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On the cover: Honors students Lara Mengak and Scott Saunders are investigating a turtle at the Odum School of Ecology pond. You can find more about ecology research on page 22.


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First-year Foundation Fellow Gabrielle Pierre is documenting her travels through Europe on a park bench in France. See more about first-year Foundation Fellows travel on page 28.

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SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS

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Q&A WITH DAVID S. WILLIAMS 12

HONORS 14

CURO 19

FOUNDATION FELLOWS 26

MOCK TRIAL 30

ALUMNI 31


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SARAH MIRZA 2014 TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT arah Mirza, a rising fourth-year Honors student and

studied abroad in Oxford, England through the Foundation

Foundation Fellow majoring in Spanish and geography,

Fellowship as well as the UGA at Oxford Program and is active

was awarded a 2014 Harry S. Truman Scholarship. This

in a number of campus organizations. In 2013, she chaired the

scholarship recognizes juniors with exceptional leadership

events and outreach activities of the Undocumented Student

potential who are committed to careers in government

Alliance, an organization that works to promote education as a

and public service. Sarah was one of 59 students nationwide

human right. She also plays trumpet in UGA’s Redcoat Marching

to receive the Truman Scholarship, which offers up to $30,000

Band and is a DJ at campus radio station WUOG.

for graduate study. She is the 19th recipient of the Truman

Sarah volunteers at Casa de Amistad, a nonprofit

Scholarship overall from UGA.

organization in Athens that provides services and support

Sarah, a native of Grand Island, NE, aims to pursue a

to underserved members of the Hispanic community. Her

master’s degree in cultural geography followed by a law

volunteer work also takes her to the Stewart Detention Center

degree so that she can work as an immigration lawyer. She

for individuals detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs

has dedicated herself to volunteerism and empowering

Enforcement, where she visits detainees and helps them

disadvantaged people to advocate for themselves. Sarah has

communicate with their distant families. She volunteers for

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Freedom University, which provides college-level instruction

representative for the Truman Scholarship. “I am impressed that

to academically qualified students regardless of their

she is characteristically interested not only in direct action, but

immigration status.

also in the theory behind social change, in order to be more

Sarah has interned with the Workers Defense Project, a membership-based organization in Austin, TX that empowers

effective in the long run.” The Truman Scholarship Foundation was established by

low-income workers to advocate for fair employment. She has

Congress in 1975 as a federal memorial to the nation’s 33rd

also taught at the Summer Enrichment Experience Camp in

president. The activities of the foundation are supported by

Nebraska for gifted elementary and middle school students.

a special trust fund in the U.S. Treasury. The 2014 Truman

She is a member of the Sigma Delta Pi National Spanish Honor

Scholars assembled in Missouri for a leadership development

Society and Gamma Theta Upsilon International Geographic

program. Truman Scholars also receive priority admission

Honor Society, and she is a recipient of the UGA geography

and supplemental financial aid at some premier graduate

department’s Kenyon Memorial Award for academic excellence.

institutions, leadership training, career and graduate school

“Sarah is exceptionally bright, dedicated, and passionate about helping others,” said David S. Williams, UGA’s faculty

counseling, and special internship opportunities within the federal government.

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S C H O L A R S H I P S

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TWO MORE GOLDWATER SCHOLARS

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onors students Tuan Nguyen and Amy Webster have been named 2014 Barry M. Goldwater Scholars. The Goldwater Scholarship recognizes exceptional secondand third-year students in engineering,

mathematics, and the natural sciences and is the premier undergraduate award of its type in these fields. UGA students have received the Goldwater Scholarship virtually every year since the mid-1990s, and the 2014 recipients bring the university’s total of Goldwater Scholars to 46.

Tuan is a rising fourth-year student from Douglasville, GA who is majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology as well as mathematics. He plans to pursue a combined M.D./Ph.D. degree with the ultimate goal of improving cancer diagnostics and treatment. He has received several honors and scholarships at UGA, including the Bernard Ramsey Honors Scholarship, the CURO Honors Scholarship, and a CURO Summer Research Fellowship. Tuan volunteers as a tutor through the UGA Division of Academic Enhancement as well as MATHCOUNTS Outreach. This past summer, Tuan was one of three UGA Honors students who participated in New York University’s Summer Undergraduate Research Program, and in 2013 he participated in an NSF-funded summer undergraduate research program at UC-San Diego.

➤ FACT Honors Students have won 25 Goldwater Scholarships since 2004.

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Amy, who is majoring in genetics and mathematics, is a

them to be able to take full advantage of opportunities both

rising fourth-year student from Kennesaw, GA. She plans

on and beyond campus.”

to pursue a Ph.D. in genetics with the goal of studying the processes that regulate gene expression. Amy presented her research findings at the 2014 CURO Symposium, and she has participated in the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience at Emory University. Amy was also awarded a 2014 DAAD RISE scholarship to conduct research in Germany. She is active in the Genetics Student Organization and has been involved with University Chorus and Women’s Intramural Basketball. “I am so happy for both Amy and Tuan, who are most deserving of this recognition,” said David S. Williams, who serves as UGA’s faculty representative for the Goldwater Scholarship. “While each deserves credit on his or her own, their success speaks to the importance of being able to begin significant faculty-mentored undergraduate research through CURO from their first days on campus. This has led

“I am very pleased that UGA is adding two more Goldwater Scholars to the recent and impressive roster of our students who have been recognized for their success in the important fields of engineering, mathematics and the natural sciences. Such recognition is also a tribute to the faculty and staff in the Honors Program, whose work challenges and supports these very good students. I know that Tuan and Amy have bright futures ahead of them and I offer them my congratulations.” – UGA President Jere W. Morehead

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CA R N E G IE J UNIO R RE SEARCH F E L LOW

YULIYA BILA

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uliya Bila, an Honors student and Foundation Fellow who graduated in May, was awarded a 2014 Carnegie Junior Research Fellowship. Each year, the Carnegie

Endowment for International Peace offers approximately 10 to 12 one-year fellowships to graduating seniors and individuals who have graduated during the past academic year. The fellows are selected from a pool of nominees from nearly 400 participating colleges. Carnegie Junior Fellows work as research assistants to the endowment’s senior associates. Through her fellowship, Yuliya will conduct research for books, co-author journal articles, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony, and organize briefings attended by scholars, journalists, and government officials. Yuliya’s scholarly work as an undergraduate focused on relations with Russia, since she believes that “this area of foreign policy will define [her] generation.” At UGA, Yuliya majored in international affairs as well as Russian and Spanish. During her final semester, she interned with the State Department in Washington, DC through the UGA Washington Semester Program. She spent the preceding summer in Russia as a Critical Language Scholar. Her capstone Honors thesis, “The Implications of an Eastward Shift in Real Power in the European Union,” explored how European Union economic policy would change if Eastern Bloc countries were incorporated into the EU.

“Yuliya’s perfect academic record, immense intellectual potential, extraordinary language ability and demonstrated dedication to a career in global diplomacy make her a perfect match for the Carnegie Junior Fellowship,” said Brock Tessman, associate professor in the UGA School of Public and International Affairs.

Yuliya was born in Ukraine and raised in the Czech Republic before immigrating to the U.S. and becoming a citizen. She has said that growing up in countries so strongly affected by their relationship with Russia allows her to view regional issues from multiple perspectives. Her aim is to attain a doctorate in area studies with the ultimate goal of working at Carnegie Moscow to influence the foreign policy strategies of the U.S.–Russia relationship.

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ERASMUS MUNDUS AWARD FOR LINDSAY ULLRICH

in women’s and gender studies. She intends to examine the implementation of international standards for women’s rights in conflict situations. During her undergraduate experience, Lindsay twice studied in England through the UGA at Oxford program. In the summer of 2013, she worked

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at the Center for Language and onors student Lindsay Ullrich from Dacula, GA

Culture and volunteered at the Women’s Training Center in

graduated in May with a degree in religion. Shortly

Marrakech, Morocco. She also studied Islam and Arabic, as

following graduation, she was named an Erasmus

well as intercultural dialogue, through the UGA in Morocco

Mundus Scholar. Established by the European Commission, the Erasmus Mundus Programme offers

Program. Throughout her studies at UGA, Oxford, and

financial assistance to promote cooperation among

Marrakech, Lindsay developed an interest in war-torn

higher education institutions, to contribute to the

regions in which gender rights are affected both by

mutual enrichment of societies by developing student

extreme ideological beliefs that promote the unequal

skills, and to improve accessibility and enhance the

treatment of women and by conditions that leave women

profile of higher education in Europe.

vulnerable to violence. Her ultimate goal is a career with

Lindsay will study at the University of Hull and the

Central European University to pursue a master’s degree

UN Women, working with the Ending Violence against Women initiative in the Arab states and North Africa.

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S C H O L A R S H I P S

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NEW FULBRIGHT RECIPIENTS

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he Honors Program serves the entire UGA

Tiffany Brown, from Warner Robins, GA, graduated this

campus by coordinating the application process

summer with a major in Spanish. She wants to use her training

for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program for all

to be a teacher of Spanish and has the goal of establishing

UGA students, including both undergraduate and

a family literacy center in the community where she will

graduate students. This year, twelve UGA students

eventually live, to enable illiterate adults to learn to read.

in all were offered Fulbright grants, including seven

Tiffany will spend the bulk of her time as a Fulbright awardee

undergraduate Honors students. For a variety of

at the Universidad de Antioquia in Medellín, Colombia,

reasons, four of these students chose to turn down

teaching and tutoring English and hosting a program at the university’s English radio station. Following her Fulbright

the award: Nadine Najjar, Matt Tyler, Jacqueline

year, Tiffany will have several options to consider. “I hope to

Van De Velde, and Stenka Vulova. Of the eight UGA

stay and work in Colombia with a nonprofit organization or

students who did accept the Fulbright awards, three

continue teaching English throughout Latin America,” she

are Honors graduates: Tiffany Brown, Winn Davis,

says. “After a few years living and working abroad, I want to

and Christine Pardue.

return to the United States in pursuit of a master’s degree in either Romance languages or international education.”

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Winn Davis, from Savannah, GA, graduated in 2011 with a major in international affairs. As an undergraduate, he volunteered with UGA’s Office of International Student Life, assisting international students in adjusting to their new surroundings and sharing their culture with the local community. He also traveled widely, including Kazakhstan, the Republic of Georgia, Scotland, and Hungary. His experiences with study abroad reinforced his desire to pursue academic and research opportunities in other countries. With a focus on bilateral relations, Winn’s Fulbright year will find him in Croatia, working with the University of Zagreb’s Political Science faculty members as well as those in the Department of West Slavonic Languages and Literature. He will investigate the effects of Croatian diaspora policy on bilateral relations, a situation with increased significance at this time, thanks in no small part to Croatia’s accession to the European Union. With plans to seek a career in the U.S. Foreign Service after his Fulbright year, Winn says his time in Croatia will enable him “to move ever closer” to his professional goals.

Christine Pardue, from Cleveland, GA, graduated this May with a major in English and was a recipient of the Joshua Brown Award (given to the outstanding rising junior in UGA’s English Department). She considers herself a “cross-cultural educator,” and earned her stripes as an ESL conversation tutor, an English teacher at a Hungarian kindergarten, and as a mentor and tutor to under-served students not far from the UGA campus. During her Fulbright year in Gabrovo, Bulgaria, Christine will teach high school conversational English, with an emphasis on American literature, music, history, food, and social practices. Upon her return to the U.S., she intends to pursue a graduate degree in library science, English literature, or creative writing.

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NEW BOREN SCHOLARS

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our UGA undergraduate students have been awarded 2014 Boren Scholarships, which are funded by the National Security Education Program and offer up to $20,000 for language study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests. UGA is one of only a handful of institutions with as many as four Boren Scholars this year.

The Honors Program coordinates and oversees the process for all students who apply for the Boren Scholarship. The four 2014 UGA Boren Scholarship recipients include Kara Fambrough, a third-year student from Conyers who is majoring in international affairs and Arabic, and Rodrigo Tapia, a third-year student from Elijay who is majoring in chemistry and mathematics with a minor in Japanese, as well as two Honors students: third-year Andrew Jarnagin and second-year Blake Traeger.

Andrew Jarnagin Andrew, a third-year Honors student majoring in history and Arabic, will begin his sevenmonth Boren-funded program in the fall of 2014, studying Arabic and the Jordanian dialect at the Qasid Institute in Amman, Jordan. He also plans to take area studies courses in international relations, Islamic thought, and Islamic art. In the spring he will focus exclusively on Arabic language at Qasid. At the conclusion of his Jordan residency, Andrew will return to the U.S. to write his senior thesis on Middle Eastern history, which is where his knowledge of Arabic will be pivotal. Upon graduation, Andrew’s professional plans are centered on returning to the Middle East to fulfill the service requirements of his Boren Scholarship (either with the State Department Bureau of Intelligence and Research or the Bureau for Population, Refugees, and Migration) and then working toward a career in the Foreign Service.

Blake Traeger A second-year majoring in international affairs and Romance languages, Blake is a student in UGA’s Portuguese Flagship Program, the only Portuguese Flagship Program in the nation. Blake will use his Boren Scholarship to fund his capstone Flagship year, scheduled to begin in February 2015. During that year he will study Portuguese Literature and history at the Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and take classes in Portuguese and Brazilian history and culture. After a semester in classrooms, Blake will then transition into an internship with a yetto-be determined Brazilian company. While he doesn’t know yet his specific assignment, Blake says he looks forward to “learning professional vocabulary for international relations in a real-world environment.” After his studies in Brazil and UGA are done, Blake has career plans that include serving as a government specialist focused on Brazil/U.S. relationships.

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ANOTHER SCHOLARSHIP FOR SMITHA GANESHAN Smitha Ganeshan earned a bachelor’s degree in biology with a minor in anthropology this past May and now attends Harvard Medical School. As an Honors student and Foundation Fellow, Smitha received many awards and recognitions, highlighted by a Harry S. Truman Scholarship in 2013. Smitha’s studies at UGA focused on the intersection of health and policy. She directed the health policy and the environmental policy centers in the UGA chapter of the Roosevelt Institute, a national student-run think tank. Through Roosevelt, she drafted a federal Health Professional Shortage Area designation application on behalf of Athens-Clarke County that has enhanced the ability of safety net providers to compete for grants. She conducted undergraduate research in the field of public health and interned at the Greater New York Hospital Association as well as the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, DC. As an undergraduate, Smitha also had a global dimension. She studied at Oxford University through the UGA at Oxford program, interned at the World Health Organization’s Hospital for Diabetes in India, and assisted physicians in Peru and Nicaragua. Smitha was recognized shortly after graduation by being selected as one of only six students nationwide to receive a $15,000 Marcus L. Urann Fellowship from the Phi Kappa Phi honor society.

MATT TYLER AWARDED JAMES MADISON GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP Former Honors student and Foundation Fellow Matt Tyler, who graduated in May with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in political science, has been awarded a 2014 James Madison Graduate Fellowship. This fellowship, granted to only one person per state, is given to stellar students who desire to become outstanding teachers of the American constitution at the secondary school level. Matt is now using his James Madison Fellowship to pursue a master’s degree in social studies education at Columbia University in New York City. Matt’s passion for teaching was sparked during the summers of 2010 and 2011, when he worked as a counselor at an environmental education camp in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. He saw there that “students learn more through experiences than through memorizing names and dates in a book.” As a UGA student, Matt researched the impact of experiential learning on student outcomes, and he aims to put that research into practice as a social studies teacher in Georgia after he completes his graduate studies in New York. “Matt Tyler is one of those wonderful students who remind faculty members of why they wanted to become university teachers,” says Ronald Butchart, Distinguished Research Professor and head of the Department of Educational Theory and Practice in the College of Education. “Matt is unfailingly curious, strikingly insightful, insatiably challenging, and invariably modest about his own abilities.” Matt hopes the James Madison Fellowship will provide him with the same type of support that he has received from faculty, staff, and students at UGA.

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Q & A

Q&A WITH ASSOCIATE PROVOST AND DIRECTOR DAVID S. WILLIAMS This fall marks the tenth year that you have served as director of the Honors Program. What are the most significant changes in the program over the past decade?

offer a “one-stop shop” for every Honors student to have the programming at hand that he or she needs to develop and be successful. Our main goal is to help all of our students reach—and even exceed—their academic dreams, and to be

Building on the long-time

very competitive in their next steps, whether it be graduate or

leadership of Dr. Lothar Tresp,

professional school, or a career.

who was director of the Honors Program from the 1960s to

How would you define the role of the Honors Program at UGA?

the 1990s, a number of factors permitted the program to take off not just in the past ten years, but

I think that Honors students are vitally important to all aspects

really over the past fifteen years or

of the mission of the University of Georgia. They help to

so. Obviously, the introduction of

raise the level of discourse in classes, and they contribute

the HOPE Scholarship in the mid-

to the quality of the research being done and the services

1990s allowed us to keep more of

we provide. This leads in turn to enhanced levels of faculty

the state’s “best and brightest” at

engagement with these students, helping with faculty

home. Jere Morehead, who became director in 1999, moved the

recruitment and retention. The Honors Program administers

program forward in several ways. Under Professor Morehead,

the institution’s top academic scholarships, including the

who is of course now UGA’s President, the Honors Program

Foundation Fellowship, as well as the leading undergraduate

moved into its social and administrative home, Moore College,

research efforts, and it also serves as the institution’s clearing

and Myers Hall became an Honors magnet residence. Moreover,

house for nationally competitive awards and fellowships.

Professor Morehead launched important programming for

Simply put, Honors students enrich UGA locally, nationally,

study abroad, undergraduate research, and internships. For

and globally, and therefore it is important to us all that we

instance, under his leadership, the Honors in Washington, DC

have a very strong Honors Program.

program was founded. What we have done in the past ten years is to follow this trajectory to extend existing programming and

What are some of the most impressive accomplishments by Honors students in the past decade?

add new opportunities. What are some of the ways that the Honors Program has expanded?

I guess I would point first to our having two Rhodes Scholars in 2008—Kate Vyborny and Deep Shah. I think that was not

One new area is career development programming, such as the Roosevelt Institute for students who are interested in public

of signaled that UGA had “arrived” in some sense. Not only was UGA the only public institution in the country with two

policy, and the Corsair Society for students who are interested

Rhodes Scholars that year, but Kate and Deep were also the

in careers in financial services and management consulting.

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just important to each of them personally, but it also kind

In addition, we have greatly expanded the reach of CURO,

fifth and sixth Rhodes Scholars that UGA had had since 1996.

the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities, which

We have gone on to add two more—Tracy Yang and Elizabeth

now operates across campus, serving all undergraduates.

Allan. I think that their successes are emblematic of what

We have also added a lot of opportunities to contribute to

is going on in the Honors Program at large and are leading

the local community in civic engagement programs such as

indicators of widespread student success. So there are many

tutoring and mentoring through MATHCOUNTS Outreach

other student accomplishments that I could mention, such as

and the Thomas Lay After School Program. In short, we now

the 25 Goldwater Scholars, 11 Udall Scholars, and 8 Truman

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Scholars that we have had over the past ten years, as well as the many recipients of the Fulbright grant. In fact, because

applications to jump out of the pile at the next level.

of progress made over the past decade, UGA is now regularly

Where is the Honors Program heading now?

considered a Fulbright “Top Producer” institution.

I think our future mission is pretty simple and straightforward, and that is to make it possible for even more of our students

Certainly, the success that the Honors Program has had with major scholarships in recent years is very impressive. Is there another area that you would highlight? Really, I could mention so many student stories of individual accomplishment, but I guess I would highlight undergraduate research. I think it is remarkable that UGA is able to provide through CURO an almost unmatched opportunity to participate in faculty-mentored research for up to a full four years. There are only a handful of institutions in the country

to participate in the opportunities that the Honors Program provides. For instance, when I first became director in 2004, we were able to support about 20 to 25 students with stipends each summer for study abroad. Because of the generosity of several donors during the last ten years, we supported more than 60 students to study abroad this past summer. But there are many more who could experience study abroad—or undergraduate research, or an internship, or civic engagement, and so on—if we were able to provide the financial support they need. So I think that continuing to raise funds for student

that can say that. And these opportunities—these research

support, whether through our Annual Fund or our new Parent

experiences—are producing students who become authors

Society or through dedicated endowments, will let us “spread

and co-authors of journal articles and who are able to present

the wealth” and permit even more students to have incredible

their research at national conferences, which allows their

and life-changing experiences through the Honors Program.

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H O N O R S

SAM KINSMAN

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onors student Sam Kinsman recently returned to campus

an internship program. While he spent the first half of his time

after a 10-month sojourn to Brazil, a work-study trip made

in Brazil studying at UNESP, Sam searched for an internship

possible by the Honors International Scholars Program

that would fulfill his plans to work in finance and to work for a

(HISP) and the Portuguese Flagship Program at UGA, which in

company where he’d have to speak Portuguese. Initially, he had

early 2012 became the nation’s first Undergraduate Flagship

difficulty finding traction, but as is often the case in situations

Program in the language. The program, developed in response

like these, he got help from UGA alumni finding what he was

to the need for more speakers of Portuguese as Brazil’s economy

looking for. “I went to another country on another continent to look

quickly develops, is a partnership between the National Security Education Program, UGA, and Universidade Estadual Paulista

for a job in finance and had no idea where to start looking,” he

Júlio de Mesquita Filh (UNESP), one of the top universities in the

says. “But I reached out to a lot of UGA alumni in the U.S. before I

Brazilian state of São Paulo.

left who connected me with their contacts in the offices of their companies located in Brazil, which landed me several interviews.”

“It was such an impactful year,” Sam, a Minnesota native

who grew up in Woodstock, GA, says. “Brazilians are welcoming

Sam ultimately selected an internship offered by the London-

people. It was easy to make friends who wanted to share their

based professional services firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers

culture and language with me and who helped me when I

to work for four months, which dovetailed nicely with his

needed it. The people I met made all the difference. ”

professional goal of working in international corporate finance. He worked on several merger and acquisition transactions

A finance and international business major (who is

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minoring in Spanish and Portuguese), Sam did not hesitate to

for PricewaterhouseCoopers, starting by helping a Japanese

leap into the unknown as he joined the Flagship Program at

company sell its Port assets in Southern Brazil to a multinational

its onset and traveled to Brazil without a commitment from

commodity trading firm. “The best part of the project was to

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see the M&A process from start to finish, from learning about the company and visiting the port, to meeting with the clients and buyers, and closing the deal three months later.” During his internship, he also helped prepare a Road Show for investors in Singapore, build presentations for the privatization of Rio de Janeiro’s International Airport, and his most memorable project, advise the Sovereign Wealth Fund of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates on its investment in Brazilian business titan Eike Batista’s “super port” being built to ship iron ore to China. “I could not have had a better experience with my team. I had a lot of responsibility on that project, and I was in the right place at the right time,” he says. “The project required me to build a valuation model, so I learned what goes into valuing a mining company. Nearly all of my work with PricewaterhouseCoopers was conducted in Portuguese. But in this instance, the Sovereign Wealth Fund representatives spoke English, so it made sense for me to communicate directly with the client. It was something I never expected to happen, but when it did, I jumped right on it.” Sam, who expects to graduate in December 2014, has thus far had an intriguing undergraduate career – in addition to his 10 months in Brazil, he’s studied Spanish in Spain, the art of negotiation at the London School of Economics, worked as an intern in the New York State Court System, the debt ratings agency Moody’s, and in the investment banking division of Goldman Sachs. With an eye on returning to work in the prolific Brazilian business community, Sam says his participation in UGA’s Honors Program has proven to be most beneficial. “I have had a fantastic experience with Honors over the last three-anda-half years,” says Sam, who writes for the student-run Georgia Political Review, leads hiking trips for UGA’s Outdoor Recreation Program, and is a member of the Corsair Society, sponsored by the Honors Program. “Taking advantage of Honors-sponsored programming like book discussions, Lunchbox Lectures, and Alumni Connections, helped to refine my interests. The highlight of my time at UGA has been the strong friendships I’ve formed on campus with a group of people I’d do anything to help. Following that are the international adventures I’ve had and friends I’ve made around the world, made possible by the HISP and other scholarships I’ve been awarded at UGA.”

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H O N O R S

JOY PELTIER, AT YOUR SERVICE

J

oy Peltier, a second-year student from

area, encouraging healthcare providers to volunteer

Douglasville, GA, majoring in cognitive science

their skills. She also worked as a patient advocate at

and Romance languages, received the Honors

the clinic itself, helping English and Spanish-speaking

Program Ash Service Award. She used her stipend

clients get the medicines they needed. In addition,

this past summer interning for LifeTools Community

she called pharmaceutical manufacturers, contacted

Development Corporation, Inc., a nonprofit

applicants for additional patient advocate positions,

organization based in her hometown. In August

and performed a myriad of administrative support

2013, LifeTools opened the CarePlace, the only free

tasks. Oddly enough, it was being turned away from

healthcare center in Douglas County, GA. The clinic,

the very first practice she visited that gained the clinic

which is open on Saturday mornings, accepts patients

a new cadre of medical volunteers from a major health

by appointment in order to manage the influx of

maintenance organization. These doctors began

uninsured and underinsured Douglasville citizens

serving this August. Joy has decided to continue volunteering at the

seeking assistance. To serve the community more effectively, the clinic needed to expand its volunteer

CarePlace for the reasons she stated so well: “My time

medical staff, a job assigned to Joy.

at the CarePlace has confirmed my conviction that my career must have a major service component,

This summer, she visited medical practices and

possibly one that is related to the medical field.

hospital administrators throughout the Douglasville

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This experience taught me a great deal about dynamic teamwork, healthcare, and the running of nonprofits. However, the most profound insight I gained was that it takes an open heart, determination, and a willingness to remain undaunted in the face of the word ‘no’ in order to be truly dedicated to bringing hope to others. The one ‘yes’ that can make all the difference may be just around the corner if you persevere.” This August, Joy started the new academic year as a UGA Resident Assistant at Myers Hall.

The Ash Service Award was established by Kathryn L. Ash (’82) and Darren W. Ash (’81, ’82), to cultivate and support a culture of locally focused community service within the UGA Honors Program. Every summer, a $3,000 stipend is awarded to two Honors students who intern full-time in the summer on behalf of a service organization in Georgia, supporting programming that improves local communities.

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H O N O R S

READY, SET, and GO

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hen Honors student Tyler Daugherty graduated one year ago from the Savannah Arts Academy, he was ready to take on Athens and UGA. After registering for classes, Tyler

immediately signed up as a tutor for the Honors-sponsored Thomas Lay After School Program, became a member of the Roosevelt Institute, and joined MEDLIFE at UGA. He also was selected as a new member of the Honors Program Student Council

(HPSC), of which he is treasurer, and with other members of HPSC served as a volunteer for the Georgia Food Bank and the Athens Homeless Shelter. With a declared physics major with pre-med intention, Tyler started doing research with Dr. Tho Nguyen in the physics department but felt he still needed to find a place for his creative energy. Adding both a theatre and Italian minor, he auditioned for, and ultimately got, the role of Hanschen in the UGA Theatre production of Spring Awakening. “Spring Awakening and Hanschen forced me to mature, helping me find in myself a deeper passion for theatre and a greater acceptance for society as a whole,” he said after the show was over. “It is this experience that helped me to realize what I think to be the most beautiful thing about the theatrical arts: in this realm, we are each forced to explore aspects of ourselves, as performers and audience members, which we may fear or hide from, and that helps us to grow and mature as individuals and as a society.” After volunteering for a week during winter break with MEDLIFE Mobile Clinic in Esmeraldas, Ecuador, where he and 35 other students provided basic healthcare to residents with limited access, Tyler returned to UGA ready for more. He continued his physics research with Dr. Nguyen, whose group focuses on Spintronics in π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Tyler spent much of the summer in Huntsville, AL at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center through an NSF-funded Heliophysics Research Experience for Undergraduates. He shows no signs of slowing down on this track to build a future career at the intersection of science and art.

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ANOTHER POSTER ON THE HILL

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ach April, the national Council on Undergraduate Research hosts Posters on the Hill in Washington, DC. Approximately 75 students from all over the country are selected on a competitive basis, out of a pool of approximately 700 applicants, to present their research posters to invited guests such as senators, representatives, congressional staff members, federal agency program officers, and the science press corps. Students have an opportunity to meet with their state representatives, attend field trips, and hear from speakers who are innovators and supporters of undergraduate research. This year, Lydia “Meg” Babcock-Adams joined the roster of recent UGA Honors students who have been selected for this prestigious program and honor. Meg will graduate in 2016 with a degree in chemistry as well as an interdisciplinary studies program in marine sciences. She

has taken multiple CURO research courses and has been working in marine science labs for two years. She was a 2013 CURO Summer Research Fellow, and the funding this provided allowed her to participate in a three-week oceanographic journey in the North Pacific. Meg presented her results from this expedition at the 2014 CURO Symposium. Her oral presentation was entitled, “Chemistry at Sea: An Expedition to the North Pacific to Analyze Deep Ocean Refractory Carbon.” For the Posters on the Hill program, Meg presented on the topic, “Methods of Evaluating the Role of UV Radiation on the Global Marine Organic Carbon Cycle.” As part of the program, she met with members of the Georgia congressional delegation and had the opportunity to tell her personal story of how undergraduate research has significantly impacted her college career.

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C U R O

CURO Symposium by the Numbers Beginning in 2010, the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO), which is administered by the Honors Program, made participation available to all UGA undergraduates, regardless of Honors standing or GPA. As a result of a variety of outreach efforts by Honors staff members, over the past several years the number of nonHonors students participating in the annual CURO Symposium has increased, as follows: 2012: 185 total student presenters, with 30% non-Honors participants 2013: 202 total student presenters, with 41% non-Honors participants 2014: 258 total student presenters, with 43% non-Honors participants

The 2014 CURO Symposium was the 15th hosted by the Honors Program: 119 poster presentations 142 oral presentations 21 high school students attended as Promising Scholars

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NCUR Congratulations to UGA undergraduates Austin Garner, Melissa Jennings, Cecilia Moore, and Holly Boggs for being invited to present their undergraduate research at the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR), on April 3-5, 2014 at the University of Kentucky. Their research abstracts were chosen from more than 4,000 submissions. Austin’s research abstract is entitled “The Genetics of Hybrid Lethality Between Two Species of Mimulus,” Melissa’s is entitled “Biosynthesis of Base J by JBP1 and JBP2” and Cecilia and Holly’s is entitled “Analysis of Media Coverage of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.”

(l-r) Holly Boggs, Austin Garner, Cecilia Moore, and Melissa Jennings

Save the Date 2015 CURO Symposium March 30 and 31, 2015 Classic Center Athens, GA

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C U R O

ECOLOGY RESEARCH

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he University of Georgia’s Odum School of Ecology is the first stand-alone school of ecology in the world. With faculty expertise ranging from global

change effects on ecosystems to the ecology of infectious diseases, species loss and invasions, and marine and freshwater conservation, it is not surprising that Honors students are very engaged with ecological studies at UGA. Lara Mengak and Scott Saunders are representative of this trend. Lara, from Watkinsville, GA, is a 2014 graduate

who majored in ecology. Her undergraduate research was part of a project that examined coastal vertebrate response to sea level rise on the Georgia coast. In specific, she studied patterns in habitat usage by American alligators and how these patterns change with a rise in sea level. Lara conducted spotlight and kayak surveys to determine where alligators were located and then, using ArcGIS mapping software, described the relationship between marsh composition and alligator occurrence. This work was facilitated during the summer of 2013 through the CURO Summer Research Fellowship. Illustrating the difference that this scholarship can make, Lara relates that:

Dr. Vanessa Ezenwa (r) with Honors students (l-r) Tori Lavelle, Carmen Kraus, Lara Mengak, and Scott Saunders at the pond at the Odum School of Ecology

“Before that summer, I had never worked with birds, fish, or reptiles. It was quite a learning experience!” Lara presented the results of her work at the CURO Symposium in both 2013 and 2014. Scott is also a recent graduate with a major in ecology. During the fall of 2012, he began formal academic research studying disease ecology using computational methods, starting with a project on Lyme disease. He worked with a model to predict what type of Lyme disease might be expected in the future under climate change scenarios. For his capstone Honors thesis last spring, Scott developed a model to explain tick life cycles in the hope of explaining the distribution of Lyme disease across the United States and beyond. Scott presented his work at the 2014 CURO Symposium. He is now attending Caltech in a Ph.D. program in biology.

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Why I Enjoy Doing Research “This past spring semester under the direction of Dr. Vanessa Ezenwa, I pursued a CURO research project in order to delve into the world of anthelmintic resistance. Although parasitic worms might not seem like the most savory of subjects to research, the ability of helminths to survive drug treatment at the recommended dosage rate is a critical hazard in the management of infectious diseases. I was particularly interested in the fact that the livestock farms of South Africa now carry the highest levels of anthelmintic resistance, and newly emerging strains may soon be uncontrollable by existing anthelmintics. Concentrating on the single helminths species Cooperia fuelleborni, I examined the frequency of anthelmintic resistance in a wild population of African buffalo in South Africa in order to better understand the consequences of interactions between wild and captive game populations as well as the role of national park managers in attempting to control infectious disease outbreaks. Much of my semester was spent developing an assay for detecting resistance in the focal helminths species. Under the guidance of Dr. Adrian Wolstenholme of the Department of Infectious Diseases, the amino acid results suggest that the general primer sequence produced can be used to assign a Benzimidazole (an anthelmintic) sensitivity phenotype. A recent study, which proposed that wild ungulates could potentially act as anthelmintic-resistant reservoirs, gives cause for further study in order to assess whether helminth crosstransmission between livestock and wildlife occurs and contributes in any way to the development of resistance on livestock farms. Dr. Ezenwa’s invaluable role as my mentor went far beyond the usual job description—in addition to teaching me more about intestinal parasites than I ever thought possible, I gained an advisor who never failed to make me laugh and a desire to learn even more. She encouraged me to pursue my internship this past summer at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, and I greatly look forward to working with her again in the semesters to come.” – Tori Lavelle ’16, Honors student and Foundation Fellow from Macon, GA majoring in ecology.

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C U R O

CURO SUMMER RESEARCH FELLOWS

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his past summer, thirty UGA students performed undergraduate research in a wide array of disciplines with a number of top faculty members through the CURO Summer Research Fellowship. All CURO Summer Research Fellows receive a $3,000 stipend from the Honors Program to support their research projects. Following is a sampling of what Honors students have

been researching through this scholarship program.

Kaitlyn Beck: “Proposal for Research on the Old English Poem ‘Elene’ by Cynewulf, with a Focus on the Figure and Propaganda of Constantine the Great.” Kaitlyn is studying Elene by Cynewulf, a poem about Helena, the mother of ancient Emperor Constantine the Great. Her goal is to find out how the propaganda of Constantine affected later portrayals of the Emperor, and how successful that propaganda was. She is using an historical perspective to examine previous research that notes similarities in Constantine’s iconography in historical texts.

Brett Bennett: “The Forgotten Radical: Southern Women and the New Left Student Protests of the 1960s.” Brett is focusing on the struggles of the lesser-known Southern New Left groups in the 1960s and 1970s and researching why these “radical” student organizations felt the need to separate

Andrew Jarnigan: “The Sublimated Essence of America and the History of Coca-Cola in the Middle East.”

men and women. Comparing Southern student protests to

Andrew is researching the political role Coca-Cola plays in

Northern ones, she is exploring the radical Southern woman

the Middle East, given the fact that over the past 50 years

and how being a woman affected one’s ability to be a radical.

the company has become commonly known globally as a

By examining old issues of the Red & Black newspaper and

symbol for Americanization. Andrew is examining the history

archives at the Russell Special Collections Library, Brett’s work

of Coca-Cola as a political entity in the Middle East, while also

focuses heavily on the UGA campus and radical organizations.

building on the work of other economic historians. Andrew hopes that his research will provide information that counters the standard conceptions of globalization as a symbol of imperialism.

➤ FACT This summer thirty students received stipends for a CURO Summer Fellowship

Twenty students were Honors students Ten were non-Honors students They worked with 29 UGA professors (from 16 departments)

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Thomas Johnston: “Factors Influencing the Development of Extractive Foraging Skills in Juvenile Bearded Capuchins.” Thomas’s research focuses on the act of foraging and resource exploitation in primates, specifically juvenile bearded capuchins. He is interested in how developing, juvenile capuchins learn the skills of how to feed themselves at a young age (before they are able to crack palm nuts with stone hammers), whether it be by social learning of experience or by observing adults. Thomas has studied capuchins in Brazil, recording their foraging actions and documenting how the monkeys’ ages, body sizes, and food extracting effectiveness and techniques reflect their social learning.

Megha Kalia: “Mechanism of Development Regulation of Base J Synthesis in ‘Trypanosoma brucei.’” Megha researches

Dr. Dorothy Fragaszy showing Thomas Johnston examples of palm nuts opened by capuchin monkeys

Jason Moraczewski: “Assessment of Poroeomic and Glycomic Profiling of Medaka ‘Oeyzias latipes’ to Further the Understanding of the Physiological Response to Low-level Ionizing Radiation.

parasitic African

Jason is studying the effects of low-level ionizing radiation (IR) on the

Trypanosoma brucei, a

metabolic adaptations within the evolutionary changes of a species. Any

specific trypanosome

doses of radiation can result in alterations and changes in morphology,

that has adapted to

protein expression, and cellular and system level functional activity. He

avoid being detected

is interested in working with the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

by its host immune

and the medaka fish to analyze the effects of low-level IR on aquatic

system. Base J is one

organisms. By examining the effects of exposure to chronic, low-level

component that

IR on these fish, he hopes to produce a significant explanation of past

helps the organism

evolutionary and future evolutionary biological events.

change its outer coating, which ultimately allows the trypanosome to escape being attacked by the host because it becomes unrecognizable. Megha is interested in the biosynthesis of base J found in the mid-gut of mammals, when it is in a different stage from the original formation in the bloodstream. By testing and blocking the functions of base J in the mid-gut, Megha wants to answer questions relating to what makes base J so important in gene repression, and whether or not there are any similarly functioning molecules.

Dr. Carl Bergmann (r) with Jason Moraczewski

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F O U N D A T I O N

F E L L O W S H I P

FROM JAMAICA TO GEORGIA

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onors student Camir Ricketts was born and raised in Montego Bay in Jamaica. While studying at the Herbert Morrison Technical High School, he

also attended the Caribbean Institute of Technology, pursuing a degree in information technology. After receiving several academic accolades, Camir was accepted at the University of Georgia, where he is now a senior majoring in microbiology. He has been active both at UGA and in the Honors Program and last spring was awarded the mid-term Foundation Fellowship. Through the Fellowship, he has studied abroad in Argentina and Uruguay and also had the opportunity to spend this past spring semester at Oxford University in England. “Being in Oxford for a whole semester was one of the best experiences of my undergraduate career,” Camir says. “It was multi-dimensional. I was excited to take science courses at Oxford, but before I started those I had four weeks of Modernist Literature and Tudor and Stuart History, two subjects that I consider very far from my forte. The classes were very engaging, though, and my tutors were leaders in their field.” Taking genetics and microbiology at Oxford was especially rewarding to Camir: “My courses allowed me the freedom to choose topics that interest me and were relevant to the kind of problems I see myself tackling in the future.” Of course, many of Camir’s most memorable moments in Oxford were spent outside the classroom. Being a part of Keble College through UGA’s Oxford Program allowed him to partake in an authentic student experience and interact with full-time Oxford students. According to Camir, “I genuinely enjoyed punting down the river on a sunny day, grabbing afternoon tea, and hanging out in the city centre. I even got a chance to play with the Keble College cricket team. It was an unforgettable experience, and even though I’m happy to be back in Athens, I miss it every day.”

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Camir readily credits the Honors Program for his experiences and successes: “The Honors Program has been so much more than I expected. I was initially drawn to the smaller class sizes, but it has also allowed me to meet outstanding faculty members and the high caliber students whom I now call my peers.” He goes on to add that “it has opened many doors for me because of the Honors staff members who are willing to do anything in their power to ensure that I have the tools necessary to pursue my interests.”

At UGA, Camir conducts undergraduate research at the Poultry Diagnostic Research Center with Drs. John Maurer and Naola Ferguson-Noel, with whom he is working on locating genes that allow strains of the Mycoplasma Gallisepticum organism to be virulent. This pathogen is economically significant, since it causes upper respiratory tract infections and systemic reactions in chickens, which commonly lead to death. Camir is using bioinformatics tools to evaluate research data with hopes of using the knowledge gained to develop an effective vaccine. During the fall of 2013, he presented his research results at the meeting of the Southeastern branch of the American Society for Microbiology. This fall, he will present his research at the American Veterinary

Camir with Dr. John Maurer in the Poultry Diagnostics Research Center

Medical Association Convention.

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F O U N D A T I O N

F E L L O W S H I P

FIRST-YEAR FOUNDATION FELLOWS TRAVEL New York City / Washington, DC

to sitting in the garden at the UGA Center with a book, there’s nothing better.” – Jonah Driggers

“The whole week was a fantastic experience for all of us. We went from talking with analysts on the trading floor of Goldman

“Engaging in stimulating seminar and tutorial discussions

Sachs to learning about biomedical research from the associate

challenged me to think critically and question why I hold the

dean of NYU’s Sackler Institute. We heard a firsthand account of

beliefs and values that I do. Outside of class, taking in the unique

dealing with Hurricane Sandy from a UGA alumna who serves as

sights and sounds of Oxford–like punting on the Cherwell River

general counsel for the Greater New York Hospital Association

and attending Open Mic Night at the Catweazle Club–made for

and helps to coordinate emergency response in the city, and one

some truly memorable experiences. However, the greatest part of

short plane ride later we were talking politics with lobbyists and

the Maymester we spent at Oxford was having the opportunity to

senators over breakfast in Washington, DC. That Supreme Court

make all of these memories with some of my closest friends and

Justice Clarence Thomas–and everyone else we met with that

creating lifetime bonds in the process.” – Hammad Khalid

week–was so willing to share knowledge and experiences with us really put into perspective how fortunate we are to have such

“After a week of wonderful travel through Portugal, France, and

opportunities.” – Bruce Li

Italy, I headed to Switzerland as a research intern at Hocoma AG, a neurorehabilitation robotics company based in Zurich. I had

“I really enjoyed each city revealing itself, from the famed

the opportunity to visit hospitals throughout Switzerland and

attractions such as Broadway, the Met, the Lincoln Memorial, and

Germany, speak with leaders in the neuro-rehabilitation field, and

the Smithsonian to subtle nuances like $2 dumpling boxes in

pursue my own research project.” – Cali Callaway

Chinatown and little hidden DC restaurants at night.” – Gabrielle Pierre

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“I spent a week exploring Paris and then went to Tours for an

Oxford University and Europe

internship with the Archdiocese of Tours. After returning to North

“Oxford was a fantastic experience. It is incredible to be

Sainte-Anne in Church Point, Nova Scotia. Sainte-Anne exceeded

surrounded by the history and culture of learning that is so

all of my expectations. It’s a beautiful little campus in a town of

apparent in this city. From studying in the Bodleian Library (and

a few hundred people, with a very simple and inspiring lifestyle

sitting next to a professor telling you about the book he’s working

and culture. The French language class that I took was incredibly

on), to working with the brilliant tutors that teach your classes,

challenging and rewarding!” – Tristan Bagala

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M O C K

T R I A L

UGA MOCK TRIAL

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f you ask dedicated mock trial students what mock trial is, they might tell you the following: Mock trial is a high-energy, fastpaced blend of theatre, debate, and just a touch of science.

It is objections and responses, rules of evidence and rules of procedure–a battle of wits to the very end. The trials may not be real, but the experience is very, very real. Founded by students in 2004, UGA Mock Trial is now the largest

student-run undergraduate mock trial program in the United States. Its 55 members are responsible for the success of the program–it is one of the few student-run and student-coached programs in the country. While many of the members plan to go to law school, there are also members majoring in science, economics, journalism, and mathematics, many of whom do not plan on pursuing law. This diversity is one of the program’s greatest strengths. The Honors Program proudly sponsors UGA Mock Trial, including supporting team members for all travel to competitions. During the 2013 – 2014 academic year, the team participated in 21 tournaments. At the opening rounds of the Championship Series in Greenville, NC, the team won second place and a bid to the National Championship Tournament. The A-team tied with Georgetown University for the Spirit of AMTA award, which the American Mock Trial Association grants to “the team that best exemplifies the ideals of honesty, civility, and fair play,” based on a vote of their peers. The team earned 28 points out of a possible 30, and third-year Honors student Ayman Tartir won All-National witness honors. At the National Championship in Orlando, FL, the A-team competed against the top teams in the nation. While the team did not place, Honors student Mindy Johnson earned 26 ranks on the defense, the fourth highest ranking in her division. She is the second All-American attorney in the program’s history, and the first to earn the honor on the defense.

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A L U M N I

WHY I GIVE “My UGA Honors Program experience fueled my intellectual curiosity and inspired an insatiable love for learning that continues to this day. I was given the keys to possibility limited only by my imagination and the depths of persistence. Who wouldn’t want to give others that same gift?” Rebecca Winkler (‘98) established the Becky Winkler Honors Program Student Support Fund in 2012 to help further the academic experience of Honors students.

2013-2014 Honors Scholars TAs Honors students Babajide (BJ) Oluwadare and Colby Ruiz were chosen as CURO Honors Scholars Teaching Assistants for the 20132014 academic year and received stipends that were supported by the generous gifts of Ms. Becky Winkler. Community is an important aspect of the CURO Honors Scholarship, and to that end the CURO teaching assistants play an important role as leaders and mentors. CURO teaching assistants help lead discussion and activities in the CURO research seminar, make significant contributions to the recruitment of new CURO scholars, and act as representatives of the program for students across campus.

BJ Oluwadare

BJ is a fourth-year from Stone Mountain, GA majoring in microbiology, and Colby is a fourth-year from Valdosta, GA majoring in biological sciences. BJ studies protein structures on Mycoplasma pneumonia with Dr. Duncan Krause of the Department of Microbiology, and Colby investigates the processing pathway for CAAX proteins with Dr. Walter Schmidt of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Both are accomplished researchers and leaders of the CURO Scholar community.

Colby Ruiz

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Great Ways You Can Help Support Honors Program Students 1.

Give generously to the Honors Program Annual Fund. Scan this QR code or go to honors.uga.edu and click on “Donate Now.�

2.

Consider becoming a member of the Honors Program Parent Society if you are a parent of an Honors student.

3. Consider an endowment to support Honors students in perpetuity for undergraduate research, travelstudy abroad, or our internship program. 3. Consider including the Honors Program in your will or estate planning.

5. Alumni Connections are another way our alumni can give back to the program. If you are interested in giving current Honors Program students a glimpse inside your field of work, come and make a presentation. 6.

You can host fellow Honors Program alumni or an event for high school students who are eager to hear more about what the Honors Program can offer them.

7.

Participate in Super Friday. This yearly event is a chance for our alumni to share their post-graduation experiences with our current Honors students. We have tremendously successful alumni, and we would love to share your experience and knowledge with students who are eager to make their own impression on the world.

4. Become a mentor for Honors Students. The Honors Program Alumni and Friends Mentoring Network was created with you in mind. Go to honors.uga.edu/ alumni-mentors and create your profile (make sure you keep it updated over time). Honors students in good standing can search this database for mentors.

For questions regarding any of these options, contact the Honors Development Office Dorothe Otemann 706.583.0698 dotemann@uga.edu

or

Kate Belgum 706.542.2649 kateb1@uga.edu

Join the Honors Program

Alumni & Friends Mentor Network and Help Honors Program Students Plan for the Future!

honors.uga.edu/alumni-mentors 706-542-2649

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You’re Invited!

Honors Program Football Tailgate Party…

The Honors Magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Georgia Honors Program

PUBLISHER

You are cordially invited to attend the Honors Tailgate on Saturday, September 20, 2014 on the Gowen Courtyard of Moore College (Herty Field side), starting at 9:30 a.m.

UGA Honors Program 002 Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, GA 30602 David S. Williams, Associate Provost and Director EDITOR

Dorothé Otemann PHONE

706.542.3240 FA X

706.582.6993

We hope t o see you t here!

EMAIL

dotemann@uga.edu WEBSITE

honors.uga.edu DESIGN

Sam Pittard University Printing PRINTED BY

University Printing PHOTOGRAPHY

Wingate Downs Cassie Wright

Copyright © 2014 by the University of Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way without permission from the editor.

The University of Georgia is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.


HONORS PROGRAM

The University of Georgia Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, GA 30602 www.honors.uga.edu

Nonprofit Org. U. S. Postage

PAID

Athens, GA Permit No. 165

The marks contained in this publication are registered ÂŽ marks of the University of Georgia and may not be used without written authorization from the University of Georgia.

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UGA Honors Magazine, fall 2014  

Magazine of the University of Georgia Honors Program, fall 2014

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