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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

SCHOOL

OF

SOCIAL

WORK

SPRING 2016


Table Of Contents E V E N T S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 RESEARCH.......................................................................... 4 P R O G R A M S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 FA C U LT Y N E W S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 R E S E A R C H S T A T E M E N T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 C L I N I C A L & A C A D E M I C P R O F E S S I O N A L S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 R E C E N T P U B L I C A T I O N S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 A L U M N I N E W S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 I N M E M O R I A M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 S P E C I A L R E C O G N I T I O N S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 G I V I N G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49


FROM THE DEAN I am delighted to present this overview of recent research and activities conducted at the University of Georgia School of Social Work. The scholarship of our faculty continues to span the range of the social work profession: behavioral health services, health disparities, evidence-based practice, social justice, community empowerment, trauma, child welfare practice and social policy issues, among others. Within these pages, you will find that our faculty approach issues of national and global significance with creative questions that address persistent and emerging social problems. Thanks to the outstanding efforts of our faculty, we continue to grow in the areas of research funding and discovery. The school was recently awarded a $1.3 million federal grant to help build Georgia’s capacity to address behavioral health problems among children and at-risk youth. Our faculty have also secured significant extramural funding for interdisciplinary research efforts in collaboration with the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, the College of Education and the College of Engineering. We also welcomed five exceptional new faculty members: Llewellyn J. Cornelius, the Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professor of Social Justice and Civil Rights; assistant professors Rebecca Matthew, Jane McPherson, and Michael Robinson; and field education coordinator Carol Smith. Moreover, the school established the endowed Georgia Athletic Association Professorship in Health and Well-Being, which will strengthen our efforts to address health disparities. In program news, we partnered with the Candler School of Theology at Emory University to offer a dual master’s degree in social work and divinity. Our dual master’s degree in social work and public health continued to grow with the addition of two concentrations, and this past fall the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services renewed funding of the Title IV-E Child Welfare Education Program. In August we celebrated the move to our new home at 279 Williams Street. We deeply appreciate the support of President Jere Morehead and Provost Pamela Whitten, who helped to make our relocation possible. Last summer, after a decade of service, I announced my intention to step aside as dean of the school. It has been tremendously rewarding to serve as dean and to collaborate with you in marshalling resources to advance the school. On July 1 of 2016, Dr. Anna Scheyett will succeed me. I invite you to read more about her on page 13. I look forward to continued engagement with the school, and encourage your ongoing involvement as well. I offer my profound thanks to our alumni and friends for your strong support. Your contributions continue to provide critical financial assistance for our programs and exceptionally talented and diverse students. Regards,

Maurice C. Daniels Dean and Professor


EVENTS

School Holds Open House at New Location Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

On Aug. 28, 2015, the School of Social Work welcomed the public to its new home at 279 Williams Street. The school had been housed in Tucker Hall, a former dormitory, since 1974. UGA President Jere W. Morehead praised the school’s endeavors. “I believe that this permanent home for the School of Social Work will turn out to be one of those seminal events in the history of the school and will help ensure its continued rise in national prominence,” he said. Members of the UGA and Athens community gather outside the new School of Social Work Building.

Dean Maurice Daniels thanked the president and provost for their support and expressed his hopes for the school’s future.

“We are pleased with the wonderful learning environment for our faculty and students,” Daniels said. “We are especially pleased with this location’s proximity to the Athens-Clarke County community, and we look forward to utilizing this space to maximize partnerships with community organizations.” Collaboration with the local community began at the event with an art exhibit created by children in Helping Art Reach Public Spaces, a program that provides free arts education and mentoring to youth in the East Athens area. Broderick Flanigan, the artist and activist who developed the program, was in attendance along with some young artists and their families. The show was facilitated by Assistant Professor Rebecca Matthew. Mary Frances Early, the first African-American to graduate from the university, and Associate Dean Shari Miller also addressed the attendees. Students led guests on tours of the 159-year-old building, a former textile mill on the banks of the North Oconee River. Constructed in 1857, the school’s new home was originally known as the Athens Cotton and Wool Factory. The 37,000 square foot, four-story facility now holds classrooms, conference rooms, instructional technology laboratories, offices and a student lounge. Also among the guests were Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten and Charles Stewart, who served as the school’s first dean from 1964 to 1995. Stewart recalled when the school was first housed in Waddell Hall, a building of roughly 1,700 square feet. “It was very small,” he said. “We were very glad to eventually get Tucker Hall, but this is definitely a step up. I think the school can accomplish a lot here.” For more photos of the Open House, visit bit.ly/2015-SSWOpenHouse.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


EVENTS

Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

Hollowell Lecture explores story of judge who battled racial, gender bias

When 15-year-old Constance Baker Motley told her parents that she wanted to be a lawyer, her mother advised her to become a hairdresser instead. Her father said nothing. Even if college wasn’t beyond the means of their large, poor family, it was extremely unlikely in the 1930s that a black female could gain admission to law school. And yet she did. With the help of a philanthropist, Motley not only entered Columbia University Law School, but became one of America’s most successful civil rights litigators and a distinguished federal judge.

“She lived a paradox of change,” Harvard law and history professor Tomiko Brown-Nagin told attendees March 17 at the fourth annual Donald L. Hollowell Lecture. Brown-Nagin is the author of many Tomiko Brown-Nagin articles on civil rights history as well as the book Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement, which won the 2012 Bancroft Prize in American History. She currently is working on a biography of Motley. Motley accepted a job with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and went on to win nine out of 10 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court as well as many landmark desegregation lawsuits throughout the South. Despite her successes, she still encountered bias. After nearly two decades with the LDF, Motley was bypassed for its leadership in favor of a male lawyer. The choice stung, but she moved on. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, NYWT&S Collection, LC-USZ62-138795

She was named the nation’s first black, female federal judge in 1966, and continued to weigh in on issues of discrimination until her death in 2005, including cases of gender bias. The lecture was preceded by a short film about Hollowell and introductory remarks by Maurice C. Daniels, dean and professor of the School of Social Work and director of the Foot Soldier Project for Civil Rights Studies, and Llewellyn Cornelius, the Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professor of Social Justice and Civil Rights Studies and director of the Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights. After the lecture, Brown-Nagin and Cornelius took questions from the audience.

Constance Baker Motley and Donald L. Hollowell.

“This lecture is part of the center’s commitment to foster in-depth conversations regarding human and civil rights,” Cornelius said. “I look forward to more conversations like this, which can inspire future research, scholarship and community engagement.”

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RESEARCH

UGA receives $8.2 million grant to support families in Georgia child welfare system Credit: Cal Powell/UGA

Child welfare grant investigators from left to right: Lance Palmer, Joe Goetz, Jerry Gale, Jennifer Elkins, Karen DeMeester and Ted Futris. Not pictured, Jay Mancini.

An $8.2 million federal grant is enabling an interdisciplinary team of faculty to work with families who are most at risk of entering the state’s child welfare system. The work is part of the Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Project, an intervention research project that focuses on creating positive and stable homes through the integration of research-based services designed to improve healthy marriage and relationship skills and promote economic stability. Jennifer Elkins, assistant professor of social work, is part of the research team, which is led by Ted Futris in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. As a co-principal investigator, Elkins is providing expertise on trauma, child maltreatment and domestic violence in developing and testing a training protocol for addressing financial and relational stress among high-risk families. The protocol will help train individuals who provide direct services for new parents, foster parents and reunified families, and biological parents of children 18 and under who were removed from their home and have been reunited. “We’re incorporating a trauma-informed perspective in everything–from the protocol of the interventions, to the underlying framework, including a version designed for single, unmarried parents to make sure that counselors are able to assess for child maltreatment and domestic violence risk.” said Elkins. The project will deliver the Elevate Curriculum, a research-informed couples education program developed by Futris and researchers at Auburn University. Participants also will receive a three-week financial literacy education program that focuses on managing finances and building wealth. Students from both the School of Social Work and the College of Family and Consumer Sciences are involved in the project, providing services such as child care, conducting in-home visits, and collecting needs assessment data. Partners such as the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services and Project Safe are assisting in connecting eligible parents and families with project leaders. Read more at t.uga.edu/1Qu.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


RESEARCH

NSF funds interdisciplinary empathy research Researchers from the University of Georgia School of Social Work and College of Engineering have been awarded a three-year, $339,746 grant to investigate how engineering students can best develop empathic orientation and skills to inform their roles as agents of change. Empathy–the experience of understanding another person’s condition from that person’s perspective–is as necessary for engineers as for social workers, said School of Social Work Associate Dean Shari Miller, a co-principal investigator on the project. “Just because a project may be expertly crafted on a technical level doesn’t mean it will be the right solution in the context of a community and its needs,” she said. While future engineers get a thorough Pictured left to right: Shari Miller, Nicola Sochacka, Joachim Walther grounding in technical skills, their curriculum does not typically provide much exposure to considering how various stakeholders might affect or be affected by a project. Once in the workplace, however, engineers encounter challenges that can be helped by an empathic orientation, from developing projects with diverse partners to meeting federal or state regulations that require planning for the impact of a project on a community. Scholars have begun to recognize that empathy training should be a crucial component of engineering education, but lack proven, evidence-based teaching models that can be used in classrooms. The field of social work has a longstanding history of teaching empathy as part of students’ professional formation, which the research team will draw from. Miller and engineering faculty members Joachim Walther and Nicola Sochacka will test methods of teaching empathy in various learning situations and use their data to build a model for incorporating empathy into engineering education and other disciplines. “This project has the potential to transform engineering education and practice,” said Miller. “The integration of empathy into engineering programs will make the field accessible to a more diverse range of students and, at the same time, provide students with practical skills that will improve their professional performance.” Read more at t.uga.edu/1Ts.

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PROGRAMS

UGA, Emory offer new dual degree in social work, divinity

The University of Georgia School of Social Work and the Candler School of Theology at Emory University have partnered to offer a dual master’s degree in social work and divinity. This marks the first dual degree to be offered between the two universities. The innovative, cross-disciplinary program will develop professionals uniquely equipped to deal with issues related to aging, addiction and other stressors, according to Maurice Daniels, dean and professor in the UGA School of Social Work. “Students will learn to balance pastoral skills such as spiritual counseling with social work practices such as family therapy and community assessment, strengthening their endeavors with individual clients as well as in the public policy arena,” he said. The program, which requires coursework in grief and loss management, will also address a shortage of professionals in Georgia who can combine faith-based and clinical training to help survivors of various types of loss. “This degree requires training in grief counseling and will help to address the debilitating impact of grief, which is both a faith issue and a health issue,” said Harold Briggs, professor and director of research. According to Briggs, the number of people experiencing stress related to loss has escalated in recent years, but clergy and licensed clinical social workers–the professionals most often sought for help–often lack professional training to assist with emotional and practical strategies for coping with grief and loss. The Candler-UGA program is the first of its kind, said Ian McFarland, Stokes Professor of Theology and associate dean of Candler School of Theology. Currently there are four other dual master’s degree programs in social work and divinity in the Southeast that are recognized by the Council on Social Work Education, which accredits social work programs, but none of these require coursework in grief and loss. “Graduates of this program will be better prepared to serve clients during some of their most challenging times,” said UGA Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten. “Whether through this innovative dual degree program, infectious disease research or any number of other partnerships underway, collaborations between the University of Georgia and Emory enhance the health and prosperity of our state and nation.” Read more at t.uga.edu/1wO.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


PROGRAMS

UGA dual MSW/MPH degree adds gerontology, community empowerment concentrations The Master of Social Work/Master of Public Health dual degree program at the University of Georgia has added two areas of concentration: community empowerment and program development within the social work degree, and a gerontology concentration within the public health degree. The options double the choices available to dual degree students, who until recently were limited to a social work concentration in clinical practice and a public health concentration in health promotion and behavior. The concentrations were added in fall 2014 and fall 2015, respectively. The concentration in community empowerment and program development, or CEPD, focuses on how to create effective community organizations or initiatives to address social problems that impact health. Students will learn how to create supportive environments and initiate action within a community by developing or strengthening local groups or promoting changes in legislation. “With the CEPD concentration, students will graduate with strong skills in engaging the community in health promotion and prevention activities,” said Trina Salm Ward, program coordinator. The concentration in gerontology, administered by the MSW/MPH students in class. Institute of Gerontology in the College of Public Health, will give students a firm grounding in how aging affects older adults from biological, psychological, and social perspectives. “UGA’s Institute of Gerontology is delighted to help prepare students for careers combining the perspectives of social work, public health, and gerontology. Graduates will be highly sought after by the public and private sectors as they will have deep insights into how to address the needs of our growing older population at the local, state, and national levels,” said Mary Ann Johnson, interim director of the Institute. The process of developing both options was intensive, said Salm Ward. Faculty and staff in the School of Social Work and the College of Public Health conducted a careful review of courses to determine any overlap or program issues. The proposed changes were then vetted by curriculum committees in both units before being submitted to the Graduate School, which approved the new concentrations. “The effort put forth by faculty and staff in creating these additional concentrations demonstrates the strong commitment by both units to building this interdisciplinary program,” said Salm Ward. For more information on the dual MSW/MPH degree, visit t.uga.edu/1UW.

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PROGRAMS

Title IV-E child welfare education program returns to UGA

Pictured left to right: Graduate student Eric Langford and supervisor Brigette Love (MSW ‘02) prepare a display for National Adoption Month at the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services in Athens. Langford is interning at DFCS thanks to a stipend provided by the Title IV-E program.

After a four-year hiatus, students at the School of Social Work can once again apply for a program known as the Title IV-E Child Welfare Education Program, which supports social work education efforts to professionalize public child welfare. The program, which is funded by the Department of Health and Human Services in partnership with the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services, is named for a section of the Social Security Act that authorizes federal funding for college students who wish to train in child protection, family services, foster care, adoption and home development. “I am thrilled that we can offer this program again,” said Professor Alberta “Bert” Ellett, who oversees Title IV-E sponsored education at the school. The program provides stipends of up to $15,000 per year for competitively selected students to receive field education in professional child welfare practice. In exchange for stipends, students who are completing their master or bachelor of social work degrees are required to take two child welfare courses, serve in an internship in a county DCFS office, and upon graduation work for DFCS for 12 months for each academic year that the stipend was received. For the 2015-2016 school year, 17 master’s degree students and two fourth-year undergraduate students were awarded stipends of $15,000 and $8,000, respectively. The stipends may be awarded for up to two years. Read more at t.uga.edu/1TB.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


PROGRAMS

New service-learning course connects students with families dealing with dementia Credit: Lori Johnston

by LORI JOHNSTON, UGA Office For Public Service and Outreach Marissa Jones holds up a flash card featuring a U.S. president. “Do you recognize him?” “Do you know his name?” she asks when he doesn’t respond. Leo Jackson, a senior citizen with dementia, sits on the couch in his Athens home and stares at the photo. “No.” She gently tells him that the man is President Obama.

Students working with patients as part of service learning project.

Jones, a master’s student in the School of Social Work, then spreads out several cards she made with photos of singers and their bios. Jones and classmate Mellissa Pricher ask Jackson to select a favorite singer. He chooses James Brown and Jones begins playing his songs from her iPhone, which triggers smiles and chuckles from Jackson. “If you’re creative with activities, it can bring back memories,” Jones says. Jones and Pricher are social work students in a new service-learning class that teaches students about the impacts of dementia on a family. Each week, the students visit with Jones, engaging him in activities, and giving his family–his caregivers–some much needed time for themselves. Tiffany Washington, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work, created the course primarily for students majoring in social work or public health and who have an interest in gerontology. She partnered with the Athens Community Council on Aging who provided the students’ training and identified the families who are enrolled in the program. The course is the first service-learning project for the Council that has enabled UGA students to work unsupervised at clients’ homes, said Eve Anthony, ACCA chief operating officer. Continued next page ››

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PROGRAMS

Service-learning continued Credit: Lori Johnston

“We want to make sure that we are a good learning environment so that we’re creating a second generation of professionals who are interested in working with the aging population, or who at least understand issues related to the aging population,” Anthony said. “Service learning is creating that.” Dementia is a syndrome in which there is a deterioration in memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform everyday activities. Worldwide 47.5 million people suffer from dementia. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the total number of people with dementia will rise to 75.6 million by 2030. The students get ideas for activities from the people who are caring for the person with dementia. Suggestions have included listening to music or setting the table for dinner and things that can help the person relate to an earlier time in their life. Caregivers use the 90-minute respite provided by the students to take naps or do activities such as cleaning or gardening. Jackson’s wife, Artelia, says listening to music and looking at pictures and words holds his attention and elicits responses. “What they’re doing with him is a new activity,” she says. “When they are here with him, he smiles.” Jackson connects a square puzzle piece showing a brown hat to the “hat” word piece. Students developed a memory card game to help with patients suffering from dementia.

“You got it. You did it,” Pricher says.

“Do you have any hats?” Jones says. “I have a bunch of them,” Jackson says, laughing. As the visit ends, Jackson takes a card of Ray Charles, folds it up neatly and puts it in his pocket. Pricher takes photos to document the moment, considered another break-through in their visits. “Having this opportunity to learn and possibly explore and see if we want to work with this population, for me, it’s great,” Jones says. “Had I not taken this class I don’t know if I would have come into contact with them. I’m able to learn first hand.”

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


PROGRAMS

Students lay groundwork for community empowerment Residents of East Athens, Georgia, have a new development tool, thanks to the efforts of graduate students from the University of Georgia School of Social Work. The students, led by Assistant Professor Rebecca Matthew, produced a community needs assessment study during the fall 2014 semester that is now being used by community leaders to improve the quality of life for local citizens. “The students wanted to produce a document that would prove helpful in informing the scope of future change efforts within the community, as well as a data source to compliment grant writing initiatives to support those efforts,” said Matthew. The students worked in collaboration with the East Athens Development Corporation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for people who live within U.S. Census tracts 301 and 302, historically impoverished areas. They collected data on the tracts’ history and demographics such as population size, employment numbers, household makeup and education levels. Students then held forums in which local service providers, leaders, residents, members of law enforcement and local government discussed the areas’ assets and challenges.

Rebecca Matthew and Lemuel “Life” LaRoche (BSW ’02, MSW ’03) assist at “First Friday,” a monthly event in East Athens developed by local artist and activist Broderick Flanigan.

“Our aim was to learn more about the strengths and current needs of this Athens community, and to offer back a formal document sharing our findings,” said Julia Jones, who helped to present the students’ findings. “We were also hopefully laying some seeds for a better relationship with the university and the organizations who are positioned to be action-oriented in East Athens.” The students identified seven recurring topics of concern to the community. The three most often cited were a lack of support for youth, high unemployment and a need for greater community involvement in addressing problems. Since study’s completion, the local government has utilized it to determine priorities for community development block grants, and members of the EADC refer to it for data when seeking funding and other resources. “The assessment has been very useful,” said Winston Heard, CEO and executive director of the EADC. “It helped us to frame our five year strategic plan, and the forums conducted during the data gathering process brought together both community residents and stakeholders and helped to identify gaps in perception about youth and how the community prioritizes needs.” Members of the school continue to build relationships with the East Athens community through various activities. Read more at ssw.uga.edu/outreach.html.

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FA C U LT Y – N E W S

Dean Maurice Daniels to step down after a decade of leadership by SAM FAHMY School of Social Work Dean Maurice Daniels announced in July that he will step down after a decade of service as dean to focus more intensely on his research on the civil rights movement and his work with the Foot Soldier Project for Civil Rights Studies. “In addition to Dean Daniels’ long and distinguished career as head of the School of Social Work, he will be remembered for his important work in illuminating the history of racial desegregation at the University of Georgia and other institutions of higher learning in the South,” said UGA President Jere W. Morehead. “We are grateful for his outstanding leadership of the Foot Soldier Project for Civil Rights Studies at the University of Georgia, which uncovered the stories of some of the most iconic figures in UGA’s history.”

Maurice C. Daniels

During Daniels’ tenure as dean, the School of Social Work’s endowment grew by more than three times and the school created several new endowed scholarships and graduate assistantships. The school also created the Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professorship of Social Justice and Civil Rights Studies, the first distinguished professorship named for an African-American at UGA.

The school has established several new degree programs since Daniels became dean, including the interdisciplinary Master of Social Work/Master of Public Health dual degree program with the College of Public Health and the MSW/Master of Divinity dual degree program with Emory University’s Candler School of Theology. Its research funding has been on an upward trajectory, with major grants including $1.3 million from the Department of Health and Human Services to improve behavioral health care for at-risk youth and their families. “Dean Daniels has been a transformational leader who has brought national prominence to the School of Social Work,” said Pamela Whitten, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. “He brings a high standard of excellence and deep personal integrity to every aspect of his position, and I am grateful to him for his leadership and appreciate all that he has done to advance social justice in Georgia and beyond.” Daniels will continue to serve as dean until his successor, Anna Scheyett, joins the school on July 1. Read more at t.uga.edu/1G5.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – N E W S

Anna Scheyett named dean of UGA’s School of Social Work by SAM FAHMY Anna Scheyett, a dean at the University of South Carolina who has fostered student success while enhancing research and outreach, has been named dean of the University of Georgia School of Social Work. Scheyett, who has led the USC College of Social Work since 2011, will assume her new role at UGA on July 1, 2016. At the University of South Carolina, Scheyett oversaw a revision to the Master of Social Work curriculum and developed student testing supports that helped increase licensure pass rates by nearly 40 percent. Under her leadership, the USC College of Social Work Anna Scheyett exceeded its $4 million fundraising goal and established seven endowed scholarships. In addition, she helped develop a statewide conference on race and has been heavily involved in the South Carolina Collaborative on Racial Reconciliation to foster healthy dialogue about diversity issues on campus. Scheyett began her career as a social worker for adults with serious mental illnesses and served as associate dean for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill before being named dean of the USC School of Social Work. Her research on the intersection of mental illnesses and the legal system has been funded by agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and the South Carolina Department of Corrections. “I am pleased that Dr. Scheyett will be joining the university as dean of the School of Social Work,” said President Jere W. Morehead. “I look forward to her continued advancement of the academic stature of the School of Social Work in the coming years.” Scheyett earned her bachelor’s degrees in biology and English from Dickinson College and her master’s degree in human genetics from Yale University. She earned her master’s degree in social work from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and her Ph.D. in social work from Memorial University of Newfoundland. “I am tremendously excited by this new opportunity at the University of Georgia,” Scheyett said. “The School of Social Work has a core focus on the most pressing issues of our time-social justice, health and health disparities and poverty-with brilliant, dedicated faculty and students invested in moving the needle on these challenges. Read more at t.uga.edu/281

Spring 2016

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FA C U LT Y – N E W S

New endowed professorship in health and well-being The recently endowed Georgia Athletic Association Professorship in Health and Well-Being will address persistent and emerging disparities in the health and welfare of underserved populations and help to strengthen the university’s dual degree graduate program in social work and public health. “The professorship builds on the School of Social Work’s efforts to promote research, teaching and service that address the unequal distribution of resources and access to health care. Over the past few years the school has developed a dual degree program in social work and public health, and the university funded a dual degree faculty line with the College of Public Health,” said Maurice Daniels, dean of the school. According to a 2008 report by the Georgia Department of Community Health, low-income and minority residents in Georgia suffer at much higher rates of poor health outcomes than in other states across the U.S. on key indicators of health such as childhood obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. Often the root causes are social in nature, including discrimination, income and access to resources and education. “This professorship will extend opportunities to address health disparities in the state of Georgia,” said Trina Salm Ward, assistant professor and coordinator of the dual degree program in social work and public health. “I am looking forward to increased interdisciplinary scholarship opportunities for our students as well.” The professorship is the fourth endowed professorship at the school. The others are the Thomas M. “Jim” Parham Professorship, established in 1998; the Pauline M. Berger Professorship in Family and Child Welfare, established in 2002; and the Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professorship of Social Justice and Civil Rights Studies, established in 2010. For details about recruitment for this position, please visit t.uga.edu/1Ye.

‘Social change’ scholar named Hollowell Distinguished Professor Llewellyn “Lee” J. Cornelius is the new Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professor of Social Justice and Civil Rights Studies at the UGA School of Social Work. Cornelius serves as director of the Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights. As director, Cornelius oversees an annual speaker series and will collaborate across disciplines to develop externally funded research to address persistent and emerging social problems.

Llewellyn Cornelius

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“Dr. Cornelius is a distinguished scholar in both health policy and social justice, with a strong commitment to human and civil rights and translational research,” said Maurice Daniels, dean of the School of Social Work. “He has an exceptional teaching record with a capacity to teach across programs and a strong record in research, community service and practice.”

University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – N E W S

Hollowell Professor continued Cornelius is one of the most cited African-American scholars in social work. His book, “Designing and Conducting Health Surveys: A Comprehensive Guide,” has been cited more than 1,300 times since it was published in 2006. His research centers on creating and evaluating interventions to improve the health and well-being of under-resourced communities. He has been honored for his contributions to improving health care access for impoverished populations, even having a day named in his honor by both the mayor of Chicago and the governor of Illinois. “This position is a natural extension of the work I have done in the community and academia my whole life,” Cornelius said. “I have always been passionate about equity and thinking strategically about the best way to use data and tools in advocacy to promote sustained social change for marginalized populations.” The Hollowell professorship honors the late civil rights leader and attorney, who was lead counsel in Holmes v. Danner. This 1961 landmark case secured admission to UGA for the first two African-American students. It is the first distinguished professorship at UGA named for an African-American. Read more at t.uga.edu/1OB.

Meet our new faculty! In addition Llewellyn J. Cornelius, the School of Social Work also welcomes the following faculty members: Prior to earning her doctorate, Rebecca Matthew worked as a non-commissioned officer in the United States Army, as well as a community organizer and in various non-profit research positions involving healthcare access, healthcare quality and workforce diversity issues. Since joining the school in 2014 she has engaged her students in community empowerment projects in East Athens, a historically impoverished community. Her areas of interest include poverty and inequality, community development, labor justice, and cooperatives and the social economy. In spring 2015 she was voted by the school’s graduate students as MSW Faculty Instructor of the Year. Rebecca Matthew

Jane McPherson is particularly interested in rights-based practices that address social inequalities and the unequal distribution of wealth, health, political power and community wellness. She organized the state of Florida for One Million Bones, an arts-activist, anti-genocide movement which culminated in the laying of one million handmade bones on the National Mall in June 2013. As a licensed clinical social worker she has extensive experience working in the areas of sexual trauma, child abuse, family violence, bereavement, human trafficking, torture, and the special treatment needs of women. Her work has been local and global in scope, extending from rural Florida to New York City, Egypt and Brazil. Jane McPherson

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FA C U LT Y – N E W S

New faculty continued Michael Robinson’s teaching philosophy centers on experiential and team-based learning. His students’ community engagement projects foster self-respect and dignity among marginalized populations while helping students to apply textbook lessons to real-life situations. His research interests address the health and well-being of African-Americans and other underserved populations, particularly in relation to mental and substance abuse disorders. He is currently serving a three year appointment as a manuscript reviewer for the Journal of Social Work Education. He has also assisted the Council on Social Work Education through appointments to the Council for Racial, Ethnic and Cultural Diversity and the Commission for Diversity and Social and Economic Justice. Michael Robinson

As coordinator of field education at the Gwinnett Campus, Carol Smith applies over a decade of personal experience in social work field education. A licensed clinical social worker, she has provided case management, consultation and numerous other services to agencies that provide resources for families, children and youth. Her past educational responsibilities include assisting the directors of field education at Georgia State University and Valdosta State University. She has taught classes at both the bachelor’s and master’s degree levels in a wide range of areas, including child trauma, psychopathology, social work methods, social work macro and micro practice and family perspectives. Carol Smith

School of Social Work faculty, alumni, receive Distinguished Social Work Practice Awards

Alberta Ellett

The Georgia Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers honored two University of Georgia School of Social Work faculty members at the organization’s annual meeting on Oct. 22. Maurice Daniels, professor and dean of the school, and Alberta “Bert” Ellett, professor of social work, both received Distinguished Social Work Practice Awards. Daniels also was presented with the 2015 David E. Levine Excellence in Education and Ethics Award.

The Levine Excellence in Education and Ethics Award honors social workers who have promoted ethics and education, training and development as an integral part of social work education. It is named for David L. Levine, a UGA School of Social Work faculty member who passed away in 2011, and who served as chair of the NASW Georgia Chapter’s Committee on Ethics. In addition to Daniels and Ellett, 12 other social workers received the Distinguished Social Work Practice Award. Seven of the 12 had UGA ties, having earned their degrees or taught at the UGA School of Social Work: Nancy Kropf, a faculty member from 1990 to 2006, Lawanna Barron (MSW ’91), Dorothy Carillo (PhD ’93), Jan Ligon (MSW, PhD ’89), Ben Marion (MSW ’73), Rocio del Milagro Woody (MSW ’88) and Jan Yates (MSW ‘75).

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

TENURED & TENURE TRACK FACULTY

RESEARCH STATEMENTS Maurice C. Daniels DEAN AND PROFESSOR

EdD • Indiana University, Higher Education MSW • Indiana University BA • Indiana University, Psychology

“My research centers on social justice, community empowerment, civil and human rights. My primary areas of scholarship focus on unsung social justice advocates, grassroots activism, and the history of the civil rights movement.”

Shari E. Miller

ASSOCIATE DEAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PHD PROGRAM DIRECTOR PhD • University of Maryland, Baltimore, Social Work MSW • Yeshiva University, Social Work BA • State University of New York at Binghamton, Sociology

“My research focuses broadly on social work education and the social work profession, including professional socialization, educational innovation, self-care, development of theory, interdisciplinary and inter-professional education and practice, and reflective education and practice for a sustainable global society.”

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FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Harold E. Briggs

PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PhD • University of Chicago, Social Development/Social Treatment MSW • University of Chicago, Social Treatment BA • Morehouse College, Sociology

“I study the interactive cultural adaptive determinants of poor physical and mental health adjustment among African-Americans, and how these determinants influence risky practices such as drug abuse, unprotected sex practices and incarceration. I also study the effectiveness of inter-professional behavioral health social work education.”

Rosalyn Denise Campbell ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Michigan, Social Work and Sociology MSW • University of Michigan BA • The University of Texas at Austin, Sociology, Ethnic Studies

“I study the mental health, illness and wellness of individuals from underserved groups, particularly Black Americans. My goal is to push the field forward by recognizing and exploring the heterogeneity of Black American experiences. By examining these variations, I hope to design more culturally appropriate interventions aimed at improving mental health and wellness.”

Mary A. Caplan ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of California, Berkeley, Social Welfare MSW • University of California, Berkeley BA • University of Oregon, Sociology

“My research focuses on the relationship between poverty, personal debt, the welfare state and capitalism. Specifically, I want to understand how low-income people utilize informal, fringe and predatory financial services to make ends meet within the context of changes in social policy and the political economy.”

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Y. Joon Choi

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PhD • Virginia Commonwealth University, Social Work MSW • University of Michigan MA • City University of New York – City College, International Relations BA • Ewha Womans University, Social Work “I am currently conducting a randomized controlled trial of an online intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention curriculum with Web 2.0 features for Korean American immigrant faith leaders, in order to test the efficacy of the intervention in changing Korean immigrant faith leaders’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (KAB) related to IPV in general and their responses to IPV in their congregations.”

Llewellyn J. Cornelius

DONALD L. HOLLOWELL DISTINQUISHED PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CIVIL RIGHTS STUDIES PhD • University of Chicago, Social Service Administration MA • University of Chicago, Social Service Administration MA • University of Chicago, Social Science BA • Syracuse University, Psychology/Sociology “My research focuses on empirically documenting barriers of access to health care, mental health services, social services, educational opportunities and employment opportunities for underserved populations. It also focuses on engaging communities as co-partners in the design and implementation of interventions that improve the overall health and well-being of disadvantaged populations locally, nationally and globally.”

Jennifer Elkins ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • Columbia University, Social Work MSW • University of Wisconsin BA • University of Wisconsin, Psychology/Social Work “What is the impact of trauma and loss over the life course? What are the underlying micro- to macro-level mechanisms contributing to adaptive and maladaptive developmental outcomes? Questions such as these form the basis of my research, which is devoted to understanding and intervening with diverse populations and age groups that have experienced trauma, violence, abuse and loss.”

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FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Alberta J. Ellett PROFESSOR

PhD • Louisiana State University, Social Work MSW • University of Georgia BS • University of Alabama, Microbiology “I examine child welfare (CW) organizations and workforce issues; CW interface with courts and CW practice and education. I have also developed measures of human caring, self-efficacy, professional organizational culture and intent to remain employed that demonstrated reliability and validity in two large statewide studies. I’m currently secretary of the Society for Social Work Research and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Public Child Welfare.”

Michael J. Holosko

PAULINE M. BERGER PROFESSOR OF FAMILY AND CHILD WELFARE PhD • University of Pittsburgh, Social Research MSW • University of Toronto BA • York University, Toronto, Psychology/Sociology

“I am interested in evaluation and research related to programs and interventions for at-risk children and families. Our field needs to do a better job in developing simpler methods to evaluate our programs and creative ways to disseminate such information to our practitioners.”

June Gary Hopps

THOMAS M. “JIM” PARHAM PROFESSOR OF FAMILY AND CHILDREN STUDIES PhD • Brandeis University, Social Policy MSW • Atlanta University BA • Spelman College, Political Science/History “I have developed a scholarly and research agenda that centers on clinical practice effectiveness and group work with clients and families overwhelmed by personal and environmental stressors; identification of success factors for long-term married, civically engaged and high-achieving Afro-American couples; program evaluation and effectiveness; civil and human rights in the social work profession; and human rights and privatization in central and eastern Europe.”

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Kristina Jaskyte Bahr

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Alabama, Social Work MSW • Vytautas Magnus University BS • Vytautas Magnus University, Sociology

“What helps a nonprofit organization adapt to change? I explore major factors associated with nonprofit organizations’ capacities for innovation and employee creativity, primarily through national and cross-cultural studies as well as studies of the boards of directors and foundations’ roles in encouraging or inhibiting new paradigms.”

Tony B. Lowe

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Pittsburgh, Social Work MSW • Grambling State University BA • Grambling State University, Social Work

“The profession is challenged by persistent internal and external difficulty that forever requires us to be leading advocates against old and new social problems. My research interests include mental health service and social policy issues, African-American service concerns, barriers to service, and collaborative models for international education.”

Rebecca A. Matthew ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of California, Berkeley, Social Welfare MSW • University of California, Berkeley, Social Welfare MPH • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Public Health BA • University of South Florida, Psychology “My research strives to enliven conversations and (re)imagine possibilities for greater community and economic justice. I explore alternative configurations of labor—namely, worker-owned cooperatives—as a means of supporting community development and engendering dignified labor conditions, particularly among those who provide service-oriented labor (e.g., childcare, aging care, domestic services).”

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FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Jane McPherson ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • Florida State University, Social Work MSW • Columbia University MPH • Columbia University BA • Brown University, Semiotics “I apply human rights principles to social work teaching and practice. My research creates tools to investigate and promote rights-based practices in the US and internationally; focuses attention on the challenges faced by migrants, refugees and asylum seekers; and explores the ability of art and reflection to advance social justice.”

Orion P. Mowbray ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Michigan, Social Work and Social Psychology MSW • University of Michigan MS • University of Michigan, Psychology MA • Eastern Michigan University, Sociology BA • University of Michigan, Psychology

“My research examines mental health over the life course. My specific areas of research include promoting access to mental health and substance use services and understanding differential outcomes associated with mental health and substance use service utilization.”

Larry Nackerud PROFESSOR

PhD • Cornell University, Policy Analysis MSW • Tulane University BA • Luther College, Sociology

“I teach and conduct research on the mix between the formulation of social welfare policies and the applied practice of social work. I pay a great deal of attention to the elements of research methodology, particularly the use of an interpretive inquiry paradigm, different sampling strategies, and a combining of quantitative and qualitative methods.”

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S David Okech

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MSW PROGRAM AND GLOBAL STUDIES DIRECTOR PhD • University of Kansas, Social Work MSW • University of New Hampshire BA • University of Nairobi, Social Work

“My current research and interests concern programs and policies, including child development accounts that can enhance the long-term well-being of children in lower-income families. I plan to assess how globalization impacts social welfare policies and programs around the world and how these in turn affect the economic and social well-being of children and families living in poverty.”

Patricia M. Reeves PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Georgia, Adult Education MSW • University of Alabama BA • Auburn University, Family and Children’s Services “Health-related issues have driven my research—from a focus on the psychosocial concerns of individuals living with HIV/AIDS to risk/protective factors in teen dating violence, to the humananimal bond in health and wellbeing. Additionally, with the social work profession’s growing interest in online learning, I am again focusing on educational technology, an area prominent early in my career.”

Michael A. Robinson

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Louisville, Social Work MSW • University of Louisville BS • De Paul University, Commerce

“My current focus is on African-Americans violent and sometimes deadly interactions with law enforcement. My research interests are situated in the intersections of issues that affect the health and well-being of African-Americans and other marginalized groups and the roles of communities and stakeholders in helping to negotiate these issues.”

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FA C U LT Y – R E S E A R C H S TAT E M E N T S Trina Salm Ward

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AND COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH PhD • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences MSW • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee BA • St. Norbert College, Psychology

“My research focuses on disparities in infant and maternal health. Currently I am examining mother-infant bed-sharing and its relationship to risk of sleep-related infant death. My research is interdisciplinary; it spans both the fields of social work and public health. I am especially interested in engaging community members as active collaborators in my research.”

M. Elizabeth Vonk PROFESSOR

PhD • University of Georgia, Social Work MSW • Florida State University BS • Mercer University, Psychology “I primarily investigate how transracial adoptive parents view and demonstrate racial and cultural socialization practices with their children. I want to know if there are particular socialization practices that lead to better outcomes, such as positive racial identity formation among transracial adoptees. My hope is that such knowledge will inform and improve transracial adoption practice.”

Tiffany R. Washington ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

PhD • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Social Work MSW • North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University/UNC at Greensboro BA • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Communication Studies “My research interests include aging, chronic disease and health disparities. Specifically, I examine factors that help and hinder successful disease self-management among older adults living with chronic kidney disease, and how those factors differ by race. I am interested in designing and testing age and culturally appropriate kidney disease self-management interventions for use by nephrology social workers.”

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FA C U LT Y

CLINICAL FACULTY & ACADEMIC PROFESSIONALS

Leon Banks

Anthony J. Mallon

SR. ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, BSW PROGRAM DIRECTOR, MSW ADMISSIONS COORDINATOR

SR. ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, INTERIM DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

PhD • University of Georgia, Social Work MSW • Savanah State University BS • Howard University, Psychology

PhD • University of Michigan, Political Science MSW • City University of New York BS • University of Connecticut, Biology

Mary Zorn Bates

CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MSW • University of Georgia BS • Valdosta State University, Sociology

Jacquelyn I. Ellis

Sandra R. Murphy

SR. ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, FIELD EDUCATION DIRECTOR PhD • University of Georgia, Social Work MSW • University of Michigan BA • Michigan State University, Social Work

Jeffrey F. Skinner

ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, MSW FIELD EDUCATION COORDINATOR

SR. ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, BSW FIELD EDUCATION COORDINATOR

PhD • University of Georgia, Social Work MSW • University of Georgia BS • University of Georgia, Social Work

MSSW • University of Tennessee MDiv • Vanderbilt University BA • University of Oklahoma

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FA C U LT Y

RECENT PUBLICATIONS Leon Banks REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Briggs, H. E., Banks, L., & Briggs, A. C. (2014). Increasing knowledge and mental health service use among AfricanAmericans through evidence-based practice and cultural injection vector engagement practice approaches [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), 1-14.

Harold E. Briggs REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

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with Tupac: Building a solid grounding in theory across the social work education continuum. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 35(5), 493-512. doi: 10.1080/08841233.2015.1085484 Flanagan, M., & Briggs, H. E. (2015). Substance abuse vulnerability among homeless adults in Atlanta, GA and a multilevel assessment framework. Best Practices in Mental Health, 11(2), 73-95. Holosko, M. J., Winkel, M., Crandall, C. A. & Briggs, H. E. (2015). A content analysis of mission statements of our top 50 schools of social work. Journal of Social Work Education, 51(2), 222-236. doi: 10.1080/10437797.2015.1012922

Flanagan, M. & Briggs, H. E. (in press). Ethnographic analysis of drug abuse and recovery among homeless adults in Atlanta, GA and a multilevel drug abuse resiliency tool. Best Practices in Mental Health.

Briggs, H. E., Quinn, A., Orellana, E., Roberto, O., & Miller, K. M. (2015). Community adversity and children’s mental health: Moderating effects of caregiver service utilization and race on children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. Children and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 32(6), 555-565. doi: 10.1007/s10560-015-0395-3

Briggs, H. E., Sharkey, C. N., & Briggs, A. C. (2016). The contributions of applied behavior analysis and behavioral theory to innovative research and practice cultures in social work. Journal of Evidence Informed Social Work. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/23761407.2015.1086710

Briggs, H. E., Kothari, B., Briggs, A. C., & Bank, L., & DeGruy, J. (2015). Racial respect: Initial testing and validation of the racial respect scale for adult African-Americans. Journal of the Society for Social Work Research, 6(2), 269-303. doi: 10.1086/681625

Briggs, H. E., Cox, W., Sharkey, C., Briggs, A. C., & Black, M. (2016). A review of the research on Pinkston’s single parent training program. Research on Social Work Practice 26(1), 128144. doi: 10.1177/1049731515592033

Briggs, H. E., & Campbell, R. D. (2014). Social determinants of behavioral health disparities: Best practice approaches. [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health editors]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2).

Briggs, H. E., Cox, W., Sharkey, Corley, N., Briggs, A. C., Black, M. (2015). The role of the behavioral perspective in model development research with single parent families. Children and Adolescent Social Work Journal. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10560-015-0428-y

Briggs, H. E., Miller, S. E., & Campbell, R. D. (2014). Introduction: Disparity-inducing social determinants of behavioral health: Future directions through best practices in mental health [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), xi-xvii.

Elkins, J., Miller, S., Briggs, H., & Skinner, S. (2015). Teaching

Briggs, H. E., Banks, L., & Briggs, A. C. (2014). Increasing

University of Georgia School of Social Work


FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S knowledge and mental health service use among AfricanAmericans through evidence-based practice and cultural injection vector engagement practice approaches [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), 1-14. Briggs, H. E. (2014). Editorial: What do we really know about the role and impact of culture as a social determinant of mental health [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]? Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), 103104. Huggins-Hoyt, K., Holosko, M. J., Briggs, H. E., & Barner, J. R. (2015). Citation impact scores of top AfricanAmerican scholars in social work: The story behind the data. Research on Social Work Practice, 25(1). 164-170. doi: 10.1177/1049731514530004 Briggs, H. E., Bank, L., Briggs, A. C. (2014). Behavioral health and socialcultural determinants of corrections involvement among vulnerable African-American females: Historical and contemporary themes. Journal of Forensic Social Work, 4(3), 176-202. doi: 10.1080/1936928X.2014.999851 Briggs, H. E., Bank, L, Fixsen, A., Briggs, A. C., Kothari, B., & Burkett, C. (2014). Perceptions of the AfricanAmerican experience (PAAX): A new measure of adaptive identities among African-American men and women. Journal of Forensic Social Work, 4(3), 203-233. doi: 10.1080/1936928X.2015.1029660 Quinn, A., Briggs, H. E., Miller, K. M., & Orellana, E. R. (2014). Social and familial determinants of health: Mediating effects of caregiver mental and physical health on children’s mental health. Children and Youth Services Review, 36, 163-169. doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2013.11.016 Miller, K. M., Orellana, E. R., Briggs, H. E., & Quinn, A. (2014). Influence of caregiver substance dependence and serious mental illness on children’s mental health: Moderating effects of social support. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 31(5), 435-454. doi: 10.1007/s10560-014-0326-8

Rosalyn Denise Campbell REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Briggs, H. E., & Campbell, R. D. (2014). Social determinants of behavioral health disparities: Best practice approaches [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health editors]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2). Briggs, H. E., Miller, S. E., & Campbell, R. D. (2014). Introduction: Disparity inducing social determinants of behavioral health: Future directions through best practices in mental health [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), XI-XVII. Campbell, R. D., & Long, L. A. (2014). Culture as a social determinant of mental and behavioral health: A look at culturallyshaped beliefs and the impact on help-seeking behaviors and service use patterns of black Americans with depression [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), 48-62. Whitley, R., & Campbell, R. D. (2014) Stigma, agency and recovery amongst people with severe mental Illness. Social Science and Medicine, 107, 1-8. doi: 10.1016/j. socscimed.2014.02.010

Mary Caplan REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Caplan M. A. (in press). [Review of the book Poverty and Shame: Global Experiences by E. Chase & G. BantebyaKyomuhendo (Eds.)]. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare. Caplan, M. A., & Riccardelli, L. (2016). Institutionalizing neoliberalism: 21st century capitalism, market sprawl and social policy. Poverty & Public Policy, 8(1), 20-38. doi: 10.1002/pop4.128 Kindle P., & Caplan, M. A. (2015). Understanding the fringe economy. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 42(1), 49–72.

Continued next page ›› Spring 2016

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Caplan, M. A. (2014). Community economic development strategies to resist predatory lending. Social Work, 59(2), 149–156. Caplan, M. A. (2014). Financial coping strategies of mental health consumers: Managing social benefits. Community Mental Health Journal, 50(4), 409–414. doi: 10.1007/s10597-013-9674-7 ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES Caplan, M. A. (2015). Credit. In M. Odekon (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty (2nd ed., Vol. 1, pp. 310-312). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi: http://dx.doi. org/10.4135/9781483345727.n166 Caplan, M. A. (2015). Georgia. In M. Odekon (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty (2nd ed., Vol. 2, p. 659). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483345727. n339 Caplan, M. A. (2015). Supplemental security income, services funded by. In The Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity. (Vol. 3, pp. 1275-1276). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi: http:// dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483346663

Bride, B. E., Choi, Y. J., Olin, I. W., & Roman, P. M. (2015). Patient violence towards counselors in substance use disorder treatment programs: Prevalence, predictors, and responses. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 57, 9-17. doi: 10.1016/j. jsat.2015.04.004 Choi, Y. J., McGarity, S. V., & Langhorst, D. M. (2015). Increasing follow-up rates in longitudinal studies of women with Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs). Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 15, 288–306. doi: 10.1080/1533256X.2015.1056526 Choi, Y. J. (2014). Korean American clergy practices regarding intimate partner violence: Roadblock or support for battered women. Journal of Family Violence, 30(3), 293-302. doi: 10.1007/ s10896-015-9675-0 Choi, Y. J. (2014). Determinants of clergy behaviors promoting safety of battered Korean immigrant women. Violence Against Women, 21(3), 394-415. doi: 10.1177/1077801214568029

Llewellyn J. Cornelius REFEREED BOOKS

Caplan, M. A. (2015). Social Security, services funded by. In The Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity. (Vol. 3, pp. 1213-1214). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi: http://dx.doi. org/10.4135/9781483346663

Y. Joon Choi REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Choi, Y. J., & Cramer, E. P. (in press). An exploratory study of female Korean American church leaders’ views on domestic violence. Family Violence and Ethnic Populations. Choi, Y. J., & An, S. O. (2016). Interventions to improve responses of helping professionals to intimate partner violence: A quick scoping review. Research on Social Work Practice, 26(1), 101127. doi: 10.1177/1049731515579420

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Cornelius, L. J., & Harrington, D. A. (2014). Social justice approach for survey design and analysis. New York: Oxford University Press REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Abrefa-Gyan, T. A., Cornelius, L. J., & Okundaye, J. N. (2016). Socio-demographic factors, social support, quality of life, and HIV/AIDS in Ghana. Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work. 13(2), 206-216. doi: 10.1080/23761407.2015.1018033 Abrefa-Gyan, T. A., Cornelius, L. J., & Okundaye, J. N. (2015). Gender and children as the moderators of the relationship between social support and quality of life: An empirical study of people living with HIV/AIDS in Ghana. Social Work in Public Health, 30(7), 550-558. doi: 10.1080/19371918.2015.1071611


FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Simpson G. M. & Cornelius L. J. (2015). Overlooking African American males: A qualitative perspective of urban African American grandmother caregivers’ reliance on family members. Journal of Human Behavior and Social Environment, 5(1), 149-170. doi: 10.1300/J137v15n01_08 Sam-Agudu, N. A., Cornelius, L. J., Okundaye, J. N., Adeyemi, O. A., Isah, H. O., Wiwa, O. M., Adejuyigbe, E., Galadanci, H., Afe, A. J., Jolaoso, I., Bassey, E., & Charurat, M.E. (2014). The impact of Mentor Mother Programs on PMTCT service uptake and retention-in-care at primary health care facilities in Nigeria: A prospective cohort study (MoMent Nigeria). Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 67(Suppl. 2), S132-S138. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000331

professionals (pp. 89-99). New York, NY: Springer Publications. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Ezeamama, A., Elkins, J., Simpson, C., Smith, S., Allegra, J. & Miles, T. (2015). Indicators of resilience and healthcare outcomes: Findings from the 2010 Health and Retirement Survey. Quality of Life Research. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s11136015-1144-y Elkins, J., Miller, S., Briggs, H. & Skinner, S. (2015). Teaching with Tupac: Building a solid grounding in theory across the social work education continuum. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 35(5), 493-512. doi: 10.1080/08841233.2015.1085484

Weigner, M. B., Basham, H.F., Dewar, K. M., Rupp, V.A., Cornelius, L. J., & Greenburg, M. R. (2014). Patient attitudes regarding consent for emergency department computed tomographies. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 15(1), 14-19. doi: 10.5811/westjem.2013.5.15893

Gearing, R. E., Brewer, K. B., Elkins, J., Ibrahim, R. W., MacKenzie, M. J., & Schwalbe, C. S. (2015). Prevalence and correlates of PTSD, depression, and suicidality in Jordanian youth in institutional care. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 203(3), 175-181.

Greeno, E., Shdaimah, C., & Cornelius, L. J. (2014). Meeting the civil legal needs of low-income Marylanders: An evaluation of a Judicare pilot. Journal of Policy Practice, 13(2), 65-84. doi: 10.1080/15588742.2013.855888

Miles, T., Allegria, J., Ezezamama, A., Simpson, C., Gerst, K., & Elkins, J. (2014). In a longevity society, loss and grief are emerging risk factors for health care use: Findings from the Health and Retirement Survey cohort aged 50 to 70 Years. American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049909114552125

Maurice C. Daniels REFEREED BOOKS Daniels, M. C. (2016). Saving the soul of Georgia: Donald L. Hollowell and the struggle for civil rights. Athens: University of Georgia Press. (Original work published 2013)

Jennifer Elkins REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS Elkins, J., Holt, J. & Miles, T. (2014). The role of informal caregivers for frail elders in disasters. In C. A. Cefalu (Ed.). Disaster preparedness for seniors: A comprehensive guide for health care

Simpson, C., Allegria, J., Ezeamama, A., Elkins, J., & Miles, T. (2014). The impact of mid and late-life loss on insomnia: Findings from the HRS 2010 cohort. Family and Community Health, 37(4), 317-326. doi: 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000267 Okech, D., Ottenweller, M., Elkins, J., Caldwell, E., & Segoshi, M. (2014). Constitutionalism and social development in Kenya. Social Development Issues, 36(1), 78-92. Gearing, R. E., Townsend, L., Elkins, J., El-Bassel, N., & Osterberg, L. (2014). Strategies to predict, measure and intervene across types of psychosocial treatment adherence. Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 22(1), 31-45. doi: 10.1097/HRP.10.1097/ HRP.0000000000000005

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Alberta Ellett REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Ellett, A. J. (in press). Child protective services maltreatment investigation/assessment: An overview for attorneys. In D. N. Duquette, A. M. Haralambie, & V. S. Sankaran (Eds.). Child welfare law and practice: Representing children, parents and state agencies in abuse, neglect and dependency cases, 2nd Ed. (Redbook). Bradford Publishing, Co.: Denver, CO. Ellett, A. J. (2015). A walking contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction: A critique of Stoesz’ the child welfare cartel. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049731515617301 Ellett, A. J. (2014). A first-hand account of Title IV-E child welfare initiatives in social work education and practice. Advances in Social Work, 15(1), 63-79.

Holosko, M. J., & Skinner, J. (2015). Leadership and management: Necessary skills for field directors. In M. Raskin, C. Hunter, & J. Moen (Eds.) Quality social work field education: A field director’s guide (pp.287-300). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books. Holosko, M. J. & Faith, E. (2015). Educating BSW and MSW social workers in child welfare services. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 3-25). New York, NY: Springer Publications. Holosko, M. J., Tillotson, S., & Ojo, J.E. (2015). Child development. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-Informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 4151). New York, NY: Springer Publications.

MONOGRAPHS/RESEARCH REPORTS

Holosko, M. J. & Ojo, J. (2015). Risk assessment: Issues and implementation in child protective services. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-Informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 85-97). New York, NY: Springer Publications.

Ellett, C. D., Ellett, A. J., Ellis, J. I., & Rugutt, J. K. (2015). Summary project report on the development and initial validation of new assessment indicators and measures for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) human services inventory. Athens, GA: CDE Research Associates, Inc.

Holosko, M. J., Cooper, R., High, K., Loy, A., & Ojo, J. (2015).The process of intervention with multiproblem families: Theoretical and practical guidelines. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-Informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 137-164). New York, NY: Springer Publications.

Michael Holosko REFEREED BOOKS Dunlop, J., & Holosko. M. (in press). Service user input in planning local community services. Chicago, IL: Lyceum Publications. Holosko, M. (in press). Social work case management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Wodarski, J., Holosko, M., & Feit, M. D. (Eds.) (2015). Evidenceinformed assessment and practice in child welfare. New York, NY: Springer Publications.

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REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS

University of Georgia School of Social Work

Holosko, M. J., & Bostur, J.R. (2015). Child maltreatment. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 189-217). New York, NY: Springer Publications. Holosko, M. J. (2015). The empirical base for the implementation of social skills training with maltreated children. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 261-278). New York, NY: Springer Publications. Holosko, M. J. (2015). Summary: Field-tested evidenceinformed assessment and treatment for practice in child welfare. In J. Wodarski, M. Holosko, & M. D. Feit. (Eds.) Evidence-informed assessment and practice in child welfare (pp. 295-298). New York,


FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S NY: Springer Publications. Holosko, M. J. (2015). Social work practice and leadership. In K. Corcoran (Ed.). The social workers’ desk reference (3rd ed.) (pp. 4550). New York: Oxford University Press. Holosko, M. J. (2015). Neoliberalism, globalization and social welfare. In K. Corcoran (Ed). The social workers’ desk reference (3rd ed.) (pp. 941-949). New York: Oxford University Press. Holosko, M. J., & Barner, J.R. (2014). Neoliberal globalization: Social welfare policy and institutions. In Vidal de Haymes, M., Haymes, S., and Miller, R. (Eds.). The Routledge handbook on poverty in the United States (pp. 239-248). London,U.K.: Taylor & Francis. Holosko, M. J. (2014). Evaluating quantitative studies. In R. Grinnell, Jr. and Y. Unrau (Eds.) Social work research and evaluation: Foundations of evidence-based practice (10th ed.) (pp. 467-487). New York: Oxford University Press. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Colvin, M. L., Pruett, J., Young, S., & Holosko, M. J. (In press). An exploratory case study of a volunteer-based sexual assault hotline: Implications for training and practice. Violence Against Women. Holosko, M. J. (2016). Introduction to the special Issue on intervention research [Special issue on intervention research]. Research on Social Work Practice, 26(1), 5-7. doi: 10.1177/1049731515581015 Holosko, M. J. (2016). Dedication to Dr. Elsie Pinkston [Special issue on intervention research]. Research on Social Work Practice, 26(1). doi: 10.1177/1049731515581015 Chan. C. & Holosko, M. J. (2016). A review of information and communication technology enhanced social work interventions [Special issue on intervention research]. Research on Social Work Practice, 26(1), 88-100. doi: 10.1177/1049731515578884 Chan, C., & Holosko, M. J. (2016). The utilization of

social media for youth outreach engagement: A case study. Qualitative Social Work. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1473325016638917 Holosko, M. J., Barner, J. R., & Allen, J. L. (2015). Citation impact of women in social work: Exploring gender and research culture. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049731515598374 Chan. C., & Holosko, M. J. (2015). An overview of the use of Mechanical Turk in behavioral sciences: Implications for social work. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049731515594024 Holosko, M. J., & Skinner, J. (2015). A call for field coordination leadership to implement the signature pedagogy. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, (25)3, 275-283. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2015.1005519 Holosko, M. J., Winkel, M., Crandall, C. A., & Briggs, H. E. (2015). A content analysis of mission statements of our top 50 schools of social work. Journal of Social Work Education, 51(2), 222236. doi: 10.1080/10437797.2015.1012922 Green, D. M., Twill, S., Holosko, M. J., & Nackerud, L. (2015). An ecological approach to evaluating a system of care program: Dollars making sense. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 11(5), 484-497. doi: 10.1080/15433714.2013.853585 Barner, J. R., Holosko. M. J., Thyer, B. A., & King, Jr., S. (2015). Research productivity in top ranked schools in psychology and social work: Research cultures do matter! Journal of Social Work Education, 51, 5-18. doi: 10.1177/1049731514549815 Huggins-Hoyt, K., Holosko, M. J., Briggs, H. E., & Barner, J. R. (2015). Citation impact scores of top African-American scholars in social work: The story behind the data. Research on Social Work Practice, 25(1). 164-170. doi: 10.1177/1049731514530004 Holosko, M. J., Jolivette, K., & Houchins, D. E. (2014). Reporting guidelines for intervention and evaluation research conducted in juvenile and adult corrections: A guide for better quality and uniform standardization. Journal of Correctional Education, 65(3), 66-90. Continued next page ›› Spring 2016

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Barner, J. R., Holosko, M. J., & Thyer, B. A. (2014). American social work and psychology faculty members’ scholarly productivity: A controlled comparison of citation impact using the h-index. British Journal of Social Work, 44(8), 2448-2458. doi: 10.1093/bjsw/bct161

Bowles, D. D., & Hopps, J. G. (2014). The profession’s role in meeting its historical mission to serve vulnerable populations. Advances in Social Work, 15(1), 1-20.

Green, D. M., Twill, S. E., Nackerud, L., & Holosko, M. (2014). An ecological approach to evaluating a system of care program: Dollars making sense. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 11(5), 484-497. doi: 10.1080/15433714.2013.853585 . Battle, S. F., Davis, L., Duongtran, P., Garrison, B., Gitterman, A., Green, R. R., Harris, M. S., Harrison, D. F., Hilarski, C., Holosko, M. J., et al. (2014). EOV Editorial Board. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 24(8), 1010. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.958402

Hopps, J. G., & Lowe, T. B. (2014). Social work profession: Political context. In C. Franklin (Ed). The Encyclopedia of Social Work. National Association of Social Work Press and Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/ acrefore/9780199975839.013.622

Holosko, M. J., Jolivette, K., & Houchins, D. E. (2014). Reporting guidelines for intervention and evaluation research conducted in juvenile and adult corrections: A guide for better quality and uniform standardization. Journal of Correctional Education, 65(3), 66-89.

Jaskyte, K. (2016). Work values of public, nonprofit, and business employees: A cross-cultural evidence. International Journal of Public Administration, 39(3), 184-193. doi: 10.1080/01900692.2014.1003386

June Gary Hopps REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS Hopps, J. G., & Lowe, T. B. (In press). Power in social and human service: Theories, practices, and reality. In E. Pinderhughes (Ed.). Power: A 21st century social work imperative. NASW Press. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Bowles, D. D, Hopps, J. G., and Clayton, O. (in press). The contributions of historically black colleges to the social work profession. Journal of Social Work Education. Hopps, J. G., and Bowles, D. D. (2015). A response to Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder: Energizing, educating and empowering voters. Phylon: The Clark Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture, 52(2), 1-23.

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ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

Kristina Jaskyte Bahr REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Jaskyte, K., & Holland, T. (2015). Nonprofit boards: Challenges and opportunities [Guest editorial]. Human Services Organizations: Leadership, Management and Governance, 39(3), 163-166. doi: 10.1080/23303131.2015.1035612 Jaskyte, K. (2015). Board of directors and innovation in nonprofit organizations model: Preliminary evidence from nonprofit organizations in developing countries. VOLUNTAS: The International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organization, 26(5), 1920-1943. doi: 10.1007/s11266-014-9505-7 Jaskyte, K. (2014). Individual and work values of nonprofit, public, and business employees: How similar or different are they? Human Services Organizations: Leadership, Management and Governance, 38(3), 283-296. doi: 10.1080/03643107.2013.866606


FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Tony B. Lowe

Jane McPherson

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS

Daniels, J. B., & Lowe, T. B. (2014). Students’ acceptance of Afrocentricity into the social work curriculum. Journal of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship, 1(1), http://digitalcommons.fvsu.edu/ fvsu-jtls/vol1/iss1/1/

Androff, D., & McPherson, J. (2014). Can human rights-based social work practice bridge the micro/macro divide? In K.R. Libal, S.M. Berthold, R.L. Thomas, & L.M. Healy (Eds.) Advancing human rights in social work education. Washington, DC: Council on Social Work Education.

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES Hopps, J. G. & Lowe, T. B. (2014). Social work profession: Political context. In C. Franklin (Ed). The Encyclopedia of Social Work. National Association of Social Work Press and Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.013.622

McPherson, J. (2014). Four factors: Assessing refugee survivors of torture in personal and cross-national context. In Sven Hessle (Ed.), Global social transformation and social action: The role of social workers (pp. 112-117). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Anthony J. Mallon MONOGRAPHS/RESEARCH REPORTS Grossman, J., Kato, L., Mallon, A., Maguire, S., & Conway, M. (2015). The value of credentials for disadvantaged workers: Findings from the sector employment impact study. The Aspen Institute. Washington, DC.

Rebecca A. Matthew REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS Matthew, R., & Smith, A. M. (in press). La Frontera: Social work case management with unaccompanied minors in Arizona. In M. Holosko (Ed.) Social work case management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. JOURNAL ARTICLES Matthew, R. (in press). Community engagement: Behavioral strategies to enhance the quality of participatory partnerships. Journal of Community Psychology.

Berthold, S. M. & McPherson, J. (in press). Fractured families: U.S. asylum backlog divides parents and children worldwide. Journal of Human Rights and Social Work. McPherson, J. (2015). Human rights practice in social work: A U.S. social worker looks to Brazil for leadership. European Journal of Social Work, 18(4), 599-612. doi: 10.1080/13691457.2014.947245 McPherson, J., & Cheatham, L. P. (2015). One million bones: Measuring the effect of human rights participation in the social work classroom. Journal of Social Work Education, 51(1), 47-57. doi: 10.1080/10437797.2015.977130 McPherson, J. (2015). You told me your story without words. Journal of Poetry Therapy, 28(1), 63-64. doi: 10.1080/08893675.2015.980067 McPherson, J., & Mazza, N. (2014). Using arts activism and poetry to catalyze human rights engagement and reflection in social work education. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 33(7), 944-958. doi: 10.1080/02615479.2014.885008

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Shari E. Miller

Orion P. Mowbray

REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Miller, S. E., Hayward, R. A., & Izlar, J. (in press). The place for a global and holistic environment: international challenges and opportunities for social work education in the 21st century. In I. Taylor, M. Bogo, M Lefevre, & B. Teater (Eds.). The Routledge international handbook of social work education.

Mowbray, O., McBeath, B., & Bank, L. (in press). Trajectories of health and behavioral health service use over time among community corrections involved rural adults. Social Work Research, 40(1), 7-18. doi: 10.1093/swr/svv048

Miller, S. E. (2015). Professional socialization: On becoming and being a social worker. In K. Corcoran (Ed.). Social workers’ desk reference (3rd ed.) (pp. 8-17). New York: Oxford University Press.

Mowbray, O., & Quinn, A. (2015). A scoping review of treatment services among older adults with substance use problems. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049731515579075

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Kaiser, M., Himmelheber, S., Miller, S. E., Hayward, R. A. (2015). Cultivators of change: Food justice in social work education [Special issue: Environmental justice, green social work or eco justice]. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 34(5), 544-557. doi: 10.1080/02615479.2015.1063599 Elkins, J., Miller, S. E., Briggs, H., & Skinner, S. (2015). Teaching with Tupac: Building a solid grounding in theory across the social work education continuum. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 35(5), 493-512. doi: 10.1080/08841233.2015.1085484 Briggs, H. E., Miller, S. E., & Campbell, R. D. (2014). Introduction: Disparity inducing social determinants of behavioral health: Future directions through best practices in mental health [Special issue on social determinants of behavioral health]. Best Practices in Mental Health, 10(2), XI-XVII. Sowbel, L. F., & Miller, S. E. (2014). Gatekeeping in graduate social work education: Should personality traits be considered? Social Work Education: The International Journal, 34(1), 110-124. doi: 10.1080/02615479.2014.953046

Mowbray, O., & Scott, J. A. (2015). The effect of drug use disorder onset, remission or persistence on an individual’s personal social network. American Journal on Addictions, 24(5), 427-434. doi: 10.1111/ajad.12224 Mowbray, O., & Quinn, A. (2015). Prescription pain reliever misuse prevalence, correlates and origin of possession throughout the life course. Addictive Behaviors, 50, 22-27. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.06.006 Mowbray, O., Glass, J., & Grinell-Davis, C. (2015). Latent class analysis of alcohol treatment utilization patterns and 3-year lcohol related outcomes. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 54, 21-28. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2015.01.012 Mowbray, O. (2015). [Review of the book Research Methods for social workers: A practice-based approach (2nd ed.) by S. S. Faulkner & C. A. Faulkner]. Research on Social Work Practice, 25(1), 174-175. doi: 10.1177/1049731513518353 Mowbray, O., Quinn, A., & Cranford, J. A. (2014). Social networks and alcohol use disorders: Findings from a nationally representative sample. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 40(3), 181-186. doi: 10.3109/00952990.2013.860984 Mowbray, O. (2014). Basic statistics in multivariate analysis. Research on Social Work Practice, 24(6), 727-728. doi: 10.1177/1049731514526786

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Cranford, J. A., Krentzman, A. R., & Mowbray, O. (2014). Trajectories of alcohol use over time among adults with alcohol dependence. Addictive Behaviors, 39(5), 1006-1011. doi: 10.1016/j. addbeh.2014.02.009 Mowbray, O. (2014). The moderating role of social networks in the relationship between alcohol consumption and treatment utilization for alcohol-related problems. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46(5), 597-601. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.12.001

Larry Nackerud

Barner, J. R., Okech, D., & Camp, M. (2014). Socio-economic inequality, human trafficking, and the global slave trade. Societies, 4(2), 148-160. doi: 10.3390/soc4020148 Okech, D., & Barner, J. (2014). MSW Students’ motivations for taking an international social work elective course. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 34(2), 167-181. doi: 10.1080/08841233.2014.892051 Okech, D., Barner, J., Segoshi, M., & Carney, M. (2014). MSW student experiences in online vs. face-to-face teaching formats? Social Work Education: The International Journal, 33(1), 121-134. doi: 10.1080/02615479.2012.738661

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Risler, E., & Nackerud, L. (in press). Vocational education practice guide. Journal of Correctional Education.

Okech, D., Ottenweller, M. D., Elkins, J., Caldwell, E., & Segoshi, M. (2014). Constitutionalism and social development in Kenya. Social Development Issues, 36(1), 78-92.

Green, D. M., Twill, S., Holosko, M. J., & Nackerud, L. (2015). An ecological approach to evaluating a system of care program: Dollars making sense. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 11(5), 484-497. doi: 10.1080/15433714.2013.853585

Katiuzhinsky, A., & Okech, D. (2014). Human rights, cultural practices, and state policies: Implications for global social work practice and policy. International Journal of Social Welfare, 23(1), 80-88. doi: 10.1111/ijsw.12002

Risler, E., Kintzle, S., & Nackerud, L. (2015). Haiti and the earthquake: Examining the experience of psychological stress and trauma. Research on Social Work Practice, 25(2), 251-256. doi: 10.1177/1049731514530002

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

Sims, O. T., Whalen, C. C., Nackerud, L., & Bride, B. E. (2014). Longitudinal effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy and cytokine-related depression on hepatitis C viral logs during antiviral therapy. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 34(1), 80-84. doi: 10.1097/JCP.0b013e3182a47397

David Okech REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Okech, D., Kim, J., & Little, T. D. (2015). Recent developments in structural equation modeling research in social work journals. British Journal of Social Work, 45(2), 685-704. doi: 10.1093/bjsw/ bct154

McGarity, S., & Okech, D. O. (2015). Tip curves. In M. Odekon (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty (2nd ed., Vol. 4, pp. 1545-1546). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi: http://dx.doi. org/10.4135/9781483345727.n800

Patricia M. Reeves BOOK CHAPTERS Reeves, T. C., & Reeves, P. M. (2015). Learning. In L. Cantoni & J. A. Danowski (Eds.), Communication and technology: Handbook of communication science (pp. 467-483). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Reeves, T. C., & Reeves, P. M. (2015). Educational technology research in a VUCA world. Educational Technology, 55(2), 26-30. Continued next page ›› Spring 2016

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FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Reeves, T. C., & Reeves, P. M. (2015). Reorienting educational technology research from things to problems. Learning: Research and Practice, 1(1), 91-93. doi: 10.1080/23735082.2015.1008120.

Trina Salm Ward

Michael A. Robinson

Mazul, M. C., Salm Ward, T. C., & Ngui, E. M. (2016). Anatomy of good prenatal care: Perspectives of low income African American women on barriers and facilitators to prenatal care. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 1-8. doi: 10.1007/ s40615-015-0204-x

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Moore, S. E., Robinson, M. A., & Adedoyin, C. (2016). Introduction to the special issue on police shooting of unarmed African-American males: Implications for the individual, family, and the community. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26(3-4), 247-250. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2016.1139995 Moore, S. E., Robinson, M. A., Adedoyin, C., Brooks, M., et al., (2016). Hands up-don’t shoot: Police shootings of young Black males: Implications for social work and human services. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26(3-4), 254-266. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2015.1125202 Moore, S. E., Adedoyin, C., Robinson, M. A., & Boamah, D. A. (2015). The black church: Responding to the drug-related mass incarceration of young black males: “If you had been here my Brother would not have died!” Social Work & Christianity, 42(3), 313-331. Moore, S. E., Robinson, M. A., & Thompson, C. (2015). Suffering in silence: Child sexual molestation and the black church: If God don’t help me who can I turn to? Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 25(2), 147-157. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.956962

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REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Salm Ward, T. C., Wagner Robb, S., & Kanu, F. A. (2015). Prevalence and characteristics of bed-sharing among black and white infants in Georgia. Maternal & Child Health Journal. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10995-015-1834-7 Salm Ward, T. C., & Balfour, G. (2015). Infant safe sleep interventions, 1990-2015: A review. Journal of Community Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10900-015-0060-y Salm Ward, T. C. (2015). Reasons for mother-infant bedsharing: A systematic narrative synthesis of the literature and implications for future research. Maternal & Child Health Journal, 19(3), 675-690. doi: 10.1007/s10995-014-1557-1. Salm Ward, T. C., & Ngui, E. M. (2015). Factors associated with bed-sharing for African-American and white mothers in Wisconsin. Maternal & Child Health Journal, 19(4), 720-732. doi: 10.1007/s10995-014-1545-5. Salm Ward, T. C., & Doering, J. J. (2014). Application of a socio-ecological model to maternal-infant bedsharing. Health Education & Behavior, 41(6), 577-589. doi: 10.1177/1090198114543010.

Robinson, M. A., & Cheng, T. C. (2014). Exploring physical health of African-Americans: A social determinant model. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 24(8), 899909. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.914993

Jeffrey Skinner

Wall-Bassett, E., Robinson, M. A., & Knight, S. (2014). Food related behaviors of women in substance abuse recovery: A photoelicitation study. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 24(8), 951-965. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.923359.

Holosko, M. J., & Skinner, J. (2015). Leadership and management: Necessary skills for field directors. In M. Raskin, C. Hunter, & J. Moen (Eds.) Quality social work field education: A field director’s guide (pp.287-300). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

University of Georgia School of Social Work

REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS


FA C U LT Y – R E C E N T P U B L I C AT I O N S Skinner, J. F. (2015). Social work practice and personal self-care. In K. Corcoran & A. Roberts (Eds.) Social workers’ desk reference (pp. 130-139). New York: Oxford University Press.

transracial adoptive parents [Special issue]. Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, 24(1), 40-57. doi: 10.1179/1053078915z.00000000022

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Lee, J., Vonk, M. E., & Crolley-Simic, J. (2015). A model of factors related to cultural and racial socialization among transracial adoptive parents. Families in Society, 96(2), 141-147. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1606/1044-3894.2015.96.14

Holosko, M. J., & Skinner, J. (2015). A call for field coordination leadership to implement the signature pedagogy. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, (25)3, 275-283. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2015.1005519 Skinner, J. F. (2014) [Review of the book Empowerment as ceremony by W. M. Epstein]. Research on Social Work Practice, 25(2), 287-288. doi: 10.1177/1049731514534901

M. Elizabeth Vonk REFEREED BOOKS Bergquist, K. S., Vonk, M. E., Kim, D. S., & Feit, M. (Eds.). (2014). International Korean adoption: Fifty years of practice and policy. Korean translation. Seoul, Korea: KoRoot Publishing.

Tiffany Washington REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Washington, T., Zimmerman, S. & Browne, T. (2016). Factors associated with chronic kidney disease selfmanagement. Social Work in Public Health, 31(2), 58-69. doi: 10.1080/19371918.2015.1087908 Jason, K. J., Carr, D. C., Washington, T. R., Hilliard, T. S., Mingo, C. A. (2015). Multiple chronic conditions, resilience, and workforce transitions in later life: a socio-ecological model. The Gerontologist. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1093/geront/ gnv101

REFEREED BOOK CHAPTERS Vonk, M. E., & King, K. (in press ). Adoption in schools: Challenges for children and teachers. In J. Waller (Ed.) Mental health promotion in schools: Special topics, special challenges. Bentham Science. Vonk, M. E. (2015). The assessment and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. In K. Corcoran (Ed.), Social workers’ desk reference. (3rd Ed.) (pp. 601-607). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Vonk, M. E., & Early, T. J. (2015). Cognitive-behavioral therapy. In K. Corcoran (Ed.), Social workers’ desk reference (3rd ed.) (pp. 257-263). Oxford: Oxford University Press. REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES Lee, J., Crolley-Simic, J., & Vonk, M. E. (2015). Religion and cultural and racial socialization among international

Washington, T., Zimmerman, S., Cagle, J., Reed, D., Cohen, L., Beeber, A., & Gwyther, L. (2014). Fidelity decision-making in social and behavioral research: alternative measures of dose and other considerations. Social Work Research, 38(3), 154-162. doi: 10.1093/swr/svu021 Cohen, L. W., Zimmerman, S., Reed, D., Sloane, P. D., Beeber, A. S., Washington, T., Cagle, J. G., & Gwyther, L. P. (2014). Dementia in relation to family caregiver involvement and burden in long-term care. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 33(5), 522-540. doi: 10.1177/0733464813505701 Beeber, A., Cohen, L., Zimmerman, S., Gwyther, L., Washington, T., Cagle, J., & Reed, D., (2014). Differences in assisted living staff perceptions, experiences, and attitudes. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 40(1), 41-49. doi: 10.3928/00989134-20130731-03

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ALUMNI

News & Notes 1970s Edwin Risler (BSW ’77, MSW ’82, Ph.D. ’98) was featured on Georgia Public Broadcasting’s “On Second Thought” radio show in June 2015. The discussion centered on the city of Savannah’s efforts to help juveniles leave crime behind when they enter adulthood. That interview can be heard at bit.ly/1NA8FyO. Risler, who recently retired as a professor from the School of Social Work, specializes in the areas of juvenile justice, poverty and social welfare. Eugene Wigelsworth (MSW ’74) was the keynote speaker for the Woodville Ministerial Alliance’s Spring 2015 meeting. Wigelsworth, who is director of religious programs and a volunteer coordinator with the Mississippi Department of Corrections, focused on the need for more volunteers in prison ministry. Read more at bit.ly/1MipWib.

Eugene Wigelsworth

1980s Mary Zorn Bates (MSW ’83) was recognized as the UGA MSW Program’s Outstanding Teacher of the Year for 2015 (Gwinnett campus), 2014 (Athens and Gwinnett campuses) and 2013 (Athens campus.)

Tim Echols (BA ’82, MA NPO ’06, MA ’09) announced in April 2015 that he will run for a second term on the Georgia Public Service Commission. Read more at bit.ly/1Mior3F.

Tim Echols

Linda Grobman (MSW ’82) was recipient of the NASW Pennsylvania Chapter’s 2014 Social Worker of the Year Award. A video of her acceptance speech may be seen at bit.ly/1WRfF4s. Grobman is founder and publisher of The New Social Worker magazine, a quarterly online magazine about the social work profession. Linda Grobman

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ALUMNI

News & Notes continued 1990s In 2014 Cheri Hall (BSW ’98, MSW ‘00) finished her term as president of the UGA Alumni Association’s Colorado chapter. Hall is currently the education programs specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado.

Cheri Hall

The UGA Alumni Association included Laura Jalbert (BSW ’99, MSW ‘00) in its Class of 2014 “40 Under 40.” Selections were based on graduates’ commitment to a lifelong relationship with UGA and their impact in business, leadership, community, artistic, research, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors. Jalbert is the owner of Mindful Transitions, LLC, a counseling and social services agency for seniors. Laura Jalbert

Karen Wicker (MSW ’93) published her first book, “Enterprising African American Youth-The Challenge!” (Karen May Wicker, 2015). She also serves as a substitute teacher for the City of Decatur and Atlanta Public Schools.

Betsy Vonk (Ph.D. ’96) was featured in UGA.edu’s Focus on Faculty series in April 2015. The story is online at bit.ly/1IhFSNG. A book she co-edited, International Korean adoption: A fifty-year history of policy and practice, was also published in a Korean translation.

2000s In 2015, Leon Banks (Ph.D. ’07) was named director of the Bachelor of Social Work program at the UGA School of Social Work. He also co-authored the article, “Increasing Knowledge and Mental Health Service Use among African-Americans through Evidence-Based Practice and Cultural Injection Vector Engagement Practice Approaches, which was featured in the October 2014 issue of Best Practices in Mental Health.

Alice Boateng

In March 2014, Alice Boateng (Ph.D. ‘06) was installed as a queen mother of the village of Akyem Bomaa, Ghana. The position, said Boateng, carries with it “duties similar to those of social workers.” Boateng, a faculty member of the University of Ghana department of social work, is developing a resource center and other projects to empower women and children in the area. A video of her installment ceremony is at bit.ly/Boateng-BomaaTiwaWest.

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News & Notes continued In 2014, Brian Bride (Ph.D. ’01) was appointed director of the School of Social Work and professor at the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. In December 2015 his research on PTSD was mentioned in an article in The Atlantic.

Leigh Engen (MA NPO ‘08) received School of Social Work’s 2015 James Dodd Distinguished Alumni Award. The award is given each year in recognition of an alumnus who displays meritorious leadership, initiative, dedication and loyalty to the school. Engen, who lives in Connecticut, is a board member of the Twenty-Seven Foundation, which has funded 20 graduate assistantships in the nonprofit management program.

The University of Georgia’s “Gear Up for College” program, which is managed by Jonathan Brunson (BA ’06, MA NPO ‘12) was recently recognized as a “Bright Spot” in the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. The program is part of outreach efforts by the UGA Office of Admissions to bring more underrepresented populations to campus. Read more at t.uga.edu/1WC Jonathan Brunson

Tamara Grant (MSW ’06) published her seventh book, “The Thrill of the Chase,” in 2014. Grant writes under the pen name Dominique LeSane, and publishes under her own imprint, Zen Publishing. Read more at amzn.to/1WXdpc6.

In November 2015 the Social Empowerment Center, a social services agency owned and run by Shelly Hutchinson (MSW ’00), was included in the UGA Alumni Association’s 2016 Bulldog 100 list of the 100 fastest growing companies owned by UGA graduates. The SEC was ranked No. 1 in 2014 and No. 9 in 2015. The 2016 rankings will be released in January 2016. Shelly Hutchinson

In June 2015, Dione King (MSW ’08, Ph.D. ‘12) was named an Emerge Faculty Fellow at the University of West Florida. As a fellow, King is developing an experiential learning undergraduate course titled “Enhancing Student Knowledge Through the Use of Research and Community-based Activities.” She also received the 2015 Social Work Educator of the Year Award from the NASW Florida Chapter-Northwest unit. King is an assistant professor in the College of Education and Professional Studies. Dione King

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ALUMNI

News & Notes continued Lemuel “Life” LaRoche (BSW ’02, MSW ’03) received the School of Social Work’s 2016 James Dodd Distinguished Alumni Award. He also received the UGA President’s 2015 Fulfilling the Dream Award for significant efforts to build bridges on behalf of civil and social justice. LaRoche also presented a 2015 TEDxUGA lecture titled “Chess and Community: The Power of a Single Hour,” which may be viewed at bit.ly/tedxugalaroche. LaRoche is founder and director of Chess and Community, a non-profit organization based in Athens that uses chess to teach critical thinking skills to at-risk youth. Lemuel “Life” LaRoche Credit: Alex Menendez/NBC

In June 2015, Jen Liam (MSW ’02) competed on the seventh season of the NBC sports game show American Ninja Warrior. For her qualifying round, filmed in Orlando, Florida, Liam and other contestants had to navigate an unusual obstacle course in a short time. Although she didn’t qualify, she said she plans to attempt the course again in the show’s next season. Liam is a clinical social worker in Atlanta specializing in work with families, parents, young adults, adolescents and children. An interview filmed for the show featuring Liam, her wife Debbie Lillard Liam (MSW ’91) and their daughter is at bit.ly/JenLiam-ANW7.

Jen Liam on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior

Georgia Trend Magazine named Carla Smith (MSW ’05) to its list of “40 Under 40” outstanding Georgians in October 2015. She is a human resources, policy and talent management director for Signature HealthCARE, a long-term nursing care provider. Col. Jeff Yarvis (Ph.D. ’04) was appointed deputy commanding officer of the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center at Foot Hood, Texas. He is also chief operating officer for the center, which includes a team of nearly 4,000 military and civilian personnel and has an annual operating budget of $330 million.

Carla Smith

Jeff Yarvis

2010s USA Today featured Carol Britton Laws (Ph.D. ’12) in a November 2015 story that highlighted a new UGA program for students with special needs. The full story is online at usat.ly/1Mir6KA. Laws is an assistant clinical professor and coordinator of Interdisciplinary Disability Studies Education in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Carol Britton Laws

In 2015, Shauna Taylor (BSW ’12) was selected as social work graduate student intern for Chicago’s Heartland Alliance Northern Tier Anti-Trafficking Consortium. Taylor has served as a Community Fellow at the University of Chicago’s International House for the last two years. Shauna Taylor

›› Send your updates to Harold Waters (ABJ ‘98,) Alumni Development Director, hwaters@uga.edu or (706) 542-5450.

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ALUMNI

In Memoriam Nancy J. Rothenberg (MSW ’78), formerly Nancy Williams, passed away peacefully August 26, 2014. She was born December 24, 1946, in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from Montclair State College with a bachelor’s degree and went on to earn a master’s degree in social work from the University of Georgia and a doctorate from Florida State University. While living in Tallahassee, Rothenberg built a successful marriage and family therapy private practice and taught at the Florida State University School of Social Work. In 1998 Rothenberg joined the faculty at the UGA School of Social Work. She taught family-centered, practicerelated courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs, and created an innovative service-learning course, “Social Work with Burn Survivors.” In 2005 Rothenberg broadened the school’s global education experiences through the creation of the course “Peace-keeping and Conflict Resolution in Northern Ireland,” which gave students firsthand exposure to the impact of long-term conflict in that region. As part of the Gertrude Mongella Initiative, which targets women’s empowerment issues in East Africa, in 2008 she accompanied an interdisciplinary team of students and faculty to facilitate a service-learning and research project in Tanzania. Rothenberg served as the director of Global Education from 2006 until her retirement in 2013, as well as the coordinator for the popular interdisciplinary Marriage and Family Therapy Certificate Program. Her honors include the prestigious Lois and Samuel Silberman Fund Award for her research in resiliency development with the burninjured population; a UGA Scholarship of Engagement grant through the Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach; and she was a 2010 recipient of the Scholarship of Engagement Award for her contributions in service-learning, teaching and related research. A talented artist and devoted mother and grandmother as well as a respected faculty member, Nancy Rothenberg is fondly remembered by her many friends at the School of Social Work as a wonderful mentor and colleague who brought humor and compassion to all aspects of her life. Blue Hydrangeas, by Nancy Rothenberg

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ALUMNI

In Memoriam Robert A. Berry, (MSW ’80) 61, of Harrisburg, Pa., passed peacefully Oct. 22, 2015. Berry served as a Dauphin County Assistant District Attorney and established a private practice in family and criminal law. Barbara R. Bohn, (AB ’61) 76, of Chattanooga, Tenn., passed away Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015. She majored in social work at UGA and worked at the Red Cross at Fort Benning and later at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Michael T. Campbell, (BSW ’76, MSW ‘83) 60, of Flowery Branch, Ga., passed away on Aug. 23, 2015. He was retired from his position as a bioterrorism coordinator for the state of Georgia and had served as a case management coordinator with the North Georgia Mental Health/Mental Retardation/Substance Abuse Center. Linda Cooper, (BSW ’79) 77, of Gainesville, Ga., passed away Dec. 6, 2014 at her residence following an extended illness. She was retired from a long career in the field of economic development. She was instrumental in securing funding for health departments, senior citizen centers, day care centers and other community projects in her beloved Georgia mountains. Martha H. Cox, (BSW ’87) 51, of Kensington, Md., died on Dec. 12, 2014. She helped others through charity and clinical practice at Walter Reed Hospital as well as other suburban hospitals in the Washington, D. C. area. Marilyn Ellisor, (MSW ’83) 71, died Oct. 3, 2014, at her home in Watkinsville, Ga., after a year-long confrontation with cancer. She taught elementary school children in Nevada and California prior to beginning a 34-year career with the Georgia Department of Family and Children Services. Richard H. Finney, (MSW ’71) 86, of Booneville, N.C, passed away Oct. 22, 2015 after a long battle with cancer. Finney served as a chief of social work for the Veterans Administration in Salem and Hampton, Virginia. After his retirement he returned to his love of ministry with the Methodist Church in the Western North Carolina Conference. Meredith Forlenza, (MSW ’06) 33, of Buford, Ga., passed away May 16, 2015 at her home, after a 10-month battle against breast cancer. Forlenza devoted her professional life to helping others, first in social work and then as a school counselor at Buford Middle School, where she was employed for six years. Michael C. Herndon, (BSW ’79) 65, of Hartwell, Ga., passed away Sept. 17, 2014 in Athens. Herndon began his career as a teacher in Elbert County, and then taught several years in Anderson County, South Carolina. He later became a social worker for the state of Georgia. Anna R. Johnson, (MSW ’86) 85, of Conyers, Ga., died on Jan. 8, 2015. Rita F. Jones, (MSW ’83) 61, passed away on June 13, 2015 in Lexington, S.C. A licensed master social worker, Jones was employed for 13 years as a case manager for the Healthy Start Program at the Sarasota County Health Department. Barbara Kemp, (MSW ’74) 88, of Aiken, SC, died on Jan. 19, 2015. She worked for many years at the Aiken County Health Department, both as a social worker and as a supervisor.

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ALUMNI

In Memoriam continued Claire V. Krissinger, (MSW ’66) 76, died May 26, 2015, at the Ogeechee Area Hospice Inpatient Facility Statesboro, Ga. After becoming a licensed clinical social worker in 1973, she worked with Pineland Mental Health, in Statesboro, Fort Stewart, and in home health, nursing homes and private practice. Linda M. Landry, (BSW ’90) 66, of Athens, GA., passed away suddenly at her home on Oct. 15, 2014. She was a licensed clinical social worker and worked as a psychotherapist for 20 years. Elaine B. Law, (MSW ’73) 82, of Augusta, Ga., passed away Aug. 12, 2015. She began her professional career as an elementary school teacher in New York and later in central Florida for the Department of Family and Children’s Services. After completing graduate studies, she worked with Northeast Georgia Regional Mental Health Center. She retired after 19 years of service as a supervisory medical social worker with the Veterans Administration in Augusta. Brenda J. Milner, (BSW ’10) 54, of Athens, Ga., died on May 19, 2015. Patricia Nardone, (MSW ’76) 67, of Trenton, N.J., died Oct. 5, 2014. Nardone was a licensed clinical social worker for the Division of Youth and Family Services and later with the Children’s Home Society of New Jersey in Trenton, for over 40 years of dedicated social work service. Marilyn Schroer, (MSW ’75) 79, Cumming, Ga., passed peacefully on Dec. 20, 2014. Schroer helped thousands of people in her career as a licensed clinical social worker, hospital social worker, home health care social worker, and a case manager for the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services. Wilehmena Scogins, (MSW ’88) 71, of Millen, Ga., died Saturday, May 16, 2015 at her residence. She was a retired director for Ogeechee Mental Health. Janet R. Steele, (MSW ’89) 77, of Oak Harbor, Wash., died May 15, 2015. She worked for the state of Georgia in the field of gerontology and continued to volunteer in that field after retirement. Douglas Samuel Tant, (BSW ‘77) 62, of Acworth, Ga., passed away on Dec. 29, 2015. A proud alumnus of UGA, he worked over 30 years as a residential home builder with Doug Tant Builders. Gwendolyn Turner, (MSW ’71) 84, of Chattanooga, Tenn., passed away on June 4, 2015. She was a native of Atlanta and had retired as wing director from Central State Hospital, Milledgeville Ga.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS

2015-2016 Honors Day E N D O W E D A S S I S TA N T S H I P S & S C H O L A R S H I P R EC I P I E N T S • Pauline Berger Memorial Graduate Assistantship in Family and Child Welfare Jessica Parker • Leadership in Addiction Treatment Award Renee Hall-George • James D. Horne Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship Hannah Mapes • Helen Elizabeth Huey Scholarship Chelsea Brooks, Kelly Coffin • Wilbur P. Jones Scholarship Xue Cui • Pauline D. Lide Scholarship Lauren Swanner, Lauren Welty

Honors Day awards

• Elizabeth B. Loyd Scholarship Carly Farrell, Chelsea McElveen • Joe and Diane Perno Scholarship Karen Cleveland • Kenneth Whiddon Scholarship Brandon Baird • Heather Christina Wright Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship Shannon Griffiths, Mary Grace Sexton • Heather Christina Wright Memorial Graduate Scholarship Yosha Dotson, Carly Shockley • Robert A Vonk Scholarship Kaylen Hilton • David and Helen Rasmussen Scholarship Jennifer Park

Hannah Mapes Continued next page ››

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SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS

2015-2016 Honors Day continued • Sue Stephenson Single Parent Support Fund Scholarship Brittney Smith O U T S TA N D I N G F I E L D I N S T R U C TO R S Director: Sandra Murphy • BSW Field Instructor of the Year Sally Sheppard • MSW Field Instructor of the Year – Athens Lisa Gerardot • MSW Field Instructor of the Year – Gwinnett Warren Smith DEGREE PROGRAM AWARDS BSW Director: Leon Banks

Sandra Murphy and Lisa Gerardot

• Outstanding BSW Student Shannon Griffiths • BSW Advisor of the Year Ellen Pauloski • BSW Teacher of the Year Stephen McGarity MSW Director: David Okech

• MSW Foundation Student of the Year – Athens Trevor Rodgers • MSW Concentration Student of the Year – Athens Aura Morris • MSW Teacher of the Year – Athens Rebecca Matthew Trevor Rodgers

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS

2015-2016 Honors Day continued • MSW Foundation Student of the Year – Gwinnett Campus James Stinchcomb • MSW Concentration Student of the Year – Gwinnett Campus Laura Best-Moore • MSW Teacher of the Year Gwinnett Campus Tiffany Washington MA NPO Interim Director: Anthony Mallon

• MA NPO Student of the Year Fengdi Li • MA NPO Teacher of the Year Bob Sleppy

Bob Sleppy, Tony Mallon and Fengdi Li

PHD Director: Shari Miller

• PhD Student of the Year Lloyd Allen • PhD Teacher of the Year Mary Caplan SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS

• Staff Member of the Year Christina Autry • 2016 James Dodd Distinguished Alumni Award Lemuel “Life” LaRoche

Mary Caplan and Lloyd Allen

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SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS

Shannon Griffiths: Honors Student Shannon Griffiths (BSW ’16) came to UGA because she “wanted a school where I would learn outside of the classroom as much as I did inside of one,” and she has taken good advantage of all those opportunities. She’s been active in UGA Miracle, volunteered at Mercy Health Center, and helped to reestablish a campus chapter of the Phi Alpha Honor Society for Social Work. In addition, she tutored English as a second language at an elementary school and completed a Spanish minor at UGA’s campus in Costa Rica. Through a social work class, Griffiths also mentored a high school student in foster care. It provided “an extremely influential experience,” she said. Through UGA’s Center for Undergraduate Research, and with mentoring by Assistant Professor Mary Caplan, Griffiths also engaged in research with fellow undergraduate Brittany Talkin. This spring the pair presented the results of their qualitative study “Women, Welfare and Borrowing” at CURO’s annual student research symposium. Despite a full schedule and health issues within her family, Griffiths maintained a 4.0 grade point average, earning her recognition as a Presidential Scholar and the UGA Presidential Award of Excellence. The latter honor is awarded to less than one percent of undergraduate students in their final year of study. Griffiths also was named 2016 BSW Student of the Year. Several scholarships helped: the Zell Miller Scholarship, the UGA Charter Scholarship and the Heather Christina Wright Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship. The latter came at a particularly good time. “The Wright’s generosity has meant so much to my family and me,” said Griffiths. “You can ask the clerk at the Bursar’s Office who watched me dance as I learned I had been awarded this scholarship!” This fall Griffiths will head back to the school to begin her first year as a graduate student. She plans to pursue a career in medical social work. Shannon Griffiths presents research at the 2016 CURO Symposium.

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University of Georgia School of Social Work


GIVING

The importance of your gifts Your gifts go a long way toward helping us fulfill our mission of educating individuals who can make real and abiding change in the world. When you contribute to the School of Social Work Fund, you send a message of hope and empowerment to current and future generations who will benefit from your generosity. The School of Social Work has several giving opportunities that benefit our students and faculty. Here are a few ways in which your gifts help. They: • provide financial support for need-based scholarships • enable students to present research at professional conferences • provide ongoing research support for faculty • give students unique experiential learning opportunities in Ghana and Northern Ireland • purchase equipment to enhance educational technology

2 0 1 4 - 2 0 1 5 Ye a r i n R e v i e w

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Advocates for Positive Social Change 279 Williams Street • Athens, GA 30602 • (877) 535-6590 • ssw.uga.edu

UGA School of Social Work Magazine - Spring 2016  

Spring 2016 issue of the University of Georgia School of Social Work Magazine

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