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Three years ago, I was thrilled to come to the University of Georgia, but I never could have

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imagined the opportunities that awaited me here. One of the most notable experiences I’ve had at UGA is being a member of the Honors Program. This program has enriched my college education through more personalized learning, closer relationships with professors, opportunities to take graduate-

I N S I D E

level coursework and access to extracurricular lectures and

events that I would not have

otherwise had.” –Megan Gallagher ’14, social work

FOUNDATION FELLOWS 2 CURO 6 CORSAIR 10 STUDY ABROAD 12

INTERNSHIPS 14

ALUMNI 16


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doing it all

eemingly, Honors student and Foundation Fellow Jacqueline Van De Velde, a native of Saint Simons Island, GA, has done it all as a student at UGA. Taking a course of study for an undergraduate degree in international affairs and combined undergraduate and master’s degrees in English, Jacqueline

is an excellent student who takes her learning far beyond the classroom. Supported by funding from the Honors Program, she has traveled throughout Europe and Africa, and has a broad range of internship experiences. Jacqueline provides service and leadership wherever she goes. As Dr. Valerie Babb, professor of English, aptly observes: “I think of Jacqueline as a young public intellectual. Her dedication to study is matched by her passionate belief that intellectual pursuit should positively impact the world around her.” During the fall of 2013, Jacqueline interned in Atlanta at The Carter Center in the Conflict Resolution Program, focusing on access to justice in Liberia. Prior to that, she was a Security Leadership Fellow at UGA’s Center for International Trade and Security and a Richard B. Russell Security Leadership International Fellow at UGA’s Carl Vinson Institute of Government. In addition to her work at The Carter Center in Atlanta,

According to Jacqueline, “religion and ideology play

Jacqueline has been very active beyond campus, both in the United

tremendous roles in modern conflicts, yet the U.S. Government has

States and abroad, having served as a public affairs officer in the

historically shied away from the religious dimensions of conflict.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Federal Law Enforcement

This is a mistake.” She adds: “Since the Cold War, the world has seen

Training Center in Georgia; as a country of origin researcher for the

an increase in religious adherents, an increase in the fervency of

Human Rights League in Slovakia, where she also assisted refugees;

belief, and an increase in state restrictions on religious freedoms. The

and as an intern with INTERPOL in France, where she developed

increasing frequency and fervency of belief has led some within the

an ethical code of conduct and organized a leadership program.

academic community to identify religion as the ‘missing dimension

She has also been a volunteer third-grade teacher with an NGO in

of statecraft.’ As conflicts with religious aspects increase in number,

Ghana.

U.S. foreign policy will increasingly be crippled if it fails to address

Amongst her many experiences, Jacqueline’s transformative experience as an intern at the U.S. State Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom in Washington, D.C., stands out.

this crucial facet of multi-faceted problems. Simply put, religion and U.S. foreign policy must co-exist.” Following graduation, Jacqueline heads next to law school. She

There she drafted and edited reports and memoranda concerning

aspires ultimately to work in the U.S. Department of State, crafting

restrictions on religious freedom in international settings.

foreign policy that promotes and protects both U.S. interests and the

Jacqueline is deeply committed to alleviating such conditions

human rights of all global citizens.

and working to ensure religious freedom throughout the world. Moreover, she has a great interest in the interconnection of religion and foreign policy.

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F E L L O W S

COMMI TMEN T

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avid Millard exemplifies the commitment of the Honors

Last summer, through funding supplied by the Foundation

Program to help students think and serve on both a local and

Fellowship, David returned to the township of Khayelitsha, outside

a global basis.

Cape Town, with equipment and CDs of free educational software.

A native of Athens, GA, David is a fourth-year Foundation

Fellow who is completing degrees in mathematics and

He repaired the township school’s computers, and loaded software that will enable students to get more from the resources on hand.

computer science prior to starting his career as a software

Reflecting on the ties between his local and global service,

developer with Microsoft, following his graduation this coming

David says, “It’s really exciting for me to get the opportunity to see

May.

these things merge.”

Before coming to UGA, David volunteered with Free IT Athens,

which collects old computers and refurbishes them to sell at a

When I was looking at colleges as a high

low price. At UGA, he has led MATHCOUNTS, an Honors Program-

school student, UGA seemed like it provided the

sponsored outreach initiative to help local secondary students in developing math skills. Last year, when he visited South Africa as part of a Foundation

Fellows spring break trip, David was exposed to educational disparities owing to the inequalities of the apartheid era.

and I’ve found that to be true again and again. As an Honors student and Foundation Fellow,

“Our spring break trip had an educational focus,” says David.

“We went to townships, which are essentially communities

I’ve been given the opportunity to study at the

outside of cities with temporary housing constructed by residents,

University of Oxford, conduct robotics research in

and went to schools in the townships that were segregated during apartheid. We had a conversation with professors from

Germany, stay with indigenous families in Costa

the University of Cape Town about why these schools are still

Rica, and visit South Africa twice. I turned down

underperforming and underfunded.”

acceptances at Princeton and Yale to come here,

Given his interest in technology and the role it plays in

and I’m very glad that I did.”

education, David was inspired to return to South Africa to help create positive change.

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most opportunity for me to achieve my goals,

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impact

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hen Smitha Ganeshan, a native of Johns Creek, GA, came to UGA four years ago, she was confident that she could get to a top-notch medical school by being an Honors student. She knew about the strength of the science faculty at UGA and the opportunities to conduct undergraduate research,

and she had seen the track record of previous students. But she could not have predicted that she would become a public health leader so quickly, and have such an impact while still a student. From the time that she set foot on campus, Smitha was on a

productive premedical track. While majoring in anthropology and biology, she served as an editor for the Journal for Undergraduate Research Opportunities, and served in healthcare facilities in Athens as well as abroad in India, Nicaragua, and Peru. Based on her superior performance throughout, she was selected for a highly competitive Honors in New York internship with the Greater New York Hospital Association, where she worked on public health issues such as obesity prevention. Smitha intends a career as a physician policymaker, with

overriding interests in alleviating health disparities and building a financially sustainable health care system. When she was a second-year student, Smitha took a public policy course associated with the Honors-

The Honors Program has truly been

sponsored student think tank, the Roosevelt Institution. Smitha chose

my home away from home. Through

to explore ways to enhance delivery of primary care services in the local

dinner seminars with faculty, book

community, and the policy proposal she developed dealt with enabling local leaders to improve access to primary care services for low income and uninsured patients. Dr. Monica Gaughan, who taught Smitha in UGA’s College of Public Health, says: “To be honest, it initially seemed comical that a student would be able to solve a problem that has simmered for decades. I have never seen anything like this kind of focus and persistence from an undergraduate in my career.” Smitha’s extraordinary work was recognized on a national level when

discussions with my peers, internships, and opportunities for travel, the Honors Program has placed the resources I need to thrive at my fingertips. But beyond these resources, the Honors

she was awarded a 2013 Harry S. Truman Scholarship, which identifies college

staff has supported me tirelessly as

juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to a career in

mentors and friends throughout my

public service. Smitha is UGA’s 18th Truman Scholar. Not surprisingly, Smitha has already been accepted at several leading

undergraduate career.”

medical schools. She is sure to continue making a positive difference wherever she chooses to go from here.

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The Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities

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he University of Georgia is one of only a handful of institutions in the country where undergraduates can conduct faculty-mentored research for a full four years, regardless

of discipline, academic major, or grade point average. The Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities, better known on campus as CURO, is the reason why. Created in the late 1990s, CURO is administered by the Honors Program, and the majority of Honors students participate in at least one semester of CURO research. Having matured as a full-fledged program, CURO expanded its reach in 2010 when it became available to all undergraduates across campus, not just Honors students. The result is that more students than ever are engaging with CURO. From 2010 to 2013, non-Honors participation in CURO nearly doubled. “The increased participation in CURO we are seeing is very exciting,” says Dr. David Williams, associate provost and director of the Honors Program. “Undergraduate research gives students extensive and sustained contact with faculty mentors, who are able to open doors for them throughout their undergraduate experience. This leads to high levels of student achievement.” Williams adds, “More and more, students know before they even arrive on campus that they want to conduct undergraduate research, and they understand that they can do that here with full support through CURO.” CURO offers a range of opportunities for students to pursue research with premier faculty members and share their accomplishments with the campus community and beyond. Through CURO, undergraduates can learn strategies and skills to help them identify and contact research mentors, earn degree program academic credit, compete for funded summer research opportunities, present their findings at the annual CURO Symposium, and publish their work in the Journal for Undergraduate Research Opportunities. These offerings allow students to tailor their undergraduate research experience to their specific goals.

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CURO HONORS SCHOLAR

COLBY RUIZ

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s a CURO Honors Scholar, Colby Ruiz has been involved with research since he arrived as a first-year student in 2011, investigating a little-understood protein processing

pathway in yeast that directly correlates to the processing pathway of a human protein that is mutagenic in thirty percent of human cancers. Colby has been mentored in this research by Dr. Walter

Schmidt of the department of cellular biology. Encouraged by Dr. Schmidt, in 2013 Colby attended the 20th annual Southeastern Regional Yeast Meeting (SERYM) held at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, where he received the Best Undergraduate Poster award. In addition to its positive impact on the development

of his skills as a scientist, Colby enjoys the community spirit that accompanies research life. Colby is proactive in creating a sense of community. Among other activities, he serves as a student teaching assistant in a CURO research methodologies course, and he is also active with the Georgia Recruitment Team, attending panels and touring campus with prospective students. Such recruitment events made a big impression on him when he was a visiting high school student. During his visit to UGA, he met students and faculty members involved in research in the sciences, including Dr. Schmidt. Colby says: “I learned about the different kinds of research happening on campus. I went from not knowing anything about UGA or my career to knowing that I had to attend UGA and conduct research with these faculty members. The whole ride home with my dad, it was all we could talk about.” A native of Valdosta, GA, Colby hopes to return one day to serve the community as a surgeon. For Colby, the desire to return to Valdosta is not only due to the strong roots he has there but also because Valdosta offers what he calls the “perfect combo” of a small town with a large hospital. According to Colby, “In a place like that, if you have an idea, it can start at home with family and friends, but then spread out from there. If you want to start a social organization, or hold a philanthropic event, someone always knows someone else who can help, and you can get results.”

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third-year Honors student from Dacula, GA, Mindy Johnson is pursuing degrees in political science and economics with a public policy emphasis. She is also

completing a certificate in legal studies. Mindy is very active on the UGA campus and in the

local community. She serves as the president of the UGA Undergraduate Mock Trial Association, which teaches students important skills in advocacy and public speaking. Through her volunteer work with the Athens Peer Court, she teaches middle school and high school students about the value of the judicial system. Mindy is also one of the directors of the Freshman Board of the Student Government Association, a teaching assistant for the Honors Program, and a member of the Arch Society. Mindy has conducted a number of research projects in the areas of legal studies and public policy. As a member of the Honors-sponsored Roosevelt Institution, she examined the fact that several Georgia counties lack an accountability courts system that could help keep drug offenders and the mentally ill from returning to prison. This project led to a presentation at the CURO Symposium entitled “Drugs and Mental Health Courts in Georgia’s Criminal Justice System,” which described a policy proposal that could lead to lower recidivism rates and costs for taxpayers. As a Fellow at UGA’s Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Mindy furthered her research through two projects. One assessed the impact of mandatory arbitration when city and county governments reach impasse in negotiating Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) distribution. Her second project examined whether receiving college credit through high school AP classes reduces subsequent HOPE Scholarship costs. Having been selected for the prestigious Honors in Washington internship program, Mindy is headed to our nation’s capital this coming summer, where she will continue her study of legal and policy issues. After completing law school, she plans to return there and pursue a career in constitutional law and civil liberties.

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ourtni Young is a third-year animal science major from Alpharetta, GA. As a CURO Honors Scholar, she has been conducting research

under the guidance of Dr. Erik Hofmeister of the College of Veterinary Medicine for the past two years. Her work has focused on pain diagnosis and observation by veterinarians. In part, her research has examined whether previous experience and a history of living alongside an animal affects a veterinarian’s ability to measure observational pain. Says Courtni, “recognizing pain and its intensity in a patient is a skill all doctors need to learn if they wish to make an accurate prognosis.” As she points out, “unfortunately for veterinarians, their patients are incapable of coherently communicating with them.” Courtni is now at work on a separate project to determine anesthesia-specific risk factors for animal patients that develop complications such as low blood pressure, low temperature, and prolonged recovery. Describing her research in this area thus far as “rewarding,” Courtni looks at it as a possible step in her career development and is considering becoming an anesthesiologist.

Make Plans to Attend the 2014 CURO Symposium Monday, March 31, 2014 Classic Center, Athens, GA

Poster Session and Reception 5:00 – 6:00 p.m., Grand Hall South

Oral Sessions 1:25 -3:20 p.m.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Keynote Address and Excellence in Undergraduate Research Awards Dr. Phaedra Corso Professor of Health Policy and Management College of Public Health “Health Policy and the Promise of Research” 4:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ballroom E

Oral Sessions 9:30 a.m. – 4:45 p.m. Free and open to the public

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CORSAIR: Excellence personified

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decade ago, the idea that elite investment banks on Wall Street would look to UGA for a steady supply of top student talent would have been unthinkable. But due to the efforts of a few loyal alumni in partnership with the Honors Program and the Terry College of Business, what was once unthinkable is now the reality. When Honors alumnus Brooks Andrews graduated from UGA in 2007, he was not confident that he would be able to realize his dream of beginning his career with a job in financial services in New York. Yet, because of the guidance and support he received as one of the first members of an alumni-driven mentoring network, the Corsair Society, he was able to land a position as an investment banking analyst at Barclays Capital in New York. Corsair pioneers like Brooks have paved the way for others, and now premier banks are actively looking to Corsair members to fill coveted intern slots and job placements. Since its inception in 2006, the Corsair Society has placed more than 80 UGA juniors, a majority of whom were Honors students, in internships at the likes of Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, J.P. Morgan, Barclays Capital, Deutsche Bank, Citigroup, UBS, and Credit Suisse. These internships regularly lead to subsequent job offers. And, upon achieving full-time employment, program participants have gone on to become top performers, achieving direct promotions, admission into top-tier business schools, and entrée into stellar enterprises including private equity firms, asset management, and market-leading corporations. Honors alumnus Patrick Dever, who graduated in 2010 and is now an associate at Citigroup in New York, states: “Without Corsair, I would not have the job that I have today. Corsair gave me the knowledge needed to get an internship and also connected me to a network of finance professionals to further my progression in this industry.” Similarly, Honors alumna Bethany McCain, who graduated in 2013, says: “Becoming a member of the Corsair Society undoubtedly equipped me fully to find a job on Wall Street. The senior members of the organization, as well as the broad alumni network in New York, devoted time and energy to teaching junior members how best to position ourselves in an extremely competitive landscape. I would not be an analyst at J.P. Morgan now without the support of the Honors Program and the tools given me by Corsair.” Initially, the Corsair Society operated as an alumni-driven student group. Over time, its collaboration with the University increased, with the result that it became a fully formed organization sponsored and supported by the Honors Program. Consequently, the initiative has expanded its reach to support students seeking internships at top firms in related fields, including

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McKinsey & Company and Boston Consulting Group. In addition, a new academic course, Introduction to Markets and Enterprises, was launched by the Honors Program in 2012 to expose second-year students to career paths in business and the work of the Corsair Society. Selection for this course and membership in the Corsair Society are open to both Honors and non-Honors students, and are also open to students carrying any academic major, whether in or beyond the Terry College. The Corsair Society is the brainchild of Honors alumnus David Battle (2000), now vice president at Metalmark Capital, a New Yorkbased private equity firm, and his fellow Terry alumnus Jeff Bogan (2002), vice president of corporate development at Lending Club in San Francisco. Their original hypothesis was that UGA students could compete with their Ivy League peers if given the same opportunities. From the beginning, Corsair members have been taught that they must not only learn the technical basics, but also develop


personal qualities associated with success—they must have a positive attitude; they must be prepared and detail-oriented at all times; and they must make time for self-reflection and self-improvement. Above all, they must not depend on the alumni network to magically make things happen for them; rather, they must have a bias toward action and take the steps themselves that are necessary to open doors. Given the wisdom of this founding vision, the success of the Corsair Society to date is impressive, but perhaps not surprising. And no doubt, continued success and expansion lie ahead. According to David Battle, “Last summer, the Corsair Society had over a dozen students participating in junior-year internships at top firms on Wall Street with another dozen starting full-time jobs. Over the next five years, I believe we will at least double this presence, and we have the opportunity to make a similar impact in other areas like management consulting where intense preparation and industry collaboration can make a big difference. Alumni are also collaborating more than ever before, identifying and developing attractive projects for their businesses and for new enterprises. An exponential growth opportunity exists.�

Michael Ostergard, Managing Partner at Accenture, one of the many impressive guest speakers for the Introduction to Markets and Enterprises course, which he helped to develop.

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H O N O R S

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

S C H O L A R S

P R O G R A M

“My study abroad trip has helped me develop a greater interest in finance and marketing. More generally, my experience abroad has given me a more realistic understanding of global markets. Although business classes often teach theoretical approaches to analyzing markets, no book can teach the full impact that culture has on different markets around the world. In particular, the language barriers between people can play a significant role in business interactions.” Joey Alvey ’14, agribusiness – Honors International Scholar to Chile

“Having never been outside of the United States before, I was well aware that my understanding of the world was largely confined to the small corner I have been in with the rest in my mind in only pictures and words. As such, the first day in Costa Rica was admittedly shocking. But, as my high school Spanish came back and I began to integrate myself into the culture and environment, my three-and-a-half week trip through some of Costa Rica’s most important and beautiful ecosystems became one of the greatest experiences I have had not just in college, but in my entire life.” Breanna Crowell ’15, environmental health science and ecology – Honors International Scholar to Costa Rica

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“I was entering an unknown culture, an unknown land, as I stepped out of the airport into the dense, humid air of New Delhi, India. I would be traveling with a group of medical and anthropology students, doctors, and professors to the Himalayan Mountains. It took some mental and physical preparation for the culture shock and high altitude, but the rewards from traveling to the Himalayan Mountains with the Medical Anthropology expedition go far and beyond. One of my most memorable moments on the trip was one hot afternoon, about halfway through the expedition, when a group of anthropology students went to a school for nuns studying Buddhism. The Nunnery was outside a very remote city in the Himalayas. Our arrival was unexpected to the nuns, but they still gladly welcomed us into their home and school. They informed us that many of their peers were in the town of Manali, more than a half-day drive away, because they were sick from malnutrition. Nonetheless, the Nuns who were present served us all delicious chai tea and cookies and took the time to be with us

“It is nearly impossible for me to begin describing

for a few hours. They

my study abroad experience to Spain and Europe’s

were so kind and giving,

oldest, continuously inhabited city, the port of

even though they were

Cádiz. For someone who has never traveled west of

suffering from lack of

the Mississippi River, the total mix of discovering a

food and resources. I

new culture, interacting with a completely different

knew then that I wanted

group of people, and exploring the intricacies of

to make a difference in

second language was a wholly eye-opening and

people’s lives and use all

unforgettable time in my life. Although I went

the talents and gifts I have

overseas to study Spanish, I returned to America

to my fullest. I have the

with a much deeper knowledge than a single

resources and training

Romance language. In my time there, I was able to

from my university studies to improve both the environment and

get to know another culture, which in turn, helped

the lives of the people who rely on it, and I plan to make my goals

me to understand my own.”

a reality.” Mack Hennessey ’14, history and social studies Tiffany Eberhard ’15, environmental health science, anthropology

education – Lanier Honors Scholar to Spain

– Clark Honors Scholar to India

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In addition to multiple projects, Anna (Roberto) and I were able to attend any of the meetings that GNYHA held in their conference center for member hospitals and facilities. These ranged from seminars on how Medicare impacts hospitals to how to comply with new flu regulations in New York State. We also had the opportunity to travel around the city and state to various meetings. During my first week in New York, we went to Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center to interview Linda Reissman, the Director of Emergency Management. We also attended the New York State Department of Health committee on certificates of need in Manhattan, and in July I was able to travel to Rochester to cover another committee meeting as the representative of GNYHA. On top of the wonderful internship at GNYHA, simply living in New

Mermaid Parade, Smorgasburg in Brooklyn, Central Park, the Highline,

York City was an experience that made this summer so memorable.

a Yankees game, a Mets game, and a variety of great restaurants.”

Anna and I lived in NYU housing with students who were doing

Sarah Lane ’15, genetics and masters in public health –

biomedical research at NYU, and it was great to be able to befriend

Honors in New York Scholar with the Greater New York Hospital

and spend time with other students our age. We were constantly

Association

exploring the city, and I can’t say that there was ever a dull moment. We went to museums, Broadway shows, ballets, the Coney Island

Pictured on right with fellow intern Anna Roberto

This summer experience provided me a chance to dive head-first into the world of politics in our nation’s capital. Not only did I discover a great deal about the political processes of our government, but also how a congressional office handles media issues. During my ten-week Honors in Washington internship I was invited to join Senator Isakson, his chief of staff, and the press secretary to go to the office of Congressman John Lewis, where the Senator presented Congressman Lewis with a copy of the resolution he brought to the floor of the Senate. It was to honor Congressman Lewis for civil service, both as a civil rights leader in the 1960s and as a member of the House of Representatives.” Jared Dunn’14, public relations – HIW Exposition Foundation Scholar with the office of Senator Johnny Isakson Pictured with Congressman John Lewis

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I was not quite sure what to expect out of my internship upon my arrival, but I was never worried that I would be bored. How could I be when I was walking the halls of the organization that was responsible for Hiram Bingham’s, Louis Leakey’s, Jacque Cousteau’s and Bob Ballard’s explorations and discoveries? Luckily, I was right. I started my internship on Wednesday, May 15, and they put me to work right away. In addition to receiving the basic tours and orientations that week, my colleagues took me to meetings, gave me pitching assignments, had me put together media kits, build media lists, and more. The very first thing I pitched, National Geographic Traveler’s new City Guides app, was picked up by the Los Angeles Times and then syndicated across the country, and that Friday, I volunteered at a National Bike-to-Work Day event on the National Geographic campus. Even in that first short week, I felt like a valuable part of the communications team.” Whitney Jinks ’14, public relations and Spanish – HIW Carmical Honors Scholar with National Geographic

I need only one word to describe my summer in the nation’s capital: life-changing. I developed a great amount of confidence and professionalism throughout my nine weeks interning in Congressman Barrow’s office. Additionally, I learned the art of networking and communicating with others as well as improved upon valuable skills such as writing and organization. Thus, my nine weeks in Washington D.C. forever changed my life and molded me into a stronger and more knowledgeable person.” Taryn Winston ’15, political science and journalism – HIW Hicks Honors Scholar with the office of Congressman John Barrow Pictured with Honors Alumnus Jonathan Arogetti, Senior Legislative Assistant to John Barrow

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A L U M N I

Why I Give “We support the Honors Program because it provides an opportunity for Georgia’s best students to fully develop their potential in a competitive environment. The Honors Program is the crown jewel of the University of Georgia and is amongst the finest programs of its kind in the United States. It is our pleasure to support this effort.” Howard Young (’82), and Becky Young (’82) established the Bill and Jane Young Honors Undergraduate Research Scholarship in 2006 and the Daniel Von Hoff Honors Undergraduate Research Scholarship in 2012.

2013 Bill and Jane Young Honors Undergraduate Research Scholarship Recipient Anjali Kumar came to UGA with the support of the CURO Honors Scholarship. Now a second-year student, the Lawrenceville, GA native is majoring in biology with an interest in public health. Since her first days on campus, Anjali has been engaged with research on pancreatic cancer proteins and associated biomarkers, working with Dr. Lance Wells at the Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. As the 8th recipient of the Bill and Jane Young Honors Research Scholarship this past summer, Anjali was able to intensify her research, which involved specialized study of factors related to innate immunity to pancreatic cancer. Given this significant opportunity to focus for several weeks on pancreatic cancer, Anjali says, “I am looking forward to moving ahead with the project to determine the specific protein linked to pancreatic cancer. Each step of the protocol brings us closer to finding the protein or group of proteins. I hope to continue working in the field of cancer, as I have come to enjoy learning about and researching a disease that it is so critical to better treat and eventually cure.”

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The Honors Program congratulates our 2014 Bulldog 100 honorees Kris Nordholz (class of 1995), Full Media Paul (Paton) Faletti (class of 1999), NCM Associates Danielle Hosker (class of 2001), Dancefx, Inc. Jeffrey Mares (class of 1983), The Propel Agency Emily F. Howell (class of 2000), Howell Orthodontics David Felfoldi (class of 2001), Sherpa! Web Studios

Honors Magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Georgia Honors Program

PUBLISHER

UGA Honors Program 002 Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, GA 30602 David S. Williams, Associate Provost and Director EDITOR

Dorothé Otemann PHONE

706 542-3240 FA X

706 582-6993 EMAIL

dotemann@uga.edu

Explore ways you can help support the Honors Program at UGA! Go to www.honors.uga.edu, scan QR below, or contact dotemann@uga.edu

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UGA Honors Magazine, spring 2014  

The first edition of the University of Georgia Honors Program's magazine, spring 2014.

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