Social Justice Wanted 2021-2022

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Wanted with 2020-2021 Research Review


TABLE OF CONTENTS SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021 – 2022

FACULTY STATEMENT ON SOCIAL JUSTICE........ iii THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK RESPONDS TO:

COVID-19 Care, Social Justice and Compassion in Response to COVID-19, Llewellyn J. Cornelius..... 1 Clinical Response to COVID-19 Kate Morrissey Stahl........................................3

RACISM School of Social Work Statement on Racism and Social Justice......................................... 5 The Intersection of Ageism and Racism in a COVID-19 Era Tiffany Washington........................................ 6 Addressing the Policing Crisis: Michael Robinson Looks at the Lethal Use of Force and Needed Changes, Laurie Anderson................... 8 “No More”: Black Women Are Shedding Their Capes and Abandoning the Superwoman Trope, Rosalyn Denise Campbell.................................11

INJUSTICE AND EXPLOITATION Community Living for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Georgia: Past, Present, and Future, Rebecca Wells......... 15 Social Justice and Gender-Based Violence on College Campuses, Adrienne Baldwin-White................................ 18 A Social Work Value-Based Approach to Addressing the Problem of Human Trafficking, David Okech, Anna Cody.................................20 To Build a Better World: Now is the Time for a Rights-Based Approach to Social Work Practice, Jane McPherson............................................26 SOCIAL WORK IN ACTION Social Justice Common Book Initiative, Tiffany Washington, Jennifer Elkins................... 31 The Social Worker Engaged in Social Policy, Yosha Dotson................................................ 33 Protecting Survivors During the Pandemic: Domestic Violence Residential Services Response to COVID-19, Y. Joon Choie, Elyssa Schroeder .................................................. 35 SSW FACULTY & PHD STUDENT RESEARCH REVIEW (2020-2021)........................................ 37

SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021-2022 Editor: Anna Scheyett Design/Production: Kat Farlowe Copy Editor: Johnathan McGinty Publications Wrangler: Kat Farlowe Photo Credits: Amber Raines; Athens Banner Herald-Joshua Jones, Harold Waters; Red & Black-Katie Tucker; UGA Photographic Services-Nancy Evelyn, Peter Frey, Robert Newcomb, Chad Osburn, Dot Paul, ANdrew Davis Tucker; UGA School of Social Work-Laurie Anderson. © 2021 University of Georgia School of Social Work

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The University of Georgia does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, color national or ethnic origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, or military service in its administrations of educational policies, programs, or activities; its admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other University-administered programs; or employment. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to the Equal Opportunity Office, 119 Holmes-Hunter Academic Building, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. Telephone 706-542-7912 (V/TDD). Fax 706-542-2822. https://eoo.uga.edu.


UGA SSW Faculty Statement on Social Justice

University of Georgia School of Social Work FACULTY STATEMENT ON SOCIAL JUSTICE

Developed through a collaborative and synthetic faculty discussion process. At the UGA School of Social Work, we believe social justice occurs when systems of all sizes (individuals, families, communities) are able, safely and dependably, to obtain the civil and human rights and resources they need to thrive. These include but are not limited to health, economic growth, social rights, equity, inclusion, safety, freedom to move about the world; social support, food security, a clean environment, education, employment, childcare and housing. Eliminating social injustice is central to our work as social workers, requires brave and assertive action and effort, and must be present in all we do and say. The School of Social Work advocates for social justice by fighting for the rights of people and communities, particularly those who have experienced marginalization, stigma, discrimination, and oppression of any form. We partner with communities in Georgia and around the world to embrace and speak truth to power and privilege and to promote change for social justice in our classrooms, our research, and our service. Approved unanimously by the faculty of the School of Social Work, September 15, 2017 Photo by Laurie Anderson

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Social Work Responds to COVID-19

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Care and Social Justice in Response to COVID-19 — Llewellyn J. Cornelius

CARE, SOCIAL JUSTICE AND COMPASSION IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19 Llewellyn J. Cornelius, PhD Donald L. Hollowell Distinguished Professor of Social Justice and Civil Rights Studies Director, Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights

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write this essay in honor of the spirit of Langston Hughes' character Jesse B Semple (also known as Simple), who spoke plainly in the 1940s Chicago Defender—an African American newspaper—about what was on the everyday persons’ mind. In that vein, this essay focuses on what everyday people are crying out to us about, what they need from us NOW as they are coping with COVID-19 as well as what all of us can do to help. What am I hearing from everyday people? Or to quote Chris Tucker, "Do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth?" This is what I recently heard from someone living in a small low resource rural community that is highly impacted by the coronavirus. “What are you doing right now to help me eat, help me keep my job and help me not get evicted from my apartment?” In the same conversation, they said that they were “afraid to answer their phone because of COVID.” Because they are afraid, they will hear that “yet another person they personally know of” has just died from the coronavirus. At the same time, “they can’t go to that funeral” and “will never get to see their body.” When I asked further, they responded by saying

that they and others in their community "feel awful that they can’t be with their loved ones who are isolated by themselves in hospitals or a quarantine site.” During the same week, I heard another cry for help. I was on a 90 minute regularly scheduled monthly conference call with more than 50 mostly older adults across the U.S. that focused on planning cultural activities in their communities. After 83 minutes passed on this Zoom call, without a single question or comment from the leadership team about how individuals on the call were dealing with COVID-19, an upset community partner interjected: “I just had five people die in my community, and I can't believe we are on this call carrying on like business as usual.” What ensued was 10 minutes of defensive responses from the leadership team, followed by deflecting from the issue presented by the upset caller, which clearly showed that the leadership team was far more concerned about their organizational planning activity then they were about the pain that everyday people were feeling then. I know these observations are not unique to me as we hear these same cries for help in

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Care and Social Justice in Response to COVID-19 — Llewellyn J. Cornelius

our work, on the TV media, and on social media. The underlying message being conveyed is this is NOT business as usual. In effect, we are ALL being asked by these everyday people: Are we listening with our hearts instead of our heads??? What appears to be coming out of these cries for help is that people are afraid, overwhelmed, and stressed out, and worried about their basic human needs. They are worried about going hungry. They are worried about being evicted or worried about getting sick.They are overwhelmed by the loss of those dear to them or being hindered from being with them in the hospital or nursing home and overwhelmed by the loss of many of the priceless things that we all take for granted like simple hugs, real live threedimensional encounters, like simply being able to congregate anywhere.

In response to these cries, maybe we need to ask ourselves as helping professionals, are we balancing basic mindfulness/ self-nurturance with being “present” for others? Are we also telling other everyday people that WE all need to take care of ourselves and each other? When someone is being evicted, they do not want to hear about our next project, peer review article, grant, or presentation. Around the world, WE are being tested to “do” as opposed to “theorize, conceptualize and talk.” Yes, while social justice is about empowerment, liberation, advocacy, agitation and so on, it is also about being emotionally present and compassionate in response to the tidal wave of requests for our compassion and concrete basic assistance that we are experiencing. 

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Center for Social Justice, Human & Civil Rights is providing resources for our community partners. Click on the following community resources link to find information on COVID19 and behavioral health resources, particularly for vulnerable groups such as children, the elderly, non-English speakers and others. COVID-19 COMMUNITY RESOURCES.

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Clinical Response to COVID-19 — Kate Morrissey Stahl

CLINICAL RESPONSE TO COVID-19 Kate Morrissey Stahl, PhD, LCSW, CST Clinical Assistant Professor

As the COVID-19 crisis hit, the School of Social Work faculty decided that our social justice mission meant that we had a responsibility to consider how best to respond in ways that would be supportive to our students and our communities.

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e began to appreciate the array of specialties in our community, how we might learn from one another, and how each could be mobilized to serve the wider community. Clinical social work is my specialty, so I will share some of the work we did in this capacity. COVID-19 made even more obvious deep disparities in healthcare access and challenges for well-being. In Athens, the behavioral health community rallied around three groups: medical workers, small business owners, and vulnerable populations. Early efforts on a local clinical therapist listserv included gathering a list of providers to support healthcare workers on a sliding scale as needed. In a second wave, the suicide of a prominent Athenian businesswoman galvanized reflection on how to support small business owners. That week, there was significant discussion on a local therapist page. In addition, the dean called a meeting with the local chamber of commerce. A group of social work faculty, the dean, and a

representative from the chamber discussed ways to support the business and nonprofit communities. We gathered names of sliding-scale providers for small business owners, the field office considered creating small support groups, and others reflected on employee assistance programs. As the pandemic wore on, there was increasing need for clinical referrals and Employee Assistance Program referrals. In my clinical life, I made time to expand support for vulnerable populations, including healthcare providers. In the field, clinical work shifted by moving online. This shift happened quickly even at larger clinics and at a training clinic that I supervise. This shift to online was especially important for providing support to another group I serve extensively: the LGBTQ population. Suddenly, my clients receiving gender affirmation treatment were slowing down the treatment as some services were considered elective. Clients who had moved away from home or had tenuous relationships with their families were considering whether and how to

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Clinical Response to COVID-19 — Kate Morrissey Stahl

connect. On the other side, people who had been single for years were seeking out sex therapy services during the pause provided by the pandemic as the isolation they experienced in social distancing made them realize they did want sexual relationships in their lives. COVID-19 impacted different groups differently, shifting life in both welcome and unwelcome directions. Students also have been worried about the job market. I explored the question of hiring students after graduation and hired a graduate to provide sliding scale therapy under my supervision at the clinic I own. In addition, we offer donation-based yoga in this space, and spent time as a group becoming more educated on traumainformed approaches to yoga, including active anti-oppressive approaches in the definition of trauma-informed. A current MSW student interested in trauma and yoga joined the book club after he expressed his overall interest to me. The yoga side of the clinic works primarily by donation, so as we worked to decide about when to safely open, we also considered how to continue our mission to share valuable mindfulness practices in affordable and safe ways with the community. We also listed our clinic on a design site shared by Associate Professor Kristina Jaskyte. Thanks to our diverse faculty, we received much helpful advice about how to pivot in response to the pandemic. With all of these upheavals, I considered and discussed with colleagues how to expand questions of healthcare disparities and cultural trauma in the class on behavioral methods. If clinicians are offering services that do not situate the individual in their social context in meaningful ways, including addressing the problem of white supremacy with white clients, they are missing out on a crucial

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element of addressing human suffering. It is also an ethical responsibility of social workers to respond to social justice issues in our communities and countries. For that reason, clinical social workers in Athens and faculty members circulated petitions and spoke at a town hall in support of a proposal by two commissioners in Athens to increase social service options and decrease police interventions so that relatively minor infractions would be less likely to escalate to violence. The School of Social Work provides a clinical education that emphasizes the impact of social oppression and need for social responsibility while also understanding the individual manifestations of these forces. As protests move through the country; as the drumbeat of violence against people of color grows louder; as a white woman threatens a Black man in Central Park with calling the police and emphasizing his race; as police suffocate George Floyd in full view; as Rayshard Brooks is killed by police in Atlanta: the need for change is obvious. We see a unique opportunity and responsibility to provide support and community as we work toward that change. 


Social Work Responds to Racism SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK STATEMENT ON RACISM AND SOCIAL JUSTICE The School of Social Work condemns racism and the callous acts of violence behind the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and other African Americans. We mourn their deaths. We are committed to seeking racial justice and to actions that make positive change happen. We are committed to these actions with broad input and ongoing collaboration and dialogue. We are committed to ensuring that “social justice” is more than a phrase on our website. It is the focus of our mission. We strongly support our professional organization, the National Association of Social Workers, and its condemnation of lethal police force against unarmed African Americans. We also strongly support our educational accreditation body, the Council on Social Work Education, and its Statement of Social Justice and the Society for Social Work and Research’s Call and Commitment to Ending Police Brutality, Racial Injustice, and White Supremacy.

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THE INTERSECTION OF AGEISM AND RACISM IN A COVID-19 ERA Tiffany Washington, PhD Associate Professor, Interim PhD Program Director The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored two issues that social workers must address with urgency: ageism and racism.

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geism represents biased beliefs or attitudes toward an individual or a group of people based on age. As cases of coronavirus in the U.S. first emerged, so did a very concerning narrative that only “old people” were the at-risk group of COVID-19. Indeed, the CDC reports “Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.”1 We also know that “8 out of 10 deaths reported in the U.S. have been in adults 65 years old and older.”2 However, the problem was the narrative gave people the impression that just older adults were susceptible to coronavirus. Such a narrative likely influenced the behaviors of younger people who did not see themselves at risk for the disease (i.e., largely influenced by early reports on the fatality rate of the virus in China). The fact that “boomer remover” as a COVID-19 moniker was trending on social media is a reflection of ageist beliefs people hold toward older adults. But there was also ageist language toward younger adults. For several days, headlining

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the media were reports of younger adults hanging out on beaches and enjoying their spring breaks totally oblivious to the COVID-19 risks. Indeed, their behaviors went against stay-at-home and social distancing recommendations, and it’s unfortunate that some college students tested positive after going on spring break.3 However, younger adults were not the only individuals defying those recommendations, and they expressed their frustration against older adults on social media for weeks.4 Meanwhile, media reports are capitalized on this contention by pitting Millennials against Baby Boomers and vice versa.5 Further complicating risk-related myths is what scholar and law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw referred to as the “fatal intersection of racism and ageism” in a coronavirus era. African Americans and older adults began to represent a disproportionate number of coronavirus cases.6 Instead of acknowledging the social determinants that relate to health disparities, the narrative shifted once again to older African Americans as the sole at-risk group.


Agesim and Racism in a COVID-19 Era — Tiffany Washington

Ageism and racism are injustices. Exposing society’s ageist and racist beliefs is an important call to action for social workers. As a starting point, social workers must examine their own age- and race-related biases, and consider how these biases are barriers to equity in health care. Also, social workers are positioned to shift conversations to focus on the many social determinants (i.e., the social and economic conditions of one’s environment)7 that exacerbate health-related disparities and injustices. I am currently examining these topics in a qualitative study with health care social workers about their scope of practice during COVID-19. Among the questions asked include their perspectives about observed injustices during the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., the potential rationing of healthcare based on age). Ageism and racism are not new issues. Still, the COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the

tendency to make assumptions about one’s value based on age or race. Social workers play an important role in facilitating discussions and pursuing policies toward ending these pervasive issues.  References Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, June 25). People who are at increased risk for severe illness. https://bit.ly/3gw0Gco 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, July 30). Older adults and COVID-19. https://bit.ly/39TnBMx 3 O’Kane, C. (2020, March 23). Florida college students test positive for coronavirus after going on spring break. CBSN. https://cbsn.ws/2DtcQEp 4 Jacobo, J. (2020, March 18). The frustration millennials have with older people not taking coronavirus precautions seriously. ABC News. https://abcn.ws/3gvRpRJ 5 Peterson, A. H. (2020, March 12). How millennials are talking to their boomer relatives about the coronavirus. BuzzFeed News. https://bit.ly/2XpqjEc 6 Waldstein, D. (2020, April 10). C.D.C. releases early demographic snapshot of worst coronavirus cases. NYT. https://nyti.ms/2DwvSd1 7 HealthyPeople.gov. (2020). Social determinants of health. https://bit.ly/3a1UhDt 1

Characteristics of COVID-19 associated hospitalizations displayed by race/ethnicity and age. Source: COVID19 — Associate Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) https://bit. ly/2PnUzen

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Addressing the Policing Crisis — Michael Robinson

ADDRESSING THE POLICING CRISIS: MICHAEL ROBINSON LOOKS AT THE LETHAL USE OF FORCE AND NEEDED CHANGES Michael A. Robinson, PhD Associate Professor, MSW Admissions Coordinator, Director, Northern Ireland Studies Away Program by Laurie Anderson

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ven after the Ferguson riots, it didn’t occur to Michael Robinson to research the frequency of police killings of unarmed Blacks. The African American academic was not studying law enforcement practices, but a brief encounter with a total stranger changed the direction of his research. “A student who I’d never seen before, a young African American male, came up to me and said, ‘What are you doing about these police killings of Black men?’ “And I said, ‘What do you mean?’ “He said, ‘That’s what I thought.’ And then he walked away.” Robinson never saw the man again, but the conversation bothered him so much that after he joined the faculty of the School of Social Work at the University of Georgia in 2015 he began a new line of inquiry. Robinson wondered how the incidence of police killings of civilians compared across races. He started looking for statistics, but could not find a reliable database anywhere on the subject. Of 18,000 police agencies in

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the U.S. only 2%-3% reported to any type of database, and did so voluntarily. “The only way to find out about it was through the newspapers,” he said. Two newspapers – the Washington Post and the United Kingdom’s Guardian – were tracking police-involved deaths in the U.S., but their data differed for the same periods. It took Robinson and two student assistants months of comparing the data and combing through other news sources to get a reasonably reliable accounting for a single year – 2015. The data showed that unarmed African American men were being killed by police at almost five times the rate of unarmed white men, despite being roughly 7% of the U.S. population. “Then I started noticing a pattern,” said Robinson. The largest number of killings of unarmed Blacks by police were in former slave-holding states. The deaths were highest in Maryland and Virginia, states that originated restrictive laws known as Black Codes. The laws were directed at


Addressing the Policing Crisis — Michael Robinson

newly freed Blacks after the Civil War and enforced by white police. In the North, police historically focused on the impoverished communities of immigrants, but they also targeted Blacks. For more than a century in both regions, law agencies chose physical force first to maintain control over poor areas. Today’s law enforcement practices still reflect this mindset to various degrees, said Robinson. The Council on Social Work Education’s Conference on Racial Ethnic and Cultural Diversity recognized Robinson’s 2017 paper, “Black Bodies on the Ground: Policing Disparities in the African American Community,” with its Most Impactful Article award. With Sharon E. Moore and A. Christson Adedoyin he co-edited the 2018 book “Police and the Unarmed Black Male Crisis: Advancing Effective Prevention Strategies” (Routledge).

Is such reporting mandatory now? I am not aware of any national legislation to make mandatory reporting of deaths of citizens by police. This January the FBI launched the National Use-of-Force Data Collection program, which invites participation from all law enforcement agencies, but participation is voluntary. Should police departments be abolished? I don’t believe they should be abolished, but I do believe that instead of spending a lot of money on militarizing police departments, funding should go into social programming in the neighborhoods. Funding should be put into after-school programs for kids. There should be incentives to have companies build businesses in poor areas and hire residents. You need more community policing that puts police of color in neighborhoods of color, walking or biking a beat as opposed to driving, because then

Here Robinson explains his researchgrounded recommendations for change. In your 2017 study, you recommended that police departments report any policeinvolved deaths to a national database. Why? A national database can shed light on racial bias in police use of lethal force and indicate where external reviews of police procedures may be needed. It shouldn’t take months to get accurate numbers.

Protester at the Athens Anti-Discrimination Movement Justice for Black Lives Rally, Athens, Georgia, June 6, 2020. Photo by Joshua Jones/Athens Banner Herald. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/3gDi1zK.

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Addressing the Policing Crisis — Michael Robinson

you’re forced to have conversations. If you get to know the community you’re policing, then maybe you’re less likely to mistreat someone.

What other recommendations would you make?

You’ve recommended implicit bias training for officers. What is implicit bias?

More mental health services should be available to officers and their families. Basically it is a stressful job and assistance, if needed, should be available to the police officers and their families.

Implicit bias is prejudice you may not be aware of. You may give more weight to what someone in a business suit says, or less weight to something that an adolescent tells you. Those are implicit biases. We all have them. In policing, they can affect impartial treatment under the law, and even adversely escalate situations. Some police agencies provide evidence-based training on strategies to recognize and reduce implicit bias. The training isn’t standard practice but it should be. How does knowing about 19th century policing practices help today? Current policing tactics reflect policing of the past. As with implicit bias, if we’re aware of that past we can better address problems related to it.

Make body cameras mandatory.

There should be a national “use of force” policy that has been heavily researched, instead of jurisdictions coming up with their own policies. De-escalation training should be mandatory. Many situations can be de-escalated if police are properly trained. De-escalation basically gives the officers strategies to calm situations, especially folks who are experiencing mental health issues and also individuals who are armed and unarmed. Above all, unarmed citizens should not be given a death sentence on the street because they are experiencing a mental health crisis or resisting arrest. These are just a few recommendations. 

Protesters in downtown Athens, Georgia during the Athens Anti-Discrimination Movement Justice for Black Lives Rally for the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery on Saturday, June 6, 2020. Photo by Joshua L. Jones, Athens Banner Herald. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/3gDi1zK.

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”No More” — Rosalyn Denise Campbell

“NO MORE”: BLACK WOMEN ARE SHEDDING THEIR CAPES AND ABANDONING THE SUPERWOMAN TROPE Rosalyn Denise Campbell, PhD, LMSW Associate Professor

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n August 2020, when COVID was raging and people were dying and rebellions were erupting, I turned to social media to console, commensurate and conspire. And amongst the Tweets and posts and messages that were flying across my screen, one in particular profoundly captured my attention: “Black women will save the United States.” I stared at the screen, inhaled deeply and exhaled slowly, and my fingers began to move:

That first Tweet revealed what many unconsciously were counting on: that Black women would once again rescue us from the rubble of life that was collapsing around us. Because, you see, when Black women save themselves, they save everybody. And people know that; they count on it. They know that culturally, socially, and politically, Black women will do what it takes to survive, to make sure those they love and everything thing around them survives. I mean, it’s who we are. It’s who we’ve always been.

“We’ll let this [expletive] burn.” In that one tweet, I had finally declared “no more.” I could write countless pages about what led up to that moment — what subconsciously prompted me to Tweet those words — but that is for another time. What is important to note is that for many Black women like myself, the pandemics of COVID-19 and festering racial injustice and animus combined with generations worth of frustration, anger and exhaustion drove Black women across places and spaces to boldly declare “no more.”

Sure, folks love to trot out those other stereotypes. You’ve seen them — probably in “meme” form these days — and shared them and laughed at them and subtly — or maybe not so much so — believed them. But everyone knows who Black women really are. We’re caretakers and nurturers and healers. We’re comforters and confidants and congratulators. We have donned the cape and swooped in time and time again to save the world from itself, but this time — one Tweet at a time — we were saying “no more.” Yes, Black women have always been viewed as some sort of superwoman,

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“No More” — Rosalyn Denise Campbell

some sort of magical being that manages to pull it all together and make it against all odds. Magical, yes, because it is beyond comprehension how a group of individuals so undervalued and under-resourced and under-compensated manage to make miracles happen in their personal and professional lives. Because, more often than not, we’ve had to. For survival’s sake, we’ve had to make something out of nothing. We’ve had to do more with less. We’ve had to function beyond our limits… shouldering doubt and blame, and ridicule along the way. But no more. Black women, en masse, have said “no more.”

resisted and rebelled and marched and maneuvered while continuing to live and love. But there is something different about this moment. There is simply something different about the way in which the Black women of this time are declaring “no more,” how Black

No more will we raise our voices to speak out against the many wrongs that destroy minds and spirits only to have praise expressed in secret. No more will we mend broken spaces only to have our access restricted once order is restored. No more will we shoulder the burden and bear the weight of the forgotten only to be replaced when we are exhausted and spent. No more will we be labeled as resilient for surviving unnatural circumstances created by policies and practices that are mean to undermine and destroy our very existence. No more will we sacrifice our mental and physical health for the sake of the greater good with the promise that it will soon be our turn at the table. No, we are finally saying, “no more.” And this is also not to discount, discredit, or disrespect the elders that have come before us, who in their own way strategically circumscribed or circumvented the obstacles that dotted their paths, who

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women throughout this nation and globally are removing those capes that have twisted and knotted and become nooses to strangle and suffocate us as we have struggled against injustice and inhumanity. Yes, those capes are coming off but not in a way that abandons our desire to create and build


and repair. We are just choosing to be more discerning, selective, and intentional about how we want to invest our time and expend our energy. We are realizing, collectively, that resilience is no badge of honor, and that we win nothing by our suffering and demise.

Black women are able to navigate and survive racist, sexist, ableist, capitalist systems to eek out some semblance of success. No, I will focus on the ways in which Black women are opting out, strategically and completely; the ways in which they are saying “no more.” I will continue to conduct research and advocate on all matters related to mental health as I have in my recently published work on peer support services and barriers to mental health services. However, with a small group of colleagues, I will be intentionally collecting and exploring the lived experiences and narratives of Black women. So far, we have completed one manuscript on the need for targeted research and intervention for Black women and are working on another examining the psychological effects of being Black women in “elite” spaces like academia. I also plan to revisit my earlier work examining the superwoman trope and its negative impact on Black women’s mental, emotional, and behavioral health. Additionally, I will examine how they are taking those twisted, soiled capes and using them to feed the flames engulfing structures of oppression and marginalized spaces that never served us and have only been used to hinder and devalue us.

Adobe Stock Photo

We are realizing that we matter. Our lives matter. Black women matter. And we will be invisible no more.

And I will investigate how they are letting this [expletive] burn but also what springs up from those ashes; what new or fresh ways of being and knowing and living and thriving emerge from the season of no more. 

It’s all of this that I seek to capture in my future work. Not just the ways in which

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Social Work Responds to Injustice and Exploitation

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COMMUNITY LIVING FOR ADULTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN GEORGIA: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE Rebecca Wells, PhD Assistant Clinical Professor MSW/MPH Coordinator

The History of Community Living in Georgia

(Legal Aid Atlanta).

Georgia’s history of institutionalization, de-institutionalization, and community living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities spans almost 200 years. In 1837, Central State Hospital was chartered in a bill to care for people with developmental disabilities and mental illness and separate them from mainstream society. Institutional care for people with disabilities through residential training centers and mental health hospitals went largely unchallenged in Georgia until the late 1990s when a historic case in Georgia changed all of that.

In the Olmstead Decision, Georgia Legal Aid staff argued that keeping Lois at Georgia Regional Hospital (when she could live a successful, supported life in the community) violated her rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The court ruled that Lois and another plaintiff had a right to live in the community and that segregating them and others without cause was a violation of their rights under the ADA. According to the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, “The Court held that public entities must provide community-based services to persons with disabilities when (1) such services are appropriate; (2) the affected persons do not oppose community-based treatment; and (3) community-based services can be reasonably accommodated, taking into account the resources available to the public entity and the needs of others who are receiving disability services from the entity.”

Lois Curtis is one example of a person with a developmental disability who was institutionalized at the age of 11 at Georgia Regional Hospital. She remained there until she was 29 years old (Knight, 2018). Eventually Lois sought help from the Atlanta Legal Aid Society attorney Sue Jamieson who was visiting the Georgia Regional Hospital. Lois’s story became documented as part of a larger story, the Olmstead Decision, which is “the most important civil rights decision for people with disabilities in our country’s history”

This court decision was historic and resulted in community integration reforms across the United States, yet there is still much work to be done. To fully realize a

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future for adults with disabilities where they are fully supported and a part of their communities, we need community awareness, acceptance, and adequate supports and services to support individuals who would have previously been served in state institutions. Treasure Maps: Shining a Light on Community Living for Adults with Disabilities During the spring and summer of 2021, I worked with a team of local disability professionals from the city of AthensClarke County, local non-profits, and UGA

to shed light on the issue of inadequately funded supports and services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Sponsored by Georgia Options, L’arche Atlanta, and The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities, our team planned and supported a free event in Athens called “Treasure Maps: The Georgia Storytelling Roadshow, 2021.” This pop-up, interactive event featured a film about ten people with developmental disabilities from Georgia telling their own stories about life in their communities as a person with a developmental disability. One of six shows across the state of

Rebecca Wells and event organizers lift Liz Primm, the Show Marshal, at the Athens stop of Treasure Maps: The Georgia Storytelling Roadshow 2021, at Terrapin Beer Co. in Athens, Georgia. Photo by Katie Tucker/Red&Black

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Georgia, the Athens event was an inclusive affair that reflected our community’s diverse, vibrant nature. The event included diverse participants and vendors (with and without disabilities), live-local hosts, and performances from the Love. Craft Band. The event sought to increase awareness, expand alliances with, and garner support from the community for persons with disabilities who live in the state of Georgia. At the event, attendees learned about Georgia’s Medicaid waivers available to support adults with disabilities in the community. Attendees also learned, however, that there are over 7,000 people currently on the waiting list for supports and services.

we will need an expansion of state-funded supports (the advocacy goal of our Treasure Maps show) and also public support for creative grassroots ventures like Love.Craft Athens, a non-profit that serves adults with developmental disabilities in creating and selling art (without the support of state funding). We will also need awareness, acceptance, and the fostering of community connections like those portrayed in the Treasure Maps film. I hope that our Athens Treasure Maps event is just the start of a broader conversation about the importance of true inclusion for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in our communities – not as tokens, but as fully valued members of our community.

The Road Ahead

If you are interested in viewing the Treasure Maps film, it is freely available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/xR0cUat5kio. 

While progress has been made since the 1999 Olmstead Decision, much work is still to be done in Georgia and across the United States to ensure adults with disabilities live supported lives in the community. Medicaid waivers and paid supports are just one option – and unfortunately, an option that is only available to a minority of Georgians. In a recently released report from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Georgia was listed among the states who spend the least on people with IDD (Larson et al., 2021). The report also outlines that most adults with IDDs across the U.S. do not actually get services from their state developmental disability agencies; in fact, only around 17% of people with IDDs get paid supports. Advocacy and awarenessbuilding events, like the Treasure Maps show, by Georgians with and without disabilities are needed to make supported community living a reality for many Georgians.

References Knight, R. (2018, February 28). One woman with disabilities fight for freedom for all. RespectAbility. https://www.respectability.org/2018/02/onewoman-disabilities-fight-freedom/ Legal Aid Atlanta (n.d.). The Olmstead Supreme Court Decision in a Nutshell. Olmstead Rights. https:// www.olmsteadrights.org/about-olmstead/ United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. (n.d.). About Olmstead. Olmstead: Community Integration for Everyone. https:// www.ada.gov/olmstead/olmstead_about.htm Larson, S.A., Butterworth, J., Winsor, J., Tanis, S., Lulinski, A., and Smith, J. (2021). 30 years of Community Living for individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (1987- 2017). Washington, DC: Administration for Community Living, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

If adults with disabilities are to be fully welcomed and included in our communities,

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Gender-Based Violence — Adrienne Baldwin-White

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES

Adrienne Baldwin-White, MSW, PhD Assistant Professor

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ender-based violence is a social justice issue. One contributing factor to the continued perpetration of gender-based violence are social and cultural gender inequities. Norms and expectations around gender influence how individuals communicate and behave during sexual encounters and romantic relationships. Gender-based violence also means that gender minorities (i.e. female presenting and expressing individuals, nonbinary individuals, trans individuals, gay men and lesbians [because their sexuality may mean they express themselves in ways contrary to social and cultural expectation]) disproportionately experience trauma, and the negative effects of that trauma, including depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress, suicidal ideation, substance misuse, and eating disorders. Also, because there is an expectation that these individuals are responsible for preventing their own victimization, they have to take precautions and navigate life differently. They are burdened with the existential threat of violence, which takes a psychological toll. College students, in particular, may be particularly vulnerable to these norms. Emerging adults are developmentally closer

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to adolescents rather than adults, and are still developing their own identities and cultivating what they want and need in relationships. My own research explores the attitudes and beliefs college students adopt while forming who they are, and how those norms increase their risk or perpetuate or be a victim of sexual violence. This research includes understanding the origins of those norms, what things maintain or change problematic norms (including social media), how those norms can be changed, and how we can develop effective prevention programs to address those norms and reduce the risk of sexual violence on college campuses. An example of norms that contribute to gender-based violence include expectations of aggression (of male identifying and presenting individuals) and compliance (of female identifying and presenting individuals); both lead to nonconsensual sexual and romantic relationships among college students. Addressing and changing problematic norms is challenging. And with college students requires innovative approaches. My research also integrates the use of technology to not only increase the effectiveness of prevention programming, but also improve accessibility (a social


justice issue itselt) to programming that may lead to less trauma experienced by college students. Reducing gender-based violence also requires an intersectional approach. Research has established, for example, that individuals are less likely to intervene to help a Black woman being aggressively or violently pursued by someone. Therefore, effective prevention programming must consider how a person’s race impacts whether or not someone will be an effective bystander and intervene to prevent a sexual assault. Women of color are also less likely to be believed by police. Therefore, when creating interventions to improve empathetic responses to survivors, educational interventions must consider how implicit racial and gender bias reduce the likelihood a survivor will receive the help they need from medical or criminal justice systems. Trans women of color are also at an elevated risk of experiencing sexual violence. My research examines the unique experiences of trans and nonbinary individuals, and how to increase awareness of those unique experiences, and increase empathy towards survivors. The same approach is being used to capture the experiences of gay and lesbian individuals to understand their relationship norms to improve understanding of consent and healthy relationships. An antiracist and antioppressive approach to gender-based violence requires an examination of systemic changes that need to occur to prevent sexual and relationship violence and help survivors. For college students in particular, this means ensuring campus police understand the importance of trauma informed policing. In partnership with campus police, my research is working to develop an online training for patrol officers to educate

them on trauma informed responses to survivors of sexual violence. The same trauma informed education is needed for medical professionals. In collaboration with community partners, I am developing a smartphone app that will provide medical professionals with the information needed to respond to survivors of sexual or relationship violence with compassion and empathy; and in a way that will not elicit a trauma response. University systems must also be changed so students feel supported and encouraged to report when sexual or intimate partner violence occurs so they have access to the resources they need. This means creating a campus environment that acknowledges the trauma of gender-based violence and holds individuals accountable for perpetrating intimate partner or sexual violence. At the core of my research in gender-based violence prevention on college campuses is an understanding that gender inequity is at the core of campus sexual and intimate partner violence. It has created norms and expectations that have negatively impacted college students’ behavior and contributed to the continued perpetuation of sexual assault. These gender norms also intersect with norms surrounding race, gender identity and sexual orientation that require research that attempts to include everyone’s voice in deciding how the problem of campus sexual violence should be addressed. 

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A SOCIAL WORK VALUE-BASED APPROACH TO ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING David Okech, PhD Professor, Director, Center on Human Trafficking Research & Outreach

David Okech

Anna Cody, PhD Assistant Research Scientist

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here are several approaches to tackling the problem of human trafficking. A human rights approach to trafficking, for instance, places victims at the core of anti-trafficking efforts by prioritizing the protection of their rights. All victims are entitled to assistance without any obligation on their role in the process of tackling the problem1, 2, 3. A public health approach develops interventions that target the drivers, facilitators, or protective factors that are associated with trafficking. This approach provides support for survivors mental and physical health needs and is very useful in dealing with the debilitating effects of trafficking on survivors4, 5, 6. A criminal justice approach on the other hand intervenes at the perpetrator level by developing and executing appropriate and effective policies to prevent trafficking through prosecution and punishment of offenders. The presence of tough laws and law enforcement officers are seen as deterrents to would-be traffickers.7, 8

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Anna Cody

Finally, a social justice approach to trafficking acknowledges these approaches but also focuses on the root causes of trafficking at the micro, mezzo, macro, or global spheres. This approach looks at the push and pull factors that drive or draw people into trafficking situations. These factors may include lack of decent jobs and social protections, gender-based discrimination and violence, poverty, lack of knowledge on the side of victims, increased globalization and movement of people, natural catastrophes that displace people, or man-made disasters like war and civil conflict. In other words, a focus on social justice in human trafficking emphasizes tackling the root societal,


economic, environmental, and political factors that can result in people being vulnerable to trafficking.8, 9,10, 11 The UN Sustainable Development Goals can be an appropriate social-justice framework as they aim to reduce inequality, discrimination, and gender-based violence, and to ensure decent work for all. If we achieve progress towards the achievements of these goals, we might begin to record a decline in the prevalence of trafficking across the globe.12,13 Given that human trafficking is a complex multi-dimensional issue, no approach can sufficiently and exhaustively address the problem. In response, the Center on Human Trafficking Research & Outreach (CenHTRO) at the UGA School of Social Work has brought together faculty and staff from various perspectives and disciplines to conduct research, develop programs, and influence policies that can reduce trafficking in the US and abroad. We use an eclectic approach in addressing the problem and we are also guided by the values and ethical principles of the social work profession as articulated in the Code of Ethics of the US-based National Association of Social Workers (NASW).14 In this brief, we highlight how our work applies the six social work core values, including social justice in addressing the problem of human trafficking across the globe. Value: Service Ethical Principle: Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their knowledge, values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their professional

skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service). Application: CenHTRO is working with local, NGO, and intragovernmental agencies in tackling trafficking. In our research and programming, we use our values that place survivors and victims at the center of our service. We are serving on the boards of various state, national, and international anti-trafficking agencies where we provide technical support gained from our experience and expertise. We are particularly focused on supporting local NGOs in building their capacity to sustainably and meaningfully support survivors, families and communities. We use our resources and position to strengthen community-based organizations which have limited resources, limited opportunities for training and are on the front lines of addressing the complex challenge of human trafficking. While we acknowledge that existing anti-trafficking frameworks have strengths and limitations. Therefore, our approach is to use a set of the best approaches that result in the greatest client outcomes rather than to focus on ideological inclinations that can plague anti-trafficking efforts and thus reduce the effectiveness of our services. Value: Social Justice Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive

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to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people. Application: Human trafficking survivors deserve social justice and this may be accomplished in different ways depending on the situations at hand. CenHTRO ensures the inclusion of survivor voice in research, programming, and policy advocacy. Survivors know best what they need and our goal is to provide opportunities for self-empowerment by addressing the main facilitators of human trafficking. Our theory of change posits that addressing social injustices, such as family violence, violence against women and poverty, which are root causes of trafficking, can result in the reduction of the problem. We strive to focus on addressing the problem of human trafficking through a broader ecological perspective, which centers survivors and their families in understanding the trafficking phenomenon and works directly with key governmental actors and local leaders in order to make meaningful social change. This approach enables us to focus on a problem that is mostly hidden and a population that is designated as hard-to-reach. Social justice also means strengthening criminal justice responses to perpetrators of trafficking; we therefore work with legal actors by providing training in anti-trafficking laws and advocate for just policies at local and national levels. Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person. Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients’ socially responsible selfdetermination. Social workers seek to

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enhance clients’ capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social workers are cognizant of their dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society. They seek to resolve conflicts between clients’ interests and the broader society’s interests in a socially responsible manner consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession. Application: Human trafficking disproportionately affects vulnerable groups that include women and children. CenHTRO is working to reduce all forms of child trafficking in Guinea and Sierra Leone and sex trafficking among women and girls in Senegal. In these efforts, we enhance the dignity of these populations by ensuring their voice in defining and describing the problem as well as in determining and improving program design (Ghana). CenHTRO is committed to inclusivity and promoting survivor voice in decision making within the center. This is why CenHTRO has developed a strategic plan which will include survivors of trafficking as key members of our advisory board. As an academic center based in the United States we recognize the potential for a power imbalance between us and our implementation and research partners in the global south who often work in low resource communities and face immense political and economic challenges. We actively work to support our partners in making social change which is inclusive of their cultural and community values. We intentionally work to address inherent power differentials in our relationships with our partners, by ensuring that our research activities and work with implementation partners is supportive of building their capacity and supporting our partners in making meaningful change rather than being extractive.


Value: Importance of Human Relationships Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.

various disciplines to meaningfully and effectively prevent and respond to human trafficking.

Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change. Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and

Value: Integrity Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.

Application: We use the collective impact approach by engaging multi-sectoral stakeholders in addressing trafficking across the globe. The collective impact approach is grounded in building trusting, supportive, mutually beneficial, and collaborative relationships across multiple sectors in order to effectively and proactively address social problems, such as human trafficking. In building a community of stakeholders with different levels of social power and ensuring that we are all working towards common goals, we are strengthening our ability to effectively and proactively address the complex and multi-sectorial challenge of human trafficking. Recently, on March 2, 2021, we launched the Sierra Leone project that was addressed by the Vice President of the country, Dr. Mohamed Juldeh Jalloh, among other government dignitaries. On August 12, 2021, we held a roundtable with academic, government, NGO, civil society, and local leaders to explore the various challenges in anti-trafficking efforts. We have built relationship building into the core operations at CenHTRO, where every implementation country has a resident country manager who helps in developing, deepening, end expanding our relationships with key stakeholders. We recognize that without good relationships, it is impossible to work cross-nationally and across the

Social workers are continually aware of the profession’s mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards and practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers should take measures to care for themselves professionally and personally. Social workers act honestly and responsibly and promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated. Application: Trust is a key factor to the success of our projects. Given the language, cultural, and geographic differences that CenHTRO operates in, cultural humility and meeting our partners where they are paramount in enhancing trust. We actively work to build collaborative and transparent relationships with partners and to ensure that we are answerable to our partners just as they are to us. We maintain the highest degree of accountability in our financial, research, and administrative engagements because we must also remain accountable to our fund. Ultimately, we want those affected by the problem of trafficking to have faith in our efforts and staff. To achieve this, CenHTRO has recruited the best staff, faculty, and graduate students who are committed to the ideals of trust, open communication, and active listening. Value: Competence Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional expertise. Social workers continually strive to increase

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their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice. Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession. Application: CenHTRO’s faculty and staff are highly competent individuals. Our faculty come from social work, law, political science, public health, sociology, and statistics. The interdisciplinary nature of CenHTRO has contributed to increased capacity among faculty and to the establishment of innovative lines of research. Among these is the Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum (PRIF) where we are testing the various methods of prevalence estimation in Brazil, Cost Rica, Morocco, Pakistan, and Tunisia. We are coordinating the research with interdisciplinary research teams from top institutions in the US and using our values to create a conducive environment where various researchers from diverse disciplines can learn the best-practices in the science of prevalence estimation. PRIF has produced a statistical definitions document15 and is in the process of producing an indicators document that will enhance the precision of human traffic kicking prevalence estimation. In conclusion, we demonstrate in this brief how interdisciplinary research teams that have social workers can integrate the values of the profession in enhancing the rights and social justice of trafficking victims and survivors, who are the main stakeholders in all anti-trafficking initiatives. Research, programming, and policy work that recognizes the inherent challenges in antitrafficking efforts should identify the best approaches in mitigating the various forms and types of trafficking. Strengthening local institutions is key to developing effective programs irrespective of the approach or combination thereof that one applies;

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however, if the goal is social justice for victims and survivors, then a combination of a human rights, public health, criminal justice, or social justice approaches are inevitable.  References Knight, R. (2018, February 28). One woman with disabilities fight for freedom for all. RespectAbility. https://www.respectability.org/2018/02/onewoman-disabilities-fight-freedom/ 1Budiani-Saberi, D., & Columb, S. (2013). A human rights approach to human trafficking for organ removal. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 16(4), 897-914. https://link.springer.com/content/ pdf/10.1007/s11019-013-9488-y.pdf 2Chung, R. C. Y. (2009). Cultural perspectives on child trafficking, human rights & social justice: A model for psychologists. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 22(1), 85-96. https://doi. org/10.1080/09515070902761230 3Segrave, M. (2009). Human trafficking and human rights. Australian Journal of Human Rights, 14(2), 71-94. https://doi.org/10.1080/13232 38X.2009.11910855 4Greenbaum, J. (2020). A public health approach to global child sex trafficking. Annual review of public health, 41, 481-497. https://www. annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurevpublhealth-040119-094335 5Schroeder, E., Edgemon, T. E., Kagotho, N., Aletraris, L., Clay-Warner, J., & Okech, D. (2021). A Review of Prevalence Estimation Methods for Human Trafficking Populations. Public Health Reports, 6Todres, J. (2012). Assessing public health strategies for advancing child protection: Human trafficking as a case study. JL & Pol’y, 21, 93. https://ssrn.com/ abstract=2200456 7Kaye, J., Winterdyk, J., & Quarterman, L. (2014). Beyond criminal justice: A case study of responding to human trafficking in Canada. Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, 56(1), 23-48. https://doi.org/10.3138/cjccj.2012.E33 8Pfeffer, R. (2018). Reframing human trafficking: From a criminal justice problem to a social justice issue. Journal of Family Strengths, 18(1), 6. https:// digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/jfs/vol18/iss1/6 9Katiuzhinsky, A. & Okech, D. (2014). Human rights, cultural practices, and State policies: Implications for global social work practice and policy. International Journal of Social Welfare, 23(1), 80-88. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsw.12002 10Okech, D., Choi, Y.J., Elkins, J., & Burns, A.C. (2018). Seventeen years of human trafficking research in social work practice: A review of the literature. Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, 15(2), 103-122. https://doi.org/10.1080/23761407.2017.1 415177 11Perdue, T., Prior, M., Williamson, C., & Sherman, S. (2012). Social justice and spiritual healing: Using micro and macro social work practice


to reduce domestic minor sex trafficking. Social Work & Christianity, 39(4). https:// web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/ pdfviewer?vid=0&sid=c9d845ed-4096-4837bbb4-0012ccdc1916%40sessionmgr4008 12Okech, D., & Danikuu, A. (2017). Providing a Lifeline for female survivors of human trafficking in Ghana. In M. Gray (Ed.). The handbook of social work and social development in Africa (pp. 203214). NY: Routledge. 13Okech, D., Bolton, C., & Schroeder, E. (2021). Financial education in human trafficking interventions: Implications for research, programming, and policy, In Nicolini. G., Cude, B.J. (Eds). Handbook on Financial Literacy. Routledge, Milton Park Abingdon (UK). 14Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved from https://www. socialworkers.org/About/Ethics/Code-of-Ethics/ Code-of-Ethics-English 15US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Okech, D., Aletraris, L., & Schroeder, E. (2020). Human trafficking statistical definitions: Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum. University of Georgia African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery & The US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. Funding acknowledgment Funding for this work was supported by the U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons grants #SSJTIP18CA0015 and #SSJTIP18CA0032.

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Rights-Based Social Work Practice — Jane McPherson

TO BUILD A BETTER WORLD: NOW IS THE TIME FOR A RIGHTS-BASED APPROACH TO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE Jane McPherson, MSW, MPh, PhD Assistant Professor, Director of Global Engagement

Arundhati Roy, the Indian novelist and human rights activist, has written of the current pandemic as a catastrophic rupture in our lives from which we have an opportunity to build a new and better society. Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next. We can choose to walk through it, dragging the carcasses of our prejudice and hatred…Or we can walk through lightly, with little luggage, ready to imagine another world. And ready to fight for it. (Roy, 2020) Eighteen months into the pandemic, we are not yet walking lightly through this portal. COVID-19 has exposed or exacerbated core weaknesses in our society: extreme inequality, embedded structural racism, and a White-supremacist founding ideology that has shaped our social institutions, including the police, healthcare delivery, and yes, social services. Further, even though we have experienced the collective trauma of a pandemic, as a nation we have not drawn together in solidarity, but seem to have grown even further apart (Gomez, 2021).

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So, what is a social worker to do? To paraphrase both Saul Alinsky (1971) and Barack Obama (2018), we need to work in the world today—as it is—and we must work to dismantle unjust systems in order to build the world as it should be. As professionals who work shoulder-toshoulder with individuals experiencing injustice, we must use our skills—both micro and macro—to address people’s immediate needs while also insisting on a redistribution of privilege, wealth, and power in our societies. In other words, now is the time for social workers to commit to taking a rights-based approach to social work practice (Mapp et al., 2019). Rights-based practice sees the world through a human rights lens; it employs rights-based methods; and it aims at rights-based goals. Through a rightsbased lens, we see that access to healthcare, unemployment benefits, housing, social security, education, etc.—the social and economic rights first promised in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)—are actually privileges reserved for the lucky rather than rights guaranteed to all. Shifting the focus from human needs to human rights requires social workers to see clients’ concerns in larger sociopolitical


Rights-Based Social Work Practice — Jane McPherson

context and to assess for the presence of oppression and social exclusion, beyond the more standard social and psychiatric concerns. Further, it challenges us to work in solidarity with our clients in the fight for justice. Seeing problems through a rights-based lens leads social workers to set ambitious, justice-focused goals. A client’s need for a roof over her head may be met by referring her to a shelter, but securing her human right to housing will require a longterm commitment to social and political change. A rights-based approach guides intervention. Rights-based social workers root their practice in the human

Pillars of Practice

rights principles of human dignity, antidiscrimination, participation, transparency, and accountability (McPherson & Abell, 2020). Living by these principles, we cultivate democratic and transparent engagement with service users. Relationships built on equality and respect serve to deconstruct traditional power dynamics based on profession, race, income, or other social status (McPherson, 2015). This practice of building respectful and engaged partnerships that question the usual distribution of authority creates expectations—within service users and social workers—that all will be listened to and treated with dignity. Everyone’s voice matters.

Components of Practice

© Jane McPherson 2015

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Rights-Based Social Work Practice — Jane McPherson

Rights-based practice with its ambitious and aspirational goals is necessarily collaborative. To create the justice-focused changes, social workers must engage clients, communities, and political leaders. Other professionals are needed: lawyers, certainly, but also organizers, doctors, educators, researchers, faith leaders, and more. Rights-based practice, which requires attention to both micro- and macro-level concerns, demands skills and energy that go beyond what a single human being (even a social worker!) is likely to possess alone. Rights-based practice is political. It requires advocacy and activism, and this is surely a time when political action is needed to address the human rights violations that we see all around us: people of color assaulted by police or incarcerated in US prisons, jails, and detention centers are experiencing violations of their right to nondiscrimination; Texas and other states are erecting barriers between women and their reproductive rights; and voting rights are everywhere in jeopardy. Rights-based practice requires social workers to stand up for human rights. Social workers may feel uncomfortable with this call to political action. Indeed, evidence shows that social workers are less comfortable with activism than they are with other aspects of the rights-based practice model (McPherson & Abell, 2020). This discomfort is something must examine critically. Professional neutrality simply serves to ally professionals with the powerful against the interests of the underserved and disenfranchised (Farmer, 2005; Freire, 1984). We must return to the activism that built our profession and revive our long and brave tradition of campaigning for civil, social, and economic rights (Piven & Cloward, 1978; Reisch, 2013).

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A human rights-based approach to social work understands service users as experts and partners, rather than passive recipients of charity and services (Mapp et al., 2019). It also empowers—and challenges—us to promote our core professional values, even (and especially) when those values are threatened by structural racism and austerity-driven social policy. Arundhati Roy asks us to imagine the world on the other side of the portal. As social workers, we must pass through that door as human rights practitioners. We must embrace practices that fully respect the human dignity and human rights of our services users. We must envision an ambitious expansion of a human rights access for all—and we must be willing to work for it.  Author note: An earlier version of this editorial appeared in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work (June 2020) as “Now Is the Time for a Rights-Based Approach to Social Work Practice.” https://doi. org/10.1007/s41134-020-00125-1 The original article can be accessed here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/ s41134-020-00125-1 References Knight, R. (2018, February 28). One woman with disabilities fight for freedom for all. RespectAbility. https://www.respectability.org/2018/02/onewoman-disabilities-fight-freedom/ Alinksy, S. D. (1971). Rules for Radicals. New York: Random House. Farmer, P. (2005). Pathologies of power: Health, human rights, and the new war on the poor. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Freire, P. (1984). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum. Gomez, V. (2021). A partisan chasm in views of Trump’s legacy. https://www.pewresearch.org/ fact-tank/2021/03/29/a-partisan-chasm-inviews-of-trumps-legacy/ Mapp, S., McPherson, J., Androff, D.A., Gatenio Gabel, S. (2019). Social work is a human rights profession. Social Work, 64(3), 259-269. https:// doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz023


Rights-Based Social Work Practice — Jane McPherson

McPherson, J. (2015). Human rights practice in social work: A U.S. social worker looks to Brazil for leadership. European Journal of Social Work, 18, 599-612. https.com//doi:10.1080/13691457.2014.9 47245 McPherson, J. & Abell, N. (2020). Measuring rightsbased practice: Introducing the Human Rights Methods in Social Work scales. British Journal of Social Work, 50, 222–242. https://doi.org/10.1093/ bjsw/bcz132 Obama, M. (2018). Becoming. New York: Crown Publishing. Piven, F. F. & Cloward, R. A. (1978). Poor people’s movements: Why they succeed and why they fail. New York, NY: Vintage. Reisch, M. (2013). What is the future of social work? Critical and Radical Social Work, 1(1), 67-85. https://doi.org/10.1332/204986013X665974 Roy, A. (2020, April 3). The pandemic is a portal. The Financial Times. https://www.ft.com/ content/10d8f5e8-74eb-11ea-95fe-fcd274e920ca

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Social Work in Action

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Common Book Initiative — Washington, Elkins

SOCIAL JUSTICE COMMON BOOK INITIATIVE Tiffany Washington, PhD Associate Professor, Interim PhD Program Director Tiffany Washington

Jennifer Elkins, PhD Associate Professor, MSW Program Director

For a third year, the School of Social Work is engaging in a Common Book Initiative. This effort, whereby all entering students read and discuss the same book on a social justice topic, encourages students to think critically about the roles and responsibilities of social work as a social justice profession. Jennifer Elkins

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he NASW Code of Ethics states that “social workers must take action against oppression, racism, discrimination, and inequities, and acknowledge personal privilege.” This commitment to social justice is inextricably linked to the promotion of economic justice. However, sometimes the link between past and present economic injustices in the United States isn’t given enough attention. Amid a national reckoning on inequality, racism, and white supremacy in 2021, the organizing committee chose “dismantling racism” as the topic of focus for the third

annual Social Justice Common Book Initiative (SJCBI). Selected with the input of current social work students for the first time, Heather McGhee’s timely new book, The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together, traces the impact of racism on the economy in the U.S., the origins of the wealth gap, and strategies for moving forward. The book introduced students to McGhee’s zero-sum paradigm that suggests progress comes at the expense of marginalized groups. We were also introduced to the concept of “the solidarity dividend”

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that describes how people reach across racial lines to work together for the common good and secure better lives for all. As with previous selections, Drs. Tiffany Washington and Jennifer Elkins expected this book to expand students’ understanding of social justice, engage their intellectual curiosity about progress through social policy formation, and challenge their critical thinking about social workers’ role in dismantling white supremacy and promoting an economicallyjust society. To date more than 700 incoming MSW and PhD students have participated in the SJCBI during their summer and fall orientations. In addition to exciting and energizing discussions at orientation, many faculty have incorporated the book selections into their courses through required reading, assignments, and/or discussions. Washington and Elkins are proud to have established this initiative and look forward to seeing the new and exciting directions it takes as the new organizing committee transitions in this upcoming year. 

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Social Worker and Social Policy ­­— Yosha Dotson

THE SOCIAL WORKER ENGAGED IN SOCIAL POLICY Yosha Dotson, MSW Academic Professional, Graduate Recruitment Coordinator

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his year the state of Georgia passed its first hate crimes bill. More than half a century after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and almost as long since the first federal hate crimes legislation was signed, Georgia was one of only four states in the country that did not have a bill that increased penalties for crimes based in discrimination and hatred of “the perceived other.” This bill (HB426) was tabled by the Senate Judiciary Committee during the first half of the session and was expected to sit on the table (not move) for the remainder of session. It only passed amidst pandemic, peaceful protests, violent unrest, the slow apathetic suffocation murder of George Floyd by police officers, and the stalking death of Ahmad Arbery in rural Georgia – both of which were broadcast on television and in social media worldwide. Simultaneously, Georgians experienced voter disenfranchisement, extensive budget cuts to direct services for those with mental, physical and substance use challenges, the refusal to use big business to bring additional capital into the state and reopening the state with a disregard for

federal guidelines. What does that say regarding the importance of social justice and the action required to bring about change? Social work was founded on the principle of taking action. The first social workers challenged the system. Trash collection was the catalyst for movement and community organization. So what is our obligation as social workers today? Social workers are positioned to utilize the dual perspectives of macro and micro practice to foster change in systems that are resolved to maintain the status quo. I would pose that there are still system problems that must spur us to action. In the current session, this action for change helped restore funding for maternal health, peer services and crisis beds for youth. However, there are challenges that remain. As social workers, we have the statistics, the research and the organizing capacity to confront issues of discrimination, disenfranchisement, racism, tokenism, and institutional and structural oppression head on. It is time to act.

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Social Worker and Social Policy — Yosha Dotson

My research and practice expertise is in education and mobilization of communities to engage in the policy space. This includes strategy and advocacy messaging. This same messaging is crucial in my own professional community—social work.

3) Testimony - Understand both sides of an issue and call, submit comment or plan to testify in committee meetings. Providing testimony can be effective in bringing forth positions that have been unheard or reaffirming points for legislators.

To that end, here are some ways social workers can engage in the current social policy landscape:

4) Advocacy in Groups – Join or find organizations focusing on your interests that participate in advocacy and lobbying at the state level. These organizations often create legislative agendas and real time legislative updates and alerts so that members know when to take action. Actions can include advocacy days, placing calls, sending emails or testimony.

1) Elections – Volunteer to participate in the upcoming election. This can include working at polling locations and phone banking. Contact the Secretary of State to ensure that complaints are logged. Post important voter dates/deadlines on social media or throughout your organization. 2) Programs/Research - Educate yourself regarding programs and models that are best practices. Share this information with your legislators before sessions. Let them know what is important to you and the community you are representing. Most legislation is brought forward because of what legislators learn in their districts. Presenting issues to legislators creates “champions” for those causes.

As social workers it is our responsibility to define what we see and speak up. If we remain silent, we permit opportunities for increased injustice, including disenfranchisement and trauma, to persist. We have an opportunity to set the tone for generations to come. 

Yosha Dotson training community advocates on how to speak with their state legislators at the Black Infant Health Summit sponsored by Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies. Photo by Amber Raines, https://www.murphyraines.com/.

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Protecting Survivors During a Pandemic — Y. Joon Choi, Elyssa Schroeder

PROTECTING SURVIVORS DURING A PANDEMIC: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RESIDENTIAL SERVICES RESPONSE TO COVID-19 Y .Joon Choi, PhD Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean Elyssa Schroeder, MSW PhD Student

Y. Joon Choi

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istory has shown that in times of societal crisis, such as natural disasters and financial downturns, intimate partner violence (IPV) tends to rise. Recent events, such as Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey and the Australian Black Saturday fires, elucidated this phenomenon by demonstrating increased IPV incidences up to four years after the natural disaster (Schumacher, 2010; Serrata & Hurtado Alvarado, 2019; Parkinson & Zara, 2013). Other studies have found that rapid increases in the unemployment rate and unstable economic conditions, as seen in the Great Recession of 2008, increased abusive partners' controlling behaviors (Schneider, Harknett, & McLanahan, 2016; Lucero, & Santiago, 2016). The COVID-19 pandemic created distinctive conditions that overlap the increased risk factors of both a natural disaster and an unstable economy for increased IPV while also further isolating survivors through social distancing practices. The United Nations estimates suggest that three months of quarantine could increase global domestic violence by 20% (United Nations Population Fund, 2020). In Georgia, domestic violence calls during the pandemic, including calls

Elyssa Schroeder

from first-time reporters, have increased 42-79% (Braverman, 2020; Burns, 2020; Evans, 2020). Domestic violence shelters represent a foundational service intervention that fulfills IPV survivor needs that cannot be met with other services (Lyon, Lane, & Menard, 2008). These residential programs provide 24/7 housing assistance for survivors fleeing IPV while providing additional wraparound supports such as therapy, legal advocacy, and case management. Shelters typically seek to create safe and healthy environments for

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Protecting Survivors During a Pandemic — Y. Joon Choi, Elyssa Schroeder

survivors, and the COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented changes to those standard operating procedures. Shelter environments are communal by nature, with survivors often sharing rooms and common spaces, which increases the risk of spreading the virus. Additionally, survivors typically exit shelter services when they can be financially independent. With mass unemployment and reduction of income for many Americans, the impact on survivors currently living in domestic violence shelters can be monumental. This creates a bottleneck effect where survivors are unable to exit shelter services into a safe and stable environment, preventing new residents from entering. The intersections of increased need for shelter services with an increased risk in housing people communally and decreased economic options for survivors exiting shelters creates an unprecedented challenge for these programs. Our current research study seeks to understand how shelters are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, given these constraints and an initial vacuum of information. The study targets both domestic violence shelter staff and shelter leadership to obtain a multi-pronged picture of how policies and decisions were enacted. This study utilizes an online survey with questions surrounding changes in everyday operations of domestic violence shelters. Specifically, it inquires how domestic violence shelter leadership made decisions affecting survivors and shelter staff during the pandemic and subsequent shelter-in-place policies. It also examines domestic violence shelter staff’s perceptions of how particular policies affected their ability to respond to survivor needs and how their health concerns impacted their work. The ultimate goal of the study is to identify gaps and best practices in shelter service to

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inform future infectious disease response planning for domestic violence agencies. The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented challenge in providing residential services. This study will shed light on how domestic violence agencies can continue to deliver life-saving services in these exceptional times and further their commitment to equitable access for all survivors.  References Ignatieff, M. (Ed.) (2005). Introduction: American exceptionalism and human rights. American exceptionalism and human rights. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Braverman, J. (2020, May 11). APD says domestic violence crimes up 42% while other crimes down significantly during COVID-19 pandemic. 11Alive. Accessed on 25 May 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/3dXDaTA. Burns, A. S. (2020, April 28). Stay-at-home order poses new problems for family violence victims, shelters. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Accessed on 25 May 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2YSOrAe. Campbell, A. M. (2020). An increasing risk of family violence during the Covid-19 pandemic: Strengthening community collaborations to save lives. Forensic Science International: Reports, 2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fsir.2020.100089 Evans, S. (2020, April 22). CCPD, SPD report recent rise in domestic violence calls. WTOC11. Accessed 25 May 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2BnHJJW. Lyon, E., Lane, S., & Menard, A. (2008). Meeting survivors’ needs: A multi-state study of domestic violence shelter experiences. Hartford: School of Social Work, University of Connecticut. Lucero, J. L., Lim, S., & Santiago, A. M. (2016). Changes in economic hardship and intimate partner violence: A family stress framework. Journal of family and economic issues, 37(3), 395-406. Serrata, J., & Hurtado Alvarado, M. G. (2019). Understanding the impact of Hurricane Harvey on family violence survivors in Texas and those who serve them. Texas Council on Family Violence. https:// nnedv.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/NNEDVWebinar-Hurricane-Harvey.pdf Schneider, D., Harknett, K., & McLanahan, S. (2016). Intimate partner violence in the Great Recession. Demography, 53(2), 471-505. https://bit.ly/2XvXYMJ United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). (2020, April 27). Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on family planning and ending gender-based violence, female genital mutilation and child marriage. United Nations Population Fund. Accessed on 25 May 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2YRrpdd.


Publications and Presentations

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Faculty

FACU LT Y REFEREED PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTATIONS Click on the faculty member’s name to view their online profile.

LYDIA ALETRARIS ASSOCIATE RESEARCH SCIENTIST PhD • University of Georgia, Sociology MA • University of Georgia, Sociology BS • Illinois Institute of Technology, Psychology

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Schroeder, E., Edgemon, T. G., Aletraris, L., Kagotho, N., Clay-Warner, J., & Okech, D. (in press). A review of prevalence estimation methods with human trafficking populations. Public Health Reports. Paino, M., Aletraris, L., & Roman. (2020). The use of off-label medications in substance abuse treatment programs. Substance Abuse, 41(3), 340–346. https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2019.16 35962 REPO RTS Mowbray, O., Aletraris, L., Disney, L., & Doran, E. (2020). Procedures and processes for estimating mental illness in the Newton County jail. University of Georgia. US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Okech, D., Aletraris, L., & Schroeder, E. (2020). Human trafficking statistical definitions: Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum. University of Georgia African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES) & The US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/ RG.2.2.31986.12484

ADRIENNE BALDWIN-WHITE ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PhD • Arizona State University MSW • University of Alabama BA • Birmingham Southern College

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Baldwin-White, A., & Still, S. (in press). Hamilton: A pedagogy of social justice and revolution in social work education. Journal of Social Work Education. Baldwin-White, A., Read, G., Beer, J., & Darville, G. (2021). Harnessing technology to prevent sexual assault on college campuses. Journal of American College Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1920605

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Baldwin-White, A. (2021). College students and their knowledge and perceptions about sexual assault. Sexuality & Culture, 25, 58–74. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-020-09757-x Baldwin-White, A., & Gower, K. (2021). Influence of social media on how college students perceive healthy relationships and consent. Journal of American College Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1927049 Gower, K., & Baldwin-White, A. (2021). Healthy dating relationships: Attitudes and perceptions of college students. Violence and Victims. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1891/vv-d-20-00001 Baldwin-White, A., & Bazemore, B. (2020). The gray area of defining sexual assault: An exploratory study of college students’ perceptions. Social Work, 65(3), 257–265. https://doi.org/10.1093/ sw/swaa017 Klein, L. B., Brewer, N. Q., Mennicke, A., Christensen, M. C., Baldwin-White, A., Cloy, C., & Wood, L. (2020). Centering minoritized students in campus interpersonal violence research. Journal of Family Violence. Advance online publication. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s10896-020-00223-8

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” — Frederick Douglass

B OOK CH AP TER S Baldwin-White, A., & Christensen, C. (2021). Understanding consent among emerging adults: Wrestling with the social construction of gender, sexuality, and salient social categories. In S. J. Dodd (Ed.), The Routledge international handbook of social work and sexualities (pp. 332-346). Routledge. https://doi. org/10.4324/9780429342912 PR ESENTATIONS O’Shields J., & Baldwin-White, A. (2021, January 19–22). Exploring the role of Snapchat use in predicting alcohol consumption among college students [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper42670.html Baldwin-White, A. (2020, November 16–20). Expanding the reach of social work through curriculum and course design [Paper session]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Baldwin-White, A., Kiehne, E., Jones, A., & Dunnigan, A. (2020, November 16–20). The reality of being an academic mom [Panel presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).


Faculty

LEON BANKS SENIOR ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, BSW PROGRAM DIRECTOR PhD • University of Georgia, Social Work MSW • Savannah State University BS • Howard University, Psychology

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S White, G. L., Banks, L., Briggs, H. E., Allen, J. L., & Lowe, T. B. (2021). The effects of child support payment factors on satisfaction with levels of parental involvement by non-custodial fathers. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/10497315211004744 Briggs, H. E., Hardeman, C. P., Banks, L., Briggs, A. C., Allen, J. L., Huggins-Hoyt, K. Y., Hopps, J. G., & McCrary, D. (2021). Do race, racial disproportionality and disparities remain a foci of child welfare?: Words matter. Child Welfare, 98(5), 93–117. https://www.proquest.com/scholarly-journals/do-raceracial-disproportionality-disparities/docview/2509358362/ se-2?accountid=14537.

JENAY M. BEER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AND COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH

McDonnell, K. K., Gallerani, D. G., Newsome, B. R., Owens, O. L., Beer, J. M., Myren-Bennett, A. R., Regan, E., Hardin, J. W., & Webb, L. A. (2020). A prospective pilot study evaluating feasibility and preliminary effects of Breathe Easier: A mindfulnessbased intervention for survivors of lung cancer and their family members. Integrative Cancer Therapies, 19. https://doi. org/10.1177/1534735420969829 CONFER ENCE AB STR ACTS AND PR OCE EDI N G S Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2021). Toward a framework for embodiment in communication technologies: Facilitating social connectivity for older adults. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 64(1), 28–32. https://doi. org/10.1177/1071181320641008 Adams, A., Beer, J., Wu, X., Komsky, J., & Zamer, J. (2020). Social activities in community settings: Impract of COVID-19 and technology solutions. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 957. https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/ igaa057.3499 Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). Leveraging assistive technology resources to support aging in place: A scoping study. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 100. https:// doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.330 Wu, X., & Beer, J. (2020). Usable and privacy-enhanced telepresence robots for older adults aging in place. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”], 4(Suppl. 1), 196. https:// doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.635

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S

Emerson, K., Kim, D., Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). The impact of COVID-19 safety recommendations on adults age 60 and older: A qualitative study. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 959. https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/ igaa057.3506

Owens, O. L., Beer, J. M., Revels, A. A., & White, K. (2021). The lived experiences of older low-income African Americans living alone: Implications for aging in place in the United States. Journal of Aging and Environment, 35(1), 42–61. https://doi.org/10.1080/2 6892618.2020.1780662

Emerson, K., Kim, D., Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). Coping with the impact of COVID-19 safety recommendations: The importance of pets. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 937. https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.3432

Baldwin-White, A., Read, G., Beer, J., & Darville, G. (2021). Harnessing technology to prevent sexual assault on college campuses. Journal of American College Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1920605

Mois, G., Collette, B. A., Renzi-Hammond, L. M., Boccanfuso, L., Ramachandran, A., Gibson, P., Emerson, K. G., & Beer, J. M., (2020). Understanding robots’ potential to facilitate piano cognitive training in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Proceedings of the International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction [Late Breaking Report], ACM/IEEE. https://doi. org/10.1145/3371382.3378299

PhD • Georgia Institute of Technology MS • Georgia Institute of Technology BA • University of Dayton, Psychology

Beer, J. M., Smith, K. N., Kennedy, T., Mois, G., Acena, D., Gallerani, D. G., McDonnell, K. K., & Owens, S. L. (2020). A focus group evaluation of Breathe Easier: A mindfulness-based mHealth app for survivors of lung cancer and their family members. American Journal of Health Promotion, 34(7), 770–778. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890117120924176 Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). The role of healthcare robotics in providing support to older adults: A socio-ecological perspective. Current Geriatric Reports, 9, 82–89. https://doi.org/10.1007/ s13670-020-00314-w Owens, O. L., Smith, K. N., Beer, J. M., Gallerani, D. G., & McDonnell, K. K. (2020). A qualitative cultural sensitivity assessment of the Breathe Easier mobile application for lung cancer survivors and their families. Oncology Nursing Forum, 47(3), 331–341. https://doi.org/10.1188/20.onf.331-341

B OOK CH AP TER S Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). Robotics to support aging in place. In R. Pak, E. de Visser, & E. Rovira (Eds.), Living with robots: Emerging issues on the psychological and social implications of robotics (pp. 49–74). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12815367-3.00003-7 PR ESENTATIONS See Conference Abstracts and Proceedings above.

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Faculty JAVIER F. BOYAS ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

PhD • Boston College MSW • University of Michigan BA • Western Illinois University

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Boyas, J. F., Lim, Y. H., & Conner, A. M. (2021). Health status among African Americans: Do social capital and financial satisfaction make a difference? Journal of Poverty, 25(1), 57–75. https://doi.org/10.1080/10875549.2020.1744790 Boyas, J. F., Woodiwiss, J. L., & Nahar, V. K. (2021). Examining intentions to engage in sun protective behaviors among Latino day laborers: An application of the theory of planned behavior. Health Promotion Perspectives, 11(3), 351–359. https://hpp. tbzmed.ac.ir/Article/hpp-34214 Villarreal-Otálora, T., Boyas, J. F., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Fatehi, M. (2020). Ecological factors influencing suicidal ideation-to-action among Latinx adolescents: An exploration of sex differences. Children and Youth Services Review, 118. https:// doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105444 Moon, S. S., Boyas, J. F., & Kim, Y. K. (2020). Using a classification tree modeling approach to predict cigarette use among adolescents in the United States. Substance Use & Misuse, 55(1), 12–22. https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2019.1653323 Zhang, S., Lim, Y., Boyas, J. F., & Burlaka, V. (2020). Family structure and youth illicit drug use, use disorder, and treatment services utilization. Children and Youth Services Review, 111, Article 104880. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104880 Kim, Y. J., Moon, S. S., Kim, Y. K., & Boyas, J. (2020). Protective factors of suicide: Religiosity and parental monitoring. Children and Youth Services Review, 114, Article 105073. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105073 PRESE N TATIO N S Kim, Y. J., Moon, S. S., Kim, Y. K., & Boyas, J. F. (2020, November 16–20). Protective factors of suicide: Religiosity and parenting monitoring [Poster presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

HAROLD E. BRIGGS PROFESSOR, PAULINE M. BERGER PROFESSOR IN FAMILY AND CHILD WELFARE PhD • University of Chicago MSW • University of Chicago BA • Morehouse College

BO O K C HA P TE RS Briggs, H. E., & Teasley, M. (in press). Eliminating racism: A critical perspective. In M. Teasley, M. S. Spencer, & M. Bartholomew (Eds.), Social work and the grand challenge to eliminate racism. Oxford University Press.

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Briggs, H. E., Collins, J., Hunt, P., Montague, S., & Vietze, A. M. (in press). Supporting families access and navigation of multiple systems. In R. Denby-Brinson & C. Ingram’s (Eds.), Child and family-serving systems: A compendium of policy and practice. Child Welfare League of America. JOUR NAL ARTICLES Johnson, W., & Briggs, H. E. (Eds.). (in press). Interventions with fathers: Effective social work practice for enhancing individual, family and civic engagement [Guest editors to the special issue]. Research on Social Work Practice. Johnson, W., & Briggs, H. E. (Eds.). (in press). Interventions with fathers: [Introduction to the special issue]. Research on Social Work Practice. Briggs, H. E., Hardeman, C. P., Banks, L., Briggs, A. C., Allen, J. L., Huggins-Hoyt, K. Y., Hopps, J. G., & McCrary, D. (2021). Do race, racial disproportionality and disparities remain a foci of child welfare?: Words matter. Child Welfare, 98(5), 93–117. https://www.proquest.com/scholarly-journals/do-raceracial-disproportionality-disparities/docview/2509358362/ se-2?accountid=14537. White, G. L., Banks, L., Briggs, H. E., Allen, J. L., & Lowe, T. B. (2021). The effects of child support payment factors on satisfaction with levels of parental involvement by non-custodial fathers. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/10497315211004744 Miller, K. M., Briggs, H. E., Elkins, J., Kim, I., & Mowbray, O. (2020). Physical abuse and adolescent sexual behaviors: Moderating effects of mental health disorders and substance use. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma, 13, 55–62. https://doi. org/10.1007/s40653-018-0221-0

ROSALYN DENISE CAMPBELL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PhD • University of Michigan MSW • University of Michigan BA • University of Texas at Austin

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Campbell, R. D., Dennis, M. K., Lopez, K., Matthew, R. A. & Choi, Y. J. (2021). Qualitative research in communities of color: Challenges, strategies, and lessons. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 12(1), 177–200. https://www.journals. uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/713408 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists. Social Work in Mental Health, 19(2), 126–140. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2021.1885090 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Disney, L. (2021). A systematic review of psychosocial-based outcomes in peer-support services. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 18(2), 155–180. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1805385 Walton, Q. L., Campbell, R. D., & Blakey, J. M. (2021). Black women and COVID-19: The need for targeted mental health research and practice. Qualitative Social Work, 20(1-2), 247–255. https://doi.org/10.1177/1473325020973349


Faculty Kim, E., Washington, T., & Campbell, R. D. (2021). Community leaders’ perceptions of depression and the perceived barriers in seeking mental health services for older Korean Americans. Ethnicity & Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10 .1080/13557858.2021.1910627 Campbell, R. D. (2020). Revisiting African American idioms of distress: Are we speaking the same mental health language? Health & Social Work, 45(1), 55–58. https://doi.org/10.1093/hsw/ hlz038 Campbell, R. D., & Winchester, M. R. (2020). Let the church say…: One congregation’s views on how churches can improve mental health beliefs, practices and behaviors among Black Americans. Social Work & Christianity, 47(2), 105–122. https:// doi.org/10.34043/swc.v47i2.63 PRESE N TATIO N S Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021, January 19–22). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41283.html Campbell, R. D., Davis, L., Fletcher, A. M. C., & Smith-Maddox, R. (2020, November 16–20). Advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in schools of social work [Interactive workshop]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Campbell, R. D., Hernandez-Hamed, E., Moore, R. M., Padilla, Y., Servillano, L., Smith-Maddox, R. (2020, November 16–20). Overcoming resistance and securing partnerships for DEI initiatives [Interactive Connect session]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

Y. JOON CHOI ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, INTERIM ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AND FACULTY AFFAIRS PhD • Virginia Commonwealth University MSW • University of Michigan MA • City University of New York – City College BA • Ewha Womans University,

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Rai, A., Choi, Y. J., Cho, S., Das, U., & Goutham, M. (in press). Domestic violence conversations on Twitter during COVID-19: What is missing? Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Rai, A., Choi, Y. J., Yoshihama, M., & Dabby, C. (in press). Helpseeking among battered immigrant Filipina, Indian, and Pakistani women in the United States: Perceived barriers and helpful responses. Violence & Victims. Yeo, H. S., Choi, Y. J., Son, E., Cho, H. K., Yun, S. H., & Lee, J. O. (in press). Childhood community risk factors on intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization among college students. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Choi, Y. J., Rai, A., Cho, H., Son, E., An, S., & Yun, S. H. (2021). Help-seeking behaviors for intimate partner violence among college students. Violence & Victims, 36(4), 548–564. https:// connect.springerpub.com/content/sgrvv/36/4/548 Lee, H. Y., Choi, Y. J., An, S., & Yoon, Y. J. (2021). Adherence to cervical cancer screening in Korean American immigrant women: Identifying malleable variables for intervention development. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 32(3), 230–238. https://doi. org/10.1177/1043659620914693 Orpinas, P., Choi, Y. J., Kim, C., Li, T., & Kim, E. (2021). Prevention of partner violence: Virtual case simulation for religious leaders of Korean American immigrant communities. Health Promotion International, daab092. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1093/heapro/daab092 Rai, A., & Choi, Y. J. (2021). Domestic violence victimization among South Asian immigrant men and women in the United States. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advanced online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605211015262.

MARY A. CAPLAN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PhD • University of California, Berkeley MSW • University of California, Berkeley BA • University of Oregon

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Lee, S., Bae, J., Sharkey, C. N., Caplan, M., Bakare, O. H., & Embrey, J. (in press). Professional social work and public libraries in the United States. Social Work. Caplan, M. A., Birkenmaier, J., & Bae, J. (2021). Financial exclusion in OECD countries: A scoping review. International Journal of Social Welfare, 30(1), 58–71. https://doi.org/10.1111/ ijsw.12430

Saasa, S., Okech, D., Choi, Y. J., Nackerud, L., & Littleton, T. (2021). Social exclusion, mental health, and social well-being among African immigrants in the United States. International Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0020872820963425 Campbell, R. D., Dennis, M. K., Lopez, K., Matthew, R. A., & Choi, Y. J. (2021). Qualitative research in communities of color: Challenges, strategies, and lessons. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 12(1), 177–200. https://www.journals. uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/713408 Choi, Y. J., Lee, H. Y., An, S. O., Yoon, Y. J., & Oh, J. J. (2020). Predictors of cervical cancer screening awareness and literacy among Korean American women. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 7(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-01900628-2

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Faculty Littleton, T., Choi, Y. J., & McGarity, S. V. (2020). Psychological and social correlates of HIV stigma among people living with HIV. Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services, 19(1), 74–89. https://doi. org/10.1080/15381501.2019.1699486 An, S. O., Lee, H. Y., Choi, Y. J., & Yoon, Y. J. (2020). Literacy of breast cancer and screening guideline in an immigrant group: Importance of health accessibility. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 22, 563–570. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903020-00973-z

Choi, Y. J., Yeo, H. S., Lee, J. O., Cho, H. K., Son, E., & Yun, S. H. (2021, January 19–22). The effect of childhood community factors on intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization among college-aged students [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41304.html

Rai, A., Villarreal-Otálora, T., Blackburn, J., & Choi, Y. J. (2020). Correlates of intimate partner stalking precipitated homicides in the United States. Journal of Family Violence, 35, 705–716. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s10896-020-00137-5

Fatehi, M., Choi, Y. J., Cho, H., An, S., Choi, G. Y., & Hong, S. (2021, January 19–22). Impact of adverse childhood experiences in the manifestation of intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration among college students: Gendered perspective [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43138.html

Son, E., Cho, H., Yun, S. H., Choi, Y. J., An, S., & Hong, S. (2020). Intimate partner violence victimization among college students with disabilities: Prevalence, help-seeking, and the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and intimate partner violence victimization. Children and Youth Services Review, 110, Article 104741. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104741

Rai, A., Choi, Y. J., Mowbray, O., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Domestic violence perceptions and its correlates among South Asian immigrants [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41338.html

Villamil Grest, C., Cederbaum, J. A., Lee, D., Choi, Y. J., Cho, H. G., Hong, S. H., Yun, S. H., & Lee, J. O. (2020). Cumulative violence exposure and alcohol use among college students: Adverse childhood experience and dating violence. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0886260520913212

Son, E., Lee, H. J., Cho, H. K., Choi, Y. J., & Seon, J. S. (2021, January 19–22). The effects of disability status and neighborhood environment on adverse childhood experiences among young adults [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper41619.html

Lee, H. Y., Yoon, Y. J., Xiong, S., Wang, J., & Choi, Y. J. (2020). Colorectal cancer screening awareness and literacy among Korean American women: Importance of health care accessibility. Public Health and Healthcare, 2(1), 001–007. https://bit.ly/3AXlJy4

Choi, Y. J., & Orpinas, P. (2020, November 16–20). Using Intervention Mapping: Step-by-step approach to translating theory and evidence into programs [Workshop, accepted, unable to present]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

Cho, H., Seon, J., Choi, G., An, S., Kwon, I., Choi, Y. J., Hong, S., Lee, J. O., Son, E., & Yun, S. H. (2020). Gender differences in intimate partner violence victimization, help-seeking, and outcomes among college students. Advances in Social Work, 20(1), 22–44. https://doi.org/10.18060/23675

LLEWELLYN CORNELIUS

PRESE N TATIO N S

PROFESSOR, DONALD L. HOLLOWELL DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CIVIL RIGHTS STUDIES, DIRECTOR, THE CENTER FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, HUMAN AND CIVIL RIGHTS

Choi, Y. J., Lee, H. Y., Yoon, Y. J., & Blackburn, J. (2021, January 19–22). The effect of social support on health literacy among Korean American immigrant women [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper43056.html Choi, Y. J., Orpinas, P., Cho, S., Han, J. E., & Park, S. J. (2021, April 5–9). In the midst of COVID-19: Challenges and creative solutions to conduct a randomized trial with immigrant religious leaders to prevent intimate partner violence [Flash science]. 2021 Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) (Virtual). Choi, Y. J., Rai, A., Mowbray, O., Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Help-seeking preferences and correlates of recommending helpseeking among South Asian immigrants. [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41335.html Choi, Y. J., & Seon, J. S. (2021, January 19–22). The effects of disability status and neighborhood environment on adverse childhood experiences among young adults [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41619.html

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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU

PhD • University of Chicago MA • University of Chicago, Social Service Admin. MA • University of Chicago, Social Science BA • Syracuse University,

B OOK S Lopez, D. S., & Cornelius, L. J. (2020). The girl from the Bronx: A memoir about resiliency and hope in the face of hardship and systemic inequity. DSL Enterprises. JOUR NAL ARTICLES Odiachi, A., Al-Mujtaba, M., Torbunde, N., Erekaha, S., Afe, A. J., Adejuyigbe, E., Galadanci, H. S., Jasper, T. L., Cornelius, L. J., & Sam-Agudu, N. A. (2021). Acceptability of mentor mother peer support for women living with HIV in North-Central Nigeria: A qualitative study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 21, 545. https://doi. org/10.1186/s12884-021-04002-1 Cornelius, L. J., & Webb, C. L. (2020). Unraveling the persistent legacy of structural racism again poor persons of color in the U.S. Journal of Poverty, 24(5–6), 355–368. https://doi.org/10.1080/108 75549.2020.1811444


Faculty Bessaha, M. L., Cornelius, L. J., & Unick, G. J. (2020). Barriers to behavioral health service utilization among first-generation immigrant emerging adults. Journal of Social Work and Mental Health, 18(1), 55–74. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.10 80/15332985.2019.1679323

Yeo, H., & Dunnigan, A. (2021, January 19–22). Trajectories of foster-care entry of infants with prenatal substance exposure in states [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https:// sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper42606.html

Gower, K., Cornelius, L., Rawls, R., & Walker, B. B. (2020). Reflective Structured Dialogue: A qualitative thematic analysis. Conflict Resolution Quarterly, 37(3), 207-221. https://doi. org/10.1002/crq.21271

Fusco, R. A., & Dunnigan, A. E. (2020, November). Frequent marijuana and alcohol use in low-income young adults: Effects of adverse life experience [Paper presentation]. International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse & Neglect International Congress, Adelaide, Australia (Conference canceled due to COVID-19).

Garcia, M., Vidal de Haymes, M., & Cornelius, L. (2020). Gads Hill Center: Revisiting the function and cause of social settlements in a time of COVID. Greenwich Social Work Review, 1(2), 133–140.https://doi.org/10.21100/gswr.v1i2.1174 Al-Mujtaba M., Sam-Agudu, N. A., Torbunde, N., Aliyu, M. H., & Cornelius, L. J. (2020). Access to maternal-child health and HIV services for women in North-Central Nigeria: A qualitative exploration of the male partner perspective. PLOS ONE, 15(12), e0243611. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0243611 Odiachi, A., Sam-Agudu, N. A., Erekaha, S., Isah, C., Swomen, H. E., Charurat, M., & Cornelius, L. J. (2020). A mixed-methods assessment of disclosure of HIV status among expert mothers living with HIV in rural Nigeria. PLOS ONE, 15(4), e0232423. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0232423

JENNIFER ELKINS ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MSW PROGRAM DIRECTOR PhD • Columbia University MSW • University of Wisconsin BA • University of Wisconsin

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Sharkey, C. N., Elkins, J. E., & Johnson, Z. (in press). Creating trauma-informed library spaces: Lessons learned from a pilot program. Journal of Social Work Education

ALLISON DUNNIGAN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, TITLE IV-E PROGRAM DIRECOTR PhD • Washington University in St. Louis MSW • Washington University in St. Louis BA • DePauw University

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Wideman, E., Dunnigan, A., Jonson-Reid, M., Kohl, P., Constantino, J., Tandon, M., & Recktenwald, A., & Tompkins, R. (2020). Nurse home visitation with vulnerable families in rural areas: A qualitative case file review. Public Health Nursing, 37(2), 234–242. https://doi.org/10.1111/phn.12699 BO O K C HA P TE RS Jonson-Reid, M., Drake, F., Dunnigan, A., Kohl, P, and Auslander, W. (2020). Preventing child maltreatment. In M. R. Rank (Ed.), Toward a livable life: A 21st century agenda for social work (pp. 152–192). Oxford University Press. PRESE N TATIO N S Dunnigan, A., Grinnell-Davis, C., & DeFrank, L. E. (2021, January 19–22). State Indian child welfare statutes and entry of American Indian/Alaskan Native children into foster care [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper44522.html Grinnell-Davis, C., Dunnigan, A., & DeFrank, L. (2021, January 19–22). The journey of American Indian and Alaskan Native youth through foster care: The effect of state ICWA statutes [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper44529.html

Morrissey-Stahl, K., Elkins, J., Topple, T., & Decelle, K. (2021). Teaching Note–Lessons from designing and teaching an antioppression capstone course. Journal of Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.20 21.1895926 Miller, K. M., Briggs, H. E., Elkins, J., Kim, I., & Mowbray, O. (2020). Physical abuse and adolescent sexual behaviors: Moderating effects of mental health disorders and substance use. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma, 13(1), 55–62. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s40653-018-0221-0 Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Jennings-McGarity, P., Grinnell-Davis, C., & Elkins, J. (2020). Caregiver problem drinking and trajectories of post-traumatic stress among youth. Children and Youth Services Review, 116, Article 105171. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. childyouth.2020.105171 Brave Heart, M. Y. H., Chase, J., Myers, O., Elkins, J., Skipper, B., Schmitt, C., Mootz, J., & Waldorf, V. A. (2020). Iwankapiya American Indian pilot clinical trial: Historical trauma and group interpersonal psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, 57(2), 184–196. https://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1037/pst0000267 PR ESENTATIONS Sharkey, C., Strickland, C. & Elkins, J. (2021, April 15–16). Resisting curriculum violence and developing anti-oppressive, trauma-informed, culturally sustaining approaches for social work education and practice. Social Work, White Supremacy, and Racial Justice: Reckoning with Our History, Interrogating Our Present, Re-Imagining Our Future. Part 4: Strategies for Achieving Racial Justice in Social Work Education (Virtual symposium). https:// uh.edu/socialwork/news/racial-justice-symposium/part-four/ program-pdfs/sharkey-stickland-and-elkins_curriculumviolence---jennifer-elkins.pdf

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Faculty Choi, Y. J., Rai, A., Mowbray, O., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Help-seeking preferences and correlates of recommending help-seeking among South Asian immigrants. [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41335.html Rai, A., Choi, Y. J., Mowbray, O., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Domestic violence perceptions and its correlates among South Asian immigrants [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41338.html

Studies, 29, 493–501. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-01901555-w Stone. R. H., Fusco, R. A., Griffin, B., Gross, S., Tran. T., & Vest, K. (2020). Factors affecting contraception access and use in patients with opioid use disorder. Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 60(S2), S63–S73. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcph.1772 Morrison, P. K., Pallatino, C., Fusco, R. A., Kenkre, T., Krans, E. E., & Chang, J. C. (2020). Pregnant victims of intimate partner homicide in the National Violence Death Reporting System Database, 2003-2014: A descriptive analysis. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0886260520943726 PR ESENTATIONS

RACHEL A. FUSCO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UGA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PROFESSOR IN HEALTH AND WELL-BEING PhD • Columbia University MSW • University of Wisconsin BA • University of Wisconsin

Fusco, R. A., & Kulkarni, S.J. (2021, April 27–30). Improving survivor health and coping through better sleep [Paper presentation]. National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence (Virtual). Fusco, R. A., & Dunnigan, A. E. (2020, November). Frequent marijuana and alcohol use in low-income young adults: Effects of adverse life experience [Paper presentation]. International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse & Neglect International Congress, Adelaide, Australia (Conference canceled due to COVID-19).

BO O KS Frieze, I., Newhill, C. E., & Fusco, R. A. (2020). Dynamics of family and intimate partner violence. Springer. J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Fusco, R. A. (2021). Frequent marijuana or alcohol use in low-income emerging adults: Impact of adverse life experiences. Substance Use & Misuse, 56(5). 711–717. https://doi.org/10.1080/1 0826084.2021.1892140 Fusco, R. A., & Newhill, C. E. (2021). The impact of foster care experiences on marijuana use in young adults. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 12(1), 54–65. https://doi.org/10.10 80/1533256X.2020.1870286

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PhD • University of Southern California MSW • University of Maryland, Baltimore BS • University of Maryland, College Park

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

Fusco, R. A., Yuan, Y., Lee, H., & Newhill, C. E. (2021). Trauma, sleep and mental health problems in low-income young adults. International Journal of Public Health and Environmental Research, 18(3), 1145. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031145.

Gibbs, J. J., Traube, D. E., & Goldbach, J. T. (2021). Venue-based versus geosocial networking application-based recruitment of young men who have sex with men: An examination of feasibility. Field Methods. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/1525822X211012260

Lee, H., & Fusco, R. A. (2021). Multiple types of childhood maltreatment, sleep, and anxiety in former foster youth. Child and Adolescent Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1007/s10560-021-00742-3

O’Shields, J., & Gibbs, J. J. (2021). Depressive symptoms, childhood maltreatment, and allostatic load: The importance of sex differences. Psychoneuroendocrinology [Special issue], 126, Article 105130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2021.105130

Jang, H., Tang, F., Fusco, R. A., Engel, R., & Albert, S. (2021). Grandparenting, social relations, and mortality in old age. Research on Aging. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/01640275211015433

Burgess, C., Rusow, J. A., Klemmer, C., Gibbs, J. J., Zhang, J., & Goldbach, J. T. (2021). Sexual and gender minority adolescents and adult social support: Affirmation from adults to adolescents. Annals of LGBTQ Public and Population Health, 2(1), 22–34. https://connect.springerpub.com/content/sgrlgbtq/2/1/22

Lee, H., Rauktis, M. E., & Fusco, R. A. (2021). Perceived stress and sleep quality among master’s students in social work. Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/0 2615479.2021.1910231 Kulkarni, S. J., Marcus, S., Cortes, C., Escalante, C., Wood, L., & Fusco, R. (2021). Improving safe housing access for domestic violence survivors through systems change. Housing Policy Debate. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/1051 1482.2021.1947865 Fusco, R. A. (2020). Sleep in young adults: Comparing foster care alumni to a low-income sample. Journal of Child and Family

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JEREMY J. GIBBS

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU

Gibbs, J., & Goldbach, J. (2020). Religious identity dissonance: Understanding how sexual minority adolescents manage antihomosexual religious messages. Journal of Homosexuality. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.20 20.1733354 B OOK CH AP TER S Price, L., & Gibbs, J. J. (2021). Religion and violence against sexual and gender minorities: A cyclical minority stress model. In E. M. Lund, C. Burgess, & A. J. Johnson (Eds.), Violence against


Faculty LGBTQ+ persons: Research, practice, and advocacy (pp. 283–300). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52612-2_22 PRESE N TATIO N S Gordon, J., & Gibbs, J. (2021, January 19–22). Understanding gay community connection in an app-based culture [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43982.html Gibbs, J. (2020, November 8–11). Pathways to suicide: A critical analysis of the impact of homonegative religious experiences on the mental health of sexual minority youth. 2020 Social Work Education and Social Development International Conference, Rimini, Italy (Conference cancelled). Gibbs, J. (2020, July 13–17). How do changes in egocentric social networks impact the substance use behaviors of young men who have sex with men. [Accepted, unable to present]. 2020 Sunbelt Conference, Virtual & Paris, France.

Clayton, O., Gourdine, R., & Hopps, J. G. (2020). Celebrating 100 years of social work at Clark Atlanta University’s Whitney M. Young, Jr., School of Social Work 1920–2020 [Special issue, introductory essay]. Phylon: The Clark Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture: 100th Anniversary, 57(2), 13–20. https://www.cau.edu/school-of-social-work/the-centennialcelebration/marchPhylon2021_57_2Winter_Digital-2-1.pdf Gary, F., Yarandi, H., Hassan, M. Brooks, L., Thiese, S., & Hopps, J. (2020). Chronic stress and depressive symptoms in midlife African American women. Journal of National Black Nurses’ Association, 31(1), 26–31. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih. gov/32853493/ B OOK CH AP TER S Hopps, J. G. (2020). Foreword. In L. Rollins (Ed.) Engaging and working with African American fathers: Strategies and lessons learned (pp. ix–xi). Taylor & Francis. ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTR IES Hopps, J. G., & Clayton, O. (2020). Social work profession: Political context. Encyclopedia of macro social work. Oxford University Press.

JUNE GARY HOPPS PROFESSOR, THOMAS M. “JIM” PARHAM PROFESSOR OF FAMILY AND CHILDREN STUDIES PhD • Brandeis University MSW • Atlanta University BA • Spelman College

BO O KS Lowe, T. B., & Hopps, J. G. (2020). Social welfare policy and services: A contemporary review and analysis. Ryan Books.

Clayton, O., & Hopps, J. G. (2020). Human rights and social work in contemporary contexts. Encyclopedia of macro social work. Oxford University Press. PR ESENTATIONS Hopps, J. G., Gary, F., & Hassan, M. (2021, August 4–8). What about our youth? Intersections among COVID-19, school closures, and health risks [Paper presentation]. 2021 National Black Nurses Association, 49th Annual Conference, Dallas, TX (Virtual). Hopps, J. G., Gary, F., & Hassan, M. (2020, September 24–26). Male perspectives on gender-based violence: A focus group study in urban Haiti [Paper presentation]. National Association of Nurses, 48th Annual Institute and Conference, Hollywood, FL (Virtual).

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Gary, F., Yarandi, H., Brooks, L., Theaze, S., & Hopps, J. G. (in press). Unraveling stress and depression among rural southern Black women at midlife. Journal of the National Black Nurses Association. Hopps, J. G., Lowe, T. B., & Clayton, O. (2021). “I’ll find a way or make one”: Atlanta University and the emergence of professional social work education in the deep South. Journal of Social Work Education, 57(3), 419–431. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.201 9.1671255 Gary, F., Yarandi, H., Sloane, E., Hassan, M., Hopps, J. G., & Campbell, J. (2021). Tragedy in Haiti: Suicidality, PTSD, and depression associated with intimate partner violence among Haitian women after the 2010 earthquake. Journal of the National Black Nurses Association, 32(1), 10-17. Briggs, H. E., Hardeman, C. P., Banks, L., Briggs, A. C., Allen, J. L., Huggins-Hoyt, K. Y., Hopps, J. G., & McCrary, D. (2021). Do race, racial disproportionality and disparities remain a foci of child welfare? Words matter. Child Welfare, 98(5), 93–117. https://bit. ly/3AXBMMh Clayton, O., & Hopps, J. G. (2020). Hope arrives for Atlanta: Lugenia Burns-Hope and the role of women in the development of the Atlanta University School of Social Work [Special issue]. Phylon: The Clark Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture: 100th Anniversary, 57(2), 41–55. https://bit.ly/3nacxSd

KRISTINA JASKYTE BAHR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PhD • University of Alabama MSW • Vytautas Magnus University BS • Vytautas Magnus University

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Jaskyte, K., Butkevičienė, R., Danusevičienė, L., & Jurkuvienė, R. (2021). Employees’ attitudes and values toward creativity, work environment, and job satisfaction in human service employees in Lithuania and the US. Creativity Research Journal, 32(4), 394–402. https://doi.org/10.1080/10400419.2020.1821160 Jaskyte, K. (2020). Technological and organizational innovations and financial performance: Evidence from nonprofit human service organizations. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 31, 142–152. https://doi. org/10.1007/s11266-019-00191-8

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Faculty Nandan, M., Jaskyte, K., & Mandayam, G. (2020). Humancentered design as a new approach to creative problem solving: Its usefulness and applicability for social work practice. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership, and Governance, 44(4), 310–316. https://doi.org/10.1080/23303131.2020.1737294 C O NF E RE N C E A B ST R A CT S A ND PR O C E E D ING S Liedtka, J., & Jaskyte, K. (2020). Assessing design thinking’s impact. Academy of Management Proceedings, 2020(1). https:// doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2020.10167abstract

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PhD • University of California, Berkeley MSW • University of California, Berkeley, MPH • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill BA • University of South Florida

PRESE N TATIO N S

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

Jaskyte, K. (2021, November 18–20). Exploring the outcomes of design thinking process among graduate students [Paper presentation]. Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action’s (ARNOVA) 50th Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Leviten-Reid, C., MacDonald, M., Matthew, R., Syms, L. & Donxiu, L. (in press). Vulnerable tenants, poor proximity? Market rentals and proximity to amenities and services. Journal of Rural and Community Development.

ZOE M. JOHNSON SENIOR ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL, FIELD EDUCATION DIRECTOR PhD • University of Georgia MSW • University of Georgia BS • University of Georgia, Psychology BA • University of Georgia, Sociology

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Sharkey, C. N., Elkins, J. E., & Johnson, Z. (in press). Creating trauma-informed library spaces: Lessons learned from a pilot program. Journal of Social Work Education.

TONY B. LOWE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PhD • University of Pittsburgh MSW • Grambling State University BA • Grambling State University

Orpinas, P., Matthew, R. A., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Calva, A., & Bermúdez, J. M. (2021). Promotoras voice their challenges in fulfilling their role as community health workers. Health Promotion Practice, 22(4), 502–511. https://doi. org/10.1177/1524839920921189 Leviten-Reid, C., MacDonald, M., Matthew, R. (2021). Public housing, market rentals and neighbourhood characteristics. The Canadian Geographer. Advance online publication. http://doi. org/10.1111/cag.12706 Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Bermúdez, J. M., Orpinas, P., Matthew, R., Calva, A., & Darbisi, C. (2021). “No queremos quedar mal”: A qualitative analysis of a boundary setting training among Latina community health workers. Journal of Latinx Psychology. Advance online publication. https://psycnet.apa.org/ doi/10.1037/lat0000193 Campbell, R. D., Dennis, M. K., Lopez, K., Matthew, R. A., & Choi, Y. J. (2021). Qualitative research in communities of color: Challenges, strategies, and lessons. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 12(1), 177–200. https://www.journals. uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/713408 Matthew, R. (2020). Banking on community: The use of time banking as an innovative community practice teaching strategy. Journal of Community Practice, 28(3), 254–264. https://doi.org/10 .1080/10705422.2020.1796877 Matthew, R., Orpinas, P., Calva, A., Bermudez, J. M., Darbisi, C. (2020). Lazos Hispanos: Promising strategies and lessons learned in the development of a multisystem, community-based promotoras program. Journal of Primary Prevention, 41, 229–243. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10935-020-00587-z

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S

Matthew, R., Salm Ward, T., & Robinson, H. I. (2020). Engaging in community-based participatory research: “Death of a Career” or a research approach in need of professional and institutional support? Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 26(3), 56–71. https://reflectionsnarrativesofprofessionalhelping.org/ index.php/Reflections/article/view/1803/1637

Hopps, J. G., & Lowe, T. B. (in press). [Review of the book Introduction to social work: An advocacy­based profession, by L. E. Cox, C. J. Tice, and D. D. Long]. Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work.

Calva. A., Matthew, R., & Orpinas, P. (2020). Overcoming barriers: Practical strategies to assess Latinos living in low-income communities. Health Promotion Practice, 21(3), 355–362. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524839919837975

Hopps, J. G., Lowe, T. B., & Clayton, O. (2021). “I’ll find a way or make one”: Atlanta University and the emergence of professional social work education in the deep South. Journal of Social Work Education, 57(3), 419–431. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.201 9.1671255

Leviten-Reid, C., Matthew, R., & Wardley, L. (2020). Sense of community belonging: Exploring the impact of housing quality, affordability and safety among renter households. Journal of Community Practice, 28(1), 18–35. https://doi.org/10.1080/107054 22.2020.1718050

BO O KS Lowe, T. B., & Hopps, J. G. (2020). Social welfare policy and services: A contemporary review and analysis. Ryan Books.

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REBECCA A. MATTHEW

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU


Faculty Okech, D., Howard, W. J., Matthew, R., & Purser, G. J. (2020). The effects of sociodemographic factors on the economic behavior of poorer households in the U.S. and Kenya. Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 38(4), 541–559. https://doi.org/10.1080/0258900 1.2020.1825648 TRAIN IN G MA N UA L S Matthew, R. A. (2021). Community-Based CHW Core Competency Training: Companion materials. University of Georgia, Athens, GA (pp. 1-17). Matthew, R. A., Darbisi, C., Orpinas, P., & Stanley, L. (2021). Community-Based CHW Core Competency Train-the-Trainer manual. University of Georgia, Athens, GA (pp. 1-98). Orpinas, P., Matthew, R. A., & Darbisi, C. (Eds.) (2021). Community-Based CHW Core Competency Training: Facilitator manual. University of Georgia, Athens, GA (pp. 1-338). Darbisi. C., Orpinas, P., & Matthew, R. A. (Eds.) (2021). Capacitación de Promotores de Salud Comunitaria: Manual del Facilitador. Universidad de Georgia, Athens, GA (pp. 1-350). PRESE N TATIO N S Hyde, C., & Matthew, R. (2021, June 3, 10, 17). Towards a model of trauma-informed community practice: Promises and challenges. MACRO-UNITED Conference (Virtual). Sharkey, C., Matthew, R., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–21). Positive youth development and collective efficacy: Protective factors for youth exposed to community violence [Paper presentation, accepted, unable to present]. 25th Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43686.html Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Bermudez, J. M., Orpinas, P., Matthew, R., Calva, A., & Darbisi, C. (2020, November 16–20). Gender, culture & professionalism: boundary setting training to support promotoras de salud [Live interactive workshop, accepted, unable to present]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Matthew, R., LaRoche, L., & Strickland, C. (2020, November 16–20). Achieving financial sustainability in small nonprofits serving marginalized populations [Panel presentation, accepted, unable to present]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

Krasniqi, V., McPherson, J., & Villarreal-Otálora, T. (2021). Are we putting human rights into social work practice in Kosovo? British Journal of Social Work, bcaa235. https://doi.org/10.1093/ bjsw/bcaa235 Salm Ward, T., McPherson, J., & Kogan, S. M. (2021). Feasibility and acceptability of a tailored infant safe sleep coaching intervention for African American families. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(8), 4133. https:// doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084133 McPherson, J. (2020). Now is the time for a rights-based approach to social work practice. Journal of Human Rights and Social Work, 5, 61–63. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41134-02000125-1 McPherson, J., & Abell, N. (2020). Measuring rights-based practice: Introducing the Human Rights Methods in Social Work scales. British Journal of Social Work, 50(1), 222–242. https://doi. org/10.1093/bjsw/bcz132 McPherson, J., Jennings, P. F., Arnold, B. H., Littleton, T., & Lee, M. (2020). Creating global scholars: Experiential learning and reflection transform an international conference into a shortterm study abroad. Journal of Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2020.1770641 Disney, L., & McPherson, J. (2020). Understanding refugee mental health and employment issues: Implications for social work practice. Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, 5(1), 19–30. https://scholarworks.waldenu.edu/cgi/viewcontent. cgi?article=1025&context=jswgc Šadić, S., McPherson, J., Villarreal-Otálora, T., & Bašić, S. (2020). Rights-based social work in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Validating tools for education and practice. International Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0020872820912310 B OOK CH AP TER S McPherson, J. (2020). Forest bathing promotes contemplation & reflection. In J. M. Volpe White, K. L. Guthrie, & M. Torres, (Eds.), Thinking to transform: Facilitating reflection in leadership learning. Information Age Publishing. McPherson, J., & Schwartz, R. G. (2020). The role of social work in juvenile justice in the USA. In Lee, O. (Ed.), The role of social work in juvenile justice: International experiences (pp. 55–79). Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law.

JANE MCPHERSON

Mazza, N., & McPherson, J. (2020). Using poetry to promote reflection on experiential learning. In J. M. Volpe White, K. L. Guthrie, & M. Torres, (Eds.), Thinking to transform: Facilitating reflection in leadership learning. Information Age Publishing.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT DIRECTOR

PR ESENTATIONS

PhD • Florida State University MSW • Columbia University MPH • Columbia University BA • Brown University

Krasniqi, V., & McPherson, J. (2021, May 5–7). Human rights approaches in social work practice in Kosovo [Oral presentation]. 10th European Conference for Social Work Research (Virtual). Bucharest, ROMANIA.

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Disney, L., McPherson, J., & Jamal, Z. (2021). “We know more than that”: The underemployment experiences of collegeeducated Iraqi refugees living in the U.S. Journal of Refugee Studies, 34(1), 1168–1184. https://doi.org/10.1093/jrs/feaa128

Nesbit, S., McPherson, J., Flanigan, B., & Do, V. (2021, April 30–May 1). “Hallowed Ground” at the University of Georgia: Making the University’s history of slavery visible (includes a filmed tour of North Campus) [Oral presentation]. History of Slavery at the University of Georgia: Symposium on Recognition, Reconciliation, and Redress. Athens, GA.

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Faculty Lee, M. & McPherson, J. (2021, January 19–22). Psychometric properties of Human Rights Lens in Social Work scale in a sample of gerontological social workers in South Korea [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41674.html

KATE MORRISSEY STAHL CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PhD • University of Georgia MSW • University of Georgia MA • Pennsylvania State University BA • Ripon College

Disney, L. M., & McPherson, J. (2021, January 19–22). “Not the chicken factory”: The underemployment experiences of collegeeducated Iraqi refugees [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper42944.html

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

Villarreal-Otálora, T., & McPherson, J. (2021, January 19–22). The time is now: Training social work students as immigrant allies [Oral presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper42693.html

Morrissey-Stahl, K., Elkins, J., Topple, T., & Decelle, K. (2021). Teaching Note–Lessons from designing and teaching an antioppression capstone course. Journal of Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.20 21.1895926

Villarreal-Otálora, T., & McPherson, J. (2020, November 16–20). Fostering and developing social work student skills as immigrant allies: Pilot study [Paper presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

B OOK CH AP TER S

SHARI E. MILLER FORMER ASSOCIATE DEAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Morrissey Stahl, K., Bower, K. L., Seponski, D., & Lewis, D. C. (2020). Critical questions for support of sexual expression during the end of life: Exploring intimacy from an ecological perspective. In K. J. Doka & A. S. Tucci (Eds.), Intimacy and sexuality during illness and loss. Hospice Foundation of America. Bower, K. L., Morrissey Stahl, K., Seponski, D., & Lewis, D. C. (2020). Intimate expression during the end of life: Considerations for practitioners working with sexual and gender minority older adults. In S. J. Dodd (Ed.), The Handbook of Social Work and Sexualities. Routledge.

PhD • University of Maryland, Baltimore MSW • Yeshiva University BA • State University of New York at Binghamton

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Fatehi M., Miller, S. E., Fatehi, L., & Mowbray, O. (2021). A scoping study of parents with a history of childhood sexual abuse and a theoretical framework for future research. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/1524838020987822 Miller, S. E., & Topple, T. A. (2020). Thinking and thinking about thinking: A qualitative study of learning in a process-centric teaching model. Journal of Social Work Education, 56(1), 115–130. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2019.1648224 Colvin, M. L., & Miller, S. E. (2020). The role of complexity theory and network analysis for examining child welfare service delivery systems. Child and Youth Services Review, 41(2), 160–183. https://doi.org/10.1080/0145935X.2019.1707076 Lee, J. J., Miller, S. E., & Bride, B. E. (2020). Development and initial validation of the Self-Care Practices Scale. Social Work, 65(1), 21–28. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz045 Sochacka, N. W., Youngblood, K. M., Walther, J., & Miller, S. E. (2020). A qualitative study of how mental models impact engineering students’ engagement with empathic communication exercises. Australasian Journal of Engineering Education, 25(2), 121–132. https://doi.org/10.1080/22054952.2020.1832726 Walther, J., Brewer, M. A., Sochacka, N. W., & Miller, S. E. (2020). Empathy and engineering formation. Journal of Engineering Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1002/ jee.20301

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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU

ORION P. MOWBRAY ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, INTERIM ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH PhD • University of Michigan, MSW • University of Michigan MS • University of Michigan, Psychology MA • Eastern Michigan University, Sociology BA • University of Michigan

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Mowbray, O., & Fatehi, M. (2021). Longitudinal trends in opioid mortality. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 21(2), 149–161. https://doi.org/10.1080/1533256X.2021.1893965 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists. Social Work in Mental Health, 19(2), 126–140. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2021.1885090 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Disney, L. (2021). A systematic review of psychosocial-based outcomes in peer-support services. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 18(2), 155–180. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1805385 Disney, L., Mowbray, O., & Evans, D. (2021). Telemental health use and refugee mental health providers following COVID19 pandemic. Clinical Social Work Journal. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10615-021-00808-w O’Shields, J. D., & Mowbray, O. (2021). Difficulties in psychosocial functioning due to current depressive symptoms: What can


Faculty C-Reactive protein tell us? Brain, Behavior, & Immunity – Health, 16, 100316. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2021.100316 Paseda, O. K., & Mowbray, O. (2021). Substance use related mortality among persons recently released from correctional facilities. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Advance online publication. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2640 8066.2021.1942371 Robinson, M. A., Kim, I., Mowbray, O., & Disney, L. (2021). African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and depression: Which biopsychosocial factors should social workers focus on? Results from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Community Mental Health Journal. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1007/s10597-021-00833-6 Fatehi M., Miller, S. E., Fatehi, L., & Mowbray, O. (2021). A scoping study of parents with a history of childhood sexual abuse and a theoretical framework for future research. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/1524838020987822 Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Jennings-McGarity, P., GrinnellDavis, C., & Elkins, J. (2020). Caregiver problem drinking and trajectories of post-traumatic stress among youth. Children and Youth Services Review, 116, Article 105171. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105171 Yates, H. T., & Mowbray, O. (2020). Evaluating the Solution Focused Wellness for HIV intervention for women: A pilot study. Journal of Solution Focused Practices, 4(2), Article 4. https:// digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/journalsfp/vol4/iss2/4/ Robinson, M. A., Kim, I., Mowbray, O. & Washington, T. (2020). The effects of hopelessness on chronic disease among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks: Findings from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Community Mental Health Journal, 56, 753–759. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-01900536-z Miller, K. M., Briggs, H. E., Elkins, J., Kim, I., & Mowbray, O. (2020). Physical abuse and adolescent sexual behaviors: Moderating effects of mental health disorders and substance use. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma, 13, 55–62. https://doi. org/10.1007/s40653-018-0221-0 REPO RTS

Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Mowbray, O. (2021, January). Longitudinal trends in suicide among lesbian, gay and bisexual Hispanic individuals [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41949.html Fatehi, M., Mowbray, O., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., & Disney L. (2021, January 19–22). An examination of fidelity to day reporting center eligibility criteria among a statewide sample [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43183.html Paseda, O., & Mowbray, O. (2021, January 19–22). Substance use related mortality among recently released persons from correctional facilities [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper44301. html Choi, Y. J., Rai, A., Mowbray, O., Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Help-seeking preferences and correlates of recommending helpseeking among South Asian immigrants. [Paper presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41335.html Rai, A., Choi, Y. J., Mowbray, O., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–22). Domestic violence perceptions and its correlates among South Asian immigrants [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41338.html Fatehi, M., Miller, S., Fatehi. L. & Mowbray, O. (2020, November 4–14). A scoping study of parents with a history of childhood sexual abuse and a theoretical framework for future research. International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA (Virtual). Mowbray, O., & Robinson, M. A. (2020, September 14–16). Designing and implementing program evaluations for accountability court programs [Presentation]. Council of Accountability Court Judges 2020 Annual Training Conference (Virtual). https://cacj.georgia.gov/2020-training-conference

Mowbray, O., Aletraris, L., Disney, L., & Doran, E. (2020). Procedures and processes for estimating mental illness in the Newton County jail. University of Georgia. Mowbray, O., Robinson, M. J., Risler, E., Skinner, J., Scheyett, A. (2020). Evaluation of family treatment courts in the state of Georgia. University of Georgia.

LARRY NACKERUD

PRESE N TATIO N S

PhD • Cornell University MSW • Tulane University BA • Luther College

Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., Disney, L., & Patel, D. (2021, January 19–22). Examining time to completion among participants in day reporting centers [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper41286.html Mowbray, O., Campbell, R., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M. & Scheyett, A. (2021, January 19–22). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41283.html

PROFESSOR

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Saasa, S., Okech, D., Choi, Y. J., Nackerud, L., & Littleton, T. (2021). Social exclusion, mental health, and social well-being among African immigrants in the United States. International Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0020872820963425 Ricciardelli, L. A., Nackerud, L., & Quinn, A. E. (2020). The criminalization of immigration and intellectual disability in the United States: A mixed method approach to exploring forced exclusion. Critical Social Work, 21(2), 18–40. https://doi. org/10.22329/csw.v21i2.6462 SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021-2022

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Faculty Ricciardelli, L. A., Nackerud, L., Quinn, A. E., Sewell, M., & Casiano, B. (2020). Social media use, attitudes, and knowledge among social work students: Ethical implications for the social work profession. Social Sciences & Humanities Open, 2(1), 100008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssaho.2019.100008 Ricciardelli, L. A., McGarity, S., & Nackerud, L. (2020) Social work education and the recognition of rights in the digital tech age: implications for professional identity. Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/ 02615479.2020.1805427 Ricciardelli, L. A., Quinn, A., & Nackerud, L. (2020). “Human behavior and the social media environment”: Group differences in social media attitudes and knowledge among U.S. social students. Social Work Education, 40(4), 473-491. https://doi.org/ 10.1080/02615479.2019.1710125 BO O K C HA P TE RS Nackerud, L. (2020). Structuralism, neoliberalism, and the U.S. criminal justice system. In L. A. Ricciardelli (Ed.), Social work, criminal justice and the death penalty: A social justice perspective (pp. 75–85). Oxford University Press. Nackerud, L., & Barner, J. (2020). Immigration, foreign nationals, and the U.S. death penalty. In L. A. Ricciardelli (Ed.), Social work, criminal justice and the death penalty: A social justice perspective (pp. 184-195). Oxford University Press.

DAVID OKECH PROFESSOR, CENTER FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING RESEARCH AND OUTREACH (CenHTRO) DIRECTOR PhD • University of Kansas MSW • University of New Hampshire BA • University of Nairobi

Balfour, G., Callands, T. A., Okech, D., & Kombian, G. (2020). Lifeline: A qualitative analysis of the post intervention experiences of human trafficking survivors and at-risk women in Ghana. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1729920 R EPORTS US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Okech, D., Aletraris, L., & Schroeder, E. (2020). Human trafficking statistical definitions: Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum. University of Georgia African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES) & The US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/ RG.2.2.31986.12484 PR ESENTATIONS Schroeder, E., & Okech, D. (2021, January 19–22). Factors associated with physical and mental health outcomes among female trafficking survivors: A hierarchical regression model [Poster Presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual).

MICHAEL A. ROBINSON ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MSW ADMISSIONS COORDINATOR, MSW/MDIV COORDINATOR, MFT CERTIFICATE COORDINATOR, NORTHERN IRELAND STUDIES AWAY DIRECTOR PhD • University of Louisville MSW • University of Louisville BS • De Paul University

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

Schroeder, E., Edgemon, T. E., Kagotho, N., Aletraris, L., ClayWarner, J., & Okech, D. (in press). A review of prevalence estimation methods for human trafficking populations. Public Health Reports.

Robinson, M. A., Kim, I., Mowbray, O., & Disney, L. (2021). African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and depression: Which biopsychosocial factors should social workers focus on? Results from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Community Mental Health Journal. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1007/s10597-021-00833-6

Saasa, S., Okech, D., Choi, Y. J., Nackerud, L., & Littleton, T. (2021). Social exclusion, mental health, and social well-being among African immigrants in the United States. International Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0020872820963425 Clay-Warner, J., Edgemon, T. G., Okech, D., & Anarfi, J. K. (2021). Violence predicts physical health consequences of human trafficking: Findings from a longitudinal study of labor trafficking in Ghana. Social Science & Medicine. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2021.113970. Okech, D., Howard, W. J., Matthew, R., & Purser, G. J. (2020). The effects of sociodemographic factors on the economic behavior of poorer households in the U.S. and Kenya. Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 38(4), 541-559. https://doi.org/10.1080/02589001 .2020.1825648 Balfour G., Okech D., Callands T. A. & Kombian G. (2020). A qualitative analysis of the intervention experiences of human

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trafficking survivors and at-risk women in Ghana. Journal of Human Trafficking. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/ 10.1080/23322705.2020.1806186

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU

Robinson, M. A., Izlar, J., & Rothstein, A. (2020) Opportunity beckons: A case for community practice within the classroom. Journal of Community Practice, 28(1), 77–87. https://doi.org/10.10 80/10705422.2020.1716426 Robinson, M. A., Kim, I., Mowbray, O., & Washington, T. (2020). The effects of hopelessness on chronic disease among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks: Findings from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Community Mental Health Journal, 56, 753–759. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597019-00536-z B OOK CH AP TER S Robinson, M. A. (in press). Introduction to integrated social work practice. In B. Cross-Denny (Ed.), Intersectionality: A framework for supporting an integrated social work practice.


Faculty Robinson, M. A. (in press). Social justice implications for Black men’s health: Policing Black bodies. In Y. D. Dyson, V. RobinsonDooley., & J. Watson (Eds.), Strength’s based approach through a social justice lens for helping professions. Springer. Robinson, M. A., Moore, S. E., & Adedoyin, A. (2020). Mass incarceration: The politics of race, gender, and U.S. prison industry. In L. A. Ricciardelli (Ed.), Social work, criminal justice and the death penalty: A social justice perspective (pp. 97–116). Oxford University Press. PRESE N TATIO N S Fatehi, M., Mowbray, O., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., & Disney L. (2021, January 19–22). An examination of fidelity to day reporting center eligibility criteria among a statewide sample [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43183.html Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., Disney, L., & Patel, D. (2021, January 19–22). Examining time to completion among participants in day reporting centers [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper41286.html Mowbray, O., & Robinson, M. A. (2020, September 14–16). Designing and implementing program evaluations for accountability court programs [Presentation]. Council of Accountability Court Judges 2020 Annual Training Conference (Virtual). https://cacj.georgia.gov/2020-training-conference

Scheyett, A. (2020). Social work in the criminal justice system: Rationale and evidence-informed practices in the United States. Japanese Journal of Forensic Social Services, 20, 100–115. Scheyett, A. (2020). Suicide prevention: Clinic, community, classroom [Editorial]. Social Work, 65(2), 101–103. https://doi. org/10.1093/sw/swaa003 B OOK CH AP TER S Scheyett, A., & Leonard, M. (in press). Mental health policies. In K. Bolton, D. McLeod & A. Natale (Eds.) Handbook of forensic social work. Crawford, K., & Scheyett, A. (2020). The death penalty for persons with serious mental illnesses. In L. Ricciardelli (Ed.), Social work, criminal justice, & the death penalty: A social justice perspective. Oxford University Press. R EPORTS Scheyett, A. (2020). Farmer stress in Georgia: Results of a survey. University of Georgia. https://t.uga.edu/7o9 Mowbray, O., Robinson, M. J., Risler, E., Skinner, J., & Scheyett, A. (2020). Evaluation of family treatment courts in the state of Georgia. University of Georgia. PR ESENTATIONS Mowbray, O., Campbell, R., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021, January 19–22). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41283.html

ANNA M. SCHEYETT DEAN AND PROFESSOR PhD • Memorial University of Newfoundland MSW • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill MS, MPhil • Yale University BS • Dickinson College, Biology BA • Dickinson College, English

J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Scheyett, A. (2021). The responsibility of self-care in social work [Editorial]. Social Work, swab041. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swab041 Scheyett, A. (2021). A time for transformation [Editorial]. Social Work, 66(3), 184–186. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swab026 Scheyett, A. (2021). Immigration and the world in 2021 [Editorial]. Social Work, 66(2). 89–91. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/ swab012 Scheyett, A. (2021). Voice and justice [Editorial]. Social Work, 66(1). 5–7. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swaa051 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists. Social Work in Mental Health, 19(2), 126–140. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2021.1885090 Scheyett, A. (2020). Thoughts in the time of COVID-19 [Editorial]. Social Work, 65(3), 209–211. https://doi.org/10.1093/ sw/swaa026

TIFFANY R. WASHINGTON ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, INTERIM PHD PROGRAM DIRECTOR, GHANA STUDIES AWAY DIRECTOR PhD • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill MSW • North Carolina A & T/UNC at Greensboro BA • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

JOUR NAL ARTICLES Childs, E.M., & Washington, T. R. (in press). Perception of health care access in rural Georgia: Findings from a community health needs assessment survey. Journal of the Georgia Public Health Associated. Carr, D.C., Jason, K., Taylor, M., & Washington, T. (in press). A brief report on older working caregivers: Developing a typology of work environments. The Journals of Gerontology: Social Sciences. Kim, E., & Washington, T. R. (2021). Community agency directors’ attitudes on depression treatment among older Korean Americans and barriers to providing services. Aging & Mental Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/1360 7863.2021.1897522 Kim, E., Washington, T., & Campbell, R. D. (2021). Community leaders’ perceptions of depression and the perceived barriers in seeking mental health services for older Korean Americans. Ethnicity & Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10 .1080/13557858.2021.1910627 SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021-2022

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Faculty Carr, D. C., Jason, K., Taylor, M., & Washington, T. (2021). A brief report on older working caregivers: Developing a typology of work environments. The Journals of Gerontology: Social Sciences: Series B, gbab131. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1093/ geronb/gbab131 Washington, T. R., Rivers, B., Raleigh, L., Hernandez, N., Le, M., Green, A., Lawrence, J., & Young, H. (2020). Lessons learned in the early stages of a community-academic partnership to address health disparities in a rural community. Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association, 8(1) 3–10. https://doi.org/10.20429/ jgpha.2020.080102 Hall, R. K., Cary, M. P., Washington, T., & Colón-Emeric, C. (2020). Quality of life in older adults receiving hemodialysis: A qualitative study. Quality of Life Research, 29, 655–663. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s11136-019-02349-9

Wells, R., Daniel, P., Barger, B., Rice, C. E., Bandlamudi, M., & Crimmins, D. (2020). Impact of medical home-consistent care and child condition on select health, community, and family level outcomes among children with special health care needs. Children’s Health Care, 50(2), 171–191. https://doi.org/10.1080/02 739615.2020.1852085 PR ESENTATIONS Wells, R., & Thompkins, B. (2020, June 1–4). A systematic review of the patient-centered medical home for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities [Conference session]. Annual meeting of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Pittsburgh, PA (Conference canceled).

Robinson, M. A., Kim, I., Mowbray, O., & Washington, T. (2020). The effects of hopelessness on chronic disease among African American and Caribbean Blacks: Findings from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Community Mental Health Journal, 56(4), 753–759. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-01900536-z C O NF E RE N C E A B ST R A CT S A ND PR O C E E D ING S Washington, T., & Feinberg, L. F. (2020). The experience of working family caregivers: Implication for a national paid leave policy. Innovation in Aging, 4, (Supplement_1), 721. https://doi. org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.2550 Washington, T., Kim, E., Mois, G., & Smith, M. (2020). Factors associated with health care utilization among working caregivers. Innovation in Aging, 4, (Supplement_1), 721. https://doi. org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.2551 PRESE N TATIO N S See conference abstracts and proceedings.

“Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own.” — Cesar Chavez

REBECCA L. WELLS CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, MSW/MPH PROGRAM COORDINATOR PhD • Georgia State University MSW • University of South Carolina MPH • University of South Carolina BA • Mercer University

JOURN A L A RTIC L E S Henderson, S., & Wells, R. (2021). Environmental racism and the contamination of black lives: A literature review. Journal of African American Studies, 25(1), 134–151. https://doi.org/10.1007/ s12111-020-09511-5

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In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and Executive Order 13672, the University of Georgia does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or national origin, religion, age, genetic information, disability status or veteran status in its administration of educational policies, programs, or activities; its admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other University-administered programs; or employment. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to the Equal Opportunity Office, 119 Holmes-Hunter Academic Building, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. Telephone (706) 542-7912 (V/ TDD). Fax (706) 542-2822. Email ugaeoo@uga.edu.


PhD Students

PH D STUDEN TS

REFEREED PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTATIONS Click on the student’s name to view their online profile.

LUIS R. ALVAREZ-HERNANDEZ, PhD ’21 J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R. (2021). Teaching note─Teaching intersectionality across the social work curriculum using the Intersectionality Analysis Cluster. Journal of Social Work Education, 57(1), 181–188. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2020. 1713944 Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Bermúdez, J. M., Orpinas, P., Matthew, R., Calva, A., & Darbisi, C. (2021). “No queremos quedar mal”: A qualitative analysis of a boundary setting training among Latina community health workers. Journal of Latinx Psychology. Advance online publication. https://psycnet.apa.org/ doi/10.1037/lat0000193 Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Cardenas, I., & Bloom, A. (2021). COVID-19 pandemic and intimate partner violence: An analysis of help-seeking messages in the Spanish-speaking media. Journal of Family Violence. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1007/s10896-021-00263-8 Orpinas, P., Matthew, R. A., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Calva, A., & Bermudez, J.M. (2021). Promotoras voice their challenges in fulfilling their role as community health workers. Health Promotion Practice, 22(4), 502–511. https://doi. org/10.1177/1524839920921189 Seelman, K., Vasi, A., Kattari, S., & Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R. (2021). Predictors of healthcare mistreatment among transgender and gender diverse individuals: Are there different patterns by patient race and ethnicity? Social Work in Health Care, 60(5), 411–429. https://doi.org/10.1080/00981389.2021.1909201 Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R. (2020). “Borikén libre”: Spaces of resistance in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. Label Me Latina/o, Vol. X [Special Issue: (Un) Natural Disasters: Sites of Resistance]. https://labelmelatin.com/?cat=49 Villarreal-Otálora, T., Boyas, J. F., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Fatehi, M. (2020). Ecological factors influencing suicidal ideation-to-action among Latinx adolescents: An exploration of sex differences. Children and Youth Services Review, 118. https:// doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105444 Orpinas, P., Matthew, R., Bermudez, J. M., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Calva, A., & Darbisi, C. (2020). A multistakeholder evaluation of Lazos Hispanos: An application of a communitybased participatory research conceptual model. Journal of Community Psychology, 48(2), 464–481. https://doi.org/10.1002/ jcop.22274 PRESE N TATIO N S Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Lough, K., & Ingram Estevez, R. E. (2021, May 19–22). Hashtags, images, and identity: An interdisciplinary qualitative approach to analyzing transgender Latinas’ use of Instagram [Oral presentation]. 17th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (Virtual).

Shrestha, N., Rai, A., Ravi, K., & Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R. (2021, January 19–22). Scoping study on culturally responsive intimate partner violence interventions for immigrant communities [Oral presentation]. 25th Annual Conference of theSociety for Social Work and Research. https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41332.html Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Mowbray, O. (2021, January 19–22). Longitudinal trends in suicide among lesbian, gay and bisexual Hispanic individuals [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41949.html Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Cardenas, I., & Bloom, A. (2021, January 19–22). The role of Spanish-speaking media in intimate partner violence help-seeking during the COVID-19 pandemic [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper42720.html Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R. (2020, November 16–20). LGBTQ+ people of color in social work research: An intersectional content analysis [Poster presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., Bermudez, J. M., Orpinas, P., Matthew, R., Calva, A., & Darbisi, C. (2020, November 16–20). Gender, culture & professionalism: boundary setting training to support promotoras de salud [Live interactive workshop, accepted, unable to present]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

BARBARA ARNOLD JOUR NAL ARTICLES McPherson, J., Jennings, P. F., Arnold, B. H., Littleton, T., & Lee, M. (2020). Creating global scholars: Experiential learning and reflection transform an international conference into a shortterm study abroad. Journal of Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2020.1770 641 PR ESENTATIONS Arnold, B. H. (2020, November 16–20). Somatic integrative approaches to addressing post-traumatic stress: A scoping review [Paper presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

ELISA CHILDS JOUR NAL ARTICLES Childs, E., & Washington, T. (in press). Perception of health care access in rural Georgia: Findings from a community health needs assessment survey. Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association. SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021-2022

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MARIAM FATEHI J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Fatehi M., Miller, S. E., Fatehi, L., & Mowbray, O. (2021). A scoping study of parents with a history of childhood sexual abuse and a theoretical framework for future research. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/1524838020987822 Mowbray, O., & Fatehi, M. (2021). Longitudinal trends in opioid mortality. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 21(2), 149–161. https://doi.org/10.1080/1533256X.2021.1893965 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists. Social Work in Mental Health, 19(2), 126–140. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2021.1885090 Fatehi, M. (2020). Review of the book Social welfare for a global era: International perspectives on policy and practice by J. M. Midgley. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1752871 Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Jennings-McGarity, P., GrinnellDavis, C., & Elkins, J. (2020). Caregiver problem drinking and trajectories of post-traumatic stress among youth. Children and Youth Services Review. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105171 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Disney, L. (2020). A systematic review of psychosocial-based outcomes in peer-support services. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2 020.1805385 Villarreal-Otálora, T., Boyas, J. F., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Fatehi, M. (2020). Ecological factors influencing suicidal ideation-to-action among Latinx adolescents: An exploration of sex differences. Children and Youth Services Review. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. childyouth.2020.105444

Fatehi, M., Miller, S., Fatehi. L. & Mowbray, O. (2020, November 4–14). A scoping study of parents with a history of childhood sexual abuse and a theoretical framework for future research. International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA (Virtual).

KATHERINE GOWER JOUR NAL ARTICLES Baldwin-White, A., & Gower, K. (2021). Influence of social media on how college students perceive healthy relationships and consent. Journal of American College Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1927049 Gower, K., & Baldwin-White, A. (2021). Healthy dating relationships: Attitudes and perceptions of college students. Violence and Victims. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1891/vv-d-20-00001 Gower, K., Cornelius, L., Rawls, R., & Walker, B. B. (2020). Reflective Structured Dialogue: A qualitative thematic analysis. Conflict Resolution Quarterly 37(3), 207-221. https://doi. org/10.1002/crq.21271 PR ESENTATIONS Gower, K. (2020, May). Dialogue in r/ChangeMyView: A discourse analysis of online data [Poster presentation]. International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Chicago, IL (Conference canceled). Gower, K. (2020, November 16–20). Reflective Structured Dialogue: A qualitative thematic analysis [Poster presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Gower, K. (2020, November 16–20). Dialogue in r/ChangeMyView: A discourse analysis of online data [Poster presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

PRESE N TATIO N S Fatehi, M., Choi, Y. J., Cho, H., An, S., Choi, G. Y., & Hong, S. (2021, January 19–22). Impact of adverse childhood experiences in the manifestation of intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration among college students: Gendered perspective [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43138.html

JOEL IZLAR

Mowbray, O., Fatehi, M., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., Disney, L., & Patel, D. (2021, January 19–22). Examining time to completion among participants in day reporting centers [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex. com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper41286.html

Robinson, M. A., Izlar, J., & Rothstein, A. (2020). Opportunity beckons: A case for community practice within the classroom. Journal of Community Practice, 28(1), 77-87. https://doi.org/10.10 80/10705422.2020.1716426

Mowbray, O., Campbell, R., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Scheyett, A. (2021, January 19–22). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41283.html Fatehi, M., Mowbray, O., Robinson, M., Risler, E., Skinner, J., & Disney L. (2021, January 19–22). An examination of fidelity to day reporting center eligibility criteria among a statewide sample [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43183.html

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JOUR NAL ARTICLES Izlar, J. (2020). Radical social welfare and anti-authoritarian mutual aid. Critical and Radical Social Work, 7(3), 349-366. https://doi.org/10.1332/204986019X15687131179624

MEGAN LEE JOUR NAL ARTICLES Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M. & Scheyett, A. (2021). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists. Social Work in Mental Health. Social Work in Mental Health, 19(2), 126–140. https://doi.org/10.1 080/15332985.2021.1885090 Mowbray, O., Campbell, R. D., Lee, M., Fatehi, M., & Disney, L. (2020). A systematic review of psychosocial-based outcomes in


peer-support services. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 18(2), 155–180. https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1805385 McPherson, J., Jennings, P. F., Arnold, B. H., Littleton, T., & Lee, M. (2020). Creating global scholars: Experiential learning and reflection transform an international conference into a shortterm study abroad. Journal of Social Work Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2020.1770 641 PRESE N TATIO N S Mowbray, O., Campbell, R., Disney, L., Lee, M., Fatehi, M. & Scheyett, A. (2021, January 19–22). Peer support provision and job satisfaction among certified peer specialists [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper41283.html Byers, T., Lee, M., & Powell, A. (2021, October 12–14). Understanding diverse student participation in campus sustainability programs [Oral presentation]. Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (Virtual).

GEORGE MOIS, PhD ’21 J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Fortuna, K., Williams, A., Mois, G., Jason, K., & Bianco, C. L. (2021). Social processes associated with health and health behaviors linked to early mortality in people with a diagnosis of a serious mental illness. Perspectives on Psychological Science. Advanced online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/1745691621990613 Fortuna, K. L., Myers, A. L., Bianco, C., Mois, G., Mbao, M., Morales, M. J., Brinen, A. P., Bartels, S. J., & Hamilton, J. (2021). Advancing the science of recovery: The utility of the Recovery Assessment Scale in the prediction of self-directed health and wellness outcomes in adults with a diagnosis of a serious mental illness. Psychiatric Quarterly. Advance online publication. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s11126-021-09963-2 Mois, G., & Fortuna, K. L. (2020). Visioning the future of gerontological digital social work. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 63(5), 412-427. https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.20 20.1772436 Fortuna, K., Myers, A.L., Walsh, D., Walker, R., Mois, G., & Brooks, J. (2020). Strategies to increase peer support specialists’ capacity to use digital technology in the era of COVID-19: Pre-Post Study. JMIR Mental Health, 7(7), e20429. https://doi.org/10.2196/20429 Beer, J. M., Smith, K. N., Kennedy, T., Mois, G., Acena, D., Gallerani, D. G., McDonnell, K. K., & Owens, S. L. (2020). A focus group evaluation of Breathe Easier: A mindfulness-based mHealth app for survivors of lung cancer and their family members. American Journal of Health Promotion, 34(7), 770-778. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890117120924176 Fortuna, K. L., Ferron, J., Bianco, C. L., Santos, M. M., Williams, A., Williams, M., Mois, G., & Pratt, S. I. (2020). Loneliness and its association with health behaviors in people with a lived experience of a serious mental illness. Psychiatric Quarterly. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-02009777-8 Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). The role of healthcare robotics in providing support to older adults: A socio-ecological perspective. Current Geriatric Reports, 9, 82-89. https://doi.org/10.1007/ s13670-020-00314-w

B OOK CH AP TER S Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). Robotics to support aging in place. In R. Pak, E. de Visser, & E. Rovira (Eds.), Living with robots: Emerging issues on the psychological and social implications of robotics (pp. 49-74). Cambridge, MA: Elsevier. https://doi. org/10.1016/B978-0-12-815367-3.00003-7 CONFER ENCE AB STR ACTS AND PR OCE EDI N G S Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2021). Toward a framework for embodiment in communication technologies: Facilitating social connectivity for older adults. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 64(1), 28–32. https://doi. org/10.1177/1071181320641008 Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). Leveraging assistive technology resources to support aging in place: A scoping study. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 100. https:// doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.330 Emerson, K., Kim, D., Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). Coping with the impact of COVID-19 safety recommendations: The importance of pets. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 937. https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057.3432 Emerson, K., Kim, D., Mois, G., & Beer, J. (2020). The impact of COVID-19 safety recommendations on adults age 60 and older: A qualitative study. Innovation in Aging [Program abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting “Turning 75: Why age matters”] 4(Suppl. 1), 959. https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/ igaa057.3506 Mois, G., Collette, B. A., Renzi-Hammond, L. M., Boccanfuso, L., Ramachandran, A., Gibson, P., Emerson, K. G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). Understanding robots’ potential to facilitate piano cognitive training in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Proceedings of the International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction [Late Breaking Report], ACM/IEEE. https://doi. org/10.1145/3371382.3378299 B OOK CH AP TER S Mois, G., & Beer, J. M. (2020). Robotics to support aging in place. In R. Pak, E. de Visser, & E. Rovira (Eds.), Living with robots: Emerging issues on the psychological and social implications of robotics (pp. 49-74). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12815367-3.00003-7 PR ESENTATIONS See Conference Abstracts and Proceedings above.

JAY O’SHIELDS JOUR NAL ARTICLES O’Shields, J., & Gibbs, J. J. (2021). Depressive symptoms, childhood maltreatment, and allostatic load: The importance of sex differences. Psychoneuroendocrinology [Special issue], Article 105130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2021.105130 O’Shields, J. D., & Mowbray, O. (2021). Difficulties in psychosocial functioning due to current depressive symptoms: What can C-Reactive protein tell us? Brain, Behavior, & Immunity – Health, 16, 100316. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2021.100316

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PRESE N TATIO N S O’Shields J., & Baldwin-White, A. (2021, January 19–22). Exploring the role of Snapchat use in predicting alcohol consumption among college students [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper42670.html O’Shields, J. (2020, September). The role of allostatic load and childhood maltreatment in adulthood depression severity [Poster presentation]. Child Maltreatment Solutions Network Conference, State College, PA (Canceled due to COVID-19).

OLUWAYOMI K. PASEDA J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Paseda, O. K., & Mowbray, O. (2021). Substance use related mortality among persons recently released from correctional facilities. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work. Advance online publication. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2640 8066.2021.1942371 PRESE N TATIO N S Paseda, O. (2021, March 11–14). Reentry programs for women transitioning from incarceration to the community: A scoping review [Presentation]. Southeastern Women’s Studies Association 2020 Conference (Virtual). Paseda, O. (2021, January 19–22). Suicide or other violent deaths amongst recently released persons [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/ webprogram/Paper44317.html Paseda, O., & Mowbray, O. (2021, January 19–22). Substance use related mortality among recently released persons from correctional facilities [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper44301. html

ELYSSA SCHROEDER J O URN A L A RTIC L E S Schroeder, E., Edgemon, T. E., Kagotho, N., Aletraris, L., Clay-Warner, J., & Okech, D. (in press). A review of prevalence estimation methods for human trafficking populations. Public Health Reports. Voth Schrag, R. J., Ravi, K., Robinson, S., Schroeder, E., & PadillaMedina, D. (2020). Experiences with help seeking among non– service-engaged survivors of IPV: Survivors’ recommendations for service providers. Violence Against Women. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077801220963861. REPO RTS US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Okech, D., Aletraris, L., & Schroeder, E. (2020). Human trafficking statistical definitions: Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum. University of Georgia African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES) & The US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/ RG.2.2.31986.12484

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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU

Marguiles, J., Voyles, M., Schroeder, E., Hooper, M., Sudolsky, C., Moore, T., Cantrell, A., & Bocklage, D. (2020). Trauma-informed assessment project: A statewide report. Texas Council on Family Violence. https://bit.ly/3zz2MAU PR ESENTATIONS Schroeder, E., & Okech, D. (2021, January 19–22). Factors associated with physical and mental health outcomes among female trafficking survivors: A hierarchical regression model [Poster Presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual).

CAROLINE SHARKEY JOUR NAL ARTICLES Sharkey, C. N., Elkins, J. E., & Johnson, Z. (in press). Creating trauma-informed library spaces: Lessons learned from a pilot program. Journal of Social Work Education. Lee, S., Bae, J., Sharkey, C. N., Caplan, M., Bakare, O. H., & Embrey, J. (in press). Professional social work and public libraries in the United States. Social Work. PR ESENTATIONS Sharkey, C., Strickland, C., & Elkins, J. (2021, April 15–16). Resisting curriculum violence and developing anti-oppressive, trauma-informed, culturally sustaining approaches for social work education and practice [Oral presentation]. Social Work, White Supremacy, and Racial Justice: Reckoning with Our History, Interrogating Our Present, Re-Imagining Our Future. Part IV: Strategies for Achieving Racial Justice in Social Work Education (Virtual symposium). https://bit.ly/39ACeVn Sharkey, C., Matthew, R., & Elkins, J. (2021, January 19–21). Positive youth development and collective efficacy: Protective factors for youth exposed to community violence [Paper presentation, accepted, unable to present]. 25th Society for Social Work and Research Annual Conference (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper43686.html Sharkey, C. N. (2020, November 4–14). Transforming public spaces to promote social inclusion and trauma informed care [Poster presentation]. 36th Annual International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) Conference (Virtual). Sharkey, C. N. (2020, November 16–20). The bridges we build: Enhancing student development through collaborative field supervision [Oral presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Strickland, C., & Sharkey, C. N. (2020, November 16–20). Power-knowledge in social work: Resisting curriculum violence and developing anti-oppressive practices [Featured live oral presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual). Sharkey, C. N., Green, T., & Mauldin, S. (2020, July 13–17). Healing without hurting: Toward a trauma-informed model for law library service [Presentation]. American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 2020 Reimagined: Unmasking Our Potential (Virtual).


CHRISTOPHER STRICKLAND BO O K C HA P TE RS Strickland, C. (in press). Ideological fracture: U.S. social work and its struggle to navigate ethical mandate and the forces of capitalism. In S. M. Sajid, R. Baikady, & M. R. Islam (Eds.), Oxford handbook of power, politics, and social work - revisiting professional education.

Villarreal-Otálora, T., & McPherson, J. (2021, January 19–22). The time is now: Training social work students as immigrant allies [Oral presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr. confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper42693.html

JANA WOODIWISS

PRESE N TATIO N S

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

Sharkey, C., Strickland, C., & Elkins, J. (2021, April 15–16). Resisting curriculum violence and developing anti-oppressive, trauma-informed, culturally sustaining approaches for social work education and practice. Social Work, White Supremacy, and Racial Justice: Reckoning with Our History, Interrogating Our Present, Re-Imagining Our Future. Part 4: Strategies for Achieving Racial Justice in Social Work Education (Virtual symposium). https:// bit.ly/39ACeVn

Boyas, J. F., Woodiwiss, J. L., & Nahar, V. K. (2021). Examining intentions to engage in sun protective behaviors among Latino day laborers: An application of the theory of planned behavior. Health Promotion Perspectives, 11(3), 351-359. https://hpp. tbzmed.ac.ir/Article/hpp-34214

Strickland, C., & Sharkey, C. N. (2020, November 16–20). Power-knowledge in social work: Resisting curriculum violence and developing anti-oppressive practices [Featured live oral presentation]. 66th Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education (Virtual).

JOUR NAL ARTICLES

TATIANA VILLARREAL-OTÁLORA J O URN A L A RTIC L E S McPherson, J., Villarreal-Otálora, T., Kobe, D. (2021). Injustice in their midst: Social work students’ awareness of immigrationbased discrimination in high education. Journal of Social Work Education, 57(1), 55–69. https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2019.1 670303 Krasniqi, V., McPherson, J., & Villarreal-Otálora, T. (2021). Are we putting human rights into social work practice in Kosovo? British Journal of Social Work, bcaa235. https://doi.org/10.1093/ bjsw/bcaa235 Villarreal-Otálora, T., Boyas, J. F., Alvarez-Hernandez, L. R., & Fatehi, M. (2020). Ecological factors influencing suicidal ideation-to-action among Latinx adolescents: An exploration of sex differences. Children and Youth Services Review, 118, 105444. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105444 Rai, A., Villarreal-Otálora, T., Blackburn, J., & Choi, Y. J. (2020). Correlates of intimate partner stalking precipitated homicides in the United States. Journal of Family Violence, 35, 706–716. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s10896-020-00137-5 Šadić, S., McPherson, J., Villarreal-Otálora, T., & Bašić, S. (2020). Rights-based social work in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Validating tools for education and practice. International Social Work. Advance online publication. https://doi. org/10.1177/0020872820912310

HYESU YEO Yeo, H. S., Choi, Y. J., Son, E., Cho, H. K., Yun, S. H., & Lee, J. O. (in press). Childhood community risk factors on intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization among college students. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. CONFER ENCE AB STR ACTS AND PR OCE EDI N G S Yeo, H. (2020). Group differences in patterns of retirement and social security benefits receipt in the U.S. Innovation in Aging, Program Abstracts from the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting, Turning 75: Why Age Matters, 4 [Suppl_1], 111. https://doi. org/10.1093/geroni/igaa057 R EPORTS Yeo, H. (2021). Employment support programs for older adults in the U.S. Global Social Security Review 2021 Spring, 16. 113-119. Sejong: Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs. https://www. kihasa.re.kr/en/publish/gss/view?seq=35950&volume=35932 PR ESENTATIONS Yeo, H. S., & Dunnigan, A. (2021, January 19–22). Trajectories of foster-care entry of infants with prenatal substance exposure in states [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https:// sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/Paper42606.html Choi, Y. J., Yeo, H. S., Lee, J. O., Cho, H. K., Son, E., & Yun, S. H. (2021, January 19–22). The effect of childhood community factors on intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization among college-aged students [Poster presentation]. 25th Annual Society for Social Work and Research Conference, San Francisco, CA (Virtual). https://sswr.confex.com/sswr/2021/webprogram/ Paper41304.html

Farine, A., Kremer, K. P., Wimmer, S. C., Villarreal-Otálora, T., Paredes, T., & Stuart, E. (2020). Anxiety, depression, and trauma among immigrant Mexican women up to two-years post-partum. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 23, 470–477. https:// doi.org/ 10.1007/s10903-020-01096-1 PRESE N TATIO N S Pulgar, C., & Villarreal-Otálora, T. (2021, September 10–11). Validating the RCOPE with Latinx immigrants during a pandemic: Lessons learned [Oral presentation]. Association for Assessment in Research in Counseling Conference. Cincinnati, OH. SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED | 2021-2022

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SSW.UGA.EDU BSW • MSW • Online MSW • MSW/JD • MSW/MPH • MSW/M.Div. • Ph.D. MA and Online Certificate in Nonprofit Management & Leadership Certificate in Substance Use Counseling Center for Human Trafficking Research & Outreach Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights Institute for Nonprofit Organizations 58

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK | SSW.UGA.EDU


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