ulldogs scored twice befo re t he ftrst half was over. I da ho r ushed t he ball deep into Gonzaga t erri tory fo ur t imes in the third period and fin ally kno t ted t he score, only to see a tic game change to defeat by the brillia nt passing of Ra lls just b efore t he final gun. Kirkpa trick and D ie hl p la yed their usual steady ga mes in the line in t heir las t appearance b efore Vandal fans.

IIH II O .

Go'Z H:. .. .

Price

7

0

0 7

7

7

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/Jarrett

(,

J eust•n

P(lgc 169


ldufw jigftti ng desperately to stern the 'J'rojan onrush

I D41i() S()UTiil:~~ CAL I IF()~~ IA

() 7'2.

Led by Russ Sa unders and Thomas Wilcox the Un iversity of So uthern California scored eleven times to humble the Vandals in the last conference game of the year for both teams. The Trojans completely outplayed Calland's m en in every department and only for a few minutes during t he fourth quarter did Idaho threaten the California goal line. T his drive from mid-field to the fiv e-yard line wa forgo tten shortly after when Saunders supplied the grea test thrill of the game and returned a punt 65 yards through the entire northern t eam for the last score.

SCORE UY QU ARTERS ...... u

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urby

Page 170


One of the Long nws which spelled ti<Jcat for the Suuthem Brunch

I V4~ V

41

S V UT~ I:I:1 N

131:14NC1i

7

Ida ho ended i ts season b y adm inis teri ng a sound drubbing to the Southern Branch at t heir first homecoming celebration in Poca tello. Eady in the game B all ard, shifty Branch back, grabbed one of P ederson 's pa ses and ran 98 yards to score for t he T igers. After th is startling play, t he Vandals se t tled down and proceeded to do a li Lllc tallying themselves. ot until Ca lland began substituting late in the game did the Southern Branch show a ny power. Art Spaugy at center intercepted a heave and repeated Ballard's feat b y racing 60 yards to score.

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Page 171


1929 Frosh SqttO(l

Coach Glenn ~ ~Red" Jacoby was greeted by a large turnout of former high chool stars in his call for Freshman football early in Oc tober. In spite of a rather poor season, Jacob y is optimi ti c over his men and claims they have learned Calland 's system well and look like real Vandals in the making. Th e Jlr t game was with E llensburg ormal on October 19. The yearling crew p layed a brilliant and powerful ga me at times, but two trick pla ys caught them napping and t hey fell before the orm al m en 12 to 6. George Wilson slipped around the end for 45 yards in the third quarter for Idaho's only counter. The Co ugar yearling proved they had one of the toughest Freshman team s in the orthwest when they swamped the Vanda l Babes 25 to 0 on McLea n Field. I daho's interfer ence was not fun cti oning, while Washington State used a series of criss-crosses and reverses to score three touchdowns and converted a blocked pu nt for the final score. The Gonzaga Freshmen held the Irish luck u ually carried b y their Varsi t y brothers a nd converted breaks into scores to win 19 Lo 0. Two fumbled punts on Idaho' goa l line and a march b y the aerial route gave the S pokane men their winning margin. The Vandals counted nine first downs to the Bull Pups eight, but l.ackcd the punch to carr y the ball over. The Babes upset a ll the dope and ca me to life by admini~ter in g a 6 to 0 drubbin g to the powerful Cheney Iorm al eleven. After the score the ball was kept near midfield, and though outplaying Cheney, Jacoby's men were unable to increase the count. The men who received their Freshman numera l are: Max E iden, Martin Norby, Arthur Roose, orman Sather, Ru ssell Gladhart, James Finch , Paul Ta ylor, M elvin Sackett, J ere Smith, Wanek St ein, els Fowles, Franklin Shissler, William Schut t e, George \Vii on, Lee Tyrell, I rwin Sta nley, Wa llace H enry, Fred Bauscher, Bernard Reiger, Dani el Aukett, Henry Lacey, Roy Bunn, Ralph Langston, Harold Jacob y.

P(lgc l 72


••

•-

-

1----I 13A§I\~TI3ALL

I


Rich Fox

Coach â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘Rich" Fox. fa c<'d a hard task at th e s tart of tbe 1929 b asketba ll season, havin g but three retu rning let lennc n arou nd who m to build hi s team. H owever the sophomores o n Lh<' squad aro e t o the occasion, and b y th <' tim<' th e regular ca. on was under wa) the a nda l. h ad a good quinte t. :YfcMillin and Lowell , who need no introduction to I da ho fans, played b a ng up hall in their fina l ea on. towc ll duplicat ed H_M ac' " feat of last year a nd brought the confe rence hi gh scoring honor agai n to Moscow. Prosp<'cts look brigh t for ne t year with Carlso n, H ale, Ho,vard, Hurley, Thompson and Shurtliff returning.

1929 Varsity

Page 174


j e:s& l~gurrola

If/on

12

\V ASillNGTON

9 8

\V ASIII NGTON STA Tio: OREGON OnEGON STATE

7

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lOAllO \\mT"AN IOAllO MONTANA

-

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NoRMAL

31 25 37 10 32 31 13 53 28 29 21 17 29 29 55

40 26 34

J\!I011118t!rs

The first JJ?. S. C. Game at Pullman

Page 175


Carlsmr

The Van dals o pened the long cage season j ust before Chri tm as b) di viding a hard-fo ug ht , erie wit h~ hitm a n in W all a Wall a. The fir t game went to the \lis ionarics 53 to 32, "hile l daho came back s trong to eke out a narrow 31 to 28 win. Fo . ubs tituted frequentl) in an effort to find a smooth combination. J l '"as evident that th e weakest p art of the Va nd al make-up was inexperience. The squad th en se ulcd down for a scri <•s of non-conference ga mes in wbic b tl1r<'<' ga mes were los t and t\\ 0 won. Gonzaga a nd Ellensburg annexed vic torie b y cores of 37 to 34 and 34 to 26. \fount St. C harl es a nd Whitm an were bea ten in clo e ga me. , a nd th e Vandal ee mcd Lo be hea ded right until th e) tacked agains t th e powerful ~ r ontana quintet and ca me o ut . econd. coring but 24 point whil e the Gri zzlie, rolled up 29. Oregon Stat<''s la nk ) fiv e opposed Jd aho in the first conferencc ga me and pla yed ragge d hall , handin g th e Fox mcn a 41 to 23 win. The next nig ht th e Ora nge me n s taged a vicio us a tlack and E mothcrcd the Va nda ls undcr a 40 to 27 score. Wes Shurtliff a nd Ed 11 urley, both pia) ing th eir first conference ga me, were outstandin g, Wes being hig h poin t man a nd Ed rep ea ted!) ta king the tipoff from \\ hitlock, 0 . . C:~> veteran center, in the first mixup. The Jocal then j o urn eyed to E uge ne for l\\ O more ga mes. Thc We bfee t rang a pa ir of fre e throws and a fi<·ld goa l in the last fort)-

• ERIES SCORE .... .. 41

Ort RI'!H N S·rA·n : .

Page 176

. . 23

27

28

~I

10

37

30


three seconds of p lay to grab a lucky victory fro m the fi ghtin g Vandals. In the ccond ga me Idaho, led b) St0\\<<'11, r<'vcrscd the tables a nd took the conte t 41 to 34. The Gem tatrrs started fa st and were well on the wa y to victory before Oregon had chalked any points. The team returned ho me to face Washin gton talc and ran u p a te n-poi n t lea d in the firs t half, only to have Holsten run wi ld and give the Couga rs a win 36 to 29. The next fra y wi th Friel's men ended in a narrow 23 to 22 win for the I dahoa ns, Tho mpson providin g the margin of vic tory with a sen ational sho t in the clm;ing second s of p lay. H a le and Collins a lso pl ayed good ha ll whil e they were in. The Vandal , playing without the ser vices of lowell , los t a nonconfere nce ga me to \1ontan a 29 to 17. The score board was empty for the first fi e minute and then the Grizzlies started thr ir fa s t passing ga me and rolled up the core. Gonzaga, the nex t opponent, Look the mea ure of tbe Foxmen 40 to 25 in an unintcrc, Ling ga me al poka ne. The Bulldog piled up a great lead in the first half, wh ic h proved too much for the Vanda ls to overco me. Washing to n's Ilu kie , led by Stork M cCla ry and H ank wa n on, copped two clo e ga mes from the loca ls b y cores of 35 lo 26 and 45 to 36. Ida ho lost its chan ce lo grab the lead

Collins

ERIE. • CORE . . . . . . . . . 26

36

15

19

\\ \ !l lll'\ C:TO '\ . • • • . • 35

~5

13

35

lDAIIO .

II urlcy

Stowell

Page 177


Rullflall

over the Sea tll e men b y dropping both contests. St owell was high point man for the Vandals in each ga me. Oregon State arri ved at Moscow on their eastern swing of the circuit and split the double -game series. Th e firs t contest went to th e invaders b y a 37 to 28 score, while Idaho garnered 41 ta llies to the Orangemen' 30 in ga me number two. Both tea ms were off the firs t ni ght, but Ball ard rang up en ough co unters to win for th e Oregon m en. hurtliff was playing exceptional b all in the second ga me until a knee injury forced him t o re tire. The University of Oregon bro ught their powerful squad of veterans to M oscow with an o utsid e chance of topping t he Huskies and proceeded to do t heir p art b y administ ering a double defea t to the Vandals, who were hopele sly out of the pennant race. The game were both close, wi th the first ending 33 to 30. Stowell and M cMillin showed real baske tball, and were easily th e outstandi ng stars for th e home men, while Eberhart, Oregon's lanky center, and K eenan, speedy forward, stood out for the Webfeet. The Oregonian's ability to convert free throws gave them the second battle, 40 to 35. Idaho started a rall y in the la t quarter, but clever sta lling on the part of th e Oregon m en prevented it fro m becom in g dangerous. Howard and C hristians st ood o ut on the defense for the Vand als. Eberhart wa s again high point ma n with 12 tallies.

SI<:R I F.S SCOR I~

Christians

Puge l 78

IOAII O . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

lj.J

30

35

OnECO N . . . . . . . . . . . '10

3 1 33

40

S hurtliff


V AI?搂 IT., 13ASI\I:TI3ALL Washington pla yed a brilliant set of games to swamp Idaho by scores of 43 to 15 and 35 to 19, cinching the titl e for themselves. The Huskies used many reserves in the first walkaway, while only McMillin and Stowell were able to score from the field. The Seattle m en uncorked a powerful offensive game, and with Sw anson as high point m an coasted to a n easy victory in t he second contest. The fmal series of the season was with Washington Sta tc. The Co ugar路s h ad b een improving steadil y all winter and were at the peak of their year's form in this final Vandal series. The first gam e at Pullman was fairly close unti.l th e cl osing minutes, when Friel's men began to bear down and won 36 to 23. Stowell was again high point man and assured himself of first scoring honors in the conference race. ln the second ga me Fox used all the men he had, but could not stop the Cougars from ringing basket after basket to win 47 to 24. The Vandals were handicapped greatl y b y the loss of Frank M c Millin in both contests. The two losses to the Pullman basketeers gave Idaho permanent cellar r ating an d assu red W.S.C. of second place. The Vandals won three and lost six non-conference ga mes, ana won four and dropped twel ve conference battl es during th e season.

Th omf1son

SERI ES SCOR E

S n.eddoll

I OAIIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

23

23

2tl

w.s.c... .... ...... 36

22

36

47

llale

Page 179


Frosh Squacl

Freshman Coach ••Red" Jacoby was greeted b y one of the largest turnouts in the history of Frosh basketball at Idaho when he issued his initial call early in December. After a few scrimmages ·with the Varsity, the team went to Lewiston and handed the high school a 38 to 11 drubbing. The men functioned in midseason form and kept the Lewiston cagers from scoring in the second half. A few days later the ormal team from the same city was beaten in a rough gam e b y a 34 to 29 score. ••Skinny" N elson, Frosh forward, was the shining light of the fra y . A trip to Spokane then netted the Frosh two wins, one from th e Gonzaga freshm en 21 to 15, and the other from Spokane U niversity 37 to 16. In both games the Vandal Babes showed careless ball until in serious danger and th en spurted to sew up the battle. The Cougar Babes exhibited a real brand of basketball to win twice from the previously undefeated yearl ings. The fir st gam e was rough and ended with a 32 to 19 score. The second affair was slow in the first half, but sp eeded up in the second and resulted in a 19 to 16 decision. After the t emporary setback b y the Pullman frosh, the young Vandal s continued their winning streak b y drubbing the Gonzaga Babes again 20 to 8 in a speed y passing game, and winning from Lewiston ormal 37 to 33. T yrell and Lacey led the Idaho attack which gained headwa y throughout the last half. Once again the Washington State freshmen took the measure of the yearlings in a two-game series b y scores of 38 to 20 and 29 to 25. Both games were fa st , with the Vandals sho·wing a margin in the first half and losing out in the second. The m en who received their freshman numerals were: Wicks, Alden , N elson , Tarbox, Showrell, Fin ch, Parks, Justus, Auke tt, Lacey, Jacoby, and Taylor.

Page /80


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Rich Fox

When Coach Rich Fox, himself a very adept Vandal performer of the national pastim e, made his initial call for v arsity candidates ea rl y in March, he was greeted by six lettermen, including Lawrence and Grabner, veteran ch uckcrs. Th e main problem lay in developing a catcher, third baseman and an outfield f rom the array of inexp erienced materia l on hand. Rainy weather delayed outdoor work until nearl y mid-April, and at the start of the long twenty-game schedule prospect s looked an y thing but bright. The Lewist on ormal and Whitman games did much to develop the team for the heavy contes ts later. Judy, Lindsay and Smith rounded out a pitching staff that gave other conference nin es many an uncomfortable afternoon before the spring was o ver. Walt Price moved in from the pastures to care for the catching assignment, and Burton, Johnson, K yselka, Duffy and H alliday plugged up the other holes like veterans. McMi lLi n, C heyne and Greelin g worked b etter than ever and often steadied the t ea m in ti ght places. Although the Vandals finished the conference race in the cellar position, many good ball players were developed for future use. Bill E ssick, Yankee scout, said, ((C heyne and M cMillin can be classed with the bes t in college baseball."

Glenn Jacoby

1929 Varsity

Page 182


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T he Va ndals, a fter a short but very intensive indoor a nd o ut door training peri od in which severa l good ballp layers were discovered to bols ter t he lettermen on hand , opened t he 1929 sea on with Lewiston orm a l. Coach Fox used practicall y his entire squ ad to win 11 to 5. T hey again took the fi eld on April 6, against the or mal men , an d behind t he ef{ective pit ching of Lindsa y and Smith swatted out a 17 to 0 win. E le ven hit off fo ur Lewiston hurler , toget her with fiv e errors by t he t eacher , were responsible for th e margin of victor y. T he nex t da y Fox chose Grabner a nd D uffy as his opening battery, b ut rain stopped t he ga me in the second inning. Both cl ubs ha d pla yed t ight balJ an d the score wa knotted with no runs crossing t he plat e. T he next week t he team entertained the crack Wh it m an squad for t wo da ys an d took the opener b y the n arrow margin of 6 to 4. The gam e was t ight thro ugho ut,

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with the Missionaries coming into the ninth inning leading 4 to 1. Whitey Lawrence poled a Texas leaguer to drive across t wo runs, and a m om ent later Johnson's hit broke up the game. In the second contest the tables were turned, and although Left y Grabner pitched s tell ar ball, allowing only five bits, the Walla Walla boys won 4 to 3. Idaho led until the l as t fram e, when bunched hits scored enough runs to plit the series. The Vandals surprised everyone b y t aking both games of the first series with Washington State. Judy received excellent support in the opener at Moscow, and Grabner and Lawrence kept the Cougar sluggers subdued a l Pullman the next day . The scores were 10 to 9 and 11 to 8. The squad left Moscow May 1 on what was destined to be a disastrous coast trip. T he University of Oregon put a strong club on the field in the first series and

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Page 185


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took both games b y scores of 10 to 2 and 5 to 1. McDonald's fa st ball was too much for Idaho and he held the upper h and throughout the opening fray, while Baker was equally as effective the second day. The fa st-sagging Vandal s redeemed them selves somewhat by di viding the series with Oregon State May 6-7. The Orangem en took the opener 8 to 5 b ehind ightingale's great hurling. Lefty Grabner kept hits well ca ttered the secon d day and won hi game 8 to 6. C heyn e, M cMi llin and Lawrence did some heavy clouting while in Oregon, but time af ter time t heir hits were turned into double pla ys. Rain in Seattle made a double -header necessar y th e second day, which did not agree with the Idahoans, who d ropped both contests. Whitey Lawrence and J erry Calhoun staged a beautif ul pitc hing duel, with th e Husky moundsman and his mates victoriou by a 1 to 0 score. Washington garnered a tally on a walk and a sin gle in the fo urteenth inning to take ga me number two

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5 to 4. no table feature of the eri c i· the fa c t that both ga me were ti ght pitching duel a nd went for ex tra frames. On home soil again the battered andals took a brid rc t before engaging Buck Bailey's Couga rs for a noth er seric . .. Rich" used nea rl y every moundsma n on his rost er during the ga mes, but was helpless to s top the improved battin g eyes of the Pullman slugger . The fir t conte t ended ll to 2, wh ile Worden pit ched a ni ce game to help hi team to a 1 1 to 6 victory in the econd. The Vandal me t Oregon Sta te' inva ion of ea tern conference circle a nd et them do"n a peg b y ncaking out a clo. c 7 to 6 win. Ida ho was outhit, but numerou u boots" by Orange infielder pellcd rui n for them. Howard Maple a nd his mate · se ttled down and played classy ball to win 11 to 2 the nc · t da y. Oregon's Webfooters were forced to bow in defeat whe n Id aho grabbed a 6 to 5

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win on I ay 22. ll owever, they more th an made up for it by pounding the ball all over the lot the second day, scoring 17 runs to the loca ls 7. The first da y wa featured b y H alliday's hca y clouting; the second no ticea ble for th e ••clowning" of both clubs. Whitman 's \1i ionarie oppos<'<l thc Va nda ls for a two-ga me erie th e nex t week a nd dro pped both eonte ts h) three -run margin . Th e firs t affa ir wa played in a hig h \\;nd , \\hich made fieldin g ha rd and coring freq uent. Id aho ga rnered ten run off oper, whi le the vi itors o nl) grabbed even counter · off the deliveries of Grabner and Lawrence. The foll o,\in g day mith held the Walla Walla men well in check b y pitch ing the Vandal to a 5 to 2 win. Th e tea m crossed bat with Washin g ton in the las t ga me of the year. It wa a n excellent exhibition ofba eball with th e llu skies bunching bits in the final fram e to take a n 8 to 7 victory.

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Ralph F. lfutchinson

Id a ho completed the 1929 track ea on with the Pacific Coast Conference meet in E uge ne, having participated in ix mee ts during the spring. I umerous excu e might b e offered for the poor year, but the mo t pia u. ible explanation is too much high cia s competition. Wa hington tate had its Foster, Lainhart and Mooberry; Washing ton it J e up, Kiser, and And erson ; "hilc other boasted men equally as good in their event . The ineligibility of towell a nd Griffith put a heavy crimp in the Vanda l power, and while good men were le ft, the supply wa limited. Coach Ralph H utcbin on wa unable to give his men mu ch work, du e to the late spring, a nd the cinder artists were not clocked aga ins t tim e until the Whitman m ee t in April. Th e Vandals took fir t s in six eve nt. when Wik won t he mile and half-mile run s, Klingler the 440 -y ard dash, Collins the shot-put, O'Brien the high jump, and the rel ay tea m, compo ed of orman, J ensen, Hodson a nd K lingler, easil y won their event . The Mo ntan a meet was run off in a cold drizzle which slowed t he runn •rs' time con iderably. Collins and Kcrshisnik were high point m en for Idaho with 8 point:; (•ach. 1 orman, O' Bricn, a nd H eath scored first pla ces in their eve nts to keep the Vandal in the running until t he last. T he sq uad \\as overwhelmed b) the brilliant di pia). of the other tea m. in both the Wa hington R elays a nd the Pacific Coas t Conference meet. Jim O'B r.icn grahh<'d a fir st in the high jump to ave the Yanda ls fr o m a shut-o ut at E uge ne. Johnnie "ormao wa. be tter tha n evrr and a con i tent point winner, \\ hilr C harle. Heath , a ophomore distance runner, prrssrd thr hrs t there wa in th e Confcrencr a nd should do much for th e Va ndals in the futur e. Pirrson, Rohcr·tson, T atum and M a on were other 1\orman, I andol Sprinter main stays o n HJlutch's" squ ad.

Page 190


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Page 191


A clost> ract> in tilt> Oregon late meet

Oregon Sta tr's track qu ad grahhrrl r lrvrn fir st plares whil r Tcl aho was takin g fo ur, and walked off with a 97 to 34. win over the Va ndal s. W iks took t he mi le run, nosing ou l Gilm ore, 0 . . C., in 4.:43.4. Heath print ed on t he Ia tl a p of t he two-mile r un an d fini heel 60 yard in fro nt of C hapson. Iorma n wa hig h point m a n for I daho wi t h nine tallies, by virtue of his first in t he b road jump, econd in the 220yard dash, and t hird in the cen t ury. Collins gave Id a ho t he o thr r fi r t place in thr hot -put with a hcavr of 43 feel 3 )1 inr hc . W hitlock of 0 . . C. was high m an of the day with 12 points.

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Page 192

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Washington State threw one of the grea tes t cinder squ ads ever seen in the orthwest into action against Idaho on th e Pu1l man fi eld. The Co ugar men ran wild to score 108 point while the Va nd als were gathering 28. Three records were smashed during the a fternoon, the firs t o ne when Taylor, W . . C., ran the mile in 4 :22. Clark turned in a time of 1:57.5 in the half-mile, and the W. S.C. relay team was clocked in 3:21.9 t o better the Pullma n score. Norm a n Look J claho's onl y und isputed firs t in the lo w hurd les, but O' Bri r n soarrd 6 fee t 1 in ch Lo Lie H erron for first in the high jump.

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The Vandal Fro h engaged in t wo major meets and gave good accounts of themselve in bo th. Th e fir tone, again. t the ,V.. C. Fro h, ended with the yearling on the short end of the 90 to 41 score. Lemp took first in both hurdles and tied in the high jump to score high points for the meet, while Bernard and H ein t ied for honors for W.S.C. The Frosh took mos t of th e field events agains t the Gonzaga Varsity hut the Irish were too strong on the track a nd no ed the m out 66 ,Y2 to 54,Y2. The men to receive numera ls were: J ossis, Craig, Lemp, D i Micelli and J ensen.

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Page 19tl

Tatum

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Cross Country tryouu

J n . pite of the fac t t hat Cha rlrs H eath a nd David \Viks finished neck and neck t o t ake the first t wo pl aces in thr an nu al cro s-co un try run with Washington Sta te, the Co uga r long-di La nce men wo n o ut by one point. 'l'hc fina l core totaled 28 to 27 and the winning time for the four-m ile cour c wa 22 minute 35 seconds. Cla rk and Ta ylor of W. . C. trotted in evenl y to tie for third place. The o ther runner in the ord er of their fini, h were: Kirk ( W), Cro c tto (W), Chi holm ( L), Hawkins (1), Davis (W), Sherar (W), Throckmorto n (I ). The mre t was to ha ve been a trian gul ar event with Wash in gton entered, hut the llu kic. withdrew at the Ia. t mom ent. ll ea th and \Viks received letters, as th ry were tlw o nl y Ida ho mr n to finish a mo ng the fir t fi ve.

1929 Varsily

Page 196


Initial W. S. C. Meet

The Varsity wrestling squad under the g uidance of Noel Franklin, student instructor, enjoyed a very successful season, emerging victorious in two of the three matches held. On F ebruary 15 the grapplers entertained the Cougar matmen in t he Memorial Gym and upset the dope b y winning 15 to 8. Shaw and Graycott droppecl the first two matches after hard battles, but Franklin, Swayne and orby all tossed their men to win for the Vandals. W.S.C. evened the count one week later when they took three falls and one decision to win 18 to 3. Franklin whipped Donohue for I daho's only points. In the Minor Sports Carnival at Pullman the Moscow tea m won the majority of matches in the finals and rolled up 41 points to win over the University of Washington and Washing ton State. Franklin capped the meet by pinning Webster of Washington to the mat and annexing the western intercollegiate 145-pound championship. Other men who grappled on the Vandal team were Greiser, Kyselka and Lopez.

1929 Vursity

Page 197


A new sport for /(lalro

Idaho's swimming t eam en gaged in t wo meets during the past season, losing the first to the W.S.C. tankmen at the Minor Sports Carnival 38 to 25. Grimm took the Vandals' only first when be led the pack in the 100-yard backstroke. Smith, Richter, Ostrander and Holman were point winners for Idaho. Idaho again lost to the Staters in the second meet b y the narrow margin of five points, which W.S.C. annexed in the relay, the last event. The final score was 32 to 27. Idaho's t enn is t eam lost to Whitman's crack squad at Walla Walla on May 18. The Vandals were unable to win a match and were complet ely outclassed b y the conquerors of Washington State. The netmen were again badly defeated b y the Pullman squad on Ma y ll. The Vandal t ennis m en were William Callaway, cap tain; Otto Krueger, Amidee W alden, Ray Wetherbee and Dick Ta ylor. F encing was introduced as a sport at Idaho this year, and the Vanda l team held a short match with t he Cougar. be t ween halves of a basketba ll game. Wurst er and Janda of Idaho and Hughes and Hague of W.S.C. scored 8 points for their schools to tie the match.

1929

Page 198

Vut路~ity

Swimming T eam


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ltttrctmurul Athletic A-fwwgers

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With a view to making this a better Intramural year than ever , ((Ath le tics for All" became the slogan of the a thle Lic depa rtment and group houses when Coach Leo P . Calland iss ued a call earl y la st October for group managers. His program for the year included the usua l sports with suggestions for comp etition in horseshoes, golf and handb all. It is believed that competition in these sports will aid materially in developing athletic material and at the same time provide enjoyment and exercise for the ordinary student. The question of points was raised and it was agreed that the winners of each league competition would receive 75 points and the U niversity champions would garner another 25, making a total of 100. As has alwa ys b een the case no varsity or freshman lettermen can com pete for his group in the sport in question. Another addition t o the program which has already increased interest is the series of contes ts b etween the champions of Idaho and Washington Stat e in a number of events for inter-school titles. The first event on the program was the cross-country race on ovember 2, over a two-mile course. Senior Hall walked off with first honors by virtue of Chi lsom, Throckmorton and Doerrie placing fourth , sixth and eighth to score 15 points. L.D.S. Institute captured second when Hall broke the tape t o garner 10 counters. Following this event were basketball, swimming, indoor baseball, tennis and horseshoes. The following men had charge of intramural athletics in their respective houses and halls : Claude Layne, A.T.O.; John Glase, Beta Chi; E lmo Thomas, Beta Theta Pi; Carl Hogue, D elta Chi; Bill Shamberger, Lambda C hi; D onnell Hunt, Tau M em Aleph; Jack Hartling, Ridenbaug h Hall; Bernard L emp, Sigma Chi; Elmer Poston, Phi Gamma D elta; Homer Brock, S.A.E.; Charles Le Moyne, Pbi Delta Theta; C barles Cheney, Sigma Nu; Frank T atum, Tau Kappa Epsilon; Vining Thompson, Lindley Hall; I var Taylor, L.D .S. Institute; Al Kroll, Senior Hall; Ralph Ormsb y, Kappa Sig ma; L eo Calland, Faculty.

Page 200

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Sigma A lplm Epsilon

Uisplaying a var it y caliber of tea m work, ig ma Alpha Epsilon, winner of ((A" league, twice defeated the Kappa Sigs, champions of the HB" division, to win the intramura l basketball title. The S.A.E. quinte t dis tinguished the mselves b y comple tin g the cason without a single defea t in nine ga mes, having won the league title with seven victories and taking the intramura l titl e from the Kappa Sigma Club with two decisive wi nnings, in the cha mpionship series. Beta Chi and Phi D elta The ta tied for third place by winning fiv e ga mes ou t of six, placing second in their respec tive leag ues. Man y stellar pla yers were unearthed as a result of the intramural race, several of them of potential varsity caliber. The players named o n The A rgonaut's all-star intra mural tea m arc: Barrett, S.A.E., and clson, Phi Delta The ta, forward ; O'Brien, Kappa S i ~ ma , center ; Peter on, S. . E., and o mmerca mp, Kappa Sigma, guards. The second tea m included Wicks, ig ma u, and J onc , Kappa Sigma, forwa rd ; Finch, . .E., center; Wright, Lambda C hi, and Yanik, Phi Gamma D ella, guard . Taggart, S.A. E .; Alden, Lambda C hi ; Tho mpson, Lindl ey Hall; l lowa rd, Phi Gamma D elta, were given honorable mention. The leading corers for the tournament were Barrell, T aggart, O'Brien, a n Jl avcrbckc, IeJ on, Ch ristians and Aukett. The ('fea ture" ga me of the tournament wa a court battle between igma Alpha Ep ilon and the faculty five. Both t eams were evenly matched, and up to the last few minute were running even up. The S.A.E. quin tet, however, spurted at the end to win their harde t game 22-14. Peterson and Taggart were individual stars for the winners. P oints won on the series standing arc applied to to tal points in a ll intram ural ac ti vi tics.

Page 201


Beta Tlwtu Pi

One of the most ho tl y contested events on the intramural ath le tic program was the annua l swimming mee t held during the first part of February. Individua l elimin ations were o arranged that the winners in all eight of the events scheduled for the meet were eligible for the finals, irrespective of their t eam 's standing. Two preli minaries were held previous to the championship meet, and the interest that was shown in this sport was evidenced b y the crowded galleries that viewed each meet. Romping off with a total of 36 points, a margin of 18 over their nearest opponents, Beta Theta Pi won the championship title in the final m eet. Lambda C hi Alpha came second with 18 points and Phi Gamma D elta third with 10 counters. Every race was closely contested and the winners hard to pick. The 200 -yard rela y between the Bet as and Fijis was easil y the thrilJer of the entire meet, both t ea ms crossing the line in t wo minutes and two seconds to end in a tie. A surprise was handed spectators as Smith, Lambda Chi , churned in to win the 50-y ard da sh from Grimm , Beta , and P eterson, S.A.E . Ost rander , A.T.O., took the 50-yard breast stroke in handy fa shion , fini shing half the leng th of the pool ahead of Sweeney and Grimm, Beta dolphins. Collier broke his former record of 48 feet in the plunge fo r distance when be floated 51 feet before the waves stopped him. Smith, Lambda C hi, chalked two additional first places in the 100-yard dash and the fancy diving ev ents to make him high man for t he conferen ce. The 200 -yard dash honors went to Richter, Beta, who had extrem e difficulty in defeating Lawson, Fiji. Lawson took second honors and Coffey, Kappa Sigma , third. Grimm, Beta, showed some real speed in the 50-yard back stroke event , outdistancing Smith, Lambda Chi, who placed second.

Page 202


Sigm<t Alpltu J::psilon

Indoor baseball, the third event on the intramura l program, was played during March and April. With the p ossible exception of basketball , more interest was shown in this sport than in any other branch of inter-group athletics for t he past several years. Over one hundred men formed thirteen fast teams representing every m en's group and hall on the ca mpus. Rich Fox, varsity ba ll mentor, placed considerable v alue on the tournament, as a number of the competitors showed promise of developing into likely varsity material. Sigma u 's slugging team garnered an extra-inning contest from Kappa Sigma and annexed the t op honors in ((B" league. This victory followed a long hard schedule in which no team was outstanding. However, in the ((A" league, the S.A.E. squad had little trouble defeating Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Chi, and Beta Chi to take chief honors in this division . The S.A.E. wins were due chie6.y to the stellar pitching of Otto Lichti a nd a strong array of batters. Considerable interest was shown on the ca mpus when the two league winners mel to settle the annual dispute in the ((Little World Series." Sigma Nu started strong in every game and by bunching hits piled up a lead which they usually held until late in the game. With the possible exception of the first title game the ((A" league champions came back strong each time to take advantage of errors and win the game by a safe margin. The winner of the championship series received the usual extra points to be applied to their total in the intramural cup competition. Although every group on the campus had their individual stars which they were willing to boost to the limit, attention must be called to the work of some men who were particularly outstanding and proved their t eam 's mainstays in every game in which they took part. They are: Winzeler, Beta Chi ; Krummes, T.K.E.; Hoffman, Delta Chi; Yanik, Fiji; Raidy, Sigma u; and Lichti, S.A.E.

Page 203


Phi Gamma Deltct

The closing months of last spring found the men's groups on the campus locked in a tight struggle for chief honors in the national pasttime. This activity capped the climax of a first -class intramural program and nearl y as much interest was displayed in following the fortunes of the different t eams as was shown toward the Varsit y nine. The schedule was run off by the single elimination m et hod, and one t ea m after another dropped by the wayside until only Beta Chi and Beta Theta Pi were le ft in the â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘A" league, and Phi Gamma D elta and S.A.E. were left in the .. B" league. Beta Chi took an easy win from their rivals and won the ri gb t to meet the Fiji ball tossers, who had in the meantime walloped S.A.E., 9 to 4. The championship ga me was an exhibition of good baseba ll in which the scoring lead changed hands several times, with the result that n either tam was certain of victory until the last man was out. Frahm, F iji hurler, tossed a bea utiful gam e to help his team to a 10 to 8 victory over the .. A" league stars. Albertson , Beta C hi moundsman, a lso hurled a good game, but severa l errors b y his t ea mmates allowed the F iji batters to push across the winning tallies in the last frame. Besides the t eam s already m entioned, Sigma Chi , Sigma u and Lindley Hall had strong clubs, which gave the leaders no small amount of worry throughout the entire series of contest s. Frahm and Albertson were recognized as the leading hurlers, while Glase, Beta Chi; Brimhall and Carey, Beta Theta Pi, boost ed the batting averages of the two circuits. The Phi Gams received seventy -five points fo r leag ue leadership, while the Beta C his carried off t wenty-fi ve points for topping their division.

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A~TIVITII:ยง


121:VI21:SI:~T~TIVI:

1()~ti()~~s C E" OF 1930, folio'' ing in the foo ts lt-ps of i Ls predecessor, again presents a R e presenta ti ve 1da hoan sc<'lion. The sec ti on this year, including four men a nd t\\O ''omen, is somewhat s ma ller than tha t of last year a mi the impa rtial committee of seniors who made the selection experie nct-cl e' tre me difficulty. I L seemed ad visable to s upple ment this sec tion e lse" here wil h a ca mpus leader section, including in its pages those s tude nts who, by accomplishment, have allained a position outs tanding a mong undergrad ua tes. Fro m this Ia u er section, a n ho nor able men Lion sectio n as it were, six gradua Ling seniors " ere selec te d to appear on the following pages as true re presenta ti ve Idahoans. Two seniors, E dward Po ulton and Darwin Burg her, whose records would cer tainly e ntitle thc m to this ho nor, appeared in 1he section las t year, a nd it is the wish of 1he commillec that their names be a ul o rna lically included in the lis r. As stude nts representing rhe hig hest ideals in men a nti women of Idaho we have c hosen for 1930: Tu1;;

J>agC' 207


Dorothy Mary F1路edrickson BECAUSE- no woman in the senior dass has evidenced like qualities of leadership and p ersonality and at the same time devoted the influence arising from them so wholehea.rtedly and LWselfishly for the good of her class and U nitJersity .

I I

I George Losie Huber BECAUSE-a s a student on the camp us he has been connected with almost every activity in which his d ass has engaged and at the same time found ample time to interest himself in affairs of student concern and campus activities of every nature.

Page 208


Fr ank Lee Winzeler B ECAU E- his recor<l as an undergraduate has been rnarkecl with a .~eries of accomplishments f ew have been able to equal while participating in as matn' acti vities and pursui ng as many interests as he has throughout his college life.

I

I I

I Cecil Hagen h e is one of the f ew men on the campus who has realized that the welfare of his University should come first and governed his conduct accordingly , always willing to do everything within his means and expecting nothing in return . BECAUSE-

..___________ __ P ag(' 209


Zelda Grace Newcomb BECAUS E- h er character and ability are such that she has been able to distinguish herself not only in the solution of all problems of interest to the woman student at Idaho, but also by her participation in 11umerous campus aclivities.

I I

I Aldon Tall BECAUSE-his efforts in connection with student government at Idaho have at all times been meritorious and worthy of mention, largely through an earnest desire on his part to aid in the upbuilding and growth of a greatPr Jdaho.

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I


Delta Delta. Delta

Tlif:

MAl:?~ McCLI~T()CI\

orority

UVIiAM SCii()LAI:?SiiiV CUV

The tradition of offering a silver loving cup to the group of women o n the University of Idaho campus attaining for a year the highes t comparative scholarship average was b egun b y Mrs. Elizabeth Kidder Lindley in 1922. The regulations governing the presentation of the cup stated that an y group of women , the majority of whose m embers lived in the same house, attaining the highest scholarship a verage for a year should have temporary possession of the cup unti l such time when one group should win it three years consecutively, when they shall receive the cup permanently. The Pi Beta Phi sororit y won the permanent possession of th is cup in 1925, so Mrs. Mary M cClintock Upham offered a similar cup to carry on th e tradition. T he cup was won for two successive years b y Alpha Phi, then Pi Sigma Rho, hut when almost in sight of their goal for permanent possession of the cup, it was won by Kappa Alpha Theta with the splendid group average of 5.024. Kappa Alpha Theta had the honor of having three members of its group members of Phi Beta Kappa , national scholarship fraternity. The cup was won last year b y D elta D elta D elta sorority, h aving attained a group average of 4.902. Kappa Alpha Theta ranked a close second with an average of 4.788. Other close ranking groups were: Delta Gamma, 4.712; Alpha Phi, 4.708; and Pi Beta Phi, 4.644. Each year the winning gro up bas its name inscribed on the cup, so at present there are four names on the cup, with Alpha Phi still leading, having won the cup in 1926 and 1927.

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Sigma Chi Fraternity

T he Burton L. French Scholarship Cup is an award to the group of men on t he University of Idaho ca mpus, having a ge neral home for tbe accommodation of not less than sixty per cent of its m embers, which has attained for a year the highest competitive scholarship average. Groups of men students eligible for competition for the cup are all such definite groups as fraternities, cooperative societies, and other organizations of a similar nature. The cup b ecomes the permanent possession of the group which has succeeded in winning it for three successive years. The cup was won the first time b y the fraternity of Phi Gamma D elta and they becam e p ermanent possessors of the trophy, ha ving won it for three successive years. Another cup was immediately offered by Mr. French on exactly the same basis as the first one. The fraternity of Tau Kappa Epsilon won this second cup in 1928 for the third successive time and b ecame its permanent possessor. Each of these two cups was won permanently within t en years of the time it was placed in compet ition. Mr. French graciously offered a third cup, which last year was won for t he fLrst time by the fraternity of Sigma Chi, having attained a group scholastic average for t he entire year of 4.448. The competition was marked b y the decidedly close averages of the leaders, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Beta Chi (local) securing second and third places with a verages of 4.339 and 4.324 respectively. Other fraternities and organi zations ranking close to the winning group were Lambda Chi Alpha with an average of 4.300, and Senior Hall, 4.208.

Page 213


Carl von Ende

The Sigma Tau Scholarship Meda l is given each year by the ld a ho C hap ter of Sig ma Tau to the sophomore who, in his fre, hma n year, has made the highest grade in the College of Engineering or in the chool of M ine . Sigma Tau is a national honorary engineering fraternit y wh ich has as its ideal high scholarship and o utstand in g abilit y in its field. The fraterni ty ha done much to furth er this ideal among its member , and take thi s me thod of . purring on to greater effort the fre hman who is jus t beginnin g his technical education. Carl von E ndc, sophomore in the Coll ege of E ngineering was Ia t year awarded the medal, having maintained a cholar hip a verage of 5.342. llarold Wa yland, also of the College of Engineering, wi th a n average of 5.853, was th e wi nner of the award for the previous year.

The Alpha Kappa P si award is a golden key given

Kenneth Dick

Page 2 11

by lpha Kappa P i fraternity to the man in the chool of Bu iness Admin i. tra tion who attains the hig hest scholarship average during his sophomore year. Alp ha Kappa P si is a na tio naI honorary bu siness fraternity maintaining ideal of cholarship a nd of bu ines abili t y and integrity . The key has been awarded annually by the fraternity incc its ins tall a tion in 1923. The key was won last year b y Kennet h Dick, who, d uring his sophomore year maintained an almo t perfect average, 5.939. Mr. Dick is majoring in accounting a nd has taken an ac tive par t in the activities undertaken by the School of Business Adminis trat ion. Allen Stowasser, who had an average of 5.580 during his sophomore year, wa t he winner of th is a ward the previous year.


XI Slf3M4. VI T4.13LI:T f: ach year Epsilon C hapter of Xi Sigma Pi engrave on a b ronze tablet in the Administration buil ding t he names of the four forestry students of highest sholarship average in t he fo ur classes. X i Sigma Pi is a national honorary forestry fraternity whose aim is to secure a high standard of scholarship in for es t education. Las t year the men whose names were engraved on th e tab let were: senior, George Garin with a n average of 5.282; junior, William T. Krummes, 5.545; sophomore, Russell LeBarro n, 5.222; freshman, Ra lph Ah lskog, 4.8 11 . Mr. Garin bas been an honor student throughout his college career and has had the honor of having his name appear on the tablet four years . ..\1r. Garin graduated this year with a final average of 5.450 coverin g his four years of college work a t t he U ni versity of Idaho.

George Carin

V li I f:li I Tli I:T4.

Vhi C hi Theta national key award is awarded annuall y on the basis of scholarship, activities and leadership to the woman student in the School of Business Administration who has most uccessfull y f ulfill ed these requirements at the completion of her junior yea r. Phi C hi Theta i a women's national honorary bu 路incss fraternity organized for promoting the cau c of higher business education and training for all ''omen who have chosen a business career. Pi chapter wa in tailed at the University of Idaho in 1926. Th e key award was won last year b y Edna wanso n, who, during her junior year, maintained thc high average of 5.310. Miss Swanson, who has maintained a remarkable chol as tic average as an undcrgradua tc is graduating t his year with a major in Business Fi na nce.

Edrta Swanson

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C('orgc L. Huber

The Rhodes Scholarship, through the bequest of the la tc Cecil Rhodes, con is ts of a scholarship for three years at Oxford U ni versity, with a yearl y allowance of approxim ately Sl ,950. Cand idates arc selected in two out of every three yea rs by a selection board, whic h thi year was composed of M cK een F. Morrow, Boise, and George Cur tis, W end ell, both former ldaho Rhod es scholars; Professors Dinnsrnorc and Harri on, University of Wa hing ton; and Dr. Boone, President of the College of Idaho. Selection of the Rhodes scholar was a nnounced after examinations held in the State House in Boise, and conduc ted in the form of a personal interview. Selection of the Rhodes scholar is based upon: literary and scholastic attainments; a n intere t in ports, uch a cricke t and football; qua li ti es of manhood, truth , co urage, devotion to duty, u路n clfishness and fellowship, and moral force and character. The Hhodes cholar appoi n ted this year was George Losie Huber. Mr. Huber wa graduated in 1930 with high honors. J. .eadcrsbip in many bra nches of extra curric ular ac tivity bas marked Mr. 11 uber's college career . During his senior year, he ser ved as vice -president of the A.S.U.I. and president of D elta Sig ma Rho, forensic fraternity. lie was a n active me mber of Blue K ey, uppercl assmen 's national honorary; Silver Lance, senior men 's honorary; Scabbard and Blade, national hon orary m ilitary fraternity; the English Club and Sigma Chi, social fraternity. Mr. Huber was also interest ed in forensic affairs and in his junior year was a m ember of the Idaho team which made a barnstorming debate tour of the Middle West . During his senior year Mr. Huber acted as a istant to Professor J. W. Garland, debate coach, with the fresh man and women's squads.

Pczge 216


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I VUULICATI()~§

I


THEG E)I

Mo u TAl s is an official publica tion of th e Associated Students of the University of Idaho. Publi bed yearl y Tn:E GE)l attempts to portra y the events of the school year and record the activities of the students on the campus. TuE GEM OF 1930 is the t wenty-eighth volu me of this publication. OF THE

A LL E

' • .J ANSSEN

F RA ' K

D.

SM

Editor Business Nfanager

IN

Honorary Editor

GEOH CE McD oNA LD -

Assistant Editor KE

A llen ] anssefl

ETH

Assistant Business M anager

O'L EA Ln '

E.'clitor

Lw

EL CA " t' B ELL -

D o

A L O EQUALs

Eu WI

M. Murphy

J. Pohlman

II. Simonds

Page 218

J>. Miller A. Rond•ll W. McDaniel

1...

Gall•~her

C. Uerndon L . l..ouio

A duertising Manager Assistant Advertising Man ager

Ci rculation Ni anager

S PntNCEtt

W. Bloir D . Stark ll.. Ou un

' · Scott J. Anderson R. Wullio

1). Donald110n

P. ~tartin G. Gray

F. White J\f. Stewart

C. Lefever

D. Coso J. Macdonald C . McDonald


GE~I

1.•1.8

] ANSSKI\

O F THE MO

\\' AYI\ K BLAIR

TAl NS BOARD DA LE Goss

Art Staff: DALE Goss, Editor;\\' ARREN

FREDA \~ IIIT E

f cDANIEL, AGNES R ANOA I. I,,

DEAN DONALOSO .

Atlministrntion: P ARI S MARTI , Editor;

ATII AN ScoTT.

Classt>s: F' n !!OA \V 111 TE, LILLI!! GALLAGI If; n, Editors; G 11ACK N IXON, J ESS IE MA<:OONALO.

Atltletics:

) OliN Pouui A , Editor ; CIIARLES METZGA R, P AU l. AUST.

Activities: Drama, MAllY MuRPHY; fusic, HAZEL Snt ONDS; Pu b licat ions, G BORCK GRAY; Mi litary, \V,\LTER GH. LESt>u ;:; D e bate, CIIARI.KS JhmNOON. E~'CIILS

of t ill' }' ear:

RANDALL \VAI.I.I S, Edi t or.

I daho Women:

HELE ISABEL LA CE.

VKASBY,

SmRLEY

Cu NINC II '"•

Editors;

Organi::ations: \fELVJ'I/ STEWART, Editor; BOYD MARTI'I, TTELI! ' DouGLAS, 0Y'IRS LAwsoN.

Frank

Composition: C II\ RLOTTI! LEf'EVEH, LOIS TuO)t PSON, PAUL \ f iLLI!R, LILLY LoUJs, JoEL A ·osnso •, RoosnT B snTIIA \1 oon s, EL'I RR PosTO'I.

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Copywriting: DoNAI.o STA IIK.

Publicity: G t.BNN SnBRN.

E. S1ori"' "

II. Ouvitl""n

L. Thom JJI<>II

0 . Laweo"

S. Cunni•lwluun ..; . l'o8ton

1•. Campbell U. Moore

C. Me1zsar

D. Eq11ala II. J ohns U. l\lor1i11

1'. Corneil J. r•• n,c

G. Nixon

C. Callawa) 1'. Auel

G. Shern

K. O'Leary •·. Duell II . Oouat..

11. Vea sey W. Cilleopic K. ~lattea

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THE l 0\110

RGO~A

i an official publication of the Associa ted tudent o f the ni ver ity of Tdaho. In it 路 thirt) -fir t year this publication ha gro wn from a rela tively small record of s tudent acti vities lo the present even-column paper, p ubli shed every Tu e da and Friday of th e coll ege yea r. As a member of the Pacific lntcrcollcgiatc Press A sociation it ranks equa ll y with publication of other univer ities of larger ize.

Cf'dric tl' l i <t$WII editor

c.~

Page 22Q

.. tlcr

T

nder the direction of Cedric d' E a urn, editor, and J ack Parker, bu ine ma nagr r, Tn E ARGON A T ha' progrcs ed materially. rn add ition t o all campus new of importance and inlcrc l , the publication has included man y features of note this year.

E. \\"arm

0. \lc:Cralh L. Smith

\\. Jon"Kn

C. Cleaoon

t:.

Oun~an

II. Kerr W.CilleoJ)ic


c~ I)H l C JACK

G.

T.

PARKER

EowARD

0

CA R L.

PAuL

Editor Business Manager Managing Editor Circulation Manager Sports Editor Society Editors

o 'EA U!U

J.

WutTTI GTO

Bnow

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E L ' IE WAR\t, L ILLIE GALLAC rrr.m H. A r. t• H l lAGA

, HEU~N KER R,

}

Column

DAN McGRATH, GERALD GnrM)t

Rl•portorial Staff: MARGARET P111 NEY, ELVA D u ' CAN, C u ARLES C ROFT, B u n ' I S BniCIIAM, RuooA SwAY ' E, L ucr E WO\IACK, ona.A Lo ceTEJC, CuARr.F.s GEuNSKY, ELMA MINEAJt, LJLLJ A WesL Ell, ETn EL GnovE, R u TH \V~;sT, LuLu SuANK, BeTu llun sT, Be1. 1.E Pon-renFJF:LO, G I .A OYS GLEASO , L uc11. LE CnrsT, CeC IL JTACE , Yf.:H A Fonn1s, TTeLEN VEASEY, ]OliN PouLMAN, \VJNt' n F.o J ANSSEN, .BEnTIIA Moo1t e, L ORNA MoonE, Mu. on e o AXTELl., CATHRYN CALLAWAY, E l.OI SE CASTEn , DY • es L AwSON, PAUL AusT, WALTER G ILLESPIE, MALCOl. M RENYnew, Tueooone A oen soN, l lAL KELLY.

L. Gallagher M. Axtell

n.

U. Simoml~

llacan

G. Shcrn

Jack Parher Bu&im!ss J\'lanager

C. Crinuu

0. Brown

M. Rcnrrcw

P. Auol

P. Jonco

Page 221


Daft' Goss

Harry Robb

Ttil: 13LUI: 13UCI\I:T ED ITOHI AL

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Jess

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lssoci(lte Hditor llumor Editor Feall/re Editor S ports Editor 1~.\:clum tf! Editor

ESS ST AF F llusin<•ss \Janager tssoriat(' Bnsiness \lan<tJ,Wr Cirwlation .llonager

\ SJST ANT E(/itorial:

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, 1\l Ent. B l•' tttZZEI . t.~;, Jour. 1\l c:DoNA LI), J o11 · T on n i\Y.

Io \ HO BL E B uCKET is th e official humor magaztnc publi l.ted by the ociated tudent of the Univcr it) of I daho. Originall y pon ored b y the E ngli h Club, thi. publica tion now appea r. quarterl y on the campu and i recog nized as one of th e major st uden t publica tion .


IDAHO~ '\!CINEFH

*.,

Norman J\ifcCinty

lfarold Nelson

EDITO RIAL STAFF

Editor HAROLD T. NELSON Managing Editor HARRY S. Owe s As.wciate Editors { ROB ERT H occ, }OliN N ICII O I.SO N, LAURENCE SM ITH

Alumni Editor Famlty Editor C!'nl'ral Staff

GREGOHY BEI.S IIRII FneD JonN SON {

WALTE it .FilWEIIC, \VII. LIA\1 LA NC:ASTRH, LLovo Jl RP.n, HouRnT Tu1wc:KMO ICTON, R ooEnT I£ AIIIIIS, C n A III . I~S MosF.It

BUS£NESS STAFF nu.,illf'.~.~

Mrumger NORMAN McGINTY A .~ .,i.Wmt /Jusi11ess A-fcuwger GEORCE KALOUSE K f:irrulatio11 i\lcuwger CARL VO'I E'IOE, Jn . Cetlt>ra/ S taff

Fnso JonNSON, C J.A IIENCE CONW\Y, SYDNEY FR ANK MENBEL\, ll \llOLD I EDEll \IE\ En, { ROBERT HEY OLOS, JOSEPII L\ 1\C\STRil

II

\lllliS,

T 11 E J OA no ENCI~EER is a technical journal sponsored by the Associated E ngineers a nd th e Associated Miners ofthe University o fJd aho. The publica tion is representati ve of s tudent engineers, alumni engineers, and the profession of engineering in the Sta le of Idaho. The Ida ho State D epartment of Public Works uses a department of Lhc m agazine as an outlet for news of scientific a nd industrial interest to people of the s tale. T u E IDAHO ENGINEER appears in Dece mber a nd May of each year.

Page 223


II illiam Krummes

lloward

argcant

F.DTTO RT AL STAFF \\' ILI, I A\f KnUMMES Jl owAn o ]AMES

E.

J. SMIGf:ANT Sow o Rn

FRED NEWCOM tm

l~ditor

Business Manager Associate Editor A.,sisumt Business 1ltlanager

T HEID AHO FoRESTER is the offi cial annual publication of Lhe Associated F ores ters. It contain a rli cle on all pha e of fore t ry a nd a rna of informa tion dealing with t echnical proble ms i n forestr y. The art icles are written b y well known men i n the forestry ind ustry and b y studenls doi ng experimental or rc. ca rch work in the Sch ool of Fore. t ry.

Page 224


rn TJX:

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~IDAHO ~ AGRICULTURIST

Kenneth Platt

Til-=

Oliwr Espc

11).~1-J() Af3~1C::ULTU~I~T

EDlTOIUAL STAFIâ&#x20AC;˘' PnoP. J. E. No nonv Faculty Advi.HII' KENNETH PLATT GLENN PRATT O r.JVER

Jon N

E sPE

SAN D~t EYER

Editor Assistant 1\ditor BusinP.,s ManagPr Assistant /Jusi n f'ss Mtlff(lf!,Pr

TnEJoArro AG RICULTURIST is an annual publica tion sponsored by the Ag Club of the College of Agric ulture. The purpose of this publi ca lion is lo s timulate interest among the prospective agricultural students and to maintain closer relations with those interest ed in agriculture throughout the sta le.

PagP 225


Whittington

Blair

Crimm

S tudent publications constitute one of the most important subdivisions of t he Associated Students of the University of Idaho. Three of these publications, The Gem of the Mountains, The I daho A rgonaut, and The Idaho Blue Bucket, come directly under the jurisdiction of t he Executive Board as the executive head of t he Associated Students. The editors of each of these official publica tions are chosen at th e annual A.S.U.I. election and serve one year as associate editors before assuming their duties as heads of the publications. The business managers, however, are c hosen b y t he Executive Board from ca ndidates who present p e titions for the positions. They likewise are required to serve one year as associates in charge. Although every position is open to any student, great care is taken to select only those who have alread y done outstanding work on the staff or have shown exception al abilit y. The sta ffs for those publications which are not controUed b y the A.S. U.I. are chosen in each case by the members of the school or departm ent represented. As in t he general student publications, selection is based on the competitive syst em and great ca re is ta ken to choose sta ff members who have already hown their abili t y and a re i n every way deserving of the position. A.S. U .I. publications during the year have developed materially with the growth of the University and from all indications much grea ter progress is to be expect ed next year. Wayne Blair, associate editor of The Gem of the Nlountains during the year just passed, will ed it t he 1931 edition. Edward Whittington, acting as ma naging editor of The A rgonaut this year, becomes editor next year. Gerald Gri mm automaticaUy becom es editor of The Idaho Blue Bucket after erv ing in the capacity o f associate editor this year.

PagP 226


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I [)VAMA

I


Ker:sey

/Jrown

Robb

[)t2.tUtAT I ~ A~T I V I ~

T he past year proved to be one of great adva ncement for the dramatic department. The increasing intcre tin thi activity wa hown b y the unusuall y large number of stude nts who enrolled in the play producti on cia ses. Tbe decision that all pla ys would be produ ced under the auspices of the A.S. U.J. was a nother proof tha l interest in drama tics was b eco ming more pronounced. tudents studying dramatic arc divided into t wo groups, tho e taki ng ele men tary and those taking advanced p lay production. M embers of the elementar y cla s gain their initial experience by appearing in the one-act pla y , wh ile those in the ad va nced classe are primarily occup ied with the production of three-act pla ys. uTbe Gossipy Sex," which was presented ovc mher 21 and 22, opened the dramatic season. It was followed by t wo groups of one-act pla ys given in mid-year. The second three-act play of the year, .. kidding," was prod uced April 3 a nd 4, wbile a group of one-act plays, preen ted :.\1ay 2 and 3, concluded the year's dramatic activities. J ohn H. Cushman, director a nd head of the department, showed very re markable insight in his choice of play , as all of them were enthusia ticall y received b y the niversity a udience . There is little doubt that t he ucces of the department is due to the untiring efforts of Mr. Cushman a nd to t he splendid cooperation given him b y his assistants, Mrs. Pauline Brown Ma tthew and Mi H elen K er ey, the assistant dean of women. H arry From "Skidding" Robb acted as student manager.

l'agP 228


'N.>ne from " 'kidding"

The complica tions which arise when a ll the me mbers of a form er ac tress's fam il y in vite g ues ts to their hom e for the sa me week-end are humorously portrayed in . oel Coward's three -act comedy, una y Fever. " The setting is la id in Judith Bliss's country home, where he has moved after her re tirement from the tage, with the intention of devo ting the rest of her life to her hu band and her chi ldren. Judith invites a young, dumb athle te, whom he b elieve. is madl y infatuated with her. H er daughter's guest is a diplomat,'\ bile her son' fri end is a sophisticated vamp with whom he imagines himself in love. Judith's novcli t hu band, on the other hand, h a asked a little flapper because he wants to stud y her t ype. Entertaining soon proves to be boresome to the eccentric Blisscs. The gues ts, m eanwhile, become so aggravated over the way they arc left to shift for themselves, that the romances, wh ich seemed t o be buddin g, arc nipped at once. Happiness is finally re tored to all concerned with the breaking up o f the house party. Doroth y Pierce Look the part of Judith Bliss, while Amne John on and Dan M cGrath played the parts of her daughter , orrcl, and her son , Simo n. H er absent-m ind<'d husband was portrayed by .Burde tte Belknap. Clara, the maid , was taken by Lillian Woodworth. Robert St. Clair was cast as T yrell, the ath le te, Es telle PickreJI as the flapper, J ackie, and Cla yne Ro bison a the diplo mat, Greathma. The production staff was compo cd of Arthur E n ign, Frank Egbers, Li lFrom "1'he Valianl" lian Woodworth and Glenn Patchen.

Page 229


Scene from the Play

ttThe Gossipy Sex," by Lawrence Grattin, is a lively comedy based on the situations caused b y Dann y Grund y's enthusia tic peddling of shaving cream s tock and scandal. Dann y's acti vities take place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bowen during an impromptu house party. He succeeds in straining the friendship b etween the nosey Hilda orris and Alice Bowen to a brea king point and also manages to prick the rosy bubble of happine which ha enveloped the newly-wedded Baxters. Ch ief of Police Mason becom es irate over Danny's remarks about his wife and atterupts to shoot him. Dann y continues his gossiping until his own fiancee, Anna, becomes so aggravated that he break their engagement. After his stock ri es skyward, however, his sins are forgiven and Danny is left sitting on top of the world. Dann y Grundy was portrayed b y Maitland Hubbard. Mr . Bowen was taken by Dorothy Pierce, while liarold Packer was cast as Bowen. Lillian \Voodworth, in th e role of Mrs. orris, led Robert St. Clair, her hen-pecked husband, aro und by th e nose. Anna Sterling was pla yed b y Bertha Moore and Loi Kenned y . Gerald K ennyon, the poet, was taken by Merle Frizzelle. Grace Parsons a nd Mary Murphy depic ted Flossie Baxter, and her husband was Dan M cGrath. Chief Mason was portra yed b y Leland Ca nnon , with Amne J ohn on as his wife. Others in the cast were Charles H erndon a Mr. Foster, the agent; Harr y Robb as Briggs, the butler, and Frances Three of th e lAst Gallet as Mary, the maid.

Pa~

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Scene from the Play

Sl\1 ()()I ~f7 ~~It's no fun having a job without a man , and it's no fun having a man and not a job!" exlaims Marion Hardy, the heroine of Aurania Rouverol's delightful threeact comedy, ~~Skidding . " "Well ," declares her mother in answer to Marion's prob lem, ~~when you've got a man you've got a job!" After spending several years in the east studying political science Marion returns home to find that the Hardy famil y is ~~ skidding. " H er father, for the fir st time in twenty years, fails to receive the nomination for judge of the district court. T he return of her two married sisters, who have left their husbands, causes Mrs. Hardy to desert her family. Marion then decides she wants a political career rather t han a husband. To make matters worse, And y, her brother, loses his girl. Domestic tranquility descends on the Hardy household with the return of Mrs. Hardy. The sist ers go hack to their own homes, the judge is nominated for the supreme court, and Marion decides to take chances on a hu sband as well as on a career. Amne John son pla yed the part of Marion and Maitland Hubbard acted as Andy. Mrs. Hard y was portrayed b y Doroth y Pierce, while Robert St. Clair was the judge. Zelda Newcomb pla yed Aunt Mill y and Harry Rohh depicted Grandpa Hardy. Marion's sist ers, M yra and Estelle, were characterized b y Mary Murphy and Grace Parsons. Merle Frizzelle, Mary Murphy, Glenn Patchen, and Harry Rohh made up the production staff. Some of the Characters

Page 231


Aduance(/ Play Production

~~Pla ygoers," ~~wed ding Clothes," ~~ women Folk" a nd ~~ out of the Nigh t" made up the initial group of one-act plays. The first includ ed C. Brinck, V. S teward, M . Murphy, B. Brown, S. Cunningham, L. Weidman, R . Shaw, L. Moore, and B. Hogg. The plot was based upon the drastic r esults attending a bride who gave her ser vants a thea ter party. ~~wedd in g Clothes" was a tragedy of an old fa rmer who, persuaded to sell a prize calf to buy clothes for his daughter's wedding, lea rned she was not to b e married at home. R. Sturman, L. Ca mpbell, E. Jacob s, L. Grosj ean, and K . Hart mad e up the cast. Proof that woman is not always the weaker sex was found in .. Out of the N ight," when an old maid captured a burglar. The cas t included B. Low, E. Phillips, F. Ga llet, H. M cCannon, W. Cummings, II. Altnow, R. Williams, S. Stewart, D. Higbie, W. Janssen, \V. Ennis, and S. Min go. .. Women Folk" was a comed y of the love affair and famil y of a young man. Those who took part were W. C ummings, R. Garver, Z. ewcomb, M. Homes, F. Larson, C. H arris, and G. Parso ns. ~~ Postal Orders" with F. Larson , S. Cunningham, M. Homes, R. Garver, G. Eldridge, L. Kennedy, M . Murphy, H . M cCannon, and H. Altnow, led the second group of pla ys. The most difficult play presented was ~~Th e Valiant." The cast was made up of B. Moore, L. Grosjean, L. Cannon, Postal Orders L. Campbell and W. Monnett.

Page 232

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Elementary Play Productiott

in wrhc Upper Forty" a college graduate and his fia ncee ma na ge affairs so they can live nca r each other. W. Janssen, R. Sturman, V. te,, ard, E . Phillips, R. Grant, C. ll a rris, C. Brinck, L. Weidman, B. Hogg, and D. Higbie were the cast. •• His First Dress S uit" was a comed y based upon a yo ung man 's e fforts to wear his first dress suit at his sistrr's wedding. Those includ ed in the cast were W. Ennis, J. Torrey, L. Moore, K. H art, E. Jacobs, R . D eiss, C. H erndon , and B. Low. One of the pla ys in the last group was .. Do as Mother Says," a farce about a mother's efforts to have her daugh ter married. Those who took part were IL Car ver, E. Philli ps, L. Moore, L. Kenned y, W. Jan ssen, C. Harris, R . Brown, and S. Cunningham. The cast of •• tt o! ITo! and a Bottle of Rum" was co m posrd of H. Shaw, S. Stewart, R. William s, H. Deiss, S. Mingo, D. Higbie, L. Weidman, R. Sturman, W. Ennis, W. Monn e ll, and C. Brinck . ..T hr Rrhrarsa l," ''ith T. Melga rd, B. ll ogg, E . .Jaco bs, G. Eldridge, B. Low, K. 11 art, i\1. ll omcs, L. Grosjean, E. Johnston, \ . Ste \\ ard, F. Larson, and II. \ 1<·Ca nno n, ''as a play within a pia). '' Prince Gabb )" was cast with B. \1oorc, R. Grant, L. Campbell , and L. Cannon, and portrayed the fickleness of the ultra-modern wife. All three groups of one act plays were given in the auditorium and were participated in b y members of both the ad vanced and elementary classes. " II is First Dress Suit"

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Page 233


University A uditorium

The Senior stunt, .. Beauty and the Boost," written by Paul Boyd and E st elle Pickrell, was awarded first place in the annual Song and Stunt Fest, which was presented May 22 and 23, 1929. Louise Lamielle as Beauty, and Ethel Lafferty as her girl friend Lena , gave such comical and witty impersonations of marionettes that they were acclaimed the undisputed stars of the show. The Junior song, written b y Dorothy Fredrickson and William Shamberger, won first prize in the musical contest. It was sung by a group of junior m en. An award of fifteen dollars was given to the class contributing the cleverest stunt, and an equal amount was given to the class presenting the best song. Cleverness and an abundance of pep in the presentation of the song, ~ ~vandals on to Conquer ," b y Harry Walden, gained honorable m ention for the Sophomores. Ethel Lafferty and Clair Gale were the composers of the Senior song, which was presented in an interesting manner b y fourteen senior men. A lively take-off of the activities which occurred in the various departments of the Universit y was given b y the Juniors in their stunt, ~ · Idaho 's Three-Ring Cir cus." Looking back into the past the Sophomores presented a melodramatic conception of .. Campustry 1313," in which Joe College, after a seemingly vain struggle with the vi11 ain , finall y won the fair Kat Kampus. As no song was submitted by the Freshmen, their only contribution was a stunt, ••stop the Press," the plot of which was woven around events in a newspaper office. Burdette Belknap was selected chairman of the entire Stunt F est. Those who were chosen to judge the stunts were Dr. G. Harrison Orians, Jasper V. Garland, both of t he English departm ent, and Glenn W. Sutton of the Business School. Theoretical value and musical content were the main points considered by Theodore Kratt, Marion Treleaven and Carl Claus, members of the music facult y, in the selection of the prize-winning song.

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Cummings

Cuntett

The Music Department of the University of Idaho ha s enjo yed a ver y ac tive and successful year under th e capable direction of its new head, Professor Carleton S. Cummings, assisted by Miss Maude Garnett and Professor Carl Claus. Prior to his coming here Professor Cummings, tenor, was singing and teaching music in New York City, Boston, and Chicago. H e has b een attempting to de velop the stat e slogan, ((Idaho positions for Idaho trained musicians," and has been very successful in working up Idaho songs and in helping to develop a music curriculum to fit students for positions as high school instructors of music. Besides these administrative duties, he has coached the mixed quartet and the Men's Glee Club, and has been much in demand as a concert singer in Coeur d'Alene, St. Maries, Moscow, Orofino, Lewiston, and Spokane, Washington. On these trips he has been accompa nied by Professor Claus, Miss Garnett, Miss Lucile Ramstedt, and other m embers of the music faculty. Professor Carl Claus is director of the University Orchestra, and a member of the string quartet. He gave a violin recital in October, has appeared as a concert violinist in Moscow and other Idaho towns, and has accompanied Prof. Cummings on trips throughout the state. Miss Maude Garnett, head of public school music and director of the Treble Clef Club, has b een active in paving the way for music t eachers in rural schools, and she is serving in executive capacities as president of the State F ederation of Music Clubs, president of the State Music T eachers' Association, and as music chairman for the Inland Empire Educational Association. Miss Miriam Little, cello, and Miss Alvina Palmquist, contralto, are two instructors and talented musicians that have been added to the music facult y this year.

Page 236


1'11<' U11itx•rsity Orch<'slra

Durin g the pas t year the University Symphony Orchestra, under the direc tion of Professor Carl Claus, has mad e a re markable record for artistic achirvement in all of its performances. The number of members, fort} ·two, remains the same as last )Ca r, and all arc carefully chosen b y Professor Claus on a merit basis. The enrollme nt is in no way limited, because Professor Claus hopes to find sufficient material within the next few years to include sixt y me mbers. However, only those are admitted who can approach the high degree of t echnical skill which the present membership possesses. The orchestra appeared b efore general assembly in the University Auditorium and gave a concert J a nuary 8, composed entirely of st andard classical selections. Some of the numbers th at were most skilfully rendered and won the most commendation included the Ballet Egyptien suite by Luigini, Wagner's Prelude to Lohcngrin , and theM arche Slave by T schaikowsky. The orchestral accompaniment for Handel's oratorio, The Messiah, given during music week b y the choral societ y, was also played b y this orchestra. Its membership includes: first violins, York Kildea, Ruth Newhouse, orman Stedtfcld, J ean Edmiston, D orothy M essenger, Vivian E dmiston, H arold Kirklin, and H elen Parrott; second violins, ina ewma n, Agnes )fcKeirna n, Caroline Schmidt, Louise McCormick, Betty Merria m, Ruth Parker, Virginia Vanderhoff, and Margaret Barton; violas, E sther Mitchell, Geneva Snook, Lucie Womack, and Caryl Thompson; bass, Lucile Glindcman and Margaret Jones; flutes, Catherine Reardon and Cynthia Dal y; oboes, Lois Thompson; clarinets, John Dretkc, James Potter, and Dolores Holmes; horns, C harles McConnell and John '\1itchcll; trumpets, H arry Walden and Floyd Suter; trombones, Ra y Kelley, Pe ter Pence, and Richard Hargrove; sousaphone, )f arvin Olson; and piano, Marguerite McMahan.

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Page 237


.lll'u·s Glt•t• Club

U~ I VI:l?S I T.,

f3LI:I: CLUE

Thr Glcr Club, directed by Professor Carleton S. Cummings, is recognized as a voca l organization of exceptiona iJ y hig h quality, and has been popular as program rntcrtaincrs. The club has appeared before general assemblies in the University Auditorium, and has sung before civic organizations in Moscow such as the Rotary Club and Chamber of Commerce. The enrollment, thirty -two in number, remains the sa me as in previous years, but the care with which Professor Cummings has picked the members insures a personnel of extraordinary ability, and well worthy of the praise it has received for its achievements. M embers are chosen on a competitive basis, and last fall at the time of the try-outs there were sixty-five people who competed for the five vacancies. Sub-organizations of the club arc the two quartets, both directed by Professor Cummings and very active on the campus. One is composed of John Soden, fir st tenor; Clarence Sample, second tenor; Will iam Shamberger, baritone; and Paul Rice, bass. The other includes K enneth H ensley, first tenor; Ronald Smith, second tenor; John J enny, baritone; and John Mitchell, bass. The quartets have b een very much in demand, and have appeared before the Ro tar y and Kiwanis Clubs, the Chamber of Commerce, the lzaak Walton League, various Moscow churches, and as feature entertainers at house dances on the ca mpus and at general assemblies. The personnel of the Glee Club consists of: first tenor, \1illard Loughrey, John Soden, K enneth Hensley, Harold Packer, Clifford Mu llikin, Burnis Brigham, Reed Murdock, and Frank Warner; second t enor, E lton Reeves, Ray K elley, Ronald Smith, Clarence Sample, E lvon Hampton , C harles Croft, and K enneth Grabner; baritone, Harold Kirklin, William Shamberger, Harry Daubert, Irwin Tomlinson, John J enny, Preston Ellsworth, Russell Potter, and Martin Rosell; bass, Paul Rice, Paul Parks, John Mitchell, Jack unemakcr, Robert Vincent, Harry Walden, Clifford Hargrove, and Lionel Campbell.


Womell's Treble Clef

Tl?I:ELI: t:LI:t= t:LUE Sevrral excellent programs have been givrn b y the Treble Clef Club, under the directio n of Miss Maude Garnett. The mrmbers, limited to forty in number, are chosen on a competiti ve basis, and the result is a strong prrsonnel of interested and talented women. The club sang at the C hristmas assembly, and, on April 8, was presented in a straight classical concert, namr ly, Gounod's Gallea, a motet for women's voices. Miss Alvina Palmquist, contralto o n the University faculty, assisted in the program. The entire entertainm r nt was well received, and showed a careful training of cha rming voices. Officers of the club are: E lizabeth Gilmore, president; Agnes Ramstedt, managrr ; and Laura Clark, secretary. A very active sub-organization of the Treble Clef Club has been the girl's sextcttc, co mposed of Elizabeth Gilmore and Huth J ohnson, sopranos; Valetta l' llrrisson and Lois Thompson, mezzos; )'~arion Lc\\ is and Elinor Jacobs, altos. Th<'y apprarrd as waites at the C hristmas asse mbl } a nd la ter in these costumes carollrd at homes and hospitals in Moscow. The scxte tte also has entertained various clu bs in Moscow, appeared at the girls' asse mbl}, and given several special numbers in the Treble Clef Club concert. \1 embers are: soprano, Verona Wolff, Lucile Burgess, Tncz Sherwood, Lutie \1ae MitchcJl, Thelma Melgard, Helen Stetler, Louise \lorle), Ruth Johnston, Elizabe th Gilmore, Caroline Schmidt, Florence Roh rer, Ber) I Davis, and Janet Gooding; second soprano, Valetta l' H erisson, Lois Thomp on, Joan Harris, Gladys Gleason, J ea n Edmiston, Lois Hall, Mary Baird, Pauline Paterka, Audrey Anderson, Ellen Chandler, Laura Clark, Agnes McKeirnan, Beth Wood, and Betty Lambdin; alto, Marion Lewis, Vivian Edmiston, Luci le Viste, Caryl Thompson, Elinor Jacobs, Virginia Knee, Ruth Ramsted t, Edna Richards, Linn Cowgill, Geneva Snook, and Agnes Ramstedt.

Page 239


The 1930 P ep Bar11/

Under the very capable direction of Harry Walden , student leader, and Dale Goss, manager , the University of Idaho P ep Band enjoyed an unusually active and successful year, with a great many splendid p erformances and public appearances to its credit. Alwa ys a popular organization on the campus, the Band has more than ever deserved the enthusiastic commendat ion it has received this year. Long ago the P ep Band became a tradition at Idaho and each succeeding year of its exist ence has served to strengthen it as an institution. How deeply rooted this institution has become and how endeared in the m emories of Idaho students it is, is evidenced b y the recognition and interest shown in it b y the old grads and p eople t hroughout the state. On the coast, as well, it bas established a unique name and reputation, largely through trips it has undertaken with v arsity athletic t eams in the course of the last few years, such as the California trip in 1928. The P ep Band played at all the football and basketball games held on the Idaho campus this year, and at the Idaho-Washington State football game at Pu1lman. In addition the Band made an extended tour throughout southern Idaho in the fall, appearing before v arious high school audiences and civic organizations, and on several occasions playing for dances. Their itinerary included Boise, N ampa , Caldwell, Gooding, Twin F alls, J erome, Buhl, Burley, Rupert, Am erican Falls, Black foot, Idaho Falls, Rigby, and R exburg. As a fittin g climax to the trip the Band played at the Homecoming game b et ween the University of Idaho and t he Southern Branch of the University at Pocatello on Thanksgiving Day. E ver y appearance was received with enthusiasm by a capacity audience and the benefit the University derived through representation b y one of its best known Harry Walden IA!ader organizations is not to be under-estimated.

Page 240


The 1930 Pep Band Concert

Entertainment, p erhaps a bit novel to the members themselves, was offered by the P ep Band when it was engaged by the T en Thousand Club of Spokane to broadcast over KHQ. It also appeared at the E lks' T emple and at the Davenport Hotel in the same city, and entertained at the Lewiston-Clarkston Cherry Blossom Festival, h eld in Lewiston May 16 and 17. The personnel of the band included t wenty -one m embers, selected from students displaying outstanding ability. T en were new m embers, chosen from a total of twenty -five candidat es. M emb ers were: trumpet s, Charles M cConnell, Floyd Suter, Frank Warner, Harry W alden , George Jullion; trombones, Ray K elley, P eter Pence, Aldon Tall, Forrest Irwin; clarinets, James Hawkins, Robert N ixon, Johnnie Soden ; altos, Dale Goss, Harry Angney, E dwin D eKay ; baritone, William Ames; sousa phone, Marvin Olson; bass drum, Allen Stowasser ; snare drum, Parris Kail. P erhaps the outstanding achievem ent of the year was the annual concert presented by the P ep Band on May 8 in the University auditorium. The program, con sisting of six groups, included overtures, marches, and popular music. As a feature of the program a special fourteen-piece orchestra was presented in an elaborate setting of v ari-colored lighting effects. Those who took part in the concert and not regular members of the Band were: trombone, Oliver Frye; clarinet s, Don Wolfe, Leo Neher, Donald E quals; alto, James Mitchell. M embers of the orchestra were: trumpets, Charles Mc Connell, F rank Warner, George Jullion ; trombone, Ray K elley; clarinet s, Don Wolfe, Leo Neher ; sousaphone, Marvin Olson; baritone, William Ames ; snare drum, Parris Kail; saxaphone, N orman McGinty; violins, York KilDale Goss dea, Norman Stedtfeld, Harold Kirklin; piano, Sidney Walden ; vocal t enor, Harold Packer. Manasâ&#x20AC;˘r

P age 241


University String Qu.artet

Two outstanding music organizations on the campus are the mixed and the string quartets. The mixed quartet includes Louise Morley, soprano; Agnes Ramstedt, alto; Harold Packer, tenor; Erwin Tomlinson, bass; and Marguerite M c M ahan, accompanist The string quartet consists of Professor Carl Claus, first violin; York Kildea, second violin; Miriam Little, cello; and Louva May J ensen, viola.

University Mixed Quartet

Page 242


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Me/gard

t=

Carlw1d

llu ber

orensic work has had a stead y advance and development during}. V. Garland's two years as debate coach at Tdaho. Largely through his efforts, an Idaho debate t eam successfully toured the Middle W es t last year. lt was his influence which enabled J daho to be the host of the speakers from each member of the Pacific Forensic League in 1929. This year he promoted an international debate with Oxford, England, an annual debate sponsored b y the Spokane Chamber of Commerce, and a debate h ) radio. H e has bee n energetic in encouraging a better public speaking department, and in the strengthening of Idaho's debate organizations. It has been his purpose not so much to win debates as to develop forceful, logical speakers, and to allow Idaho to participate in high class competition. Tlis individual e fforts have b een in a measure rewarded this year through his election as v icepresident of the Pacific Forensic League. The management of Freshman debate was this year undcrtakr n b y George Huber, a veteran m e mber of ldaho's debate squads. li e was an acti ve participant in debate work last year, b eing a member of the team which toured the Midd le West. Under his direction the freshmen have had a very successful year. Although the squad has been small , excellent material has been developed, and the freshmen teams have all given a good account of themselves. Although this is Huber's first attempt at debate coaching, the freshmen have displa yed evidences of carefu l training in every appearance. To Thelma Mclgard, debate manager for this year, should go a great deal of praise. She competently filled a responsible position; she assisted Coach Garland in his efforts to promote interest in debating; and she was an admirable hostess for the visiting tea ms. ot only did she act as debate manager, but she also found time to participate in debate herself as a member of the women's team which went to Seattle to debate the University of Washington. lt is fortunate that she is only a junior this year, for competency in such a position as she filled is difficult to find.

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Port!!rfi!!ltl

McMillin

Glrosmt

McCatuwn

Toda y women 's forensics d o no t differ materially from me n's. Both are bound b y the sa me rules of procedure, judged b y the same standards of excellence, and both employ the same type of questions. If there is a difference then, it lies only in the amount of emphasis placed upon women's debating. Tn the past this was a serious problem. It was hard t o arou c an y interest in women' forensics. This feeling graduall y lessened as developments were made, until this year two of the outst a nding achievements in forensics at Idaho were made b y the women. Lois Porterfield and Gladys Gleason debated Spokane U ni versity upon the preponderance of women t eachers in our school syst em. Th is debate was sponsored by the Spokane Chamber of Commerce, and was so thoroughl y successful that it is to become an annual affair. The Idaho and W.S.C. women have had two debates whic h were broadcast b y radio. Thi i a feature which all of the leading schools in debate work are b eginnin g to employ. In thi swiftly moving age of machinery, it i necessar y that academic work b e speeded up also. In radio debate, forensic work has t a ken its first st ep in this directio n. Instea d of asking the a udience to come to the debate, the debate is now taken to the audience. This year the Idaho women have discussed two questions : R ESOLVED, "That the preponderance of women t eachers in our school systems is detrimental," and "That the divergence of the women from the home to business is detrimental to societ y." Debates ha ve been with Oregon, Washington and Washing ton State College. The women participating in these debates were: Thelma Melgard, Lois Porterfield, Gladys Glea on, E lsie McMillin, and H elen McCannon. The fact that the squ ad was small ca lled for intensive work, a nd allowed all of the members to participate in debates. Real work was d one and there was ample opportunity for the speakers to develop under Coach Garland's tutelage. Interest in women 's forensics is increasing, and it is hoped that the squad of next year will be a larger one.

Page 248


Tay lor

Schimke

Collins

Stansell

Maintaining the position of interest it assumed las t yea r, intramural debate has enjoyed another s uccessful season. A large meas ure of the success of this activity lay in the questions chosen for d ebate. That th ey prompted interesting and anj. mated discussion is proven b y the fact that on ly one of the arranged d ebates was forfeited. But good questions alone do not make a success ful d ebate. The capable manage ment of Walter Slaughter and Julia Hunter had a great d eal to do with the fina l worth of this activity. 1 n the men's division the s ubj ect was: H RESO LV ED, That we should pity our gra nd children," while the women's group argued the question: .. RESOLVED, T hat t he modern young man is unmanly." Although it is known that no polished oratory was present in the contests, and that the speeches were sometimes prepared only a few hours before the contest, yet in most in stances the cases were presented in a ver y entertaining manner. Much of the discussion was ver y informal and served to heighte n the spirit of the contest. For the women , Alpha Chi Omega was defeated in the semi-finals b y Delta D ella Delta, who opposed Delta Gamma for the championship. Their question for the finals was changed to: ••RESOLVED, That social fraternities and sororities should be barred from American universities and colleges." In this debate D elta Gamma, negative, represented by Kathryn Coilins and E lizabeth Taylor, won from the Tri Delt team, Virginia P eck and Geneva Hand y. In the semi-finals in the men's division were Lambda C hi Alpha vs. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, won by t he form er, and Tau Kappa Epsilon vs. Lindley Hall, in which the latter emerged victorious. ••RESOLVED, That the fed eral government should develop and control the h ydro-electrical resources of the country" was the subject d ebated in th e fina ls. Earl Stansell and Weldon Schimke for Lindley Hall defeated Robert Ilogg and Harold Nelson from Lambda Chi Alpha in the last debate, giving them the championship. The d ecision in this debate was rendered b y J. V. Garland, debate coach, Dr. Church, and Professor Hopkins.

Page 249


S hu11h

W esterberg

J<unald

Pi/seth

TPiseman

The prime purpose of fre shman debate, jus t as is the purpose of any fre shman squad , is to develop material for varsity competition. In debating, just as in athle tics, the strength of a varsity man lies in the sound foundation he has received as a freshman. It has often b een said that the besL wa y to increase the effectiveness and v alu e of forensics as a whole is to increase the efficiency and forensic t echnique of the freshman squad. J daho is very fortunate in this respect, for several of the fre shmen have shown exceptional promise this year. Should they return to the University next year, they will undoubtedly make strong bids for prominent places on the Varsity squad, many of which will be left open by graduating members. Material for the freshman squad is limit ed only because of the lack of real interest shown b y the students for it. In itself, freshman debate is as instructive as any form of varsity debating and is, in addition, the logical step to varsity competition and honor in following years. Under the supervision of George Huber, three year varsity debater and freshman debate coach this year, the freshmen prepared debates on two questions: •• R ESOLVED, That all nations should adopt a plan of complete disarmament except such force as are needed for police protection "; and ••That intercollegiate athletics, as they arc conducted, are detrimental. " The fre hmcn debated both sides of these que Lions, participating in competition again t the Oregon State ormal School, the Washington State freshmen , and the freshmen of Whitman College. During this series of fiv e debates the fro sh won one and lost one to the Washington State team. The debates with Oregon State ormal and Whitman were non-decision. The m ember s of the squad who took part in one or more of these debates were: Joseph Fil eth, William Weatherall, Ralphine Ronald, C arl Westerberg, Howard Wiseman, Lu lu Shank and Wallace Baker.

P age 250


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I


Colon<'[ E. R . Chrismafl

T he U niversity has been ver y fortunate in ha ving Colonel E . R. Chrisman as an advisory head of the Reserve Officers Trainin g Corps. Colonel Chrisman has had both practical experience in actual warfare in many of the possessions of the United States and experience in handling college men. This is the Colonel's eighteenth year at t he University of Idaho. The work of Colonel Chrisman in organizing and d eveloping the R.O.T.C. to its high degree of efficiency and importance in the present curricula is deserving of praise and as a result this department has attain ed an equal footing with the other d epartments of the University. It has a de finite course of theoretical and practical in t ruction, including discipline and trainin g in the a rt of warfare as well as leadership, both of which should p rove of inestim able value in future life. It is quite apparent that such a course would fulfi1l m a ny of t he objecti ves of the University. The number of men enrolling in Ad vanced Vfilitar y increases ever y year, proving its growing popularity and importance. The adva nced course m en attend at least one ix weeks' summer camp a t C amp Lewis, Wa hing ton, w here they are trained in marksmanship, scouting and pa troling, and in practical problems of tactics. The camp progra m consist s in the practice and de mo n tra tion of all of the implem ents of m odern warfare as well as inst r uction b y o fficer of the regular army . During the past year the R eserve Offi cers Training Corps adopted a new insignia an d within the next few years the Ida ho unit hop es to secure a distinct t ype of uniform for its cade ts.

Pag<' 252


Captain Crenshaw

Major Fuller

L ieutcnllllt

hcchy

Major Francis R. Fuller, Infantry D.O.L., has been doing m os t of the a ctive executive work of the Military department, besides instructing t he advanced course men. This is the M ajor's fourth year at the Universit y. Captain Benjamin M . Crenshaw, Infantry D.O.L., has taken an active part in developing the R.O.T. C. to its present high st atus. His main work is t he instruction of the sophom ore cadet s and interesting them in the advanced courses. Lieutenant John W. Sheehy, Infantry D.O.L., is in charge of all fre shmen enrolled in military. Although Lieutenant Sheehy has only b een connected with the University one year, he has earned the respect and admiration of all the cadets. F rank Barnum, Staff Ser geant, handles all the official reports of the military departm ent and assi ts instructors and aids in coaching the rifle t eams. Lonnie Woods, Staff Sergeant, is kept busy issuing and receiving equipment and keep ing it in first-class condition. H e also directs the work of the make -up squads. Sergeant Woods ba s b een connect e d with the military department a number of years. Sergeaut Jr.Toods Sergeant B ur11um

P age 253


Li<>ul<'IIUtll

Colonel Collier

FIRST SEMESTER

Lt. Colonel Collier, with the aid of the regimental taff and the cadet offi cers, bas very ably conducted the R.O.T .C. throu gh the fall and win ter se mester. On account of the disagreeable weather very few outside drills were held a nd little opportunity was had for real experience. Close for ma tion drills and army exercises were conducted in the Memorial Gy m.

Cadet O.Dicers

Page 25-'t


Lieutenant Colonel P rice

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Lt. Colonel P rice supervised the work of Lhe Cadet officers an d led the I da ho corps through many real and practice reviews during the spring term . D ue to his excep tion al leader ship the l daho unit received the praise of General Hines, Ninth Corps Area lnspec Lor, a t the annual gener al inspection and review which was held a t the Universit y in May.

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Page 255


Cadet Bantl

Sergeu ut Nielsen

Warrant Officer Bernard ielsen, retired Army Band Leader, while at t he Univer ity has developed the military hand into one of the best hands in the West. As a result the Idaho hand is accredited first place in the Iinth Corps Area, of which Tdaho is a part. Officer ielson has been with the University for thirteen years as hand in structor and until recentl y he was a member of the faculty as an instructor of wind instruments. The Cad et ha nd holds an important place in the musical activities of the campus besides its regular function at cadet dri ll. A concert o f both classical and militan t music is given annua ll y, a nd in addition the hand playR at the graduation ceremoni es each year.

The entire idaho unit on para1le

Page 256


,\ I art ill

M o11tgomery

Twelve hundred people jammed into the assembly hall for thr opening debate of the year. T wo hundred more were turned away from the doors of tlw international debate b etween the Uni versity of Oxford, England, and the Uni versity of Idaho. The clash of the Vandal team with the men fro m " across t he pon d" '\ as one of the outstanding deb a tes of the year. The ques tio n for discussion" as : t~ H ESOLVE D, Tha t this is the b es t of all possible worlds." Purely a n academic ques ti on, it had for its purpose an attempt to develop forensic work in an intern a tional sense, and to in crease the felling of fellowship be t ween English and American sc hools. Since this debate Idaho students are much less prone to b clirve the old story that an Englishman can't see a joke. Rumor that t he Oxfordites were ÂŤwisecrackers" had preceded them t o this campus. This re port was verified during the debate; the E nglishmen's easy fl ow of humor delighted the audience. Paris Martin, Wa rren Montgomery, and J ohn Ewing abl y prese nted the affirm a tive side of the q uestion for the U niversity of Idaho. J oseph \fcK enn a, from Dublin, Ireland; Willia m Diplock, a London ttcockney"; and Richard Acland fro m York, Engla nd, all students at Oxford , upheld the negative. Splendid arguments were developed o n both sides. The E ngli shmen were m embers of the Oxford Union, the oldest deb ating societ y in the world, a nd they were ve teran debaters in every sense of the word. In spite of their skill, they had a great deal of difTic ult y in refutin g the arguments presen ted by the affirmative . This deb at e not only marked the development of a n ew era in forensic work at Idaho, hut it stimul a ted interest in debate through popular appeal t o the entire student bod y. H ailed by many as the m ost successful deb ate of the year, it was an achievement in itself. The Englishmen were delighted '\ ith the reception given them , and expressed a wish t o return . D eb ates of this kind are of real value t o forensics. Ever y two years an Oxford t eam to urs t he United St ates. lt is hoped tha t in the future they will alwa ys find it possible to stop at the U niversity of Idaho.

Page 245


Hal/iff

Platt

J ones

There are two radically differen t views as to the purpose of debate. There are s till a few schools who insist ~hat the only value of d r hate lies in the decision contest. These schools naturally place all of their emphasis on small, highly trained squads and upon three or four effective speakers. The leading school s in forensic work today, however, are tr)' ing to achieve a sensible balance b e tween the ev ils of the decision contest and the weaknesses of the non-decision debate. Idaho is a member of thi s latter group. \n activity sponsored by the stud ent body, and for which University credit is give n, should be an activity in which ever y member of the squad may participate. The prime purpose in debate, it has b ee n said, is to deve lop forceful, logical speakers, hence the leading spon sors of foren sics believe that the main value in th e work lies in the training and exprrience which it gives to the individual sp<'akers. To be able to think clearl ), presrnt arguments force full y and logica lly, and to brat ease before an audience is far more important to the stude nt th an the winning of debates. This sort of training should be attainable to all who desire it, and therefore it is believed that there is no nNâ&#x20AC;˘d for specia liza Lion, and the dc H iopment of a s ma ll , high ly train ed squad . But there are other reasons why the decision contest does not mea n as much as it form erly did. One of the recent practical developments in debate has had to do \\ith form. Some debates are now carri ed on through a series of cross -examination s, just as a court trial. Split t eam debates, open forums, and discussion meetings \\ilh the audience after the debate is over, a re all factors which are rendering the decision contest of little value. All good debates today are upon questions of real interes t to the public. The greatest value is achieved when the audience becomes interes ted <'nough to want to discuss the question informa ll y after the debate is over. Value in debate, then , is reciprocal. The greatest success is reached when both the speaker and the audience arc animated sufficicntl) to make possible intellig<'nt discussion of the question at hand. The speaker benefits b y experience in speaking; the audience through a vision of the truth brought about b y a clash of opinion.

Page 2 l6


llent</un

Su nd11rs

lluinl

During the weeks of March 19 to April 4 three representa ti ve members of Idaho's forensic squad toured the wes tern states a nd participa ted in the Seventh Annu al Pacific Forensic League Confe rence held at Tucson, Arizona. It was the purpose of J. V. Garland, Idaho's debate coach, and C harles H erndon and Paris Martin, student debaters, not only to represent Idaho a t the League conference, but also to engage in a number of debates en route. H ow well they succeeded is shown b y the fact that five deb ates were schedul ed on t he trip to the conference. AU these debates were confined to a discussion of t he advisability of all nations adopting a plan of complete disarmament, but the Idaho m en were prepared to discuss either side of this question. The schools m et upon this trip all rank high in forensic circles. The University of Montana, Bozeman State College, University of D enver, Colorado College, and the University of Southern California were among t he institutions debated. Idaho ma y well be proud of the showing her representatives made at the forensic conference, sin ce J. V. Garland was elect ed vice -president of the League. Martin entered in extemporaneous and H erndon in the oratorica l contests, both making creditable showings. With the good beginning made last year as a stepping stone, Idaho representatives took active p art this year in a ll t he functions of the Forensic League, a nd it is this sort of participation whi ch will treng then debate at Idaho. Representing Idaho at the University of Oregon, and at Oregon State College, were Orville Baird and Charles H erndon. The) deba ted th e problem of world peace and disarmament. Though adept and versatile, they were defeated by the University of Oregon in a decision debat e rendered by a ingle critic judge. The question of the British criticism of American educa tio n Idaho debated both pro and con with W.S. C. and with W hitman College. An a ffirmati ve t eam composed of Baird and Platt met Saint Olaf College upon the di armam ent question, and the debate with the University of Oxford employed the academic question: .. RESOLV ED, That this is the best of all possible worlds."

Page 247


Cadet Rifle Team

Captain Crenshaw directed the Vandal rifle team through a very successful season, winning most of the matches with various universities and colleges throughout the United States. Due to Captain Crenshaw's efforts the work of the rifle t eam was recognized as a minor sport. Consequently each year the ten men with the highest average scores for the entire season are granted a sweater with the rifle team insignia on it. The men who received the award this year were: E. Huttehall, B. Bunker, J. Anderson, V. Estes, R. White, C. Whittaker, T. Reardon, and A. Moss. Four other m embers, P. Manning, J. Croy, P. Croy, and T. H elmer , ranked in the first t en, hut had previously received awards.

Capwin Crenshaw

Preparing for the atmual spring inspeclion

Page 257


Chris Harman

Ml LIT4.~.,_., 134-LL The annual Military BaH, held at the E lks' temple, February 21, was one of the most successful social events of the year , due to the efforts of Chris Harman, general chairman, and his sub -committees. These committees were as follows: PROGR AMS

FINANCE

DECORATIONS

Virgil Estes, Chairman Charles LeMoyne R eynold Nelson

Chet Whittaker, Chairman Charles Herndon

Ray Plumlee, Chairman Jack Dodd Ray Kelley

The officers' ladies were astounded and thrilled as they entered through an arch of silvery sabers and saw the huge ballroom bedecked with militant finery and ornaments. Crossed swords, hanging at inter vals along the wall, polished machine guns, shining one-pounders, and somber shells arranged in a menacing manner complet ed the decorations. The small leather programs with a slim saber running diagonally across the front were t he delight of every co -ed present. One of the novel features of the affair was the pledging of sixt een men to Scabbard and Blade, national honorary military fraternit y . The pledging took place under the rigid formality of an officers' ceremony. Tbe neophites select ed were: Walter Price, Nathaniel Congdon, Edward Douglas, Charles H erndon, Eugene H utteball, John Croy, Charles Walker, Kenneth Dick, Jack McQuade, Bernard Lemp, Reynold Nelson, Vining Thompson, Jack Dodd, George Swindaman, Harold Stowell, and Ra y Kelley.

Page 258


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l\lasn u•o ra 1/ickman

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Corless

-.J ud ging teams of the University are four in number: the Animal Husbandr y Jud gin g Team judges sheep, hogs, beef cattle a nd horses; the Grain Judging Team judges grains, small seeds and forage crop. ; th e Dairy Cattle Jud ging T ea m judges the va rious breeds of dairy cattle; the Dairy Prod ucts Judging Team judges butter, milk, c heese and ice cream. These tea ms are selected each yea r from the students receiving the highest grades in the judging cl asses during the practice judging peri od. The t ea ms then go to Portl an d, Orego n, to compete at the Pacific International Livestock Show with similar t eam s from M ontan a Stat e College, Washington State College, University of California, Oregon Stat e College, and University of British Columbia. The ldaho Judging T eam s thus far have m ade an enviabl e record at t he Pacifi c Tnt ernational Livestock Show, being a mong thr hi ghest each yea r. The University of fdaho College of Agriculture is very fortun a te in hav ing such compet ent m en as coaches for these t eams, who by hard work and consistent e fforts ha ve made such r<'cords possible. A nlAL JT US U \

Coach Hi ck man Hobert Corlt'ss

OilY J U OC I "'IC TE \ \ f

Kenneth Platt Ernes t Pa lmer Earl \lcDonald DA IR Y PRODl CT S

Coa<'h Theophilus

Oliver E s pe

J U OC I ~ C

Virgil Cross Ral ph "\lagnuson

·n ; \\t

Weslt') Boicl' \'irgil Cross

George Johnson

DAlllY CATTLE J U DCI"'I C T E \\l

Coarh Anderson

Joe H eward E dward \Vaggotwr Leonard Wiseman

Coach IT ulbert

Clement Ault Menill Stinema tes Dorothy Perkins

GRAI N JUDCI

Page 260

Ardie Gus tafson

G TEA\f

Marshall Smith


Ault

llulbert

Smith

Perkins

StillliiiUl~l

Graitt Judging Team

Anderson

fl ~u.vrd

Wiseman

Dairy Caule Judging Team

Page 261


Espt

Johnson

1'heophi/us

Cross

lJoi~

Dairy Products ]uclging T eam

The Animal Husbandry Judging Team, althou gh placing fifth this year in the contest, has the record of having placed not lower than third in the previous t en years of competition at the Pacific International Livestock Show. The Dairy Cattle Judging T eam placed third this year at the Portland contest, losing second place b y one and a half points. Edward Waggoner of the Idaho team ca rried off individual honors, b eing high point man of the contest and high man in judging Holsteins. A great deal of credit is du e Professor Anderson upon his excellent coaching of the team during his first year. The Dairy Products Judgin g T ea m placed fourth this year at the Pacific International. Honors in all events were taken b y the University o( California. Of the eighteen participants in the contest one Idaho man placed fifth and one placed eighth. The Grain Judging team placed third in the con test this year. The Idaho Grain Judging Teams have established a very fine record at the contes ts held in Portland by placing near the top almost every year and se tting a record in 1927 with the highest score ever made for grain judging at the Pacific International Livestock Show. Clement Ault deserves m ention for being second high man in the contest.

Page 262


Ttte ques tion has often arisen in the mind of the editor, as it undo ubte dl y has with other s tude nts on the ('a rnpus, why a sectio n, s imilar in name to this, ha d no t previo usly a ppeared in an ltl a ho }earbook. I daho m en arc referre d to as a dis tinc t e ntity a nd pages have appeared describing their a thle tic a<¡ ti vity; if as a n o rganized unit t hey do no t appear it is beca use their ac ti vities do no t \\ arran t or ganiza tio n. On the o ther hand Ida ho \\ Omen a rc tho ro ug hly or ganized a nd their sys te m of a thle tic compe tition a nd activity has a tta ined a hig h degree of perfectio n. Jo partic ula r recogni tion has been given the m a nd no s pace has been devot ed to their ac ti' itics as \\ Omen. \\ ith this in mind, and reca lling th a t the Lni versity of id a ho is a coeducational school, it see ms a ltoge th er fillin g th a t a section should be allo tted to [d a ho \\ Ome n a lo ne. t\ ccordingly this sec tio n has been included in the pages of Tu..: G t-: \t of 1930, a rra nged and written in its e ntire ty by women. Inco mple te in scope as it may appear, it is a t leas t a n a tte mpt to carry out the purposes for which it was intend ed. Whe ther these purposes were jus tifi ed will be evid enced by the interes t sho wn in its perpetuation and conseque nt expansion. T u E E orTon.

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P age 265


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T he Associated Women Students of the University of [daho is orga nized for t he control of all matters of special interest to the women students. J t offers helpfu l fe llowship, develops a feeling of mutual responsibi lity, and fosters a spirit of unity and lo )'alty among the women of the University. It sponsors the Big Sister Movem ent to bring the women in the U ni versity in closer contact witb new students, and also maintains a student loan fund.

l'ugc 266


It was nearly mit/nit<' and nut a man

Decoration Chairman Publicity Chairman Booth Clw iruum J\,fa sic Chairman Hall Chairman Program Chairmun

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A USTA \\' III TE VALETTA L'lfERISSON MAHJORIE G RIH' ITH LOI S FREDRI CKSON ESTHEI\ JOHNSTON VIRCIN I A Li!:I C II

The annual no-men dance was a great success, even though the fair co-eds could not evade entirely the pursuit of those daring men who came in through the second story windows, the basement, and the main entrance of the Women 's Gymnasium, on the night of October 26. The men still further pestered them b y tampering with the lighting system when the dance was in progress, but the girls were undaunted; they danced by candlelight until the lights were repaired. Eleonor Me Leod and Maude Galloway took the prizes for the b est-looking costumes, while the garbs of Grace Eldridge and J essie Hutchinson were deemed the cleverest. The judges were Mrs. F . J. Kelly, Mrs. J. H. Einhouse, and Miss Elizabeth Johnson. Johnnie Soden's orchestra, dressed in " little kid" outfits- sunbonnets, socks and calico- provided the music. During intermission stunts were presented b y Alpha Phi, Alpha Chi Omega, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Fot:ney Hall, Kappa Alpha Theta, Delta Gamma, Delta D elta Delta, Hays Hall, Gamma Phi Beta, and Pi Beta Phi. The Co-ed Prom is an annual event prompted b y the Associated Women Students and this year was under the supervision of Violet Bohman as General Chairman.

Page 267


'/'ftc M.uypolt· Vance

Da nces to t ypify the struggle of t he :,casons before t he com ing of t he ge ntle M ay ushered in Ruth St ory as .May Queen a t the t wen tieth a nnual May Fe te on May 21, 1929. "Grcatforr'l' of thl' mip,ltty u·iml.~ of tin• \ortlt, Strup.p.liug u·ith II iutl'r's ltoury IIWtlf', Usltcr i11 crystolli111' jla/o('s of suou· To buffet about tilltlw \orth Wi11ds tmtw. For the ray.~ of the Su11, !Jrillia11t am/ warm, Causl' tlte furies to tiJ(•al.·l'n and tlii'A uti l'artlt is calmed as sl'rl'tle cuul cool, Tlw lr ('St rnuds lazily frolic by. But worhl without c/l(ltlfl,(' tmuhl monotou_y lw A ml SI)Otl the placill rr l'~t Winds cou~·r . ls tlw c.rdonic whir/u•i11ds from thl' l~a~t Brill(!. 011 tltc rain of 1111 lpril Sltouv•r, Tltc•u Sl~fl, fh•e<:r c:/oud.~ ar(' lightly tosst•d IJ_y ztlllt_yrs of the. Soutlr so gny; A ml lot'l' .Y flowers jow tl11• tltroug To p,n•t•t the bcautcou~ Qut'l'll of May ."

Foll ow ing the precedent of t he yea r hdore, t he Queen, Ru th Story, and her a tte nd a nts, M arylou Craven, M aid of ll o nor, and M arga ret Benham , Page, W<'re a par t of the pagea nt itself, b eing heral ded in as the Re turn of Spring. T he Processional of Senior Women, dressed in bright spri ng dresses "hich livened the scene, was followed by the selection of new pledges to \1ortar Boa rd and Sil ver Lance. Under the directio n o( M iss L. J anettc Wir t a nd Mrs. Florence Richardson Goff, the pagea n t, M a) pole dances, a nd dain t) cos tumes were made possible. M iss Wir t was assisted in direction by Ar thur E nsig n and D an l\l cGrath .

Page 268


A scene f rom tl1 e Dan ce Festival

Five main movem ents in colorful and varied interpretations were featured in the annual Dance F estival of W.A.A., presented in the University Auditorium early in the spring. An appropriate opening, ..The Gold and Silver Waltz," was carried out in those colors and was dedicated to Idaho. Interpretive dances taking a girl from the cradle to death were included in " A Short Cycle of Life." Miss Alvina Palmquist sang Schubert's .. D eath a nd the Maiden," making that dance more vivid. One of the loveliest dances of the festival, ~ ~Despair , Supplication and Hope," was in the way of an experimentation with different stage levels as introduced b y the Russian Art Theater. Moods of Gaiet y was the fourth movem ent and included "Sea Gulls," which was so popular last year. A violin solo b y Ruth Newhouse t ypified the light mood of the dance. "Come to t he Fair" was the them e movement of the festival, based on E asthope Martin's song of that name, sung b y Louise Morley. The scene included j est ers, country dancers, beggars, jockeys, clowns- in fact everything fr om ~~ The Old Gray Mare," which was a hit of the evening, to the girl waiting for " Johnny So Long at the Fair." Major parts were taken b y Joan Harris, J essie Hutchinson, Lilly Louis, H elen Mains, Velma M yers, Alice N ash, Beth Wood, Bess Louise Hogg, Ber yl Davis, Susan Malcolm, Mildred Richardson, Zelma Waller, Ilah Harris, Bertha Moore, Verona Wolff, Florence Rudger, Vivian and J ean Edmiston, Lois and Caryl Thompson, H elen Benson, Kathryn Collins, and Edna Gord. Miss Lillian Wirt arranged and directed the performance. Lois Porterfield, general chairman, aided by Dorothy Janssen, Maxine Thornhill, Velma M yers, Geneva Hand y, H elen Mains, La Vernon Thomas, Lillian Woodworth, Shirley Cunningham and Kathryn West , managed the production.

P age 269


Lillie

Axtell

"'uudn'Ortlt

JJI'arm

The Women's Athletic Association is an organization\\ hich includes all the women on the ca mpus'\ ho have b een sufficiently intcrcstrd in athletics to win membership in the club. It furthers good sportsmanship and fellowship among women and promotes interest in all the various sports. O.F.FICEHS

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Recording Secretary Reporter

JE SS IE LITTLE J>nU IH ,NCI> H ARY M11.on~:o AX'I' I>LI.

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Page 271


1930 II "omen 's " 1" Club

The Women's .. 1" Club \\as orga nized on the Idaho campus March 12, 1928, "ith t welve me mbers. Since then the organization has been active and has gone far t o carry out the id eals of sportsmanship which the t welve founders sponsored. One of the proj ects that the girls furth er is that of interesting girls ye t in high schools throug hout the state in general sports and in the Women's Athle tic Association, so they will he prepared to take part in these activities when they enter the Universit) . For membership in this organization it is necessary for a girl to earn eight hundred points, \\hi ch entitles her to the " l " S\\ Catcr award. An tt l " blanket is an exce ptional a'\ ard and is given to a girl who has the distinction of winning sixteen hundred points. Last year t wo girls were awarded t'l " blankets and this year Lillian Woodworth and Alta Tupper, both seniors, received this honor. The <tJ" Club, assisted b y members of the \V omen 's Athletic Association, sold rdrcshm ents at the football games early in the season. \Vith the pooled profits a club room " as furni shed in th e women's gy mnasium. This club room will se n <' not onl) as a mee ting room for the two organizations, but as a store room for records and properties. M embers of the club are: Lillian Woodworth , president; Florence Skinner, treasurer; Marylou Craven, secre tary; Doroth y Neal, Jessie Littl e, Dorothy Kicnholz, Florence Skinner, Alta Tupper, Charlotte Le fever, and S hirley Cunningham. ln addition to these members there are six girls who received sweaters the second se mest er and \\ ho arc in order for membership. Th ey arc Lois Porterfield, Florence Hudger, Mildred htcll, Hazel S tellmon, Prudence Rah y, and Helene Hilfiker.

l'ug(' 272


SophomorP Champio11ship T('(Inl

V()LLI:~I3ALL

Volleyball season had a bigger send-off this ) ear than it ever had before when almost one hundred girls started regular pra c tice under the coachin g of VI iss Verna McDonald and Shirley Cunningham, manager . Volleyball is one of the first major sports beginning in the fall, and when there is such enthusiastic response, it alwa ys indicates an exceptional year for the o th er sports. It is always difficult to choose t eams, especiall y in the freshman and sophomore classes, due to the large t urnouts. F irst tea ms were chosen for each class and additional second tea ms for the freshmen a nd sophomores. One girl in each class was chosen captain and assisted in the selection of the other members of the team. The games this )Car were unusually close, a tie resulting at the end ofthe tourna ment between the sophomore and junior tea ms. The decision was given to the sophomores b eca use their average score was slightly higher than that of the juniors. The sophomore t ea m also showed better team work than any other group in the tournament. The second teams had an exciting tournament of their own, and displayed excellent class spirit. Volleyball tournaments in the future will show much improvement if the present plans in regard to a longer practice period after the selection of teams are followed. Better team work wi ll be the result of a period of team practice before a tournament. Members of the winning sophomore tea m are: Maxine Thornhill, captain; Bess Louise Hogg, Lois Porterfield, Grace Warren, Dolores Holmes, a nd Joan Harris; substitutes, Helen Mouat and P earl Walters. Vfembers and substitutes of this t eam received one hundred and twenty -five points toward a W.A.A. award.

PagP 273


Freshrnall Cltampionsltip Team

For the first time in fiv e years the freshman basketball t eam defeated all comers and took the 1930 championship in the W.A.A. tournament. One hundred and thirty -fiv e girls turned out for basketball, out of which number sixty-five received W .A.A. points for steady attendance. Basketball, which is a major sport, entitled the m embers of the freshman t eam to twenty-five points in addition to the one hundred given to all member s of first t eams. This year an innovation was introduced in the red and yellow j ersics worn by m embers of competing groups in order to distinguish their respective t eams. There were three frosh t eams, two sophomore teams, one junior team, and one senior team. The second t eam s vied with the first teams in the excitement aroused. Members of the winning freshman team are: Rhoda Swayne, captain; Mary Louise Hull, Louise Mulliner, Evelyn Shoemaker, Ethel Tobey, Mildred Richardson; Betty Merriam and Mildred Patterson, substitutes. The members of the freshman team could feel justly proud, because they defeated the Class of '30, which has b een the championship team for the past three years. Miss Verna McDonald, with the assistance of Velma Myers, basketba1l manager, coached and refereed the t eam s. Idaho entered the World Free Throw Contest again this year. The six girls in the senior division who received fifty points for highest scores were: Marjorie Throckmorton, Bernice Schwerfield, H elen Mouat, Lillian Woodworth, Alma Johnson, and Mildred Axtell. The highest five in the intermediate division received twenty-five points. These girls were Evelyn Shoemaker, Lois Thompson , Aurrel Laxton, Eva Skinner, and Lois Porterfield.

Page 274


Junior Clrampionslrip TÂŤml

Baseball is fa st becoming one of the most popular sports, judging from the large number who turned out for this sport last spring. The junior t ea m, after a difficult season, emerged victorious to win the 1929 championship. D espite the loss of their st ellar pitcher, La Re ta Beeson, just before the tournament, the juniors were undismayed. They immediately selected another pitcher and played their schedule through. The se niors were the first to fall be fore the onslau ght and the sophomore t eam was next to be numbered a mong the va nquished. Thr hardest conflict of the tournament'\ as enacted when the freshman and junior tea ms met. Both were s trong nines and had been undefea ted up to that time. The game was fast and exciting. At the end of the regular innings the score was tied, and it was n ecessary to play two additional innings b efore the juniors finally pushed ahead to win the tournament and the ti tie. Each year the baseball tournament is played on the University ca mpus, and because it is one of the few major sports '\ hich takes place outdoors, i l is one of the most popular and has an unusually large turnout. While some of the other class t eam s showed individual performances that were unusuall y good, it was through the well knit t eam-work of the juniors that they showed their superiority. The 1929 championship team was composed of H elene Hilfiker , captain; Florence Skinner, Lillian \Voodworth, Bea trice Stalker, J essie Little, Doroth y Kienholz, Velma \1yers, Marjorie Throckmorton, Dorothy Sage, Margare t Fowler; Sarah Allison and H elen H eimsoth, substitutes.

Page 275


1930 Women's Rifle Team

The Girls' Rifle T eam completed a most successful season by winning th e majority of its matches. For this excellent record they are indebted to the coaching of Major F. L. Fuller and Lieutenant J. W. Sheehy. Major Fuller , who is leaving Idaho this year, bas done so much in his several years of coaching the Girls' Rifle T eam that his departure is regretted by all. The girls especially distinguished themselves this season b y vanquishing the men 's t eam in the annual match b etween them. The boys gallantly paid the penalty by treating th e girls to a dinner at the Blue Bucket. The high t eam scores for the year were those of Alta Tupper, Lillian Woodworth, Dorothy Perkins, Zoa Shaw, H elene Hilfiker, Lucile Glindeman, Kathryn West , Marjorie Weber, Esther Rae, and Isabel Lange. Each o拢 these girls received one hundred points toward W.A.A. H elene Hilfiker was general manager of the team and Isabel Lange manager of the fre shman t eam. /(/ulw

Page 276

lllnho

OppniS.

952 917 U niversity of Wichita U niversity of Nebraska 953 926 Southern California 581 577 U niversity of Nevad a 486 481 U niversity of Maine 1908 1892 . D efault to J daho U niversity of K a nsas 488 481 U niversity of Cali fornia 路 B oys' a nd Girls' Match 775 774

Un iversity of So. Dakota Michigan S tate College Washington State College Carnegie Tech University of Missouri Maine Freshman U ni versity of Maryland U niv ersity of Louisia na -

-

Opprrts.

947 947 949 958 485 486 490 494 962 965 478 4-85 488 494 1857 1957


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Vtil 131:T.£\. 1\A.VV.£\. Founded at Trilliam ""d Uary C()l/ege December 5, 1776 A/ph" Chapter of Idaho In stalled Ju ne .5. 1926

OFFICERS

H \I. I'll I£ L ~TER f.'\ R m.;n

J>rt>sidenl I ice- Presidt>nt ecretary Treasurer

El)\\ \JtJ) FILES ~·\SO'\ FniWERIC ConsE C1n ltell

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FACULTY MEMBERS

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HER'fA GENE'' IH .BEilTSO"i

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Page 280

.JouN Du~L\S

'29

GALLET,

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Wt tFRim M Er.c \ltD, ':\0 1'110\tSON, '30 lT ELE


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CQOII

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OFFICEHS l·'i rst Sem('St('r Eo\\ \liD P ot LTO:-i

Second Presidnrt 1 ici!-Pn•sitlt•llt SI!Cr('(ary Treasurer

J\

\ 1.1. 1:-!1' 'oSSEN CEOIIIC o'EASL)t

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DEAN

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ROBERT ST. C l. \111 MURTHA CLi r\P.

Sergl'llllt-ltt·A n11s

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DAII\\11\ BtiiGIIt-:R FR\1\K. \\I!'.ZM. EII CEDRI C D. E \Sl \1

FA CULTY MEMBERS Ctt AW~OII O

Cot..

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C 111uSMAN

GEORGE TlORTON

]I~SS ~: B UC IT ANAN

STUDENT M I•:M BERS ED \\ A ilO P OtJI.T()N OAR\\ I N BUIIGII IW A LDO'I T\1.1.

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K ENNRTII O'LEARY \\ AYNE B LAIII II \llliY \\ \I.OEN ]Es'l EGtllliO I. \

Cn \lll.E" Gtt \llliLL II \IHIJ.I) C\RI.SO'o lh .,..,1U .1. H '" o H .L

"Serving I Live" 13Iue Key is an hon or·ary fraternity formed on the basis of service Lo the University and to students, and is composed of onl y those upperclassmen who especiall y excel in leadership, campus activities, scholarship and personality. It ' vas founded at the University of Florida in 1924 and the Idaho Chapter was installed in May, 1925. The Student Handbook, published at the beginning of the year, was a distinct improvem ent over form er issues. All arrangements for Homeco ming were again undertaken by Blue Key 'dth decided success. Plans whereby new students were induced to enroll in Lhe University and also plans whereby the advertisement of the University could be extended were formulated and executed.

Page 281


Wa"'

Davi~o11

Rat~da/1

Zaricl.:

Rrou··n

Poultutl

Crou

VoJ/ot!/1

Vti I 4.LVti4. ()I:LT 4. OFFl CERS

1 ustice

Eo" ARO RlSSELL

I ice-} usti('l' Clerk

E. Pout.TON

s. RANO\LL

FRANK 11 . DAnSON n ooeaT A. ZAtHC:K

'f rl'tiSttrt•r

FACULTY MEMBER S DE\1'1 WM. E. MASTERSON

Pao•'. \~· "·

RoBERT BaowN E DWARD CROSS FRANK H . DAVISON

Eucsr-.E

II. PITnt \N

PROF. BERT IIOPKI'IS

ST UDENT MEM 13ERS \~

\RE

EowAno Pou1.TON

Russ ELL S. R \NDALL n ouEIIT VOSII I?.I. L

RoaEnT A. Z \IIICK

V hi Alp ha Delta is a na tional honorary professional law fratern ity which was fou nded at Iorthwestern U niversity in 1902. Its membership is limited to students in accred ited law schools whose work b as b een particularly outs tanding. The chapters arc named after distinguished law) ers and j urists throughout t he cou n try, t he Ida ho chapter being Kent C hap ter, install ed on th e campus in 19 14.

Page 2112


fu/1

lf'au.•t'J

OFFJCE H S OLIVKII E:we C L EMEN'r Au1.T GEO II C K J O II I\S()N AusT I N Su MM E II :l li AII OLil WA'I'EIIS

Chancellor Censor Scribe Ch ron i clt•r Treasurer DEAN E. J. I OOINGS PnoF. C. W. ll uNCEIIFOR O J>RoF. C. \~ . HI CK \IAN P no•' · P. MAGNUSON Pno•·· P . A. EKE PI\OF. G. ANOERSON

n.

c.

FACULTY MEMBEHS F . E. Moone H . PIERCF. A . M. Sow o En EARL B LOOGETT EocAn NEAl. H. llANSKI\ \'\'."YNE Beven

w.

c.

D t·:AN F. G. J\I II. LEII 1'1101-'. C. C. Y I NCKNT Pnot'. J , E. Nononv Pno•·· C. A. MICIIAELS J>no•·· C. W. \\ AKELAI\ 0 Geon cE Scuu. Lt NG

STUDENT ME.\lBEllS GEOitGE ]OIINSO'i l\1 \RSII \1.1. S m Tu J our-. S\'\O\I E1 eR

HARO LD Vi' ATERS OLIVER ESPE AUSTI N SU\1\IER:.

CI. E\1 EI\T 1\ l LT KEI\1\ETII 1'1•.\TT i'\IIOIK Gl STU' SO'i

Alph a Zeta is an honorary agricultural fra ternity founded at Ohio State in 1897. The Idaho chapter was installed in May, 1920. Its purpose is the promotion of higher scholarship, leadership and coopera tion a mong the students of the College of Agricultu re. Members are selected from those s t udents having complet ed three semes ters of academic work on the basis of their scholarship and leadership .

Page 283


/Iogue

1·urner

} 'ouul(

1/ale

Slaughter

Swull\*r

IJiair

llill

L. Reiniger

lie IIi/lito Jrinul..,JT'. ReiniEt« CruybiU

Vick Jlarri:\

4LVti4 I\4V V 4

Filseth

V §l

OFFICERS

First Semesll!r JonN GLAS E F. McMILLIN W. REI NICER WAYNE BLAIR

.')(•("()/1(/ S"III('Slf"l"

Pr!'sid!'nt Vici'-Prl'sidt•llt Secretary 7'reasurer

L1.0) I) I)A \'IS

,V. S I, At JGHTgn \\'u •..-ono

You

'G

K I~ NNETII DI C h.

FACULTY MEMBERS DEA N RALPH H. FARMER

II.

L.

M All S IIA I. I,

\\'. J.

WH. OE

STUDENT MEMB ERS SEN IOR S LLOYD DAVIS FnA "~K McM I LLI N

FRANK WINZELER DENNY Hoc uE

GLEt\1\ SnERN \\ \LOEN REI N I CER LEO"'ARO REit\ JC ER

TATIU'I ScoTT LEO'i-\RO HILL DOL CLAS BR.\OSIIA w

]OliN G I.AS t: A1.u :" STOll ASSE it

J ot: TLRt\ Elt

JL:\IORS

W \\ '\ E 81, \lll K Et\i'\ J;T IJ DI Ch. ' ' 1u·ono

Yot "<:

Cu\nL.,;s Gn\YBILl. RoB ERT llo LoE" " \LTER SL .- \CCIITEil

SOP IIO\IOilES JosEPH F tLSETn

Eo11 \no IJA. Iuu s

ST \'ITO 'I H ALE

Alpha Kappa Psi, Alpha Kappa C hapter, was ins talled at Tdaho in 1923 as the t hi rty-thi rd chapter of a n ational professio na l com merce frate rnit y. The national was fo unded in 1904 at New York University, School of Commerce.

Pag<' 284


Kell<>y

)oh11SOt'

Miller

McCoy

IVaylaud

Donlon

Travis

Conrc.:ay IP'erncr

Ott'CilS

Kalousch Vance

O .F Fl CE R S

President Vice-President Secretary-T reasurer Historian

DEA N P. KELLEY WAYNE I. TR AVI S WAYNE A. McCoY H AROLD T. NELSON

FACULTY MEMBERS DEAN J. C . C R AW F O RD PRo•·EssoR J. H. JoH NSON PROFESSOR H. F. GAUSS

c.

L. CA D Y J. E. B uC H ANAN JOH N W. liOW AIW

STUDENT MEMBERS HAROLD T. NELSON FRED M. JOHNSON WAYNE A . McCoY PAUL E. WERNER

JosEPH G. LANCASTER WA YN E I. TR AVI S D EAN P. K ELL EY GEORGE L. KALOUSEK

H ARR Y S . OwENS E DGAR H. NEAL LESLIE R. ANC!> Joii N E. DoNLON

v

GEORC E \ V. M t LLEil J AM E S H. WAYLAND C LAR ENCE CONWAY

~igma Tau is a national honorary engineering fraternity founded at the Universit y of Nebraska in 1904. Rho Chapter was installed at Idaho in 1922. Its purpose is to recognize scholarship and professional attainment in engineering. Members are selected from the junior and senior classes in the engineering and mines schools, their selection being based upon scholarship, practicality and sociability .

Page 285


Saunders Slau ghter

Melgartl Ewing

1-lern(lon A clams

Dairtl Hunter

Huber O'Leary

OFFI CE RS

President Vice-President Secretary -Treasurer

STU DEN T GEORGE HUllER JOHN EWING \VALTER S LAUG HTER JuLIA H UN TER 0RVr LT. E BAIRD

GEORGE HUBER JouN Ewr NC \VAI. T E R SLAUCHTt;R

M EM BERS THELM A MELGAR() KENNETH O ' L!i:AR'i CONWAY ADAMS EVERETT SANDEII S CHARl- E S HERNDON

()elta Sigma Rho, national honorary forensic fraternit y, was installed on this campus as the Idaho Chapter in May, 1927. It was founded at Chicago in 1906. Those persons only are admitted to membership who have represented their university in a speaking capacity in an intercollegiate forensic cont est and who possess greater than average forensic education, training and experience.

Page 286


C/.,rk

Fredrickson

Becker

Gloosor&

New/rouse

J<amstcdt

OFFICERS

President Vice-Presi(lent Correspondirtg Secretary Recording Secretary Treasurer Editor

DoROTH Y F n EontCKSON LAURA CLARK RuTH NEwHousE AGNES RAMSTEDT MARGARET BECKEL{ GLADYS GLEASON

FACULTY MEMBERS MAUDE GAR NETT

LuCILE RAMSTEDT

ISABELLE CLAUK

STUDENT MEMBERS DOROTHY FREDRICKSON RuTH NEwHousE DoROTHY MEssENGER ELIZABETH GIUIOUE

LOIS THOMPSON GRACE JAIN WICKS LAURA CLARK MARGA R ET 'BECKER

GLADYS Gl>EASON MARGUERITE MCMAHAN AG ES RAlt STEOT V I OLA OLIVER

ยงigma Alpha Iota was installed at Idaho June 3, 1924, as Sigma Zeta Chapter of the oldest national honorary strictly musical fraternity, founded at the University of Michigan in 1904. The purpose of this sorority is to give moral and material aid to its members, to promote and dignify the musical profession, to establish and maintain friendly relations between musicians and music schools, and to further the development of music in America.

Page 287


Nonini

Fu11u

Snook

OFFICERS

Presitle11t

Viet'· President

~~~cretary

'1 rca surer

JewELL L. llo ux FRANCIS NONIN I \VAYNE SNOOK NICHOLAS FAT'l'U

FACULTY DsA ) A \I ES F. MEsSENGER DR. R AY \IO NO i\1. 1\lOSHt:R

v.

l\lEJ\1 BERS

DAVID WARREN CooK

DR. RAr.r•ll D. RussELL PRo~·. \\. \\ AYNE S mTII

STUDENT MEMBEHS GusT E. AonAIIAMSON GeORGE CenvRNY ·rc n O L\ S FATTU ]A3IES K. Ar. r. eN ]OSEPII A USTI • Tll0)1ASON L AWRE!\CI! C n ,"roERLAIN

n.

JEwELL LLOYD ll oux LonE HuGnEs W\Y'iE SNOOK TEO CORRELL H AnOLD KrRK LI • WALTBit PrtiCE

ll O IIEIIT F. GIIEEN TII0\1 \S R . CROSON JLHt O I.I> F . DowNEY Pllll. IP MANNING \\'rLI. I\\1 S. STA ' BERRY FRAr-c•s V. No . , · r

c.

1\appa D ella Pi is a national honorary ed uca tional fraternity founded at the University of Illinois in 1911. The ldaho chapter was installed June 1, 1928. The purpose of Kappa D elta Pi is to encourage in its m embers a hig her degree of consecration to social service by: first, fo stering high professional and scholarship standards during a period of preparation for t eaching, and second, to recognize out tanding service in the field of education. To this end it hall maintain the highest educational ideals and shall foster fellowship, scholar hip and achievement in the field of educat ion.

Page 288


West

Shears

Vlll Clll

Simmons

Tll~T4.

O FFIC ERS

President Vice-Presitlent Secretary Treasurer

DoROTHY S nEAu s OLIV E NEWMAN K ATJJR YN WEST D o noTHY S utMONS

HON OR A RY MEMB E U E LL E N llE I E R SO N

S TUDE N T M AY MOS MA N CATHERI N E Y OR K MILDRED C ARLSON DoROTHY KIENHO LZ LILLI E G A LLACH E R

ME MB E R S

K ATH ERI N E MI K KELSON A LI CE O ' H ARA DoROTHY S IMMO Ns PR UD ENCE R ABY

DouoTHY S HEAUS O LIVE NEWMAN K ATIIItY N ' V EST E LLA M AE M cA LLIST EU I NA P ETERSO N

Vm Chi Theta is a national honorary business fraternity for women found ed in 1924. Pi Chapter was installed on this campus June 5, 1926. The purpose of the fraternity is to fost er high ideals for women in business carrers, to encourage fraternity and cooperation among women preparing for such careers, and to stimulate the spirit of sacrifice to the attainment of such ends. The fraternity offers each year a key award on the basis of scholarship, activities and leadership to the woman student in the School of Business who at the end of her junior year is b est able to meet these requirements. Page 289


Taylur

_K err

Colluu..'ily

OFF I C ER S

President Secretary -T reasu rer Rep orter

S T UDENT

H E LEN KEHR CAT HJ>RI NE CALLA WAY E LIZA BE TH T A YLOR

MEM B E R S

H E L EN K ERR KATHERI N E M ATTES HAZEL SI MON DS

S HIR LEY CUNN ING HAM MAR Y l\1 U RPIIY

E LIZA BE TH T AY LOU

L uc iE W oM ACK

VIU G I N I A GR ANT WILLIA MS CATHERI N E C ALLA WAY ELSI E W AR 31

P LEDGES

T beta Sigma, local honorary journalism fraternity

LI N N C owG ILL

for women, was organized on the Idaho campus in 1927, with the purpose of creating interest in journalism as a profession among the women at Idaho. Qualifications for Theta Sigma are a major or minor in journalism, and at least three semesters' work on the Idaho Argonaut. E very year Theta Sigma sponsors a banquet, having for the speaker of the day some successful woman journalist who speaks on her experiences in the field. Theta Sigma offers a silver loving cup each year to the girls of an Idaho high school who edit, by them selves, the best paper. This contest stimulates interest in high school journalism for women throughout the state. The school winning the cup for the third consecutive time will take p ermanent possession of it.

P age 290


Krumme•

XI Slf3M4 V I OFFICER S Forester \'t' ILLI AM KR UM\IES Associate Forester ARTII Utt M . B uCKINC II A" Secretary-Fiscal Agent GeoRGE T. CAttiN Ranger R usse t.r. K. L eBA RRON

F ACULTY MEMBERS DEAN F. G. MILLER EIIWIN G. WIESEIIUEGEL

AnTuun M. BucKINGIIAl\1 H OWA RD J. SARGEANT R usse u . K. LEBA RRO N

FERDI NAN D \V. IJ AAS IS ERNEST E. Jluo..:n-r

STUDENT MEMBERS GeoncE J. GAiliN TH OMAS HARiliS

II AilllY l. NETTLETON AnTuun M . So wDEn

WILLIAM T. Ktt UMMES G..:once M. J Em SON J AMES E. SowDER

X i Sigma Pi is a national honorary forestry frat<'rnity fo unded at the Universit y of Washington in 1908. Epsilon Chapter at this institu lion was installed in 1920. The object of this fraternity is to secure and main Lain a high standard of scholarship in forest education; to work for the upbuilding of the profession of forestry; and to promote fraternal relations among earnest workers engaged in forest activities.

•Wift

Page 291


Bratlslww

EHtmd

VI

S ack""

!t1essenser

lAM13()~ Ttii:T~ OFFICERS

President Vice-President Recording Secretary Correspon<ling Secretary Treasurer

DoROTHY MESSENGER EDITH EKLUND PAULINE CLARE EDITH BRADSHAw VERA SACKETT

ASSOCIATE MEMBE R S M1ss BERNICE McCoY DR. HENRIETTA J. TROMANHAUSER Mns. DonA E. MASON M n s . JEAN GARRISON

M I SS MISS Mns. M R s.

ELLEN R EIERSON PERMEAL FRENCH Loi s R ussELL LoLA GAMBLE CLYDE

STUDENT MEMBERS MARGARET BECKER MARGARET CuDDY MYRTLE RA CU AGN E S WARLICK MRs. ALTA GARRISON

PATRICIA L EE ELVIE MAE PITTWOOD E oiTn BRADSnA w GRACE D u BOis VERA SACKETT

M a s . PEARL B LACK GENEVA HANDY ADDIE MARTIN PAULINE CLA RE DOROTHY MESSENGER

EuNICE SMITH Mns. MARGARET BoLIN MISS HELEN KERSEY Mns. NELLIE 0YLEAR I NEZ WINN

V i Lambda Theta, Phi Chapter, was installed at the University May 22? 1926. This fraternity, founded in 1917, is a national honorary educational fraternity for women. It attempts to foster professional spirit and the highest standard of scholarship and professional training; to secure and maintain an abiding interest in educational affairs, and through them, in social progress; to encourage graduate work and to stimulate resear ch in the field of education; to promote a spirit of fellowship among women in the profession of t eaching; to formulate a conception of education adapted to women, and to advocate in the educational administration of universities changes which the interests of the women students demand. PagP 292


HONORARY MEMBERS KATHEIUNE JENSEN

A DAH LEWIS

IDA lNCALLS

ACTIVE MEMBERS BEATRICE STALKER DoROTHY N EAL

E DNA R ICHARDS R u nv PooL

ARDITU MELLINCER TnEUrA PIER CE

Vhi Upsilon Omicron was installed on the University of Idaho campus in 1918 as Zeta Chapter. This organization is a national professional home economics fraternity established at the University of Minnesota in 1909, and election of members is based upon scholarship, professional attitude, personality and leadership. Its purpose is to establish and strengthen bonds of friendship in 路the school, to promote the moral and intellectual development of its members in every way possible, and to advance and promote home economics as a profession.

Page 293


1/ubburd

Par•on•

Tlil:

CUI?TAI ~

OFF I C ER S

P resident Serretary

M AIT I, ANO H uun

\Ito

GII AC.R P AII SO NS

M E MBEil S

n.

] O liN C usmr AN CT, AIII GALE

MAtTLANn liunnARn RoBERT ST. C LAIR L rLUA N \ V oonwoRTH

H Anor.n P AC.KF.II l lArmv Rouu AMN E ] OIINSON D AN M c Gn ATII BF.rtTII A M o orn:

M ARY M u nPHY L OI S K ENN EDY M rwu: FruzzeLLE C IIAilLES TTF.ttNOON

I)QIIOT IIY

Pr EH CE

T h<' Curtain is a local honorary dramatic fraternity whose members are chosen for outstanding ability as actors, directors, or pla ywritcrs. Its purpose is to further dramatic activity at the University of Idaho; to make a study of acting, play writing and play production; to establish on the campus certain ethics of the theatre; to encourage through its alumni the production of desirable amateur plays throughout Idaho.

/'age 294


Murphy

Croy

K err

OFFICERS President li Eu; N KERR Vice-Presiden t P AuL CROY Secretary-Treasurer MAnY .M unPHY

l>n. G. M. Mn.LEn

J1 ELEN V RASEY Fnâ&#x20AC;˘mA W Ht TE GuACE WtCKs PAU t, C nov

FACULTY MEMBERS ADA BunKE MAn C:A ne-r BAnn v MEMBERS HELEN KEnn AontAN DES MAn AtS Wn.LJMr BnoNSON STANT,EY STANta:nnv MARY Munpuy MAIIJOtttE Gtnn't'I'H liAZEI, SrMONDS MALCOL\1 HENFIJRW Eu10 TuoM AS

Jon N

Cusn~rAN

R UT H WRST AMNE JouNSON ELTON R ERVRS LYI, E B AILEY

W inged H elmet is a local honorary literary fraternity on the campus, organized in October, 1924. Its membership is composed of those students who have displayed marked talent in writing and it purposes to encourage creative writing, not only on the part of its members but also in the University. Last year it edited a publication 11 Under the Helmet," containing the contributions of J daho students.

Page 295


OFFICERS

Captain First Lieutenant Seconll Lieutenant First Sergeant

VtRGtL EsTEs GEORGE HUBER CIIESTER W HI TTA K ER C H AR L ES LEMOYNE

RO L L COLO NEl. C IIIII SMAN LT. Cot.. CnA wFonD MAJ On Fu Lt.F. n CAt'TA I N CnENSHAW

L I EUTENANT S u EE H Y CnESTEil WmTTAKE it CLA I R E Coi. u En C uRl S H A RMON CED RI C D'EASUM G EORGE HuBER Y lllCIL ESTES K ENNET II ]ONES "ILFil E D STAN L EY

\\'ALTER Pn t cE NAT CoNGDON E. H uTTROA LL WA LKRit

J AllES l\lcQ ADR REYNOLD ~ELSO"' JACK DoDo HA ROLD STOWEJ.J,

C HA IH.ES LEMOYNE KENNETH O'LEARY R OY 'PLUMLEE FRANK SMU I N

PLEDGES

c.

EDWA R D D ouGLAS CnAitLES HERNDON JonN CnoY KENNETH DtCK

BERNAilD LEliP V 1NI G T n O\IPSOI'i GRoneR SwtNDA\IAN RAY KELL E Y

T he Nat ional Societ y of Scabbard an d Blade, HB" Company, Sixth R egiment of t he national honorary military f raternity, was inst alled on the I daho campus in 1925. The national organization, con isting of a number of regiments wit h approximately seventy compa nies, was fou nded at t he University of Wisconsin in 1901.

Page 296


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS DE AN A.

w. FAIIIIENWALD

ALFIIRD L. ANOEIISON

S T U DE NT M EM BER S

TnoMAs

rr.

HIT E HAROLD E. LE E Fwvo E. ALBERTSON HERBERT Jl . S II OOK

EDCAit D. SLATE ]OllN D. ICIIOLSON L ESLIE R . \ NCR

v

liAit O LD D. CA RLSON CAn T, J\1. Orce ANI>IIE\\ II. TIIO)JSON Jou T. CAn r>E ' TER

ยงigma Gamma Epsilon was installed at Idaho May 27, 1929, as P si Chapter. The organization is a national professional mining fraternity founded at the University of Kansas in 1915. This fraternity has for its object the social, scholastic, and scientific advancement of its member . Members are select ed from t he men of the junior and senior classes taking major work in mining, m etallurgy or geology.

Page 297


I~T~I)C()LL ~f3 14T~ l\~lf3tiTS OFFI CERS

llonorabll' /)ulw Royal S f'ribf• Chancellor of l·:xf'hl'qner

S T UAIIT KuJII A LL STA T ON l l AT, E AM LIIIOSF. A D AM S

i\tF.~lBERS SO PIIO\IORES PAIIKER W I CK Wl llR DONAU) EQUA L S K ENN ETH F u u .F.n GEOIIGE Gn \Y

FRANK Jl o s owETZ } AY KENDIIICK WARtt EN McDA 1F.r. Jon M d )o A t.D

DALENR llAII.RY B uo H ALL \V JNFR ED ] AN SS R JonN Ke sTe l!

CLYDR Jou NSO N J A CK , IJTCII 11 1.1. ALBEII 'l' PRNf:R JAMEs Powrf:ous

Mun~:.vN M c CALL } ACK MOII CAN BA Sir. M1t.es Rou t·a cT Mo0111~

WA J, I.A C E PIERCE MAUIIJ C f : SC II ALL E Jt Gonoo S1· Rn NK R G u :NN S mTu

FRRSII\IE'\ LLOYD RRF.D

R ouK w r SRssroN s

R onKnT T owr. l! GENE

\Vu.cox

R EED M U RDOCK EnN RST VA UC II N Nto:we u . C n AN DL Ell EuGENE Sco·r-r

T he Intercollegiate Knight organization is a national honorary service fraternity for freshman and sophomore men founded at the University of Washington. The Idaho chapter is known as the BaH and Chain C hapter and was ins talled in May, 1922.

PaRe 298


OFFICERS

Honorable Duke Royal Scribe Chancellor of Exchequer

STUART KIMBALL STANTON HALE AMBROSE ADAl\f S

MEMBERS SOPIIOl\fORES PARKER WICKWIRE DoNALD EQUALS KENNETH FuLLER GEORGE GRAY

FRANK I-loNsowETz JAY KENDRICK 'VARREN McDANIEL .TonN M c DoNALD

DALENE BATLEY Bun HALL WINFRED JAN SS EN JoHN KEsTER

CLYDE .TonNSON JAC K MITCHELL ALBERT PEN C E ]AllfES PoRTEOus

MuRLYN McCALL .TACK MoRGAN BAsiL MILES RoBERT MooRE

'V ALLACE PIERCE MAURICE ScHALLER GORDON STERNKE GLENN SllfTTII

FRESIIllfEN LLOYD REED ROBERT SES SION S RoBERT TowLE GENE WILCOX

REED MURDOCK ERNEST VAUGHN NEWELL CHANDLER EuGENE ScoTT

T he Intercollegiate Knight organization is a national honorary service fraternity for freshman and sophomore men founded at the University of Washington. The Idaho chapter is known as the Ball and Chain Chapter and was installed in May, 1922.

Page 298


Tli~

1()4.ti()

svu~s

OFFICEHS

President Vice-Prcsitleut Secretary Treasurer

LINN COI\(;11, 1. )OAN ll \IHUS Lo1 s FneoniCKsoN AUSTA \\HIT!>

l~ACU LTY ADVISEH M•ss ELLEN

n e u msoN

MEMBERS HEI, tjN Gt>OOES FnANCES LA R SON DAI SY Moone ELEANOit 13EitCLUNO J OLENE JOIIN SON BETTY "BELL

"Bess LouiSti Hocc RuTH CLAitK JOAN HARRIS RuTH CRows LtNN CowciLL PEARl, 'VALTERS

GEnTn uoe Oe ' NEY Lot s PonT en Fl ELn Fr.onA CoRKERY AuSTA W111TE E ST III'lll TIIOMPSO H UT B S IIITII

GEOIICIA T II OMAS M AllCAil ET GnouosKY KATIIEIIINE MIKKELSON MAncuEn t TE McMAlt AN Lo1 s Fneon1CKSON ESTIIEil JOHNSTON

"At Your Sen·ice" T he Spur organization is an honorary service organ ization for sophomore women founded at Montana Stat e College in 1920. The Idaho chapter, or Idaho Spurs, was installed in D ecember, 1924. Its purpose has been to promote all activities in which the student body participates and to uphold all traditions of the University.

Page 29!J


/J(18UII

Crimm

Gray~i/1

llobb

O'Leary

Sommercamp

Ol•'FI CEU Presiclent l ' icc-Presichmt ecreta ry-Treasurer

F AC LTY LEO C .HLA/'10

GE II \1, 1) Gll l\1\1

K E "\ I'IETII O' L EA IIY RALI' II li \CAN

~l EM BEU S

Jl \LI'II Jl UTCII I NSON

STU DE T 1\l Et.l BEHS GE II \I-I) G ill \UI

K E

NE'I'II O'LEA II Y

C II A III,I>i:l G II AYII II . I. Jl ALl ' ll ll AGAN P EYTO N SO \l M t: II CA " ••

D ouG LAS Bn AOSHA W R o na

1£A IIUY

~igm a D elta, local honorary physical education fr a ternity, founded in March of 1929, has as its purpose the promotion a nd encouragement of physical development among m en students in the University. M embers arc selected from sophomore, junior and senior classes on the basis of scholarship and interest in physical education.

Page 300


Newcomb

U 1nsbcrry

llwaer

l:~f3LISii

/) u,lap

l:LUI3

OFFICERS Prcsi<lent Vice-Presi<lcnt T reasurer Secretary

ZEL D A N ewco~UJ J u L I A Hu N T ER RO B ERT L ANSB E RRY L o u r s& lnB Y D u N LA P

STANDING COMM ITTE ES Books I! elf M embership Program Chimes Idaho

L UCI LE GLI N DEMA N VER A CHAN OJ, ER LILLI AN Woo owO RTII A ' DREW THOMSO N D AN M c Gn A Tn { GEORCE CERVt: N Y

The English Club, one of the first organizations on the campus, owes its success to Dr. G. M. Miller, who has been head of the English Department since 1917. The meetings of the group play an important part in creating interest in all branches of English work. The English Club has been outstanding for its initiative measures. In 1923 it founded The Blue Bucket Magazine, which is now sponsored by the A.S.U.I. The English Club Book Shelf furnishes the students "\vith current reading material. The club was fortunate enough this year in securing Sarah Truax Albert, dramatic reader, and Mr. Harold Whitehouse, Spokane architect, as guest s at meetings. Mrs. Albert read a play and Mr. Whitehouse spoke on famous European cathedrals. The English Club sponsored theatrical productions before the creation of the dramatics department. The Club cooperates with Winged Helmet in editing a year book, From Under the Helmet, in which literary contributions of the Idaho students are published. This organization includes all instructors, majors and minors in the department, as well as students who have distinguished themselves in composition, in journalism , in dramatics, and in debate.

Page 302


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Croas

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Af3 CLUI3 OFFICEUS Prl'si<lt>flt

GEORGE ]0111\S()r\

I iet>-Presideut

Secrewry

CLB\1 Br\T At 1,1' \\ ESt, tn B 01<: ~:

Treasurer

V tRC IL

Cnoss

ME\IBEHS SBN IOIIS \tr~TI" SlM\tHHM C\RH\ If \IUtAN ALf'Rt_.U <\IA\J(.IIA"'f

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JUNIORS K 1~ 1Tu EvA ""S

Anunt GuSTAtiSON A l_. ftH~ I) J A(; K~ON Ucno ... AI, KNtm C II A IH.. tu:t

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ANUUY.WS Wu.J.IAM Jo'RAIIM

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Cv.ottGK PAI~MER lfAIHH.f) SNOW

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lle' L"-"

( ;AINFORI) MIX CMf: ll. SIIA"Vt; R O oN\LD

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T he g Cl ub is composed of students in the College of Agricu lture. The purpose of this orga nization is sponsoring activities in the Agricu ltural College. The mo t important activit y of the Ag Club is the Little International, a live stock show fa shioned after the larger shows of the cou ntry. This show gives students of the Agricultural College practice in fitting, showing, and judging livestock and other agricultural products. The Idaho Agriculturist, a maga zine published b y the me mbers of the club, as well as the Ag B awl, Banque t, Smoker, and Ag-Lawyers Baske tball game are also sponsored b y this organization.

Page 303


OFFICERS C H AR L ES J. LANCEII AnT u u n BucKrNC II AM DonEN E. \Vooo wA n o llOLT FtHTC IHIAN PAuL W. AusT

Prcsirlt>11t Vicc-Pre.,ideut Secrewry· Treasurer Ranger Publicity

DE.\'1 }? .

G. 1\II LI.EII Pno•·. En lJ. J. t::TT I, RTO"\

FAC LTY .\1 E.\lBERS E. ll l , rJERT FenoJNANO

EST

E. G. \\

II\ \ S I S

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G Bll ii AHO

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KKMI'Fi' L. PRICE

GRAOLATE STUDE:r\TS I.

GEORGE

GARI ..

TnoMAS

S. 11 \KHI '4

.EDWARD

W. Wooos

STUDE T MEMBERS SE NIOH S i\R1'11UK ll UCKtl' (~ IIAM

Low•·a.•. J, F,u uum

C. L t:sJ..tK BUin'oN

l ltHt\tAN FICKP.

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T heA ocia ted Fore ters is an orga ni za tion compo ed of t he fac ulty a nd students of the c hool of Forestry. It a ims to pro mote a grea ter ac tivity and interes t within the chool towards t he fores t ry profession.

Page 304


OFF ICEU S

First Semester llOJ.!EitT OLIN llOBEUT TunOCKMOUTON JosEl'JJ LANCASTER

Secoll(l Semester President Vice-President Secretary-T reasurer

DEAN KEl.l.• EY ROBERT THRO CKMOUTO N JosEPII LANCASTER

MEMB E R S

0.

J. AGEE D. BAH. EY J. B AUMAN G. BEt.S HER BON J;HAM B. Bow1.ER E. BnA SC H BRIANS W . Bno ss A . W. BRow BROWN H. B UR NETT CA JU NS CA RLSO N E. CA R NEY N. CHA OLER G. CLA HK E. CONWAY T. Con nETT \V. CRAWFORO P. A. DAN I LSON J. DAUGHERTY A. D AV W SON J. DoNLO N FIJ.o"I ELI) J. FLY NN C . F nAZJEn

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c. u.

c.

W. FRIBERG M. GnEER J. G. HANNUM R. HARRIS RA RUI S E. H ATC H E. H uTTEBALL V. llAUGSE J. IIAYDEN J. HECK ATHOHN R. HoGG H. HOH N HOR ST C . H UG HES J. M. H uTC HI NSo N L. I sA KSEN A. J ACOBSEN R . JA NDA B. JON E S G. KALOUSEK W. KILLI NGS IVOitTII D. KELLEY J. KE ST ER A. KETCHEN J. KuGLER J. LANCASTJ;U W. LANCASTEit L. L ANGFOUO

s.

c.

L AUSON G. MATSEN F. MENEELY G. Mn.Len F. MORSE C. MosEn II. McB1RNEY J. McC ALL S. McCoY W. McCoY N . McG I NTY W. NEWLAND NEUMAN R. Or.tN H. OwENS R. P ANCUOUN E. P ARKBit 11. PAR SONS A . PENCE D. PETER SON L. ReED B. REI CEit G . RICE 1~. ROBJ;ItTS I. RoD EMACK C. Hoss D. R uss~; Lr.

c.

A . SACHSE

c. SAN DEH S E. SCHM IDT T. S uOW ALTJ;U

L.

R.

S~HTH

S ,u JTu

c. SN ID ER w. E. SPENCEII

u. J. STANFORD w. S TOKES V. Tno>tPSON R. TnttOCKMOUTON C .TitEN AitY L. T ucKER VON EN OE WA D E T. WAHL R. \ VAI.KE H C. \VAMSTA D ll. WAYLAN D P. 0. WEISCEUUI!:U A. WEHNEH E. WERNE II D. \VILKEilSON II. W!TTEil B. YouNc W . BunKE

c. u.

The Associated E ngineers is an organization of the faculty and the students of the College of Engineering. Its purpose is to promote engineering activities and to secure a broader understanding of engineering. Practicing engineers of prominence are secured to lecture, engineering films are shown, technical talks are given by students, and other educational features are promoted at different times.

Page 305


OFFI CE H S F I-OYO E. ALHEitTSON L ESL I E R. VANCE l h; lt i.IEU"l' SHOOK } OliN D . N I CHOLSON

Presideut Vice-Presideut TrNtsurer Secretary

A.

u.

FACULTY MF:MBE R S

w. l"AIIltl!:NWALU

F.

B.

LAN E Y

A.

L.

ANOE USON

FE L LOWS HJP STUD !~ T u o~IAS

il.

ll rn:

T

w.

STAL I!: Y

T S

liAHOLD E. L E E S T UDE

\V.

L OU I S T . A lli!: I. E

MEMBER S

SENIO itS }Oli N E. O RMA E DGAH D . S I.A T Jl; ll Biti.IERT H . S n ooK

F'LOY O E. AL.IlEUTSON At.V I N F . KllO I.l. CA itL M . DI CE \'\' ILL IA M D. LEAT ON EucENE C . JvEnSoN Jo u D. I CHOLSON

RIC H AR D H. TA Y LOU LES I.I F. R. vANCE Ro i.IERT S . WEL LS

J UNIO itS WILLI AM

D.

B .,;ssLen li AHO I,I)

D.

CA lli-SON CHA HL E S

} O li N T. CA RPBNTEil K l llTL BY

Vt: ltN O

CLAitK

G.

SOP II OMORF.S H on..:RT D. B A II. EY J os E PH K . CnBMANs

C HARLE S A. L ee R AY A. MAX F IEL D

Pu lLI P F ono R ov A. J o n soN

WA LT J.m L. O II T IIIl Y K Aill . A. SAt.SKOV

Flt l!:SII MI!: '

c.

.TO li N A\t ONSON S. K. ATK I NSON, Jn . C li ARLES N. CA tR NS F RI TZ • DAN I Et.SON EAnL E ID EM I LLER FELI X H. GORDON MAXI NE L. GoTTLI EB

G t. ~:N ITA WE CARLL. Hocu.,; HA ROLD F . H oovEn C HA it LES H . .J usTus HAL } . KELLY EMERT \V. LIN DROOS WALTE R S . LoNG TITUS N . CARTE R

F nANK M . McKI N l.F.Y R OB Eit T J. M c R AE F RED MA LCO\ISON MAllY ! 0 A. OLSON D AN I EL E . R AY MELVI N E. SACKETT NORMAN J. SATHER R AYMOND L. WRIGHT

o.

C II A HLES 0. Scocc • F RANK LYN B. S II ISSL E H H A tt O LO L. S l' llAGUE T ED SWANSON FnANK A. T H "T } AMES M . \ VAtt NER CARL M. \VESTE RBERG

w.

The Associated Miners is composed of students and fa culty in the School of Mines. Its purpose is to sponsor interest in the school and in the profession and to promote educational features for its m embers.

Page 306

""


Kienholz

Ba1eman Ewins

lns/e Spencer

Colvin Nanrolas

Dunn

OFFICERS

Director President Vice-President Treasurer Secrewry

DR. WILLIAM HI NT S EDWARD B. HILL THELMA PIERCE GER ALD INGLE LEONA BATEMA N

FACULTY ADVISERS

c. w.

DR. I. R. BOYD PROF. J. H. JOHN SON

DR. PROF.

w. WAYNE SMITH

Dn. C. W. CHENOWETH

PROF.

J. H.

C H ENOWETH

DR. WILLIAM HINT S PRO~'. E UGE N E TAYLOfl

TEACHERS JOHNSON

PROF. R.

s. SNYDE!l

The Wesley Foundation is the organization through which Methodist Episcopal students of the University do their work in the church. Religious and social life is provided in various recreations such as dramatics, music, Bible stud y and devotion. Every Friday evening the students h ave an ttAt Home" in the church recreation room. Sunday is devoted to Bible stud y at 10:00 o'clock, fellowship hour at 5:00 o'clock, devotional service at 6:00 o'clock, and the regular worship services. Four hundred students of the University are in some way a ffiliated with the church. Activities are financed by the students with the help of the Board of Education of the denomination.

Page 307


C/inP

Van. Jfa verbeke

Walker

Collier

Vos hell

Davisou

OFFI CE R S

First Semester M u n T II A C u N R F n A N K D AVI SO N A n T H U R M oon E PA TRI CK \ VA T. K F. ll

Secoml Semester Chief J ustice Associate }ustirc Clerk 1'reasurPr

JlRN ll Y VAN JlA VF. llREKE C L AIR E COLLIE!t J OH N EW TNG R O R E itT V OSH ELL

f3ench and Bar Association was organized in 1912. All students regularly enrolled in the College of Law are members. The purposes and function of the Bench and Bar Association are to cuhivate fellowship among law students; to preserve the traditions of the Law School; to promote scholarship among its m embers; to encourage a professional attitude toward the study of law; and to develop among its members those ethical standards which will make them most useful as practitioners of law. The Bench and Bar Association was largely instrumental in securing the adop tion of the ((Honor System" in the Law School. The Law School was the first school of the University of Idaho to adopt the Honor Syste m and the only school that has thus far successfully maintained it. Upon the Bench and Bar Association, in general, and upon each member thereof, in particular, rest s the duty and obligation of maintaining and enforcing this fundamental tradition of the Law School. During the year 1929-1930 Bench and Bar Association has been very instrumental in fostering interest in the College of L aw and in promoting the welfare of those registered in the law curriculum.

Page 3()8


Esurrola

Poston

St. Clair

Winzeler

OFFI CERS

Presitlent Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

FRA NK WINZELER JEss EcunllOLA ROBERT ST. CLAIR EutEn Pos1路0N

A DVISER GEOllGE E. HoRTON,

Graduate MnnagPr

STUDENT MEMBER S W ILFORD YouNG KENNETH EGBERT Sor. BRADNER

GERALD GRIM~! M RLVTN COON ItO I) V IR GIL WILSON

\VAYNE FA RLEY R oBERT G n AN'r ALOON HOF FM AN

MERCER KEnn B ,\ltTr.RTT Moss RALI'II \VA SIIUUR N

The Athletic Managers' Association was organized in May, 1928. The purpose of this organization is to bring together all athletic managers into a working unit, so that they may assist each other during the seasons of the various sports; to facilitate the handling of games; and to aid the coaches and the Graduate Manager.

'

Page 309


Richartls

Day

OFFICERS

President Viet>- President ~~cretary

1 reasu.rer

E DNA RICHARDS ANNE DAY An o iTH MELLI NGER DonoTHY OLSON

FACULTY MEMBERS Mrss KATHEHT NE JENSF.N Mrss A o A H LEwrs

Mn s. LEAH BuCHANAN M1ss M uRIEL McFAnLAND Mrss loA I NGA L LS

M r ss EuzAnETII JoH NSON Dn. ELL A Wooos

STUDENT MEMBERS VIOLET BOllMA N l\IIAUDE GALLOWAY E DNA RIC H AR D S DoROTHY 0Lso BETn Wooos Jos EPIIlNE K1 NCA IO

B ETTY BeLT. MINNIE BowER FERN SP E ' CER MARY BEYMER EsTHE R Jon NSTON RuB Y PooL VALETTA L'HERISSON SA R A H ALLISON VIRCINtA LEI G H RuTH SPY RES Lo r s FREDHICKSO • F LORE NCF. PRATT MARJORIE GRn'}'JTII

AUSTA \VIl!TE BEATRI CE STALKEH R uov B AUER MARION McGON I GLE LELA McGRATH MAXINE TnoRNIH LI.

T he Home Economics Club is an organization of all the girls enrolled in Home Economics. Its aims are to promote good fellowship among the girls and an interest in home economics work. The club is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association and is a member of the Idaho State Federation of Women's Clubs. The club has charge of the Co -ed Prom, the proceeds of which go to maintain seven fifty-dollar loans available to girls of the department. They also have charge of the bi-annual exhibit of work done by the department and of a banquet for the Northern District Home Economics Association.

Page 3l0


Craoon

York

Warner

McCinty

OFFICERS

Presillent Vice-Presitlent Secrewry Treasurer

FRANK A. WARNER DonoTuY CRAVEN C\T IIBttiNE YoRK Ott \lA ' J\lcGr NTY

STUDENT MEMBERS BETTY ASIIWOitTII REGNA CA\If>DE I . I . HAROLD COt'FIN LINN CowGru, DoROTIIY CnAVEN MARYLOU CRAVEN SmRLEY CuNNINGIIAM HELEN Do uGLAS CEDRIC D'EASUM RICHARD F.RWIN LUCI LE GLINDE\IAN HELEN l l A SON }OA N JlARRI S

MARY LoursE H ut.r. NoR~tAN McGINTY }ESSIE HuTCIItNSON N I NA New~rAN SANDY LAIDLAW GnACE PARSONS CHARLES LE MOYNE PAULINE PATERKA VIRGINIA M ACUIIlR ELWYN PETJ>R SON GeoRGE M. M1LL1Ht Lo• s RAwLs RrcnARD MooNEY KATIIERJNE Ros IIELEN MAINS WM. SnAltBERCER VIRGINIA MERRIA\1 DoROTHY SuutONS GEORCRTTA MILLER PEYTON S0\1\IRRCA\If> CoNSTANCR \1rTcuEu. CLARKR SMITH RoBERT l\lc:BIIIDE A DR EW TnO\ISO'I Gsoacs ~lcDoNu.D Fn~i\K A. WARNBR P m uP Fono

B BTTY

wILSON L uer s WOMACK BsTu WooD CATIIEtt i NE YoRK JEAN YORK }ANE MAXWELL G r.ADY S PR CR ALo&nTA EowAnos 011\IAN ALVORD LAnRs cs s~IITH Fn \1\K 1c:KrNLEY TIIO\IAS ADA\IS FnA~>K AoooTT

T he Episcopal Club is an organization composed of stud ents on the campus who belong to the Episcopal denomination.

Page 311


Conway

McCoy

~M~I:?I~~~ I~STITUT~

Ur=

~L~~TI:?I~~L ~~(71~~~1:?§ UN I VE R IT Y OF IDAHO BR A

C H

OFF ICERS Presidf'nt Vice-Preside11t Secrl'tary-'l'rNISttrer

FAC LTY J.

H.

WAYNE A. McC o v D oNA LD R . R ussELl . C L ARENCE E. CoNWAY

I E:~IB ER S

R . 11.

J O H NSON

II ULI.

STU DENT M EMBF.R S SE ' I OR S ERN EST H A T CH J O H N E. D ONLON R o B E RT W. Ou r.

Geon cE W. MILLER GRECOHY T. B E L SHER Do' \L O R . R ussELL F.R N th 'r C. B A LK OW

\'t'AYNE A. M cCo Y D EAN KELL EY H uBER T 11 \TTRUP

J UN I O R S Frt ED F.. DI CUS Jos EPn G. LANC:AST F.n J o n N L . LANC~'on o } AMES F. ME EELY ORMAN \\ • ~~ cG1 TY H \ ROLO G. D OTY

J.

R E o\I ON D P ANcno n Jou C. K uCLER

Pn t-: OE IH CK

F.

R oot-:IITS

j \CK J>. IJ ARTLI NC CI. \11~1N<:E F.. Co \ \ AY

L AU R ENC E M . SM I T H P AUL A. D AN II.SON LENNAR D • EKLUND \\ A L LAC E F. ~I CP III I.L\MEY ] 0 11 1'0 00'10\'\ DoNA LD ~I. \\ I SR\U 'I

M embership in the A.l.E.E. is composed of students regist ered in the electrical engineering curriculu m. N ational me mbership is limited to me mbers of the junior and senior classes. The organiza tion affords opportunity for the student to gain a proper perspective of engineering work b y enabling him t o b ecome acquainted with the personnel and the problem of the profe sion.

Page 3 12

""


Young!

P. Werner

Johnson

4.M~t:?IC4.~

CIVIL

llou

SUCI ~-n-' Ur=

~~C31~~~t:?S OFFL C EUS

First Sernester

Second SemestPr

LYMAN G. YouNGS PAUL E. WERNER WENDELL \VILSON

President ViC('- Presi(/ent Secr(•tary-TrPasurer

FRED M. JOHN SON RonERT JloGG PAUL E. WEttNF.ll

FACULTY M E MBERS

c.

c.

J. C \llTEII ]Oli N 11 0\\ \liD

D R\ I V\N C RAWFORD JESS E Bu c u\ NAN

STUDENT MEMB ERS S EN I OitS llAilOLO

T.

JOH N flE CKATIIOll N RoneltT Il occ

rUED JOH NSO N

NELSON

WrLLIE A. Bnoss VEIINON 1'. CA ill NS CAIIL 0. L AitSON

LAWIIENCE HANKI NS WALTEII S PENC EII ROGER P AllOZ ART IIUII WEttNEil A. Sc nwAttTZENIIAURII V 1mNON A. EATON LY\IAN G. YOUN GS

C n ARLES C. Cnoss ]OH N \\. D AUG IIERTY

CA nL C.

Geoncd E. B ,,n c r. AY RAYBUR N L. Bll i AN!! ]OliN CAII I.SON NE WF.U. B. C II AN IH.IW

A RT II Uil J. DAVIOSON FLoYD G ,,ll,u u.s Mon1u s GnEEII

n.

J. Tun oCK\IORTON WAYNE I. TRAVIS

JU N IO II S

v.

EllVIN L. \VEilNEU PA U l. E. WRttNEil WENDELL WILSON

SOPII0\1011 E S

II \T, L\' IK

C u \ S. LE i\foYNE, Jn.

F'n \NK MoR S E R 0 \1\ ' B. R A\IOS

F II RSI"IEN

c.

n.

SYDNEY II ARRI S LEi c u LINT J ,u a:s 0. McC ,\T.L

A l. llF.llT T.

PENCE ALFll F.O J, SAC H S E 1>A u r. SnJnM En C II A IILR S WA" S1'AO

Idaho Student Chapter, American Socicty of Civil Engineers, which was found ed in 1852, was installed at the University of I daho in 1926. The membership is composed of students registered in the civil engineering curriculum. The object of the society is to maintain contact with civil engineers in actual practice a nd with other engineering schools.

Page 313


M c llillin

~lou...!I

•• 1 ~~

(:L UU

O F F I CE R S \V ,\LTEII PniC:E Presidrnt l l AHOLO TOWELL Vice-Presitlent 'ecrewry· Treasurrr Fn,NK \ l c \11LL1N FO R MAL CO I M I TTEES GEORGE 11JOIIT,

Chairman

Program Committe<'

/•;nterUliument Cammitu•e

DPcorations CommilLPl'

Dn 10 \\ tK S E L\I E I\ J OH NSON

HAROLD CA RLSON Rtcll \110 T n OliAS Hucn Ou•' FY

FnEo \\'11.KIE MER RITT GnEEUNG

S T U DENT MEMBERS SE:\'IOR S \\' M. K EnS III SN IK GEonc E II JOnT DARWIN Bunc:uEn ORVJLLR !I U LT

K ENNETH B A R RETT ] A~I ES II ALLJOAY FnEo Roul'!nTSON RICHAno THOMA S

THEOOOHE } ENSE ' Fn ANK M c M1LuN Mtu·ono CoLLI NS }AMES O'Bn tEN

D AVID \\' JK S }OH N 0 11\I AN CAR L KYSELKA MEiti\ITT G lt EELI ' G

JU-.IORS \VrLLIAM Bessr.nn Gon o oN DI E H L WAt.TEII Pn1cE LE ST En KIRKPATIH CK H AUOLO STOWEL l, l i A nOt. n CA RLSON C L AI\E cR DtTTMA N HERUEII'r OwEN S H uc u D u•·•·y ll uaRnT TuO\IPSON ELMI'!II J oHNSON SOP IIO\IORES ELMER MARTIN HoWA itO B e n e J OH N CO it KERY

WALOEMAn Peoen soN R ex l lowAno

\Vest.F.Y S IIU RTLIFt' STANTON H ALE

E o wAno ll u nLEY C H A IH, ES 11 E ATII FnEo \Vu .KHl

T he ••1" Club is an organiza tio n which includes all men of the University who have been officiall y awarded a letter for participation in intercollegiate athletics, according to the provisions of the Associated Student Bod y constitution. It was formed as a common m eeting gro und for all athlete , to aid in keeping Idaho's athletics clean, to build up the University's athletic activity, and to enforce student traditions. E ach year t he ..1" Club gives a form al dance for its own members and upperclassmen. It has always b een one of the principal social events of the school year.

Page 314


Wiks

llalliday Owen~J

llcath Wilkie

Kirkpatrick O'Brien

J ensen Creeling Hjort

Hessler

Hale

M cMillin

P rice

Burgher

Sto well

Jobn&on

Kershisnik

Tho mas Ho ward

Collins Corker y K yselka

Dillman lle r~

Carl&ott

Page 315


Des iWarais

Gallagher

()~ SM~T

Callarooy

CLUI3

OFFICERS Presi1lent Vice-Presi(lent Secretary-Treasurer

GERALD DOLA N LILLIE GALLACHElt CATIIERTNE LEUTE

EXECUTIVE BOARD CA'l'HUYN CALLAWAY

Margaret B ecker Eileen B eck man William Boll J osep h Burke Willia m Cadigan Charles Coppula J ohn Cox Margaret Cuddy Leonard Di Miceli John D elo Gerald Dolan Stanley Dolan AÂŤnes Driscoll Mary F r iedman George Funke Ethlyn Gibbs Florence Graha m T heodore Grieser H ub ert Hattrup 'Vilfre(l Has{urthcr Max H en nen Tranguilino Vent ura Felipe Taaca Emiliano Francisco P ab lo Salvador M igucl Corpus Teresa Connaughton Lillie Gallagher Mary Kearns Ka t herin e K ea rns J ean H awk ins R uth Tur ner

CARL LEONARD

STUDENT MEMBERS Georgia Thomas Austa White H enry VanHavcrbeke Catherine Leute Ar t Wer ner Cat ber inc O' Brien Catherine O'Neil E r vin 'Vern er Paul Werner Margaret Steuart Susan Malcolm Violet Werner Helen Young Ralphin c R onald Mary Steele Roscoe Yo ung Rober t Zarick J ean T edford Josep hine Thompson Antonio Benliro Andres Oreiro Kathryn West Mar y Mar shall Andres Bigornia P edro F loresca Ruth Marshall Annabel Charrier H elen K earn s Kora Killion Florence Co ughlin Lilly Louis Dorot h y Olso n Vale tta L'Herisson Margar et Oud Marcella Kraemer Dolores Ha ngauer Marg_ueritc Thomctz Agnes Randa ll Jessie Dunn Ilarolu Jacobs Frances Gallet Edwar d Jarboe Frances McMonigle Alois J enny George Kalousek Julia Vallar Carl K yselka H elen Kurd y Edward Hurley Simon Morganroth J ess Egurrola AI Moser May Mosma n Joe Gilga n John Mosman George J ullion E lmer Martin Alice O'H ar a Frances Pbilipi David Sweeney Fred H olTman Maurice Schaller J erome Willia ms Thomas Shinnick

A DIUA N DES MA lt AI S

Richard Williams Fred Faires K en neth Jones Gordon Lane Earl McDonald Joe Turner Patrick Walker Ja mes Doyle Joh n Yturri Lawrence B ellinger Robert Dunn Max Eiden James K ell y J ohn Donovan Euaene Dahlke y Wa1ter Gillespie R ed mon d Pangborn George Swindarnan John Farris Herbert Hartman William K ershisnik Dan McGr ath R obert Golden Julius Hall Clyde Raid y Aubrey Arthurs Owen B uchanan Russell Jouno Kathleen Hamacher Margaret K eegan Mary Bishop J enni emae Clarke

Flora Francom~ Luella McFadden Agnes McKiern an Hazel Rodda Mary Snow Robert B row n Les ter Kirkpatrick Jerome McCoy John McDon ald Bud Metzgar J ohn O'Donnell Waide mar Ped erson Ray Assendrup Sher idan Atkinson AI Braun John Greiser Alvin Jacobso n Daniel Lopez L. Fleming B. Fleming J ack McQuade Fred Malco mson Alfred Ma t thaeus Leo Rodemack Philip Weisgerber J oe Crcmans Anthony Budd Carl Leonard Richard Miller H erman Nass Bernard Reiger Francis Kuhn

T he D eSmet Club is an organizat ion of Catholic students on the camp us. It is the purpose and endeavor of t his club to b ring ab out a friendly cooperation bet ween church and student and b etween the st udents t hemselves.

Page 316


Natrcola-3

~rupper

Gillett

Kienhol:

~VVA

Vtil CLUU

OFFJC I~ H S

S ponsor President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Editor Camlle Bt•am R ecording 'ecrt•tary

Hermu Alberts011 Sura Allison Leona Bate m an Marga ret Bolin Carrell Carter Iris Colvi n Mildr ed C reswell Mar y Darling Ruth Dun n Cynthia Daly Ruth F a nnin g Emma Everest Elizabeth Flemin g Lois Gillet t E t hel G rove Mary Gilles/lic Catherine l a11~011

Program Historian M embers/rip Social lrt ln l"itations Oetvtions

Mns.

J. II. Jou SON OoROTIIY KrENIIOLZ Lors GrLLETT ALTA TuPPER EOYTIIE NEL SON C II A IILOTTE LEFE\'Eit E DITII NANCOL AS

Clraplaiu

Dor.on ES ll or. M ES Tu E l.~tA PeAn CE GOLDI E " ' II, I. I A \I S l\1 \RJOill E TunocrotORTON R uT u TA r.ooTT HELEN M O t AT AR OAT II MOORE

Donr s S uEA

MEM B ERS B etty Myers Louise Hauck Lois Miller H elen H eimsoth Geraldine Morse Gladys H odge Edith Na ncolas Mabel H o rney Ed y th e Nelson Myrtle llare Lois llints Florence Prall Huth P ark er Ruth Johnson i\1 ildrcd Richardson Margaret King Doris Shea Dorothy Ki enholz Elizabeth Lam bdin Fern Spencer Boni t a Low Fa ye S(lencer M arjor•e S t o ne Dor othea LeMas ter Ruth S pyr es C harlotte Lefever Doroth y McFarland II uzcl S imonds Hele n Moua t Evdy u S t yner ltu t h Tulbott Lillian Mor t enso n

Cruce 'l' homu ~ M urgar<'l Thom as Mar y Turner Agnes \\ ar lick lnez \"<inn Grace \Vor ren Martha Wedin Goldie \\ illiam b Iris Colvin Ardnth Moore Thelma Peurce D olo res llolmes M argil t'<' Chris topher ll t•urietta H awkins Lu cill(' Ra m ey L ucille Guston Bert ha Schroeder

1\appa P hi is a na tional organization of university women who arc m embers of or express a preference for the Methodist Church. Its ai m is to b uild leaders for the church of tomorrow.

·wr

Page 317


i\lcCannun

EldridJl,e

Rice

J>n•sid('llt of tire 1r estm iuster Couucil St'cretary Card Catalogue !iecrewry • tdviscrs

Pn-~id r uls

/lull

L eyrer

P\ UL Rr cs "\'\' I N I F R E D Jl "' 1-:S D o ROTH Y Rr c rr \IID:sON

REv. C . .M . Dn u n v Mns . li ARVr-:Y S '" '~'" { l'vl ARK K rHTII

of the fo ur g ro ups whic h uw kc up t he club for Lhe year were " " follo ws:

First Semester fo: OWA R O "\'\' U IIR\I A'I

\ ltrnr eL LeYR ER II \ Z E t. M cC.\ N'iO'i 1' \II N .\ li ALL

/\l eu 's Class II oma11's Class Clrri.,tirlll E~~rlt'rii'Qr II t•stmiustcr Guild

Secoud St•mt•stt•r H 1-: AfWO N 1\l uRrEr. Lr-:v n e n F.LoEnT Scrr o n v GR \ CE l~ r.onrocr::

T HO \l AS

The Westmins ter Club is an orga ni za tion jn t he Firs t P resb y terian C hurch of Moscow which includes in its me mbership all of the college young people who arc m emb ers of ei t her of the college Bible classes, the Christia n E ndeavor, or t he \Ves tminst er Guild for college women. R eprc entatives from each of these activities form the W est minst er Council. The p urpo e of t he Westminster Club is to promot e study classes, discussion groups, and ocial activities for t he b ene fit of all Presb y teria n a nd Congr egational st udents on the ca mpus and others who migh t be interested. T he club seeks to t r ain young p eople for ervice in the church a nd to minister to their spiritual welfa re.

Page 318


••

I §()l2()l21TI~§

I


'f'lwmetz

II hit<>

P n•sirle11t I ic('-Prf'sidf'lll Secrc/ary -'J'n•uHlrt'r

lf'<'st

1\1 \IIGllt:R ITB '1'11 0 \fv.'l~./: Fn t:n \ \\ 11 IT F. ... \ T IIR\''\ \\EST

1\1 El\1 BER S C.:omma Phi /Jeta

1\u pflll 1/phct Th('ta

KATIIIl YN \\ t:S'I'

J3ET 1n: t. I'AC:KBNIIA\f j ,\ N t: JJ\LJ>Y

YI II G I l A Pt:cK I AHCBI.I.A KnAE\IEH

1/pha Phi

1/p/w Chi Ouwgct

L1

l'i

N

Co"~.: 11 .1.

/J('/(1

/'hi

lfEI. E" Dot c;L\S K ATIIP.Ili'\ B I \ TTE;,

Kappa Kappa Camuw l\1Afi(;U~:IIITK TIIOMt:TZ VEllA BII YANT

F1ttm \

\\ IIIT B Lt:••t:\ " E H

C 11 \Ht.o·n ·.,;

I )('//a /)efta D elta

Dun oT IIY FHt:DRICKSO'I

D oROTHY Ro usE

Dclut Ga mma

J t:SS I E

LITTLE

CoNsTANCt:

Wooos

T he Women's Pan-Hellenic Association was estab]j hed on the Idaho campus in 1912. The purpose of this organization is to regulate rna tters of common interest to the Sororities on the camp us and t o advise and fost er sorority and inter-sorority relationship.

Page 320


J. Lillie D. Frwlri&son Y. Bryan! Al. Kruemer

D.

Rou~

Y.P~

C. Wood• 8. Packmham

t-•.

Whit~

J. 1/aleyK. Wt>l

C.l4......-

v-

L.

Q,,q~i/1

If. Dous/as

M. '/"hom#"/: K. Malle>

Page 321


R. RamsiNII \furplay, llwu(l't". Su"f."i~. Thompson. rPtWr. Wf!sl, t.fag,ui~. Pari1h. Bloom \1t- \lahan. Smi1h. 1/arman. A. Ramstttdl, 8. \too~, F. &o/1. ~ immon.s, Cou·p)/1, \1f'llin#"T. VM.sey 7 .Jford. L . .lf<><>ff, RtmiJ. Co.t, Com,MI, Ronald, I an~ ,\fo/rolm, Hart, \til/or l)atil, 1\1. Scolt. Lind.Jf")'t <Miins, Edyr:«Jn .. Good1rin, Lucos, Bftl, Ru..s.&ftl. \1orroet

SOIIOit ES 1

'O IIOHf~ S

FACU I,TA'n;

1'\ U:\ 1\ EIISIT\TE SE:"ii ORS

M

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IC l ''l II

I{ UI~TEilT

lhat'IC& P\RISII C \ T II tUur\t: STEf:.~a

U uKOTII , . S utMON!:i

J UI' IO IU;

M URPU\' AHtHna \1 •-=•~u '

J Ul..IA II UNTER

\1>\tt\

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cam

SOI'IIOM OR~~

J .__\I!\

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... ~RI' ~ .. OTT "'-"nat.. R\" H\RT

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Lav~ eo~~c;ll.L

II V.I~ I '.N L UCAS IJ KtH l. D AV IS

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t\ \1"111. Kt:N GOOU\\lN ltt MNtt ll ussta.a.

I AJI~ RAWLS

SUltAN \1 ALOOL ~

ltuuHRTA

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\h t..LP.K

..: •• ~UH~T ft S MITII

\ ... , •.;s H \'ISTt~UT 'IRt.lr"' IA LHH )I At.L IIU •

f'H8Stt .Mt! N

ltt H' H VANC

Jlt:t.L

1-:u.r.." Co•.t.rNs

M " " Lou Co.<

OuttoT H\ L I NUSt; \ '

H \I, 1•111 NE HoNAa.u G.\TIIt;KtNt.: ·~·)\ V I-!AN H•·;c;NA CA Mrn~a.r. MAttGARET ScoTT

Color": Buff atod broom ,.'/ouN": l'it~l.• cornalion

Page 322


Peuce, Liu(e, V. Clwmller, Boom

Parsons, Der.t-ey, Cunningham, Larson, ]olmston, Bradshaw, rPaiters, 'Phonws, B. JJ7il&ott, JP'oodu.VJrth, Papesh, Kennt>dy

'ray/or, Leute, Ciuu, Rohrer, LeiJI,h, Steuart, Maxwell. Brosnan, 'P'()()tls, V. J\1i>rriam, Bonnell, A1oulton Simpson, O'Brien, V. JP'ilsor~, Brown, 'Eldridge. Phillips, Morsan, rPhitehou.se, Collin&, IJ7alker, Eaum, E. Chandler HUichinson, O'Neil. i>eterson, Rafter, B. Merriam

SOROltES IN FACULTATE lOA INGALLS

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE SKNIORS

KATHBRINE BBAM Vt:itA Cn:ANDLER

Beut.AB PAPESR

SntRJ.P.Y CUNNINGHAM

CATHERINE LEUTB

CoRONA

n ..::wsv

LoiS KENNEDY GLADYS PI!NC£

EOJTJl BRADSHAW

J &SSlR LITTL& Lors WAl.TBRS

BETTY WILSON

VIRGINIA l\fERRIAM

LtLLtAN WooowoRTI-r

JUtUORS GRAC& PARSONS

ESTHER MOULTON

ELIZABETH StMJ"SON

SOPROMORBS MAltY BROSNAN

F'RANCES LARSON

LOUISE ]ONES M ARCARl-:T 5Tf:UART ESTil~R JOHNSTON

CuABLO'M'E CtNN VtRGlNIA LJo:tCn FLOR&NCE ROHRER

CATHE:RlNE O'NEIL MlLLICHNT WAI.K ..:R

GRACE ELDRI.OCE JANET 1\fORGAN EUNICE PlllLLJPS lfHLSN WutTIUtOUSI-"!

INA PMTHHSON ELI ZABETII TAYI..OH

CoNSTANCe Wooos JANH M _A.XWJo:LI...

LA Vtt.RNON 'fnOMAS

FltF.SBM8N

Jh:r~F.N 'BONN ..'!LJ.. CONSTANCE LATON BHTTY MJo!tUtUM

EuzAn•:Tn BnowN

FouruliNI lll Lewis School~ Miuissi!Jpi Murch 15. 1874 Ntt Clwpler iu..,tal/1'11 SPJHPmiJPr 16, 191 I

Et.l~to:N CHANOLEit KATHRYN Cou.tNS HUTCHINSON

CATHfUUNB O'BRIJo:N F.I.IZAI)P.Tft R .H"TER VIVIAN WILSON

J KS$1 K

Colors: 8rOIIU!', pink and h/uP

Flower: Cffam whiu• rosl'

Page 323


Eastman, NPuvxmab, Huglle&, J\1cC-~nigle, Thome/: Bell, Bryant, Kin8 Bohman. flcmsauer, Canrer, Beymer, Pool, Berslund, Clark Jacobs, Rtw,·iu, Titus, Knee, Oud, Tanner, t.1cLeod, Caster. Code, CollouN"Jy Charrier, Kjusne$S. Cuscoisne, Prorce~ Steu:ard

SOHORES IN FACULTATE AOA llURKF;

VAUCUN PtiATI-!It

On. Eu.A Wono~

T.ATTIC

SORORES IN U IVEHSITATE SRNIOKS

EMZADETI-I EASTMAN

MAniON M cGoN•c•.e

OonOTnY OLSON

VJO t.ET BonM.-\N

VBRA BllYANT

Ot.tVJ·: Hucuto:s

HUTII CI.ARK

Et.P.ANOil DERCI. UNil Do1.0H.KS llANCAu ..; n

V101A~TTE

ZELDA NEWCOMB

1\1 ARCUIO:RITR ·rnOHRT'".I.

Tn·us

J U NIORS

MAK'll'

RuTu

GARVF.R

KtNC

!\iARY BEYMER

RuBY f>oo1.

SOPIIOMORHS Et.IZADRTit Rl·! l.l.

l . Rr.A ConR

FRESIJMEN

E1.0tSE CASTEn VIIICINIA KNEE !\1ARY Lou iSE ll.ANKtN VJRCJNIA GASCOICNP. ~'fA UIH'. GALLOWAY ~f."RCAflST O uo }BANNF. CnARRtKK NoRENE PEARCE Et. JNOH ]A COOS L UCINDA PARK HH VtRCINJA STKWAKI)

F'oundf'fl at Monmouth

College, 1870

Ktappa Chapter instal/eel F<-imwry 26, 1916

Page 324

MARY ELLEN KJOSNESS F r.oRBNCB Coucu1.1N ~'fARTHALBNE 'TANNP.R

Color.: Dark amllip.lu blue Flou't'r: Flf)ur-dl'-litl


]~>ntsPn,

11 A1elgard, PierN!, llanson, Newhouse, 1/a/ey, J\lfoorP, A·ftlr'i/UJII, Kl'rr Axtrll, 1-lolm~>s, PMl'rl•a, . 'f. A1PI1J(lrd, IJ7Qtsou, OsgoQ(/, lf/erry. Packenham, A1lestteugPr Kohout, Parrott~ Adams, Rae. Gle<uotJ. 1Palter, Su~ey, lJursess. llall, Gooding BrotUtlrtl, Ml'mlow.<t, A1cCormick, /Jril/, llou'tlnl, Simonton, Snow, Crort--oe

1\.~VVA

ALVtiA Ttii:TA

SOHORF.S IN FACULTATE

SOUOHES I N UN IVEH$1TATE S&NlORS ~1AIU' ~·fAHSIIAI.I, AGNES M'oonr~

CATIIHIUNE HANSON

llUTII

HELEN M €1..-CARO

1ha~BN

Mir.DftSD AXTBLL

T ntH.MA ~flt.f.CAitD

~1AHt':AR ..:T VlATSON

CORA ]RNSHN

PAUI.INf.! P ATERKA

F.WIIOUSE

DonoTrrv i\1EsseNctw

Kt:!KK

JUNIOitS

Dou)ltES Hor.MKS

lluTn

JANET GOOOlNC

MAttSHAt.r~

F.u7.ABF.TH LAMODtN

·..:Mu~ v Oscooo Jli~TIII·!I. P ACKV.NiiAM

DonoTnY PrEH.C:~ NonMA Wtmnv EI.AINP. STONE

SOI,IfOMOit Jo!S

Vrol..F.T ADAMS (;t.AOYS Gt.BASON

HtU.EN l'ARROTT

UTAHNA HALT..

Luc•c•·: UuKC><SS

l!:sTn•;tt. llA•::

IIEI.£1'1 Row& MciNTYRE

Ga&TTA DaosSARO

ANNlE SNOW

LOUVA J.\fA.Y ]t:N$t!.N HEI.KN C H ATTIN

W ,\I,T ..:tt HoTu Cnowt:

MArt.l' K .ATnF.RINE KououT

MEHLE 'A1BAOOWS HAtUUETT WALLACE

Lou•sa McCoaM•c.:

pEA ft L

J ti.A.N

S\\'E~I.~Y

Jl'ttB-Sif!olt!.N

Dt!RNICR l3niLI. MIIUAM HOWARD

Founded Qt De Pamv Univer&ity, 1870 Rt•tfl 'firMa Chapter in5tllll~l

May 15, 1920

MARY SI MONTON

Colors: Black amlgohl Flo It-er: Hlacl.- fltU! Jl,o/(1 patuy

Page 325


Simonds. Mitchell, Porbis, C<Jlet, Minger, Robin$On. M. CratJt>n. MallfJS, Hardin8 L. Porterfield. D. Craven, Corkery, DraA·e, Dunbar. Tmro, R<JoP, C. YorJ•, Douglas, JParm Martiu, Dunn, Youns, lfl'illiams, Dooliule. Rurnttl, Scllwerdjield, J-lmuon, Shoemaker. V(J/Iar iWcJ\1onigle, Green, Currie, Jones, Ashworth ]. York B. Porterfieltl, Lundsren, Ellis, Pauerson

VI 131:T4 Vlll SOROUES IN UNIVEilSITATE SENIORS FRANCES GALLET

OoaOToY MINGER

KATIIBRINE MATTES

l\1ARCERY BUilNF.TT ADOlf! MARTIN

lONEMARIE MtN(:EK CATifBlUNE YORK DLANCIU: CuRIUB

JANE ROBINSON HELEN YouNG H KSTKR Et.LI$ KATnEBINE RoE

VRRA HARDING

MARYLOU CRAVEN

JUNIOll.S

:eaMA Wu.J.u.MS H "'·"" DouGLAS

Heu:N

DuNDAil

~fARGARKT CuuoY

JULIA

V ALI.AR

HELEN HANSON

VERA FOROIS

ELSIM WARM

Be:RNH:& ScnwenoFtELO FAY TATitO

ESTUEit A.hTCBF.U. HAZ>;J, SIMONDS

LOIS POHTF.It.f'IF.I.I)

MAilJORIF. ]ONRS

SOPnOMORBS BF.TTY ASIIWORTH

Ft.OKA CORJiCF.RY Vt!ROA DOOLITTLF.

Oono1·u "' CRAveN JBSSlt:

Ouxx

]RAN YORK

PR8SEUtF.N RARRIKTTB LUNOCRSN

PuYLUS WniCHT

Founded at Monmouth Collese April 28, 1867 fdaho A lplra Chapter installflfl February 28, 1923

Page 326

BRu. f: PoaTEKf' tELO FRANCES McMoN•G'-''

EVELYN SttOBMAK.ER Mu.ORt:D PA'M'HRSON

DonoTnY DRAKK

Colors: JPi11e retl atul silr..~r blue

Flou~r:

JP'ine carnation


SM<us, Johnson, Fndricluon, Row~, Collap,hn-. \f. Kfflml. Ra<"h. Vffll, F;Jwtmls, DriM:<Jil NMII'. K incaid, L. Thompson, Laxton, Benson, C. 1'hompson, Cray. l/ Jit't"inon. L. f'"~ricluon, Wood ConnauJI,/tJon. Na~lt. fla"i$. Reierson. ,.\ fcCoy. Rl"t:kman. Arfflart. II. 1\Mrtu. \ttJl'flonaiJ, U a..·is ShenrooJ, Cr«n, K illion, Bishop, Adam•, Louis, 1'tllijHO, llurll, K. Kfflrns. Jack

SORO RES

FACULT AT E

ELLBN R E I E R SON

MIRIAM Lt 'M'L€

SO RO RES I N UN IVE RSITATE SRN IO HS l•:t ,t ZA tl f!1'11 OnJSCO I_.L

M ARY M ARCAK ET K sA a~s D o a oTu Y NEAt.

OonOTu Y S uHA ttS

D o n oTo v l " n eottt CK SON

A M NK J OII N80N

M YRTLE R ACH

JUN I O RS

D o noTu Y R ousE

J OSBPili NK Kt NCAlll

lh<o.RN IJ KN801\ I.O t:l fo"'tUmHt( ,KSON

VAt.. KTTA. L ' II H RI SSON lf ATTI E R E I ERSON Jl HL•.:N CHA y

J OAN II A RIUS AUR REL LA X"'"'N

'f RK RSA COI\, ,U .iC IITO"'i

\1ARY BISHOP l l RLB"'i K t:ARNS E l~LKN J ACK

~f A RlA N L B l\19 AUDRY A R E R AKT GR•CE C R EES J ESSIE ~f .ACDOSA I.O

CAR Vt. TnOMI•SON

M AttJOitJB

EAL

SOPIIO MOit t<.S

Lo •s Tu oMt1 SON

ALt C8

AUHUtTA ..: UW .-\H US K A.TII ... HI NK K KAH ~S

B MTu Wooo

II KLRN ' l'RL1 1P6MO I RK' S K u .L10""

EtL88N B e.CKtU N B BTU H U R ST

J , RZ SuKM " OOD

] A '<ET ) fCCo\'

ASfi B

FRESIIM EN

l...t Lt. v Louts M ou~\

A ~"'iM

A04M8

PoundNI at Dt"Pautc Ut~icw-tity <klobN- 15. 1885 Alt>hn Rho Chapin' install.,/ May 9. 1924

Colors: Scorlt!t anJ olic.- grffn Flou•r: RNI ca.rnalion and smilax

Page 327


S tri,p,ttr,

Ou'f'tll•

/Juu/ap, Clarlt·, /Jecker~ F. JPilr'te

l ....ejee•er, l/aU'Id118, ll. Clar(t, Timken. J\1Uh•r. 1/ariNt bort'f?r. 'rhomJnon. Rithell, Dtl)', J\lyer1. N. Nt! tt'IIW,, Ct.Prringtou

Proctor, i\1c•ius. FiA;kan. J\1c Cauley, IP~M. Cilmorr, i\1. Clarf>, Jr-'aller, Ueckathoru , Ut•,t/ru, llogctJ, A. lfl /rite S hauk, Low, Daly, Johu sto,, Lt•il!-htou. Alorl~>y, A·l oll. llull. S mith, Atulliuer, 'l'ur11t•r, Stm/ord LeJ\1a.sters, II. NPnuuw, ll om'f'r~ Eisinger, 8arA·er, i\1urse

ALVtiA Vtil SOIIOtn:s 1'\ F\CLJ I.TATE RuTtt lht MS ut-::Rc

SO BOBES I

IVE HSITAT E

lJ

SENIORS MAR CA RE1' D ecK ER

Lou1SR Inav O uNLAP GRKTRUOI•: STKI NCBR

1\'1 AUtti NH C umuu NCTON

J•:•N IIAWtO NS

LAURA Clo~lt.K M .u<CAK&1' OWRNS

FnHnA WnrTE

Bessn:

GEORC•:TTA l\fn. Lt-i R

JUNIOttS M AB EL DITII EI~L C u"RI.OTTP. GttACt.! POUI.SON

r ...: F EVER

INA NRWMAN

ANNE D A Y

CI.AK ..:

(;I_.AOY8 TUU(: fo:N

Ott.TTY MYERS

80PII0 MORP.S

M II.DRED

J1 \RTE~UO\\ ~R Euz4Bt.'TII Gu~MOKR

MYRL Re"'TFRo

AU,TA. WtnTR

BERNECB

ll K1'1' • lll cC.uo.HY

ZtU.)II \ \\ ALI..:R MARC \RET . ... ICK \N'

II I<LK' \IA" s DoROTtt\ s\~VORO

ll UTR WRST

ELIZ48ETH P 'ROCTOR F.STIIEK •ruOMPSO' M,tt\ E u.M~ II RC'K\TIIOR~

VERA ~I Al' 0 A KK EH EuzAB ETII 1-l oovtnc. ] 8\\"' ELL L RIG HTON

LoU18K llfORLBV LoUISE .M ULLJ zrr-' £R \1 Hd>R EO SMtTII

OOHOTIIV Ltt .\ 1 ASTEK8 GEKALDI I"'K MORSE

H EL\'S JI'H" M\ "'i ELSA East"'iCtiK

L U L U S uA NK

FRANKI E JouN"T0'

tluTn

C L4M E

YIOI.ET H AGEN

CYl'ITJIIA DAIS

Fowuled

Syracu st' U nit.v o,ity " October 10. 1872 llPia 7.t'tta CIWJJU•r ituwlhod ) II liP / 2, /928

Page 328

<'ll

M ARY Lou osB II U LL

BoNITA

Low

L UCJLB ~ {OTT TURNER

Colors: S ilt*r aud bortloou.x PlouV'rs: Jo'orp.N.mt,.lltll? lily-.Qj.t/w.vo/IPy


Kra#mtv, StalkH, MtCroth, Soc-kt<t C. Artdwson~ Randall~ Cill"pir, f.Jf!Ck_, }olan5lOit, Torwor&OII, 1... \Iii/H. Alii con, /Jrornt. Ragan H. Mill..,- Gi/11,., Mm•orr, Thornhill. Griffith, Grohosky, llurrdy. lliHI'i>urr. IA~rr8"'#ig, lf/#.l<r ~lauon, SJta.,•, IJruMt"mon, A. Amlffson

II RRM-' At.nto:K'NION

SOUOilF.S I N FACU J.T ATE M R~.

J'AUI .INI·~

M

\TTHBW8

SO ilO HES IN UN!VF.USITATE SSN I ORS SA UA At.I. ISON

Lt·:t.A McGRATH

Ct." nrt:H ANUR1t80N

C:HNHVA H ANOl'

AONH8 ll ANOA I. t , H UTII JOHNSTON

VmL\ SACK IITT

M A ttCJo: I~ LA KIU I•! M Ril

B EATRICE S'TALKEil

JUNIOilS

lt u1·u H.u : A"'{

VtnCtNIA Pt<:CK

.MAnY Gtr.r.Rst•rt:

r__,o,~

F.aA?.A tHtT H RnOWN ll u-ru JI BI.I.~ N MATSON

Mu.t.BR

M11.t.ttK

S()llJIOMORRS

lh t ..\TRJ(" ..-: GtiiJHI

KATifRKtNK .M IKK SI.SON

DonoTuY ToncettsoN

MARJORIE CRIFPITU

LII.I,UN WHSI.P.R M.\RG<\tU;T ( ;KOIIOSK\'

FRRS:IUIRS AUDRM\' ANDERSON

J UAN I TA ~fASTO:rf

CuLOtR

Sn..tw

RUTU BRUGCRMt"i

FounJM at Bo.Jton Unic..v.-r1i1y4 1888 Th"'" Ta11 ChapiH i rrJtaliPd "'"''· 1929

·Wft

Page 329


Watts Benham

Curtis Bennett

cou Shoup

Delta Gamma

M n s . ELIZADBTn G IVEN (1924}

Riclenbaugh H all

Mns. MAco ,,LEN P1 encv (1926)

Lindley H all

M ns. PeAnLE WA TTs (1926)

H ays H all

M1 ss LENA SuouP (1927)

- Delta Delta Delta

M n s . CAn lii B B EN II AM (1927}

Gamma Phi Bew

Mns. l NEZ S)JJTJJ ( 1928)

- Alpha Ph i

Mn s. MARIAN CuRTIS (1928}

• Kappa Alpha Theta

Mn s. Fn A c e s BE NNETT ( 1928}

Forney Hall

!\I n s . EvELYN Cl.ARK ( 1929)

Alpha Chi Omega

\ I n s. EuZAoETJJ R . I NGERSOLL (1929) S \IITH

Pi Beta Plri

(1929)

Kappa Kappa Gamma

!\I n s. E u Z \D BTn IT. S 1HW ( 1929)

Phi Gamma Delta

1\ln s. I.Jl.Y lJ ILL ( 1929}

Page 330

Hill

Piercy

- Beta Theta Pi

M n s . LEN OnE ScoTT ( L919)

Ins. n,nn v J.

Git'('Tt Clark

.,


••

·-----1 -


Poulton

llub('r

St. Clair

Beardmore

UFFlCEHS Pr,sidl'llt t•:rH~ARfl P our .ToN l in•-Presidt•flt G tWRG~~ Jl UBEit S<'cr('tary HORERT ST. CLAIIl 'l'reusurer

(;.,;onCE BE AR OMOitE

MEl\lBEHS

Alpha Tau Omegtt FRANK SM tll ' Jorr Soo KN

Bew Chi FR ANK

WrNZELELt

Gr.ENN S rrER N

B('ta Theta Pi STE r.r. Hot.~t ..:s GEIIAI.O GRIM\l

Velta Chi.

Sigma Clti

Signw A lpha Epsilon

" ' lt.LIAM GALIGII!;H

GEOrtt;..: Hti i31;H KKNNETII O ' LEArtY

GEORGE BEAft fi MOrtE ll. AN OALL 'VAI.LI S

M

Ert i, E FrttZZEI.l.K

Tat• Kappa Epsilon '"lLLIAM KRUM~IES 'VILLIMI HAWKINS

Sigma

u

CIIAitLI>S GrtA YBII.L DANA WHITE

Phi Gamma Delta E OWARO POULTON EurEn P osTON

Phi Delw 1'/reta

Kappa Sigma

Lambda Chi Alpha

RooErtT ST. Cr.Arn PARI S MAUTIN

PEYTON SOMMEitCAMP PATIHCK WAI, KEit

'~' ILLJAM SIIAMOErtGEU TYLErt GILL

T he Interfraternity Council strives t o harmonize all activities of common interest to the social fraternities on the campus and to cooperat e with the University in all matter s p ertaining t o these organizations.

Page 332


W. 1/atd<ins T.Gi/1

J. Sod<"n

S. 1/olma

P. Somml'f"'CCmp

E .. Po5l0n

c.

P. Walker W. Krummes

P. \tartin W. Shamb<!r6<"' C. 1/ub<"r H. Walli$

H. St. Clair C. Graybill G. Crimm

~heron

D. White .If. f"ri>ulle

F. Win,.ler E. Poulwn K. O'Lrory IP. Caligher 1-". Smuin

Page 333


Turn~, Walker~ All~n,

Hubl>arJ. Thqmcu. 1' . Esus. Jont'J. Wurltt'r, R . Taylor. ommt!'N:Omp Ou.,.ns. Ormsby, C. Taylor, L. Smith. \lcDani.t. Pat<h. \1. /loll, Drysdol~. h«idan {l,;l!'ison, Raldiff~. Bailey-. Pairn. BPn/f'r. Du.Dor(/. 1"orrt"Y, \lcufitl(/, ;Vi-con. Strote•on Ri«, E . Smidt, Doerri_,., Blak~, K~tu, D)'ff, CoDy, tanlty, Calloway, Olmst~d

J:":oCAR

e,,,,

FHATIH: S " CoL. E. II. C

~ 1:!\L.

FHATIIES I

FACl LTA'n; IIKISM \"'

U

IVI;;!!SI'I'ATI-:

8HN IOH 8

CAICOI. "'·' ·K '

lh C.II-\1(0 TJtO\I AS

JA( . K

MAJ1' 1.AN0 U U BHARO

f'Ait.KKit

J'~'n H UIHli CK JlonHKT~Ol'\ J o:-~~•·u T u n N~ n

Vtttt: tl.

l•:sor'BS

IC tc;n ,\itn TA,.

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" V.NNP.Tfl JONY.M

PA' rRaCK \'<1 ALK~R

.fUII N \\1 U U:oi1' Kit K ·\HI. Mt; UO N<\ 1,1) \lAX S ttHIUUA N

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fraternities - sororities- the p si psi psis sure got an awf ul bttnch this year- with that new house they couldn't be particular- had to fill their table- too many men eating outscholarship- a bet that the brown house beats the pillared one-and they did by a thousandth or so- activities- politics-we should have had student body president this year- we didn't get a thing last year - rush week- how i love it- pledgesnot nearly as tough on them this year - why i remember Jour years ago when i was a frosh- upperclassmen meeting in the libraty - fratemity going to the dogs- the mu mu mus are by far the cattier bunch- sorority smoking parlors - the strongest house on the campuscold sleepingporches- f ratemity cojJee vs nest coffee- pipe down out thererough week - initiation - we have another greek in the fold- too bad

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J . Sherfey £.Eklund C. Thomas L. J\1. Mitchell T. Pearce 11. Friend C. Hunt

L. Vine

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E. McMillin 1), Stuart

E. Evere•t M. Gottli•h

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U. OacL.Iund T. Pierce L. Cri•t M. Keesan II. Stetltr V. Tocbterrnan M. Oberme) cr T. Davio H. Heed T. Munoon C. Schmidt

\\. llatch F. U1u14d1er E. Callender

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L. CliiTonl E. Willianoo \1 . Creowell I. Col vin 1). Mcl-'urland

K. Garnette E. Pittwood ,\ 1. Fo.. 0. Moore

M. Stone

L. !Iamey D. Chapman J. Lockett

U. Detwiler n. Bell

..... Redmond

Page 355


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ox,

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Page 356

U o ~t TA BA u~ •~ ,· I SA UI•:t. LANC! J.;

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JVa m ed ;, /,onor of CPrtrwiP l •. llu,Y..;


E. \l<·t\li81tr M. AlcCI•in M. T odtl J. Johnt10n II. Miller M. Thoma•

11. Schroeder E. Weidman

G. Thoma8 M. Johnson

L. \1 cFadden

~1. f'ry

C. E. H. V. B.

E. Abel A. Pond

F. Laing U. Atherstone

L. Grot'jean J. II urri~

\1. ll omes

T alkington Minear GoodY.in Wolff Evans

)f. Sno'~ 0. Gooch M. Cald .. ell M. llore H. Flack

~1. sc:::kett M. Borton

\. \ am1erhoff P. Lee

II. Jacob• II. llo~« G. Oawoon E. II Mver I. Lan8e E. l:lutlelton

(;.

1\i~on

Z. Shaw 1). Jatrhl,.eu A. \loore II . llotftla 0. Ouiley

C. Lemon E. Flemina

L. Chariton U. Stellmon E. llartlett II. T«te W. llimea V. J'an.lue D. Palmer 1. Lintula

E. ancolos F. Francone E. Duncan R. Dunn A. ~1_cKierna n M. YC)ung

E. Schroeder M. Turner

Page 357


UAL~Tti T~Tti t71M~L OFF ICF. II !'i Ca .-.Ku·h \ ~•H nqo, ll t~u. , \It (.;,,,n'li

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I §VIT~ (I'm an angel, aren't we all)

I


Ttit: SUVVLUS CLUIJ I 1 ma y be inap pro pria te so la te in the hook to include a dub whose acti vit ies a nd me mbe rs hip sho ul d have appeared ' ' ith the o t her clubs. B ut in some unexpla ined m a nncr they were overlooked a t the time and we have been endeavoring since to loca le a )age for the m. A clu b with as vas t a rne m >crship as t he S urplus Club seems to have a t I d a h o ce rta i n ly d eser ves recogniti o n somewhere. Space as well as a difference of opinion as to who a re reall y me mbers of t he club pro hibi ts t he pr inting of m e m bers' na mes on this pa ge.

!

Page 362

There are some who claim th a t the club is a su brosa c ha pter of a na ti ona l. Altho ug h the pre :~. r and vice-prexy a re unknown, we believe the above pic tured gen t lem e n, P a trick ll e nr y Walker and Jl e nry Clay D a ubert, hold, a nd have held for som e t ime, t he offices of treasurer and secre tary . M e mbers say they were selected for their personality t heir ex tre me good looks, t heir sinceri ty of pur po c, a nd their desire a t all times to pl ace th e interests of the school above t heir ow n. The ques tion rem a ins- who a re the Gr a nd Pooba h and Vice-G ra n d S urplusser?


ro, this is n' t Washington crossing the Delaware or C hris Columbus coming a cross 10 rediscover America-i t is our O\\n little Georgie cross in~ the big pond on his way to o,rord's s toried ha lls. Out to conquer ne \\ worlds, "hat are the wild waves whispering to George and ''hat are the thoughts coursing thro ugh his ever acti ve mind as the ship draws nearer and nearer British soil? What c hanges will he ins tigate and will they unders tand over there that these changes are only for the conseque nt welfare of the schools of England?

Firs t, "ill there in a ll like lihood be a revision of s tude nt politics a nd the Zeta party gi,·cn a fc" l<'ssons in real s tudent or ga nizatio n"? \nd "ill the English, so long in the dark, issue a se<·ond i\1 agna Charta and fall right in s te p "ith the proposed changes"? ~ ill Geo•·g<' refuse honor after honor, even A.S.l.Ox. offices"? Will he have learned every thing in his firs t year and participated in every ac tivit)? It is a lready rumored that he has been offered the chairmanship of the senior picnic on the bank of the Thames. No matter, here's to s uccess, George.

Page 363


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e>OOK~

MONT~

Of l]t

AND l]fl2 AUTI40D.f, AfTrR A Yf.A a.s E~ DEAVOr< To SCL~cT Tl.IE \10ST ?tZOM I NENT .A UT~OPS AND Tf-tEit.( WOt2K.I N6S CtJ ~E CAM~~ WE

NOW -HAVe AT

OU~ DI~POSAL TWELVt:-

M~STt.\Q.PI c.GF=.S -

t:AC.H O~E: A BOOK Cf: T+H: MONT~ • Ar ~0 TrU-E 1-tAS sucf-f A~ OUTS TAI\JDI IV6 <PQOUP Bee:~-­ PQt.VAI LtD U'PO~ TO PUT Tl-ft.C0#4P[fTr= ...ll <;TOJ'2.Y tT'S AGTrVrTtf~ orv T.Wt. ~·

or

Wt'lrT!t.tJ 'PAGt. ALAt2M rN(;LY Stt\iPl.r IN TtKT T-#t:Y G4~ 'Bf: U~D~Q)TOOD 8Y -ALL-- TAlLf: At>VA~TAGt:. Cf mt~ o1'POQTu~tTY A~D setvD YoUQ,-DQDt.Q, To-DAV - ArvY TeN r0t2A NtGILEL - lJ)U lJJtLL rriVC> T~ ,J I() t1r·(l '(V

Page 366

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W EWI S II to express our sincere gratitude to all who cooperated with the editor a nd m anager of TnB GBM OF 1930 in the production of a larger yearbook at Idaho, and particul arly: To th e me mbers of the ed itorial and managerial s tairs, who so willingly con tributed the time and effort necessa r y for the publication of the book; To Hal ph W. York of y nH5路 Yorl.. Company, Boise, printers of the volume, whose invaluable services ca n never be full y appreciated b y I daho students; To Walter M. lrvinc o f th e Western Engraving & Colortypc Company, Sea ttl e, whose id eas and s ugges tions reflee tcd a deep interes t in the publication; To Charles Dimond, \\ hose bea utiful photographic ''or!.. appears in the o pening section, in apprecia tion of his efforts at a ll times t o secure the ncces ary photograp hs; To Mr. Miller, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Dufresne, Mr. R adley, Mr. Egel and, Mr. C hurch , and other me mbers of Syms-York Compan y who so readily cooperated with Mr. York when ca lled upon to expend additional time and effort upon the publication of TuE GEM 0 1~ 1930; To S terner's Studio and the Mil..los S tudio for their "illing cooperation in ecuring student photographs for the book; To the advertisers in T tlE GE'f OF 1930, who e cooper a Lion 1s sincerely appreciated b y the s tud ents of the University of Idaho.

S. J ANSSE

ALLE

FnA

K

,

/!:ditor.

D. SMUt , Jl1anager.

Page 367


ADVERTISER'S INDEX J •a~,.

:!118 37\1

A. G. s i)Uuldiup; C ump(lll)' . . . . • . . Auto lntc rurba u Coru1•~wy ..

B oise C it ) ~a ti on a l IJ a nk Boise Communi l ) I' MIll<' Ro> d 'A , .. Block's . . .. Rlue D•u·l et I nn ••• Blue Cab Comr••n>

:170 :1\11 385 379 370 387

C.m r>uo Ba r~r Sh o r> Carte r O nt« ComJUUI )

389 31\ 1 390 373 381\ 374 :18 1 374

Coeur d ' Ale ne llo td C r a n e & Com1la n y • C r ei«bto n•8 . . . Crescent ComJ)tHI ) • • • C f"not T ailor S lwp C u l hert t~on'A . .... . Oank & Cmu p & w y .•. , , . .. . ..... , , •.. D avid J, ~1 fJlluy Couqm n y . . . . .. . .. . .. .

De"""'' II o tel ... .

38\1 :170 :178 :17\1 :178

E l.ea' o ..... .

386

David's., .

. ,,. .

, .. , ...... .

Oavent"l()tt lltHe l

:187 :186 390 388

F a&bio n S ho tl . . . F irst !a tional Oa nL. ld a b u }"""irst Securit ) Cor pora t ion •..... F irat Tnuu & ~a , ina" Oanl

or

C088ett'o

U ar ~r

389 31\9 390

Sh o t>.

II. D. l'owell . . . . . H <Ni gin'& Oru 1 S tu re ,. I daho Cand)' Cotnpa n y . . . . ......... . I dah o D ail y S~tl1 e8 u• u n , , . . . • • . ....• I daho D airy P roduct8. . . . . . . ..... . lda h c) P owt'r Comp:1n y . .•....... . . .. . l dt•ho Service S tn t ion . . ...... . •.. . .. . Jula n d Mo tor Compuu y . .... . . ............ .

J ohn W. Gruha m Compa n y . . . . . • . ...•... ] err>•' A •• , •• • •• • •••• J, C . Pe nney Comtll ll) •.•..

381 :l7R

:168 :172 :181 38 1

371 375 376

f'ap.e

K e n wort h y T l1eatre .. .... .

386

La ue T hrift Stor·e s . ... . . Link 'if llu.-inefol.S Co llc,;c ..

376

as1

38 1

\t aje~ tie

Cafe .. .. . \I ikloo S ou dio• ...... . \ I il!e r-Oe r va n t. .... . \f o.eco ~ Ba r ber Sh o ,-. .• \ 10<!00" H otel .... \ l o"CC ~ Puhli!:!hin ~ Cornpa n ) \ t o~w S team Laund r) ... .\1 o.eco ~ Tr a n~fer . . . . .

368 379 386 38S 384 377

388

'\ eele) & Sons T a,-i . .. . e w Washin gt o n ll o1e l .. . orth Pacific College ..

385

375 38 8

3 80 ill\0

Orio le Nest .. . .• .. •. Owl Dna ~ Con1 1)any .. 0""> hce llo oel .. ... .

372

J»ucific Po we r & L i s ht Compa n y . Po rt la ud H o tel . .. .. . . ... . J»otla t c h Lumbe r Cum1utn y .

375 381

H . C. Beach Com pan) .

385

377

Samm' 1 Furni ture Compan)

378

Schroeter'~!!> Ba k e r ) ( E m pire \ ,S..ien tific Supply C on1pan) Sloerfe) ••........ . .... Sterner"! S tud io. Spok a ne Sur ~ical Su rpl) Co•niM U) . s, nu · Yo rk Com1)an y . .

368

T a ble S ur1>ly Com pan) .

389

Vu leo Pre•• S ho p ... . .. . Velllc h Realty Compa n y.

as9

311 385 3R7

:175 383

380

W ashington Wa t e r P o wer Comi)Uny ... .. . \\7es1c rn Engra v ing & Colo rty pc COu ap a n y \\7 bite b o use & Price . . . . . . \\' il- Wit e K nittin g Compa n y .

ass

382 374 369

Better Dairy Products J ack D. Miklos P ortraits of M ('n

13 TTE R BUT TER liLK C R EA M M I LK l CE C HEAM

Mild red G. Mi klos Ladies und Chihln•n

Idaho Dairy Products .\tO CO \\

lOA TTO

A

truly good p hotogr a ph of ) o u i m or e than a sket ch of ) o ur features; it is also a re presenta tion of yo ur c har ac ter.

" Quality and Service" Our l\1ottv

EMPIRE BAKERY Phone 2250

Third S treet

STUDIO 2 17 Eus L Third P ho ne 31 76


THE GREATEST NAME IN AWARD SWEATERS

Jl7il Jl7ite Award Sweaters Are the Choice ofEvery Pacific Coast Conference School, Also H undreds of H igh Schools and Colleges Th roughout The West. Produced Exclusively By

OLYMPIA KNITTING MILLS, I NC. "AI

th~

OLYMPIA

end of The Old OrJgon Trail"

-

-

-

WASliiNGTON

Page 369


Save!

Blue Bucket Inn OFFERS YOU

That is our advice to all young people. It's not what you earn tbat coun ts so much- it's what you save.

DANCING AN D

DINING

As soon as you begin to earn s tart to save. Begin sma ll and keep adding. Systematic saving is the s ure road to success- a nd that is what we at路e all after.

Mee t Your l."rie nd H ere

The Boise City National Bank

Come Just as Yott Are

Established 1886

Campus Social Center

BOISE, IDAHO

Made

Moll<ry

on this book is the product of an organization of specialists whose sole work i~ the creation of unusual covers fo~ School Annuals, Set Books, Histories, Catalogues, Sales Manuals and other Commercial Publications T HE COVER

THE DAVID

J.

MOLLOY CO.

2857 North '1Vestem Awnue

CHICAGO

Page 370


Things Unusual Usually at

In Spokane

WHEN it's hard t o find and when no other store would have it, then this store fills a real need. We have sold the unusual things for years and you will . save considerable time b y coming or writing directly here when the unusual thing is desir ed.

707-711 Sprague Ave.

708-716 F irst Ave.

SPOKANE

Page 371


Make Your Kitchen an

All-Electric Kitchen And Enjoy these Modern Services Water Heating

Cooking

Refrigeration

The All-Electric Kitchen is as modern as the airplane and the radio. It is the last word in convenience and economy. Eventuall y every home that is wired for electric service will have a n All-E lectric Kitchen.

Idaho Power Company

Make the

O WYHEE HOTEL Your headquarters when visiting in B oise You will enj oy your visit more if you stop a t the Owyhee. Large, airy and attractive rooms a t moderate prices. Our graciou ly appointed dining rooms serve delightful meals at popula r rates.

"Come in as you are" That's our invitation

Page 372


1855

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SEVENTY-FIFTH

ANNIVERSARY

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1930

Awaiting the Class of '30 Seen through the time-veiling perspecti ve of college life it seems impossible tha t four years have passed since the class of '30 matricula ted. But in the turbulent world outside e nough progress has developed to fill a century. Notable have been the changes in home-building. From s tark utility, plumbing and heating fi xtures have been tra ns formed into objects of beauty. New designs, ne w refine me nts, a nd irridescent colors ha ve been evolved. When the time comes for the m to plan their homes, members of the class of ' 30 are cordially invited to t he Crane Exhibit Rooms, where these new fixtures and fittings for bathrooms, ki tchens, and laundries are displa yed.

Palvu

l

C R A N E~ PLUMBING AN D H EATI NG

)f \

Fillings

T ER JA LS

Crane Compa ny, 126 South Pos t S treet, S pokane, Washing ton

Branches ancl S ales Offices in 190 Cities