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Shannon Vreeland, UGA Swimmer, Olympic gold medalist, and 2015 NCAA Top Ten Student-Athlete I grew up in Kansas and chose to attend the University of Georgia because… I took a few trips to other schools and after only a few hours at UGA, I knew it was where I wanted to go. The Honors Program at UGA is fantastic as is the sense of community. I attended a football game in the rain and the stadium was packed from start to finish with screaming, cheering fans in ponchos and the school spirit really left an impression on me. On top of all of that, the swim team and UGA coaches are world class. I could not have found a better fit.”

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16 I N S I D E

FOUNDATION FELLOWS

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HONORS PROGRAM

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On the cover: Candace Flagg with mentees of the Thomas Lay After School Program Read more about Candace on page 6.

CURO 10

ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE 12

CRANE SCHOLARS 14

PARENT SOCIETY 16


F O U N D A T I O N

F E L L O W S H I P

Running for Research

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hird-year Honors student and Foundation Fellow Jacob Kennedy, from Albany, is rarely not thinking of running these days. As an anthropology major, Jacob is

interested in social structures and networks, and applied research in cultural topics. An avid long-distance runner himself, Jacob has focused his undergraduate research, being conducted through CURO, on runners in East Africa, specifically the social networks within and between training camps, athlete migration (both domestic and international), issues of identity and gender, the role of related infrastructure, and the impacts of running-related tourism. Jacob says: “Most research on East African runners asks why they are so good and takes a biological perspective, leaving a lot unexamined. There is talk about altitude or genes, but there’s no substantial evidence to support those theories.” He adds: “What people don’t realize is that there are formal systems in place to make sure that Kenyans and Ethiopians dominate the sport, from governmental support to foreign managers and sponsors, as well as economic and social incentives. Rather than examining why those systems make East African runners great, I’m looking at how those systems are crafted and change, and how they affect individuals and groups in the region.” According to Jacob, “right now I’m gaining access to East African training camps so I can do fieldwork this summer.” In preparation for his further work, Jacob has been learning research techniques associated with the geographic information system (GIS), a computer system to capture and analyze

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geographical data. Using GIS, Jacob is now creating the first comprehensive map of East African training camps. This will not be Jacob’s first time studying in Africa. Last summer, to increase his knowledge of Arabic, his minor, Jacob studied intensive Arabic while living in a homestay in Morocco, with funding through the Honors International Scholars Program (HISP). Eventually, Jacob would like to become an anthropologist on staff at an NGO, where he can use applied research to solve local problems, particularly dealing with sport as development.

During the summer of 2014, Foundation Fellow Jacob Kennedy lived in Morocco and studied Arabic intensively, with funding from the Willson Honors Student Support Fund, through HISP.

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F O U N D A T I O N

F E L L O W S H I P

Of Jewelry and Fencing

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hird-year Ramsey Honors Scholar Melissa Cousins, from Midland, is majoring in jewelry and metals. Watching Melissa at work in the jewelry and metalwork studio in the Lamar Dodd School of Art is fascinating. It is obvious that she is highly dedicated to her craft, and she will spend hours pounding on a cup to give it just the right formation and embellishments. Alternatively, she can sit quietly at her studio desk carefully laying a precious stone in an earlier crafted earring. When you ask Melissa about her underlying academic interest in jewelry, she sums it up as follows: “I’ve started looking into the history of jewelry and craft, as well as the modern and historical differences between art and craft, and where jewelry lies in that dichotomy. The fact that jewelry is traditionally considered very much a craft has led to a lack of scientific inquiry and study on the technical aspects of jewelry. Because of this, I’m working this semester in research on enameling, which is a technique where powdered glass is fused onto metal.” Melissa states that “the way enameling is taught is rife with misconceptions, untruths, and completely made up conjecture, while the things that are actually important

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and that can have a great impact on the quality of enamel are disregarded and unstudied.” She adds: “I’m trying to uncover the truths behind enamel and hopefully develop a method of removing fire scale from an enameled piece without damaging it.” This thoughtful, quiet, and careful jewelry maker is also a very talented fencer. She is part of the UGA fencing team and is a certified referee for the United States Fencing Association. In the summer of 2014, she traveled to Costa Rica as an Honors International Scholar to study art and astronomy. Melissa is planning to make a career as a jeweler.

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H O N O R S

P R O G R A M

Candace Flagg on Her UGA Experience

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began my undergraduate career at UGA in the fall of 2011 as a biological sciences major from Bowie, Maryland. Many have asked me why I came all the way down from Maryland to Georgia. The most honest answer I can give is that I fell in love with the campus. I have many family members that live in Georgia as well, so I consider it to be a home away from home. I entered the Honors Program my first semester, seeking challenging classes and a distinctive education. I was born into a military family and grew up around the Army culture. From a young age, I learned the value of service and knew that college would be the perfect place for me to explore many service opportunities. My involvement in various organizations, like GA Daze, the

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Conduct Review Board, and Project FOCUS, has helped me find my niche. Through the Honors Program, I have benefitted not only from small class settings, and have worked with incredible teachers, but most importantly, I have been introduced to the Thomas Lay After School Program. The Thomas Lay After School Program is an Honors-sponsored service opportunity located near downtown Athens. Each weekday, Honors and non-Honors students from a variety of majors mentor elementary and middle school aged children. All of the children that attend the program come from struggling families, and many are at-risk students that do not have the same opportunities and quality of life I had while growing up. Giving these children the stability that they may lack at home and encouraging them to value their education not only makes a difference in their lives, but also motivates me each day to continue volunteering in economically disadvantaged communities. I am proud to be serving as one of two executive directors of the program this school year and to ensure the children are in a safe, yet fun environment. I have so many personal relationships with the children that attend the program and will truly miss them after I graduate. My time at UGA as an Honors student has broadened my experiences and shaped the individual I am today. I am now ready and prepared to pursue a medical career. In May, I plan on returning to Maryland and then to matriculate into medical school in the fall. I hope to attend Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. Coming from an Army family, I have always wanted to serve in the military. Even more, I would like to study medicine in combination with military training in order to become a military medical officer. My dream for now is to practice pediatric medicine. I know that working with the students at Thomas Lay has helped inspire this desire. Just before beginning my undergraduate education, many people told me that the college experience would be the best years of my life. Now as a fourth-year student excited to graduate, I know what they all meant.� S

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H O N O R S

P R O G R A M

Jameson Kenerly:

Playing with Fire

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ameson Kenerly, a second-year biological sciences major from Jesup, has loved twirling since she was a little girl. From the time she was five years old, she has competed in the national twirling competition in Southbend, Indiana. She has won many gold medals in twirling competitions, including the world’s top twirling competition, the International Cup Competition, in Amsterdam in 2013. A specialist in fire twirling

and a former Miss America Outstanding Teen, Jameson competed for the first time for UGA in 2014 at the national twirling competition and won the WOW Award based on showmanship, presentation, and entertainment. In the same year, she became the World Open Solo Champion for 18-year-olds in the individual competition. There is no denying that Jameson has a competitive spirit. So when she took Honors Director David Williams’ First-Year Odyssey seminar course last fall and heard him talk about the Honors Program, she knew that she wanted to be part of it. She worked hard and was accepted through the Honors Program’s First-Semester Entry process. Jameson says: “Applying to the Honors Program is by far the best decision I’ve made so far at UGA.” In addition to daily practices, hours working out in the gym, and performing alongside the Red Coat Band at UGA football games, Jameson makes time for other activities as well, including being a member of the Service Committee for the Honors Program Student Council (HPSC). Through HPSC, she volunteers at Barnett Shoals Elementary School’s After School Program. Jameson has also worked at the Athens Area Homeless Shelter and Rivers Alive. She organizes lectures and informal events for HPSC, such as Dr. Maria Navarro’s “Hunger and Food Security Around the World” lecture and the “Flipping Out Over Finals” pancakes event with Dr. Williams. Beyond the Honors Program, Jameson is the Academic Achievement Chair for her sorority, Zeta Tau Alpha, and works hard to boost the Chapter’s GPA and to ensure that all members of ZTA are academically successful. It is obvious that while Jameson loves twirling, she is also passionate about academics and leadership. Jameson’s dream is to go to medical school after she finishes her undergraduate degree and to become an orthopedic surgeon.

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C U R O

Mugdha Joshi

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hird-year Honors student Mugdha Joshi, from Alpharetta, is majoring in biology and anthropology. From early on in her time at UGA, research has been a large part of Mugdha’s college experience. Under the direction of Dr. Shelley Hooks in pharmaceutical and biological sciences, and with the support of the CURO Summer Fellowship and the CURO Research Assistantship, she investigates the role that the protein RGS10 plays in regulating neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease. Mugdha has conducted additional research as a member of Roosevelt@UGA (see page 14), and presented her research entitled “Academic Steroids: The Need to Control Adderall Abuse on University Campuses” at the 2013 CURO Symposium. In the summer of 2013, Mugdha spent eight weeks in rural Ghana serving as a schoolteacher and raising public health awareness. After returning to campus, she and

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Foundation Fellow Madison Snelling co-founded RefUGA, which is a refugee advocacy organization sponsored by the Honors Program. She was also a founding board member of Vibha at UGA, the UGA chapter of the Vibha Academic Bowl Outreach Program, an international non-profit organization focusing on empowering elementary and middle school children in education through alternative and fun ways. Mugdha is also a Health and Wellness Coach in the UGA kinesiology department, where she works to improve the wellness of local people with disabilities. In her spare time, Mugdha sings with the UGA African American Choral Ensemble, the University Chorus, and the Hodgson Singers. She traveled to Austria and the Czech Republic in the summer of 2014 with the UGA Hodgson Singers, where they were awarded the Grand Prize at the Ave Verum International Choir Competition. After graduation, Mudgha will attend medical school.

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Mugdha Joshi at work in the lab of Dr. Shelley Hooks

Make Plans to Attend the 2015 CURO Symposium

March 30 and 31, 2015 Monday, March 30, 2015

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Oral Sessions 11:15 a.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Oral Sessions 9:30 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Keynote Address and Excellence in Undergraduate Research Awards

Classic Center, Athens, GA

Dr. Sonia Altizer Professor of Ecology Eugene Odom School of Ecology 3:30 – 4:30 p.m., Ballroom E

Paid parking Symposium free and open to the public

Poster Session and Reception 4:30 – 6:00 p.m., Grand Hall South

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R O O S E V E L T

I N S T I T U T E

Roosevelt Institute and Course

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ounded in 2004, the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network

important problems, issues, and policies, instead of debate.

is active at more than 100 colleges and universities across

It also hosts an annual spring policy conference for Roosevelt

the country, and is intended to facilitate “local laboratories

students across the nation.

of democracy and policy experimentation” to address

The Roosevelt Network focuses on six key policy areas:

problems confronting towns, counties, and states. The UGA

defense and diplomacy; economic development; education;

chapter, Roosevelt@UGA, sponsored by the Honors Program,

energy and environment; equal justice; and healthcare. At

is particularly vibrant and has played a leadership role in the

UGA, policy centers with student leaders operate in each of

Roosevelt Network. Through Roosevelt@UGA, students examine

these areas, and economic development is addressed both

real-world problems and advocate for progressive policy

locally and globally. Roosevelt@UGA is also participating in a

proposals to help alleviate these problems.

national initiative, the Rethinking Communities project, and is

Roosevelt@UGA has several components. First, operating

working to use UGA’s campus resources to help the surrounding

as a student club, it meets weekly to discuss important issues

Athens community. Student participants in these Roosevelt

occurring in the local community and to craft policy solutions

opportunities regularly present their policy research at the

to solve these issues. The chapter mixes both policy research

annual CURO Symposium, sponsored by the Honors Program,

and direct action so that a variety of students are drawn to

and publish their ideas in such venues as the Roosevelt

participate to create positive change. In addition to the weekly

Network’s Ten Ideas publication.

meetings, the chapter also holds events such as Roosevelt

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Another hallmark of Roosevelt@UGA, through which it plays

Issues Forums, available to all students at UGA as well as

a national leadership role, is the Roosevelt Scholars course,

local citizens, which are intended to cultivate dialogue about

offered by the Honors Program every fall semester since 2007,

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in which both Honors and non-Honors students work with

of domestic abuse. Last December, another Roosevelt Scholar,

faculty mentors to develop policy analysis skills and create

Torre Lavelle, was one of six students selected nationally from

original policy proposals.

the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network to present policy

Students in the Roosevelt Scholars course have been able

proposals in Washington, D.C. to White House staff members.

to directly affect policy discussion and advocacy. For the past

Torre spoke to national energy experts concerning her policy

several years, a course-related field trip has allowed students

to implement energy efficiency standards to meet the new

in the course to interact as a group directly with the Governor’s

EPA carbon emissions targets in Georgia. The event was part

policy team at the Georgia Capitol. Students have contributed

of the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network’s 10th anniversary

individually as well. As a student in the course, Camille Gregory

celebration.

(AB ’13), now a business analyst at McKinsey & Co. in Atlanta,

Due to its effective student leadership, highly engaged

wrote a paper that became part of the Georgia Domestic

membership, and strong support from the Honors Program,

Violence Benchbook, used by judges throughout Georgia, to

Roosevelt@UGA was selected as the Roosevelt Network’s

develop new policy to deal with divorce cases with a history

Chapter of the Year in 2014.

Roosevelt@UGA is a non-partisan student-led think tank that is part of the national Roosevelt Institute Campus Network. In 2014, Roosevelt@UGA was the Roosevelt Network’s Chapter of the Year. Roosevelt@UGA is the featured cover story in the March 2015 edition of the Georgia Magazine, a quarterly newsmagazine for alumni and friends that covers the UGA community. Pictured are Co-Executive Directors Kameel Mir (l) and Alex Edquist. S

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C R A N E

S C H O L A R S

Crane Leadership Scholars

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n the fall of 2014, seven Honors students were awarded

member of Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, Order of Omega, and

Crane Leadership Scholarships. The Crane Scholarship is

Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Community involvement is

jointly administered by the Honors Program and the Center

important to John. He is a member of Rotaract, participates in

for Leadership and Service, and grants up to ten $1,000

Habitat for Humanity, and has mentored in the Clarke County

scholarships to third-year Honors students with exemplary

School District. He served on the fundraising committee

leadership records on campus and/or in the local community.

for Inspire UGA. In the summer of 2014, John was a camp

The scholarship is renewable in a recipient’s fourth year.

counselor at Camp Kesem, a camp for children whose parents have been affected by cancer. John plans to attend medical school upon completion of

2014 – 2015 Crane Scholars are: Third-year students:

Fourth-year students:

Leigh Borkowski John Collar Alex Edelstein Chelsea Fitzhugh Mugdha Joshi Ray Paleg Marco Roca

Mindy Johnson Minh Nguyen Jim Thompson Taryn Winston Jessica Wolf

his undergraduate studies. Alex Edelstein is a third-year Honors student from Johns Creek, pursuing a degree in management information systems. In addition to being a Crane Leadership Scholar, Alex has been named a Leonard Leadership Scholar. Alex serves as a Terry Ambassador and is the president of the Society of Entrepreneurs. The Honors Program supported Alex in furthering his study of Japanese through the HISP scholarship for a summer language intensive program in Tokyo.

The New Crane Scholars

Alex is passionate about entrepreneurship. He spends

Leigh Borkowski is a third-year Honors student from

a great deal of time bringing diverse students together to

Marietta, pursuing a degree in communication sciences and

form businesses and tackle problems. Alongside the Society

disorders, and a certificate in disability studies.

of Entrepreneurs, he has furthered his passion for helping

Leigh serves as the Executive Director of Designated

students start businesses by helping to create a dedicated

Dawgs, a student-run organization that provides free,

student co-working space called the “Tree Fort” and securing

safe rides home to campus and the Athens community.

potential investors for future student businesses.

Additionally, she has been a mentor at the Thomas Lay After

In the future, Alex plans to travel the world, develop

School Program. Leigh is in her second year as an Honors

sustainable consumer electronics, and continue helping

Teaching Assistant for the HONS 1000H Introduction to

students create their own livelihoods.

Honors first-year seminar. As an IMPACT site leader this year, she is planning and leading a service-learning spring break

Chelsea Fitzhugh, a native of Albany, is a third-year Honors

trip focused on disability/ability awareness.

student majoring in biological sciences. Chelsea has a commitment to service and mentorship.

Leigh plans to attend graduate school in a speech-

She currently serves as the peer advisor for the Life Sciences

language pathology program, with the goal of working in a

Creswell Learning Community and is also a member of the

research lab focused on autism and speech. She plans to be

student advisory board for UGA’s chapter of the Peach State

a pediatric speech-language pathologist either at a public

Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, which aims to

elementary school or in an early intervention program.

increase the number of underrepresented minority students

John Collar is a third-year Honors student from Marietta. He

excelling in the STEM fields across the state of Georgia.

is pursuing a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology

She has also served as an Honors Teaching Assistant; the

with a minor in Spanish.

community outreach chair for Georgia Daze, an organization

John is a member of the Arch Society and is an SGA

committed to increasing diversity within the student body at UGA; and as historian for UGA’s chapter of Minorities in

Senator representing service organizations. He is also a

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Front left to right: Mugdha Joshi, Ray Paleg, Chelsea Fitzhugh, Leigh Borkowski, Taryn Winston. Back, left to right: Marco Roca, John Collar, Alex Edelstein, Jim Thompson.

Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences. Chelsea

novice Buddhist monks. In the fall of her sophomore year,

also dedicates her time as a volunteer with Project FOCUS and

Ray interned at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base in Pearl Harbor,

the Athens Pregnancy Center.

Hawaii in a childhood development center. Ray recently

Chelsea is passionate about women’s health,

returned from a summer in Tanzania, where she interned at an

particularly as it relates to economically disadvantaged and

HIV/AIDS clinic in its community outreach department. Ray’s

underrepresented groups. She plans to one day practice

various travel and volunteer experiences have inspired her to

medicine in primary health care in underserved regions.

pursue a career in international community development and

Mugdha Joshi is a third-year student from Alpharetta

sustainable urban planning.

studying biology and anthropology. She is an Honors

Marco Roca, from Dunwoody, is a third-year student majoring

Ambassador and a Henry King Stanford Scholar.

in international affairs, finance, and Romance languages.

On campus, Mugdha is the co-founder of RefUGA, a refugee advocacy organization committed to serving refugees in Athens through service, fundraising, and raising awareness. She volunteers as a wellness coach through the Kinesiology Department’s Healthy Options Program, which focuses on exercise training for participants with disabilities (For more about Mugdha, see pages 8 and 9).

As a CURO Honors Scholar, Marco conducts undergraduate research on international law and political dissident groups. Marco serves as President of the HPSC and is an Honors Ambassador. In the School of Public and International Affairs, he is Editor-in-Chief of Georgia Political Review and he has competed in Model United Nations since 2012. As a Terry College of Business student, Marco is a member

Ray Paleg is a third-year student from Silver Spring,

of the Student Managed Investment Fund and the Corsair

Maryland, pursuing a degree in geography and certificates in

Society, an Honors-sponsored organization that assists

geographic information science and African studies. She is a

students who are interested in high-level business careers.

Bernard Ramsey Honors Scholar, Honors International Scholar,

Marco has recently accepted a summer internship in the

and Freeman Foundation Scholar.

investment banking division of J.P. Morgan in New York City.

Ray spent the summer after her freshman year in Thailand,

In addition to being named a Crane Scholar, Marco was

working at the Maetaman Elephant Sanctuary. She cared for

one of two sophomores selected for the Blue Key Honor

orphaned and threatened elephants. She then traveled to

Society and one of twelve first-year males chosen for the

Chiang Mai to help create lesson plans and teach English to

Tate Society. S

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P A R E N T

S O C I E T Y

Honors Program Parent Society

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he Honors Program recognizes how important parents are to the success of our students, and therefore would like to encourage their involvement in the Honors community. There are many ways for parents to stay connected and to support the Honors Program mission of providing an unparalleled undergraduate experience for its students. One of the most important of these opportunities is to become a member of the Honors Program Parent Society. The Honors Parent Society was created in 2013 to enhance the involvement of parents with the Honors Program, and to provide an opportunity for parents to directly support the Program and its students. In addition, it is an opportunity for parents to stay engaged with their own students. In short, it provides an enriched college experience for parents and students alike. Using the Parent Society annual membership gifts, the Honors Program is able to support transformational experiences for students through stipends for undergraduate research, internships, and both domestic and international travel-study programs.

Honors Program Parent Society members `` Are asked to make an annual tax deductible gift of $2,000 to the Honors Parent Society Fund, which is used to fund travel-study, internships, undergraduate research, and other special Honors programming. `` Are invited to attend a parent and student event and the annual Honors Program tailgate in the fall, the Gala of Giving in the spring, as well as the annual UGA Presidents Club Reception. `` Will experience a direct connection to UGA and the Honors Program and will partner with the Program to address critical student issues. `` Will provide a network of support for incoming first-year students and their parents. For more information about the Honors Program Parent Society or questions on how to become a member, please contact Dorothe Otemann at 706.583.0698 or at dotemann@uga.edu.

Honors fall tailgate at Moore College Honors student and Foundation Fellow Shaun Kleber with his parents Scott Kleber and Nancy Habif

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2014-2015 Parent Society Members: (to date)

Dean Adelman Julie Adelman-Schlosberg Lisa and James Berger Jennifer and John Brown Laurie and Paul Buhrer Tara and Andrew Butterfield Caren Chaknis Tammy and Jim Conkel Mandy and Knox Culpepper Donna and Tim Daugherty Lori and Nicholas Desoutter Michelle and Harry Dobbins Robert and Dana Driggers Beth and Clifford Favrot Laura and Benjamin Folk Madhavi and Sreeni Gangasani Eleanor and Scott Geddes Evia and Andris Golde Deborah and Bob Googe Pam and Shawn Hardister Roz and Stephen Harris Anne and Bradley Jacoby Julie and Brad Kalter Nancy Habif and Scott Kleber Kathleen Maloney Laura Martin and Byard Edwards Kim and Steve McCollam James McEachin Tamara McEachin Kelly and John Meier Sheila and Paul Monardo Susan and Frank O’Neill Nina Orsini Michele and Chris Patafio Sasikala and Ravi Penumarthi Kathryn and Alex Pope Umbertina and Stefano Righi Jayna and Neil Robertson Leigh Anne and John Schlafly Dorothy and Stan Shelton Rebecca and Harold Simon Preet and Nitin Singh Laurel and Berry Snelling Joanne and Mark Soll Melissa and John Stroud Jackie and Brad Walter Diane and David Wilkes Liz and Charlie Williams

The Honors Magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Georgia Honors Program

PUBLISHER

UGA Honors Program 002 Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, GA 30602 David S. Williams, Associate Provost and Director EDITOR

Dorothé Otemann PHONE

706.542.3240 FA X

706.582.6993 EMAIL

dotemann@uga.edu WEBSITE

honors.uga.edu DESIGN

Sam Pittard University Printing PRINTED BY

University Printing PHOTOGRAPHY

Wingate Downs Cassie Wright

Copyright © 2015 by the University of Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way without permission from the editor.

The University of Georgia is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.


HONORS PROGRAM

The University of Georgia Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, GA 30602 www.honors.uga.edu

Nonprofit Org. U. S. Postage

PAID

Athens, GA Permit No. 165

UGA Honors Program

In October, Honors Program students Megan Ernst and Colton Fowlkes were named this year’s Homecoming Queen and King. Megan is a Foundation Fellow from Atlanta who is majoring in journalism and political science, while also completing a master’s degree in public administration. Colton is from Cumming and is majoring in biology and psychology, with a minor in religion and a certificate in personal and organizational leadership. Congratulations Megan and Colton!

Like Us on Facebook! The marks contained in this publication are registered ® marks of the University of Georgia and may not be used without written authorization from the University of Georgia.

UGA Honors Magazine, spring 2015  

Magazine of the University of Georgia Honor's Program, spring 2015

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