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THE ENDOWED FELLOWSHIPS

Philip Alston Fellows

Laura Agatha Courchesne ’17

Samuel Jackson Tingle ’18

Catherine Mahala Callaway ’17

Trisha Dalapati ’19

La’Ron-Chenee H. Tracey ’16

John Bradley Stroud ’16

Tarun Daniel ’19

Abigail Elizabeth West ’19

Lauren Wesley Dennison ’16

Matthias Stephen Wilder ’18

Jonah Stephen Driggers ’17

Elizabeth Francina Wilkes ’18

Alexandra Rae Edquist ’16

Ashley Henehan Willard ’19

Seth Isaac Euster ’16

Kathleen Elizabeth Wilson ’16

Steven W. Feng ’19

Victoria Ayse Yonter ’18

Kalvis Erik Golde ’18

Lilian Lin Zhu ’18

Eugene Black Fellows Justin Samuel Payan ’17 Stephanie Alexandra Stewart ’19 Carlyle Fraser Fellows Laurel Hiatt ’19 Bruce Li ’17 Eytan Aaron Palte ’16

Shuchi Goyal ’17 John Miles Hall ’18 Mallory Jessica Harris ’18

Vera Milner Fellows

Caleb Alexander Ingram ’16

Torre Elisabeth Lavelle ’16

Nirav Ilango ’19

Divine Chukwumelie Ogbuefi ’19

Rachel Ann Kelley ’18 Jacob Randall Kennedy ’16

William Morris Fellow

Zoe Yan Li ’19

Jessica Kate Pasquarello ’19

Kelsey Jane Lowrey ’16

Winship Nunnally Fellows Nathan Andrew Farr ’17 Joshua Edward Kenway ’18 Martha Nunnally Fellow Caroline Grace Coleman ’16

Mallika Madhusudan ’18 Samia Montese McEachin ’18 Reilly Ayres Megee ’18 Caroline Elizabeth Moore ’16 Vijeth Mudalegundi ’17 Trang Xuan Nguyen ’17 Morrison Robert Nolan ’17

Charlotte & Claude Williams Fellow

Gabrielle Antoinette Pierre ’17

Carver Lowell Harris Goodhue ’17

John Michael Rawlings ’19

Penelope W. and E. Roe Stamps IV Foundation Fellows Lorin Janae Crear ’18 Thomas Andrew Desoutter ’18 Madison Caroline Dill ’18 Guy Darrell Eroh ’19 Lee Handly Folk ’16 Kirstie Dolores Hostetter ’16 Glenn Anderson Jacoby ’17 Susan Margaret Jones ’17 Hammad Ahmed Khalid ’17 Shaun Henry Kleber ’16 Christina Corrine Lee ’19 Christopher Thomas Lewitzke ’16 Krystal Lo ’17 Katherine Ann Lovejoy ’16

Giovanni Righi ’16

Sandip Minhas ’16

John White Ramsey Fellow

Leighton Michele Rowell ’16

Meredith Marie Flood Paker ’16

Bert Ferguson Thompson ’16

Ruth Anne Schade ’19

Kavi Pandian ’19

Caroline Laura Shearer ’19

Rand Warren Pope ’16

Bernard Ramsey Endowed Fellows

Mollie Rose Simon ’18

Ashley Elizabeth Reed ’19

Jonathan Paul Adelman ’17

Madison Grace Snelling ’16

Hannah Mary Reiss ’16

Swapnil Agrawal ’19

Minhyuk Michael Song ’16

Sierra K. Runnels ’18

Ashley Uchenna Amukamara ’19

Karishma Sriram ’16

Elijah Hunter Scott ’17

Kerri Ellen Andre ’18

Kevin Hongyi Sun ’16

Aditya Sood ’19

Tristan Paul Bagala ’17

Jason Patrick Terry ’17

Treva Chung-Kwan Tam ’16

Michael Logan Campbell ’18

Luke Tellis Thompson ’17

Samuel Jackson Tingle ’18


e p o r t

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FOUNDATION FELLOWS TRUSTEE COMMITTEE MEMBERS

n n u a l

Kathryn L. Ash, Chair Charlotte, NC David Battle New York, NY

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Victor E. Corrigan Atlanta, GA

c h o l a r s

Richard W. Courts IV Atlanta, GA Stephen M. Joiner Atlanta, GA

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Stanley W. Shelton Wayland, MA

o n o r s

Susan Sherman St. Louis, MO Stephen W. Smith Atlanta, GA

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John P. Spalding Atlanta, GA

a m s e y

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Pamela S. Whitten, Ex-Officio, Non-Voting Athens, GA

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Brenda A. Thompson Greenwich, CT

Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Foundation Fellowship . . . . . . .

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National Recognition . . . . . . . . .

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Faculty Mentors . . . . . . . . . . .

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Academic Enrichment

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Travel-Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 48

Conferences, Presentations, Publications . . 52 Internships . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Civic Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Lisa Ann Coole Award . . . . . . . . . 64

e l l o w s

Fine Arts Engagement . . . . . . . . . 107 Internships . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

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Jessica B. Hunt Major Scholarships Coordinator

Ramsey Honors Scholarship . . . . . . 100

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David S. Williams Director

o u n d a t i o n

Fellows Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

PROGRAM STAFF

Elizabeth M. Sassler Graduate Assistant

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Undergraduate Research . . . . . . . .

Mary Lou Swift Columbus, GA

Emily L. Myers Program Administrator

C O N T E N T S

Foundation Fellows Alumni . . . . . . . 91 Telling the Story . . . . . . . . . . . 104

Faculty Mentors . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Research & Travel-Study . . . . . . . . 112 Pre-Medical Preparation . . . . . . . . 116 Ramsey Classes . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Ramsey Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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The University of Georgia provides a world class education built upon a firm commitment to student learning and success. One of the most important and distinctive elements of the undergraduate experience is the Foundation Fellows Program. This outstanding program, part of the legacy of Bernard Ramsey and other key contributors to the UGA Foundation, provides unique educational experiences to the nation’s very best students. Foundation Fellows and Ramsey Scholars are highly accomplished and have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to academic excellence, leadership, and service, and a commitment to impacting the world around us. I have had the pleasure of working closely with these students during my career, and I am honored to continue supporting the Foundation Fellows Program as President. Jere W. Morehead, President The University of Georgia

Foundation Fellows and Ramsey Scholars are truly extraordinary, and it is a privilege to work with them on a daily basis. They have an impressive array of individual talents and abilities. Collectively, their sustained dedication to improving the world makes a very positive impact both on our campus and beyond. David S. Williams, Associate Provost and Director Honors and Foundation Fellows Programs

The Foundation Fellows and Ramsey Honors Scholars continue to be top students on the UGA campus who grow beyond it to become leaders in local, national, and global communities. These students earn some of the most prestigious scholarships in the country, are admitted to top graduate programs, and secure competitive jobs with leading companies. The trustees of the University of Georgia Foundation are proud of these outstanding students and are convinced that the Foundation Fellowship is the best program of its kind in the country. Kathryn Ash, Chairperson Foundation Fellows Committee The University of Georgia Foundation

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Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


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M

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The Foundation Fellows Program seeks to foster a community of scholars and leaders by providing intellectual, cultural, and service opportunities in an environment conducive to learning and personal growth through shared knowledge and experiences.

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T H E F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S H I P UGA’s Premier Undergraduate Scholarship Program

Beyond the obvious scholastic benefits, the Fellows program emphasizes fellowship, sharing of resources and ideas, and lifelong friendships. Peer mentoring (Big and Little Fellows), dinner-seminars and book discussions, cultural events, group

ounded in 1972 by the University of Georgia Foundation’s trustees, the Foundation Fellowship is the University’s foremost undergraduate scholarship. The program places students in a community of similarly dedicated scholars and offers a stipend that approximates the cost of attendance, a post-first-year Maymester study abroad program at Oxford University, individual travel-study grants, spring group travel-study, research and academic conference grants, discussions and workshops with some of the University’s best minds, and a mentoring plan that matches Fellows with professors who share their interests. Beyond the obvious scholastic benefits, the Fellows program emphasizes fellowship, sharing of resources and ideas, and lifelong friendships. Peer mentoring (Big and Little Fellows), dinner-seminars and book discussions, cultural events, group travel, the Fellows Library in Moore College, and twice-a-year off-campus retreats promote a sense of community among the Fellows. They quickly find themselves at home on campus within a close-knit group of scholars, and through extensive travel, they extend that experience to include global communities. In the 2015-2016 academic year, 21 first-year Foundation Fellows, 7 Ramsey Scholars, and 3 Mid-Term Foundation Fellows joined the program, bringing the total numbers to 97 Fellows and 26 Ramsey Scholars. New Foundation Fellows for 2015-2016 had an average SAT score of 1546 (math and verbal only) and an average ACT score of 35. Their high school grade point average was 4.11 on a 4.0 scale, which indicates extra points for Advanced Placement courses.

travel, the Fellows Library in Moore College, and twicea-year off-campus retreats promote a sense of community among the Fellows.

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I gave up acceptances at Ivy League schools to be a Foundation Fellow and have never regretted it. At UGA, I had the time to explore a number of different scientific areas, and that set me up for a senior editor position at Nature, the most highly cited general science journal in the world. And now I’m working with colleagues whose kids are considering the Foundation Fellowship – I tell all of them absolutely to take it!” — Chris Gunter, Fellows Class of 1992, Associate Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine

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As I approach graduation with a major in economics, a minor in biology, and a few MPH classes tucked under my belt, I can say that my road to medical school has been winding and unconventional, but all the more rewarding and enriching because of it. “At first, I struggled to unite my interests in the social and hard sciences, juggling curiosities ranging from emergency medicine to health economics and public policy. Through the Foundation Fellowship, though, I found that these pursuits were not incongruous. This program granted me the insightful advice, logistical support, and invaluable connections I needed to build my own academic path and find what niche of healthcare I belonged in. “Through a summer internship at the Greater New York Hospital Association, I saw how physicians used their front-line medical experiences to form evidencebased healthcare policy. Spending a month shadowing surgeons in Chiang Mai, Thailand taught me about the economic impact of medical tourism, along with the character of medicine that defies international boundaries. And there was the striking lesson of cultural differences when visiting a traditional Mongolian medicine man on the outskirts of Ulaanbaatar. “I also had such experiences right here in Athens – working with Dr. Franklin West in the UGA Regenerative Bioscience Center introduced me to the magic of stem cells and the excitement of translational research. The list of formative experiences goes on, but my point remains: the Fellowship empowered me as a student to explore my academic curiosities.” — Caroline Coleman, Fellows Class of 2016; Emory University School of Medicine, Class of 2020 When I started at UGA, I knew I wanted to spend time in the Grady College of Journalism, and within my first semester, that began to take shape. I had the awesome opportunity to take Great First Amendment Debates, taught by Grady’s dean, Charles Davis, as my first-year odyssey course. The journalism building has remained my focal point at UGA ever since, even as my goals and interests have shifted. “As a first year, I jumped headfirst into Grady’s New Media Institute, which I learned about on a tour as a high school senior. I took as many classes as I could and practiced everything from simple web design to creating apps with Apple software. The program gave me the chance to make friends from across Grady and to get to know faculty members who share my love of tinkering with technology. “Thanks to UGA’s generosity when it comes to accepting AP credits, I got rolling with the public affairs journalism major my first year and had the chance to reconnect with issues broached in my odyssey class. Through Communication Law, I learned the groundwork of case law upon which our First Amendment stands. This class also opened the door for me to start combining an interest in food with journalism, as I had the chance to work on a term paper about America’s unconstitutional “veggie libel” laws. “UGA has given me the chance to pursue journalism outside the classroom as well, and I have worked for The Red & Black, Georgia Political Review, and InfUSion magazine. When I wanted to spend more time focused on food, my roommate and I also started a chapter of Spoon University, a college-based food publication, at UGA. While this has been an enormous learning experience, it has also provided an opportunity to network with other foodies on campus and cemented my desire to explore food issues. “This led me to the final component of my program of study: the local food systems certificate. The interdisciplinary certificate format has allowed me to spend time learning about global poverty, farming practices, and how to ride a tractor as an intern at UGA’s organic garden. “While I don’t know where these varied interests will lead me, I hope to ultimately pursue a career combining technology and journalism with food policy.” — Mollie Simon, FF ’18

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Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


The Benefits of Being a Fellow  Annual stipend: $11,713 plus the Zell Miller Scholarship (currently worth $9,362 per year) for in-state students; $19,459 plus an out-of-state tuition waiver (currently worth $18,210 per year) for out-ofstate students  First-year housing supplement of $579  Three fully funded spring travel-study programs (first through third years, valued at $9,900) – Recent trips include: Argentina, Bali, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Morocco, South Africa, South Korea, Tanzania, Uruguay  One fully funded summer study abroad program to Oxford University immediately following the first year (valued at $8,500)

 Individual travel-study grants up to a cumulative total of $9,000 (closely related to students’ academic and professional goals, can be combined with semester stipends for study overseas for a full semester or academic year)  Research and academic conference grants up to a cumulative total of $1,750  Special seminars and book discussions with UGA and visiting professors  Faculty and peer mentoring  Twice-a-year, all-Fellows retreats  Participation in a community of young scholars who stimulate each other’s intellectual and personal development through the exchange of ideas and experiences

The Foundation Fellowship opened my eyes to the world. It took a small-town girl from South Carolina to Italy and Greece, to Tanzania, to Thailand, to Argentina. By putting me in direct contact with people who looked different from me and who thought differently, it made me who I am today. It cultivated my interest in cross-disciplinary research, encouraging me to study not only laboratory genetics but health communications so that I could more effectively translate scientific findings to the public. I am a primary care physician, medical educator, and NIH-funded scientist. I work at one of the most well-known institutions in the world, and it has nothing on the Foundation Fellowship!” – Holly Gooding Tran, Fellows Class of 2000, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

I learned about drumming, dance, and culture in Ghana, learned to speak Spanish in the Peruvian highlands, studied the dispersal of stream crustaceans in the Puerto Rican rainforest, studied English and Spanish literature with the Dons at Oxford, mapped the volcanic and glacial landscapes of the American West, and saw the golden rays leaping from the equatorial water at sunset aboard the Spondylus, in the Galápagos Islands. What other program on earth gives you these kinds of opportunities?” – Erin Mordecai, Fellows Class of 2007, Assistant Professor of Biology, Stanford University

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NATI O NA L R E CO GNITI O N

In 2015-2016, Foundation Fellows

2015-2016 Major Scholarship Winners

and Ramsey Scholars once again

Boren Scholar – Carver Goodhue

were successful

Carnegie Junior Research Fellow – Bert Thompson

in national and

Erasmus Mundus Scholar – Kathleen Wilson

international

FLAS Fellow – Lilian Zhu

scholarship

Fulbright Scholars – Kameel Mir, Hannah Reiss,

competitions, garnering

Leighton Rowell, Treva Tam Goldwater Scholars – Cali Callaway,

prestigious Marshall,

Morrison Nolan

Schwarzman,

Marshall Scholar – Meredith Paker

Fulbright, Erasmus

National Science Foundation Graduate

Mundus, Goldwater, Udall, and Boren

Research Fellow – Alli Koch Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellow – Kirstie Hostetter

scholarships, as

Schwarzman Scholar – Torre Lavelle

well as Carnegie

Udall Scholar – Jonah Driggers

Junior Research, NSF Graduate Research, and Phi Kappa Phi fellowships.

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Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


2016 Marshall Scholar – Meredith Paker (Fellows Class of 2016) Up to 40 Marshall Scholars are selected each year, and Meredith Paker, who graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in economics and a minor in mathematics, is UGA’s third student in the last decade to earn the award and the seventh in the university’s history. Meredith will use the scholarship to pursue a master’s degree in economic and social history from the University of Oxford. The Marshall Scholarship, established by an Act of Parliament in 1953, is one of the highest academic honors bestowed on American post-baccalaureate students. More than 900 students from across the U.S. apply annually. The program, which was created in gratitude for U.S. assistance to the United Kingdom during World War II under the Marshall Plan, provides funding for up to three years of graduate study at any United Kingdom university in any field. While at UGA, Meredith conducted economics research with faculty members Jonathan Williams, David Bradford, and William Lastrapes. Contributing to a growing literature on the prevalence and impact of off-label prescriptions in the U.S. pharmaceuticals market, she presented her work at the International Health Economics Association conference in Italy and at the UGA Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium. After completing her MPhil at Oxford, her goal is to pursue a doctorate in economics and begin a career as an academic economist. In addition to being a recipient of the Foundation Fellowship, Meredith is an inductee to Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi honor societies. She has studied abroad at Oxford and in Tanzania, where she summited Mount Kilimanjaro in 2014. Meredith served as an Honors teaching assistant for first-year Honors students and was vice president of the UGA Economics Society. She led a Girl Scout troop through Campus Scouts and hosted a weekly radio show on UGA’s student-run radio station, WUOG 90.5FM.

2016 Schwarzman Scholar & 2015 Udall Scholar – Torre Lavelle (Fellows Class of 2016) Torre Lavelle is one of 111 students from around the world to be named to the inaugural class of Schwarzman Scholars, a highly selective and fully funded one-year master’s program at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. More than 3,000 applicants from 135 countries applied for the Schwarzman Scholars program, making it one of the most selective in the world. At Tsinghua University, Schwarzman Scholars will live and study together on the campus of Schwarzman College, a newly built, state-of-the-art facility, and will pursue degrees in public policy, economics and business, and international studies. Torre graduated from UGA with a bachelor’s degree in ecology and an Honors interdisciplinary degree in political ecology. As an undergraduate, she was named a 2015 Udall Scholar and engaged in a number of handson learning experiences on campus and around the world. She studied conservation and ecotourism in Fiji and Tanzania and also studied literature through the UGA at Oxford program. She interned in Thailand at the Freeland Foundation, an organization that seeks to end human and wildlife trafficking; at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Virginia; at NASA DEVELOP, conducting feasibility studies for unmanned aircraft systems to provide poaching surveillance in Kruger National Park; and at the U.S. Department of State, where she researched international conservation policies and tracked economic development in African nations. In 2015, she was one of six students nationwide invited to present a policy paper at the White House, and she also presented research findings at UGA’s CURO Symposium and at the Georgia Water Resources Conference. Torre served in several leadership roles in the Roosevelt Institute, UGA’s student-run think tank, and worked as the Senior Fellow for Energy and Environment of the Roosevelt National Campus Network. Torre also co-founded and served as executive director of Campus Scouts at UGA, an after-school outreach initiative for underserved girls in the Athens community. Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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2016 Carnegie Junior Research Fellow – Bert Thompson (Fellows Class of 2016) Bert Thompson was awarded a Carnegie Junior Research Fellowship, becoming one of just 14 young scholars from across the nation to join the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace as a research assistant. His fellowship will center on nuclear nonproliferation, a subject that has surrounded his coursework and experiential learning at UGA. Bert, who graduated in May with a double major in international affairs and history, worked as a research intern at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Washington, DC, and studied at the Hertog War Studies Program in DC, the Center for the Study of Global Issues in Verona, Italy, and at Oxford University through the UGA at Oxford program. He also served as a Richard B. Russell Security Leadership Scholar at UGA’s Center for International Trade and Security and as then-Congressman Jack Kingston’s military legislative intern at the U.S. Capitol. Bert has served as a Student Government Association executive cabinet member, a student advisory board member for the Office of the Vice President for Instruction, a student athletic representative for the UGA Athletic Association board of directors, a member of the Arch Society, assistant senior editor of Georgia Political Review and as an Honors Program teaching assistant.

2016 Udall Scholar – Jonah Driggers (Fellows Class of 2017) Jonah Driggers is the ninth UGA student to be awarded the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Scholarship in the past six years. The scholarships of up to $7,000 are awarded annually to outstanding sophomores and juniors pursuing careers related to environmental or Native American public policy. He is one of 60 Udall Scholars nationwide chosen from nearly 500 nominees. Jonah is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in geography and a combined master’s degree in conservation ecology. Following his graduation, he plans to pursue a Juris Doctor to fulfill his career aspiration of working as a policy leader to help the U.S. transition to clean energy. An avid outdoorsman and Eagle Scout, Jonah has explored his passion for environmental policy as director of the Center for Energy and the Environment, which is part of the UGA chapter of the Roosevelt Institute, a student-run think tank. He is a founder and co-executive director of The Energy Concept, an organization that stimulates discussion of interdisciplinary energy strategies, and he served as an intern in the Office of Climate Preparedness at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Jonah has participated in several research projects through the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities and also as a graduate student researcher at the UGA River Basin Center and in the lab of Meigs Professor James Porter. He is the head gardener for the Lunchbox Garden Project, a student-led organization that aims to educate schoolchildren about gardening, nutrition, and environmental issues.

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Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


2016 Goldwater Scholar – Cali Callaway (Fellows Class of 2017) Two Foundation Fellows received 2016 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, the premier undergraduate scholarship in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering. Since 1995, 51 UGA students have received the award. Cali Callaway is majoring in biology with a concentration in neuroscience and pursuing a combined master’s degree in artificial intelligence. After graduation, she aims to earn a medical degree and to pursue a career conducting research in regenerative bioscience. She has spent extensive time in a laboratory through UGA’s Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities, working with Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar Steven Stice, director of the UGA Regenerative Bioscience Center, as well as during an intensive summer research experience at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. Cali also interned at Hocoma AG, the world’s largest producer of robotic rehabilitation devices located in Zurich, Switzerland, and at the Shepherd Spinal Center’s Spinal Cord Injury Lab in Atlanta. She serves as president of UGA Mathcounts, a student organization that mentors middle school students in math skills, and vice president of the Blue Key Honor Society, among other activities.

2016 Goldwater Scholar – Morrison Nolan (Fellows Class of 2017) Morrison Nolan is majoring in geology and chemistry and plans to pursue a PhD in invertebrate paleontology on a path to a career teaching and researching as a professor or museum curator. He also has conducted research through CURO, studying alongside Sally Walker, a professor of geology and marine sciences. In addition, he participated in paleontology field studies of Cretaceous deposits in Hell Creek, Montana, through the University of Washington’s paleontological field methods course and interned at a fiber optic company through the Technology Association of Georgia. Morrison co-founded UGA’s Science Olympiad Outreach and is secretary of the UGA Geology Club, a student affiliate of the American Chemical Society and a member of the Geological Society of America and the Georgia Mineral Society

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2016 Boren Scholar – Carver Goodhue (Fellows Class of 2017) Although most Americans aren’t familiar with the Wolof language, it is spoken by more than 4 million people in the West African countries of Senegal and Gambia and the North African country of Mauritania. And, in time, it will be spoken by at least one UGA undergraduate, Carver Goodhue. As part of his Boren Scholarship experience in Senegal, Carver will study Wolof and French, international development, and public health through the National Security Education Program’s African Flagship Languages Initiative. He also expects to spend a significant amount of time working with a public health NGO, and if he can find the time, he plans to train with a Senegalese wrestling team (Carver was an outstanding wrestler at Clarke Central High School.) When Carver graduates with degrees in Romance languages and anthropology and a minor in biology, he plans to fulfill his yearlong Boren service requirement by working on public health projects in Senegal for the CDC or USAID. And after his year of service, he will begin studies for an MD/MPH degree. Carver adds that one of the highlights of his undergraduate experiences has been learning French, which included a two-month sojourn to France in 2015. “Thanks to the Fellowship, last summer I was able to build on everything my French professors taught me by spending two months in France, during which time I lived with French host families, took French classes in a language school in Montpelier, and worked on a cider farm in La Perche.” He has also made the most of local volunteering opportunities, including being part of U-Lead, a nonprofit providing academic counseling, tutoring, and scholarships to immigrant students in the Athens area. “It’s been very rewarding for me, as someone from Athens, to work with students from this community and to see them succeed and obtain higher education despite significant financial and political impediments,” Carver says. This year, four University of Georgia students received Boren Scholarships, which are funded by the National Security Education Program and offer up to $20,000 for language study abroad in areas of the world deemed critical to United States interests.

2016 Fulbright Scholar (India) – Hannah Reiss (Fellows Class of 2016) For the first three months of her Fulbright year, Hannah Reiss will study Hindi at the American Institute for Indian Studies in Jaipur, and then she’ll spend nine months on an academic research grant in Mumbai. While in Mumbai, Hannah will work on a project that evaluates the impact of a prenatal mobile health initiative on its intended clientele. By drawing upon semi-structured interviews, the project will examine if and how this program serves as a catalyst for female empowerment. Hannah graduated in May with degrees in anthropology and biology, and her career plans include working on global health issues (specializing in maternal/child health or infectious disease). On campus, she conducted research in the stem cell lab of Dr. Steve Stice and served as executive director of UGA’s chapter of the Roosevelt Institute. Off campus, she studied abroad in England and Spain and interned with the Carter Center in Atlanta; Freedman Consulting in Washington, DC; and Strand Life Sciences & Organization for Rare Disease in Bangalore, India. She was also a Virtual Student Foreign Service Intern with the U.S. Department of State. After her Fulbright year, Hannah plans to attend medical school, enrolling in a joint MD/MPH program. 14

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


2016 Fulbright Scholar (Brazil) – Leighton Rowell (Fellows Class of 2016) During her time at UGA, Leighton Rowell has visited a number of intriguing locales – her Amazing Student profile says she has been able to “defend essays in Oxford, stargaze in Morocco, and pray in the temples of Bali.” And that only scratches the surface. Leighton has also spent time in Israel and Palestine, Paris, and Brazil, where she spent two months in 2015 studying Portuguese in an intensive language program as part of the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship. Now armed with a Fulbright Scholarship, Leighton will return to Brazil, and while she’s sure to learn much, this time she’ll be on the other side of the desk, teaching English in a public university. “I will be helping to plan language learning activities and lead classes for university students who are training to become English teachers themselves,” she says. “In addition to my teaching responsibilities, I am expected to do a ‘supplementary project,’ and in fulfillment of that requirement I plan to research public opinion on affirmative action in Brazilian universities.” With an on-campus background that includes serving as managing editor for the Red & Black and working at WSB-TV, radio station WUGA, Georgia Political Review, Georgia News Lab, and NBC Olympics, Leighton will also take a journalist’s mindset to Brazil. “In our globalizing world, the importance of learning to communicate across cultures cannot be overstated, and I’m excited to work with people who share my passion for language,” she says. “I’m also looking forward to improving my Portuguese, eating açaí bowls on a regular basis, and reuniting at some point with my host family from last summer.”

2016 Fulbright Scholars (Turkey) – Kameel Mir (Fellows Class of 2015) and Treva Tam (Fellows Class of 2016) Two Fellows were awarded the Fulbright Scholarship to Turkey, but in the wake of recent security concerns in Turkey, the U.S. has suspended the Fulbright ETA program there for the coming year. Having spent time in Bangladesh, Costa Rica, England, Morocco, and South Korea, Kameel Mir is well acquainted with the power of language. In addition to English, she speaks Turkish, Bengali, Arabic, and Spanish. Kameel – who recently graduated with three undergraduate degrees (Arabic, English, international affairs) and an MA in English – served as president and executive director of UGA Roosevelt, the student policy think tank. An officer in the Women’s Studies Student Organization, she also interned with the Carter Center, the Center for American Progress, the Center for International Trade and Security, and the Carl Vinson Institute of Government. She is the UGA English Department’s 2015 Virginia Walters Scholar and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Treva Tam majored in advertising and sociology at UGA. As a sophomore, she spent six weeks in Istanbul on an AIESEC internship, and she also studied abroad in England, France, and South Africa. She maintained a torrid pace on campus, interning with the University of Georgia Press and serving as vice president for the Asian Children Mentoring Program, publicity chair for the UGA AdClub, and publications coordinator for Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. She also found time to work with Georgia Political Review as design editor and to participate in a sociology research project spearheaded by Dr. Linda Renzulli. Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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2016 Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellow – Kirstie Hostetter (Fellows Class of 2016) Kirstie Hostetter, who graduated in May with a degree in environmental economics and management, was recently awarded the Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellowship to support her pursuit of a master’s degree in sustainable systems at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment. While at UGA, Kirstie served as an intern with the Sustainable Investment Group and was co-founder and executive director of industry relations for The Energy Concept, facilitating the discussion of energy-related topics throughout the campus community. She also worked on a research project that examined sea level rise in coastal communities of Georgia. As a teaching assistant, regional conference planner, and environment center director for the Roosevelt Institute, Kirstie worked on projects focused on affordable housing, organophosphate use, and rooftop gardens, and served as editor-in-chief of 10 Ideas for Energy & Environment. She says one of the more memorable moments of her undergraduate tenure was hosting Ronny Just, environmental issues manager for Georgia Power Company, in partnership with The Energy Concept and the Roosevelt Institute “and packing an entire lecture hall.” She also points to her work with the Lunchbox Garden Project, where she served as senior advisor and executive director. “A highlight was working with the students at Barnett Shoals Elementary School through the Lunchbox Garden and seeing them go from being incredibly distrustful of vegetables at the beginning of the semester to consuming entire veggie plates by the end,” she says. Kirstie, who during her time at UGA had travel-study experiences in Bali, England, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Argentina, and Uruguay, hasn’t decided what she’ll pursue once she completes her studies at Michigan, but there’s little question sustainability will be front and center, whether she is working in corporate sustainability or sustainable development in Latin America.

2016 Erasmus Mundus Scholar & 2015 Truman Scholar & Critical Language Scholar – Kathleen Wilson (Fellows Class of 2016) Kathleen Wilson – who graduated in May with degrees in Arabic, economics, international affairs – recently received the Erasmus Mundus Scholarship and will spend the next two years in pursuit of a joint master’s degree in Educational Polices for Global Development (GLOBED), which will include residencies in Barcelona, Amsterdam, Malta, Oslo, and either Jordan or Lebanon. Offered by the European Commission, the Erasmus Mundus Programme offers financial assistance to promote cooperation among higher education institutions and to enhance the profile of higher education in Europe. A 2015 recipient of the Truman Scholarship, Kathleen, whose career plans include advancing women’s political, social, and economic rights through international development projects, is spending the summer in Washington, D.C., working at the World Bank Inspection Panel. After her sophomore year, she interned (with the support of Honors in Washington) at the Feminist Majority Foundation, and in the spring of her junior year, she interned at the U.S. Department of State’s Office of International Religious Freedom. Her study of Arabic also found her in immersive environments in the Middle East. In Morocco, Kathleen also volunteered at a women’s hospital while studying in Meknès; in Oman, she studied with the support of the Department of State’s Critical Language Scholarship; and in Jordan, she took advanced Arabic literature and media classes at the Qasid Language Institute. 16

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2016 National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow – Alli Koch (Fellows Class of 2015) National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships recognize and support outstanding graduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $32,000, along with a $12,000 cost-of-education allowance for tuition and fees. The fellowships are among the most competitive in the United States. In 2013, Alli Koch enrolled in a course on tropical rainforest ecology at the Institute for Tropical Ecology and Conservation in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Three years later, she’s returning to Bocas del Toro to conduct research on the relationship between humans and their ecological environment, funded in part by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Alli, a Ramsey Scholar and Mid-Term Foundation Fellow who graduated from UGA in 2015 with degrees in anthropology and Latin American and Caribbean studies, is working on her PhD in anthropology at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her NSF Fellowship is currently “on reserve” as she was recently awarded two years of research funding from Texas-San Antonio. In Bocas del Toro, she is broadly exploring environmental relations – such as the transfer of ecological knowledge and conservation practices – between biological field stations and nearby communities. The NSF grant has made it financially feasible to do this yearly travel. Alli, who as an undergraduate also traveled to Indonesia and Morocco and conducted anthropological research through CURO, points to a 2013 sojourn she took to Costa Rica as one of the formative times in her education and in her life. A running and biking enthusiast, Alli once organized a campaign on behalf of the American Heart Association to bike from Canada to Mexico to raise funds and promote healthy lifestyle choices. During her time at UGA, she volunteered for many athletic events and river cleanups, and was race director and cycling instructor for the UGA Triathlon Club. She has also competed in the World Ironman Championship in Kona, Hawaii.

2016 Foreign Language & Area Studies (FLAS) Fellow – Lilian Zhu (Fellows Class of 2018) As a Foundation Fellow, Lilian Zhu has spent plenty of time on the move, with locales ranging from Oxford University in England to the Amazon rainforest. But her latest trip – made possible by the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship – offered a new twist to her study abroad portfolio. The Iowa native, who will graduate in 2018 with a degree in Romance languages, spent the summer in Florianópolis, Brazil, studying Portuguese and engaging in a service learning internship. Lilian’s many pursuits point to a host of interests that reflect her credo of “I love working with people to make things happen for others.” She is currently considering pursuit of the joint AB/Master of Public Administration program offered by UGA Honors and the School of Public and International Affairs, but she’s also thinking about signing up for the Portuguese Flagship program and extending her stay in Brazil. While she’s on campus, Lilian is a student liaison in the UGA Provost’s Office, serving as the first point of contact for student groups, planning and scheduling events, and advising the Provost on student issues and concerns. She’s also the civic policy discipline editor for the Journal of Undergraduate Research Opportunities (JURO) and is president of the UGA Women’s Ultimate program.

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FA C U LT Y M E N T O R S From the moment Fellows arrive at UGA, they build meaningful relationships with professors and administrators across campus and across disciplines, contributing to their development as scholars, researchers, and global citizens.

I met Dr. Martin Kagel somewhat as an accident. Freshman year, I took a class on a whim all because a friend of mine said the professor was good. Dr. Kagel’s class ended up following me through my college career; I’m writing a senior thesis with him now on the very same subject. It’s all because Dr. Kagel approached me near the end of that class and, knowing I was a freshman, asked if I was looking for a faculty mentor. He was willing to stick with me and encourage me to do more with the German department, even though I was a science major at the time. Eventually, I did end up as a German student. Dr. Kagel was the mentor for all of my research as an undergrad, but more than that, he’s been an advisor, a friend, and one of the driving forces behind my academic experience here at UGA.” ­— Kelsey Lowrey ’16

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Trang Nguyen ’17 “I first reached out to Provost Pamela Whitten because of her interdisciplinary expertise in communications health policy – my two areas of study. She agreed to be my faculty mentor for a directed reading course, which focused on the Affordable Care Act, barriers to policy implementation, and the use of effective communication campaigns to mitigate these barriers to implementation. Following that directed study, I enrolled in a CURO course with Provost Whitten to continue my health communications research. She is sincerely committed to my learning and success, and despite her busy schedule, she always pushed me to ask more questions and dig deeper with my ideas and research.” Justin Payan ’17 “When I was a freshman, senior David Millard took me into the basement of the computer science building to meet his robotics professor, Dr. Potter, whose laid-back yet enthusiastic attitude instantly convinced me to take his Intro to Artificial Intelligence class. Ever since starting that class, Dr. Potter has pushed me to succeed by putting me in advanced courses, prompting me to start a joint master’s degree in Artificial Intelligence, and helping me reach out to AI developers in industry. Despite running the Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Dr. Potter always has time to chat in his office or reply to emails at 3 AM. I’m really grateful to him for bringing me into the eclectic community of the Institute for Artificial Intelligence and for introducing me to the broader world of AI.” Krystal Lo ’17 “Freshman year I attended a dinner seminar on welfare economics led by Dr. Julio Garin. After a lively discussion on issues such as minimum wage policy, we somehow ended up on the topic of classical music. I invited him to my string quartet recital, and much to my surprise, on the day of the recital he was there in the audience—and would be for recitals to come. In addition to becoming an A-list groupie, Dr. Garin has become a close mentor and friend, who is always ready to lend an ear and offer advice. Last summer he helped me organize an internship with the Central Bank of Uruguay, an incredible experience I will always cherish.” Zoe Li ’19 “Dr. Maryann Gallagher’s passion for her field (international affairs) is contagious. During her office hours, I happened to ask about the research she is working on. Halfway through my second semester in college, I had already begun research with her through CURO on the prosecution of gender-based crimes in the International Criminal Courts, a topic I have quickly become fascinated with, and I will travel with her to The Hague in summer 2016 to visit the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia to interview prosecutors and interest groups.”

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Karishma Sriram ’16 “Guided by the suggestions of past Foundation Fellows, I contacted Dr. Steven Stice to pursue research in his lab as a mere freshman. Dr. Stice invited me to join his lab that very summer. For two years, I conducted stem cell research in bone regeneration under his guidance. Even as I decided to pursue other areas of research later on, Dr. Stice has served as a mentor and a friend, as he has offered me guidance in my current research and medical school preparation.”

and multiracial narrative. Aside from being the most inspiring academic historian I have learned from, Dr. Lawton is also an outstanding public historian. Through his Georgia Virtual History Project (GVHP), Dr. Lawton is working to provide historical content written and properly vetted by professional historians to the broader public. He guided my CURO work on the Shields Ethridge Heritage Farm as my research mentor. Without a doubt, his mentorship was the cornerstone of what has been an incredibly rich undergraduate experience.”

Seth Euster ’16 “I met Dr. Christopher Lawton as a student in my first course at UGA, Multicultural History of Georgia. In this course, Dr. Lawton challenged his students to abandon their romanticized view of the region, in exchange for a more balanced

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ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT – HONORS PROGRAM

Six members of the class of 2016 pursued joint degrees: Alex Edquist (Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Master of Arts in Economics), Seth Euster (Bachelor of Arts in History, Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, Master of Arts in Political Science), Caroline Moore (Bachelor of Arts in Advertising, Master of Arts in Journalism & Mass Communication), Giovanni Righi (Bachelor of Science in Ecology, Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Master of Arts in Economics), Kevin Sun (Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Master of Arts in Economics), and Chenee Tracey (Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs, Master of International Policy)

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On Campus – Honors, Research, Civic Engagement, Career Development Complementing the Foundation Fellow/Ramsey Scholar experience is the University of Georgia’s Honors Program, one of the oldest and most respected programs of its kind in the country. Honors at UGA provides some 2,500 students with the resources to make the most of their higher education experience – including 300 Honors classes a year with an average class size of 17 students, expert advice from Honors and faculty advisors, independent research opportunities, mentoring, internships, lunchbox lectures and book discussions with faculty, and the Myers Hall residential community. Honors students may participate in graduate courses and pursue a curriculum leading to combined bachelor’s/master’s degrees in only four years. Joint degree programs allow students to both diversify and specialize their training and knowledge. Through the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO), students work with faculty on projects that allow them to reach beyond classroom learning and give them important research-related experience to demonstrate their passion to admissions staff at graduate or professional schools. Undergraduate research opportunities abound across the curriculum, from laboratory and social sciences to humanities and fine arts. The Honors Program affords numerous opportunities for local, national, and global civic engagement and career development – including internship placements in Washington, New York, and Savannah; the Roosevelt Institution, a student-run think tank; and the Corsair Society, which mentors undergraduates pursuing banking and finance and management consulting careers. Honors staff members, including the Major Scholarships Coordinator, provide important counsel for a variety of pursuits – including drafting personal statements, resumes, and cover letters for job, scholarship, and postgraduate study applications.

Caroline Moore ’16 – Bachelor of Arts in Advertising, Master of Arts in Journalism & Mass Communication “I have continually witnessed and admired the power of creativity in my own life and in the lives of others. With this in mind, I made the decision to pursue an education and career in the field of advertising and mass communication. I set my sights on entering the challenging but rewarding world of non-profits, with the goal of leading communications and marketing efforts for education, arts education, or health-related organizations. In order to successfully navigate this sector of the communications industry, I seized every opportunity presented by the

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Honors Program and the Foundation Fellowship. “I had accumulated nearly 90 credit hours through dual-enrollment and AP courses, so this afforded the opportunity to complete a combined bachelor’s/master’s program during my four years at UGA. Many professors and faculty members offered endless support and encouragement, and Grady College provided incredible opportunities from the comfort of Athens, Georgia, to the stunning coast of Cannes, France.”

Chenee Tracey ’16 – Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs, Master of International Policy “After consulting with faculty, alumni, and current students of the SPIA dual degree, I decided that obtaining a master’s degree and a bachelor’s degree would make me the most competitive to work in the federal government post-graduation. I saw the opportunity to complete my master’s degree in four years as a way to challenge myself and take full advantage of having an undergraduate and a graduate community. (Being able to call professors by their first names is my favorite thing.) As an undergraduate, I was exposed to theory and hypotheticals, and as a graduate student of the MIP program, I’m able to delve deeply into how this theory applies to real world issues, such as trade agreements in Latin America or ongoing ethnic conflict. “The MIP program is also special because it is linked to UGA’s Center for International Trade and Security (CITS). CITS is charged with nuclear nonproliferation research and training foreign officials about curbing the spread of nuclear weapons. I had the opportunity to take a course with CITS as an undergraduate and continue to learn from faculty as a graduate student. I am confident that the connections I have made and this degree of higher learning will sustain and broaden my federal career options when I graduate.”

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ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT – SEMINARS

Dinner-seminars and book discussions are staples of the Foundation Fellowship experience. Faculty from departments across campus, industry leaders, visiting scholars, and alumni lead activities for academic enrichment and networking throughout the year. The Fellowship also provides funds for attending cultural and social events.

Dinner and Discussion with Political Commentator Paul Begala Ashley Amukamara ’19 “As an experienced political consultant and commentator, Paul Begala explained the complexities of the current political climate in the U.S. while also keeping the conversation light and humorous. Even though his experience is in politics, he left us with advice that goes beyond the political realm and made me reflect on the individual expertise found in all of us.”

Melanoma Research at Knight Cancer Institute with Sancy Leachman, Professor & Chair, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health Science University This seminar was a fascinating mixture of science, medicine, and policy in a way I had not seen before. Using her MD/ PhD training, Dr. Leachman was able to combine her interdisciplinary knowledge to create a ‘War on Melanoma’ which has been successful in outreach to affected individuals. As an aspiring MD/PhD student, this seminar really helped me to understand the different ways in which you can use the same degree to pursue different paths.”

­— Erin Hollander ’17

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Vineet Raman ’19 “Paul Begala brought to the seminar his decades of experience in politics and managed to blend together American history, election politics, communications theories, and his own irreverent humor for an engaging and accessible discussion.” University of Georgia Press with Melissa Bugbee Buchanan, Design & Production Manager, Fellows Class of 2000 Ashley Willard ’19 “I’ve always been fascinated by books, and having been responsible for my high school newspaper, I became very interested in how larger publications such as the University of Georgia Press carry out their projects from beginning to end. The dinner provided a unique behind-thescenes look at how the press selects books to print and the many stages that are required to bring a bound book to the shelves.” LGBTQ Issues in Sports: How Sports Can Drive Change with Vicki Michaelis, Distinguished Professor in Sports Journalism Emily Giambalvo ’18 “After covering eight Olympics and working in journalism for many years, Professor Michaelis owns a perspective of sports that no other person I’ve ever talked to can claim. In her discussion, we looked at how the unifying nature of sports creates a unique ability to enable social change. Professor Michaelis then let us steer the conversation, and we, of course, begged for more anecdotes about her days spent with athletes like Michael Phelps and Serena Williams. If it was not for Moore College’s closing hours, we would have likely listened until midnight.” Escape the Space: the Original Live Escape Room in Athens, GA Steven Feng ’19 “You don’t get to expose an Athens bomb plot while locked in a room rigged with a timed explosive every Sunday night. So when I found myself in this very scenario, I was glad to have 13 other amazing Fellows and Ramseys by my side. It wasn’t long after the countdown started that an intense sense of determination filled the air as my peers scrutinized

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locked boxes, flipped frantically through books whose pages might be harboring secrets, and shouted, “I found another clue, guys!” The room gradually fell into a chaotic mess of opened cabinet doors, hastily cast aside props, and a collection of unearthed clues, and yet it was this orchestrated chaos that allowed us to pull together and uncover the logistics of the terrorist threat, defuse the bomb in our room, and crack the key code barring our escape.”

Giovanni Righi ’16 “Within the community of the Fellowship, there is superb access to faculty and events that serve a discussion of the normative question of what we should be doing. We listened to Ta-Nehisi Coates discussing his letter that won the National Book Award, and we’ve delved through Supreme Court rulings on the Affordable Care Act and campaign finance. Our book discussions let us get even deeper. After reading $2 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, we discussed contemporary welfare and poverty with the sociology professor Sarah Shannon. The Honors director, David Williams, perennially leads students in discussing A Testament of Hope, the collection of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s profound writings. “These events informed my professional interests, which have mostly been in theoretical ecology and academic economics. In John Drake’s ecology lab, I found how basic science could be policy-oriented. I also worked as a research assistant for Nicholas Magnan on a development experiment in Nepal. Now, after some intense studying of economics and with support from our department, I’m writing a thesis to explore corruption, a major barrier to civic engagement. The ends of these studies, though, rest in goals – education, art, public participation – that come from discussions like those in our events.”

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Seminars and Book Discussions 2015-2016 Betsy Allen Adams* – Go Set a Watchman Jonathan Arogeti* – Peace Corps Comoros Destany Arnold & Abby Jones – C5 Georgia Youth Foundation ARTini’s Painting Workshop Paul Begala – Dinner and Discussion with Political Commentator Dan Coenen – Federalist No. 10 Amy Lee Copeland* – Sharp Teeth Rebecca Corey* – Revitalizing Cultural Heritage in East Africa Kacie Darden* & Robyn Painter* – How to Clone a Mammoth John Gittleman & Alex Patterson – Lunch at the Odum School of Ecology Janette Hill – Online Education: Future Trends & Your Impressions Jessica Hunt* – War Books Club: All the Light We Cannot See, Catch 22, City of Thieves, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, His Majesty’s Dragon, Nine Stories, The Rainy Spell, Regeneration, Redeployment, The Things They Carried Gary Jackson – Non-Tech Opportunities at Google Bronson Lee* – Facing the Fear (The Connection: Mind Your Body) Josh McLaurin* – Elected Judges: By the People & For the People, Sorta  Sancy Leachman – Melanoma Research at Knight Cancer Institute Matt Levenson* – New American/New Southern Cuisine Macbeth: Athens Town & Gown Theatre Vicki Michaels – LGBT Issues in Sports: How Sports Can Drive Change Yannick Morgan*, Jasmaine McClain*, Payton Bradford* – Between the World and Me Gautam Narula* – Remain Free: A Memoir Nicole Nation* – Expanding Healthcare & Improving Treatments in Rural Zambia Kameko Nichols* – Global Health in Southern Africa: Riders for Health Stephen Pettigrew – Big Data: Using Data & Statistics to Answer Practical Questions about the World Todd Pitman, Associated Press Bangkok Bureau Chief – Causes & Consequences of Military Intervention in Emerging Nations, Advancing Reporting in Countries under Army Rule Martin Rogers – Movie Night at Athens Ciné: Silence of the Lambs Sarah Shannon – $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America Abigail Shell* – UGA Pharmacy Workshops Meghan Skira – Marriage Markets: How Inequality Is Remaking the American Family Stress Management Workshop Lori Surmay – Human Sexuality, Reproduction, & the Law Peter R. Wilder – Personal Finance Seminar David S. Williams – A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. Vincent Wimbush – Dinner with Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar *Foundation Fellow/Ramsey Scholar Alumni Host

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TR AV E L- S TUDY

Domestic and international travel-study is an integral part of the Foundation Fellowship. Fellows enjoy unique, immersive learning opportunities around the world through individual travel grants, spring break group sojourns led by faculty, and a study abroad Maymester at Oxford University after the first undergraduate year.

Graduating Fellows Highlight the Influence of Undergraduate Travel-Study Experiences

Above anything else, I love a great story. With my travel money, I listened to a diverse cross-section of human experiences and created a great many tales of my own. The Foundation Fellowship has fed this passion for the innate connections within the human story and has allowed me to witness the beautiful differences. These astounding experiences, while quite diverse, have singularly shaped my career path.” — Madison Snelling ’16

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Madison Snelling ’16 – Bali, Cambodia, England, South Africa, South Korea, Tanzania “Above anything else, I love a great story. With my travel money, I listened to a diverse cross-section of human experiences and created a great many tales of my own. The Foundation Fellowship has fed this passion for the innate connections within the human story and has allowed me to witness the beautiful differences. These astounding experiences, while quite diverse, have singularly shaped my career path. “I learned traditional Zimbabwean dances under a blanket of a million stars, chanted before the break of dawn with South Korean Buddhist nuns, and spotted wild gibbons out of the world’s tallest tree houses. “The summer following sophomore year, I went on UGA’s Stellenbosch, South Africa Maymester. I took classes on the ramifications of apartheid and volunteered at an afterschool program in the Kayamandi Township, exploring best practices of service learning. Afterwards, I traveled to Moshi, Tanzania to work at Give a Heart To Africa, an organization that economically empowers disadvantaged women. I taught the organization’s vocations class and focused on cultural literacy and cross-generational oral histories. “For the duration of the fall semester of senior year, I worked as the Education Intern for Children for Change Cambodia (CCC) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. CCC serves the slum with the highest combined amounts of meth production and trafficking and low-end prostitution in Asia. The organization’s students are at a high risk of sex trafficking. I witnessed the impact of grassroots NGOs and the influence international donations have on them. I was able to reform the organization’s English program, and am now coordinating U.S. fundraising and grant writing efforts for CCC. “I am grateful for the freedom the Fellowship provided to pursue these nontraditional opportunities that formed my worldview and career path.”

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Jacob Kennedy ’16 – Ethiopia, Morocco, Tanzania “One of my main motivations for attending UGA was the vast amount of study abroad opportunities afforded by attending a large, public university. Without the aid of scholarships, going abroad more than once wouldn’t have happened. Winning an Honors International Scholars Program scholarship allowed me to leave the United States for the first time in order to study Arabic in Morocco. I lived with a host family for three months while taking classes in Arabic, Moroccan gender studies, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. “After becoming a Mid-Term Foundation Fellow, the chance to go abroad multiple times became a reality. I traveled with Dr. Sandra Whitney to Tanzania to learn about eco-tourism and development, and the following summer, I worked in Ethiopia with nonprofit Girls Gotta Run. The organization provides scholarships to middle school girls and uses running as a means of building self-worth. I used applied anthropology to conduct an evaluation project which will improve organizational efficacy in their longterm future. Anthropology has a lot of potential to improve how organizations and policies work. That’s something I definitely want to learn more about in grad school. “Following seven weeks in Ethiopia, I traveled to Tanzania for three more weeks. Inspired by my spring beak trip I wanted to return to climb Kilimanjaro, which I spent the first week doing. Following this I volunteered on an organic farm in Moshi town for two weeks. Living and working in East Africa humbled me and made me aware of the realities many people around the world live with, realities that are foreign to most westerners.” Kathleen Wilson ’16 – Jordan, Morocco, Oman, South Korea “When I came to UGA, I did not realize that an 8:00 am introductory Arabic course I took in my first semester would launch me on a path of trying to learning as much Arabic as possible during my four years here. The summer after my freshman year, I traveled to Meknes, Morocco, where with barely enough Arabic vocabulary to introduce myself, I communicated with my host family in a mixture of broken Arabic and French. I spent the summer intensively studying Arabic and Middle Eastern politics and returned home with an invigorated interested in the language and the region. “In spring 2015, I participated in the Washington Semester Program, blending my interest in the Middle East with practical foreign policy application through an internship in the U.S. Department of State’s Office of International Religious Freedom. In that position, I tracked the impacts of ISIS and the Syrian Civil War on religious minorities in the Middle East. Following the internship, I returned to the Middle East to continue improving my Arabic language skills and to learn more about the culture and politics in the region. “As a Critical Language Scholar, I spent eight weeks studying intermediate Arabic in Ibri, Oman. Between spending the majority of my days in classes or doing homework, I worked with my Omani language partner who spoke to me about the everyday experiences of Omani youth. I am grateful for the relationships I developed with my Muslim, Arab teachers and mentors who showed me an often-ignored side of Islam and the Middle East. “In fall 2015, I moved to Jordan and enrolled full-time in Qasid Arabic Language Institute, financing my studies with my remaining Foundation Fellows travel-study money. In my daily Arabic literature and media classes, I learned the nuanced vocabulary necessary to discuss politics and current events and to critically engage with famous pieces of Arabic literature. “When I take time to reflect on how far my Arabic language skills have come over the course of the past four years, I am truly amazed. I have gone from not knowing how to read or write the Arabic alphabet to being able to listen to podcasts, watch TV, and digest entire novels in Arabic. I know I will use these language skills as well as the things I have learned about the Middle East in my travels directly in my future career. I am grateful to the Foundation Fellowship for supporting the pursuit of my passion and for making my college career both academically and personally meaningful.”

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Treva Tam ’16 – England, France, Namibia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey “Coming into college, I knew I wanted to travel. While I knew the Foundation Fellowship would give me this opportunity, never could I have guessed the adventures and the places I would go because of it. My adventure began just one year after graduating from high school when I found myself already lost on day two of the six weeks I would spend in Turkey. After a month and a half of studying at Oxford and backpacking throughout Europe, I worked in a Turkish youth summer program for those weeks. I made amazing relationships with my host families, my students, and with friendly taxi drivers who put up with my lack of an inner directional compass. “Sophomore year I went to the International Cannes Lions Festival for Creativity with Grady

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College and networked with some of the most creative and innovative minds in the advertising industry. I interacted with the people behind top advertising campaigns and gained a real look at my how an advertising major works in the real world. “Junior year, I went on a semester exchange in South Africa at Stellenbosch University. It was an experience unlike any other. I spent most of my time teaching 38 second grade students at Lynedoch. While this was more rewarding than any classroom experience, it was tough. Apartheid had ended only 20 years ago, and I saw how racial prejudices persisted in the psyches of the children at Lynedoch and shaped how the children saw themselves and their own futures. The inequality that I saw in South Africa has driven me to pursue my own interests in social stratification and education.”

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Individual Travel 2015-2016 Jonathan Adelman

Argentina; Peru; Washington, DC; New York, NY

Mallika Madhusudan Washington, DC Reilly Megee

Philadelphia, PA

Ashley Amukamara

Croatia

Sandip Minhas

Peru

Kerri Andre

South Africa

Vijeth Mudalegundi

New York, NY

Tristan Bagala

Canada; France

Trang Nguyen

New York, NY

Logan Campbell

China

Morrison Nolan

South Korea; CaĂąon City, CO

Caroline Coleman

Cambodia; Japan; Mongolia; South Korea; Thailand

Meredith Paker

Burlington, VT

Laura Courchesne

England; Indonesia; Princeton, NJ

Eytan Palte

Washington, DC; New York, NY

Lorin Crear

Chile; Peru

Jessica Pasquarello

Costa Rica; Spain

Trisha Dalapati

England

Joy Peltier

France

Tarun Daniel

England

Rand Pope

Tommy Desoutter

Costa Rica

Cambodia; Japan; Mongolia; South Korea; Thailand; San Francisco, CA

Madison Dill

South Africa; Spain

Sierra Runnels

Canada; France

Jonah Driggers

Tanzania

Ruth Schade

Spain

Alex Edquist

San Francisco, CA

Mollie Simon

Washington, DC; Portland, OR

Guy Eroh

England

Madison Snelling

Cambodia; New York, NY

Seth Euster

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Karishma Sriram

Drew Farr

Warsaw, VA

Steven Feng

England

India; Cambridge, MA; Columbus, OH; San Antonio, TX

Moira Fennell

New York, NY

John B. Stroud

Kalvis Golde

Washington, DC

San Juan, Puerto Rico; New York, NY; Seattle, WA

Shuchi Goyal

New York, NY

Treva Tam

Jack Hall

England

Erin Hollander

England; New York, NY

Nirav Ilango

Australia

Canada; Washington, DC; Bloomington, IN; Chapel Hill, NC; Columbus, OH; Philadelphia, PA; Nashville, TN

Glenn Jacoby

Ghana

Jason Terry

Australia

Susie Jones

South Africa; Roseville, MN

Bert Thompson

San Francisco, CA

Rachel Kelley

South Korea

Luke Thompson

New York, NY

Jacob Kennedy

Princeton, NJ

Samuel Tingle

Joshua Kenway

New York, NY

Australia; Fiji; India; Malaysia; Nepal; New Zealand; Hawaii

Shaun Kleber

Oakland, CA; Washington, DC

Abigail West

Spain; Sapelo Island, GA

Torre Lavelle

Thailand; Washington, DC

Matthias Wilder

New York, NY

Elizabeth Wilkes

Netherlands; San Francisco, CA; New Haven, CT; Washington, DC

Kathleen Wilson

Brazil; Jordan; Oman; Atlanta, GA; Boston, MA

Christopher Lewitzke Brazil; Washington, DC Bruce Li

New York, NY

Zoe Li

France

Krystal Lo

New York, NY

Katie Lovejoy

Panama; Romania

Victoria Yonter

Ann Arbor, MI

Emily Maloney

Antarctica

Lilian Zhu

Brazil

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Spring Break 2016 International and Domestic Trips ECUADOR Program Leaders: Kelly Dyer, Associate Professor of Genetics, and David Hall, Associate Professor of Genetics Academic Focus: Ecuador’s Biodiversity, Culture, and History Mallory Harris ’18 “From eating a live giant palm weevil larva with my vegetarian roommate to standing atop a centuries-old tree and observing parrots at eye level, the spring break trip to Ecuador offered unexpected adventures. We hiked through the cloud forests of the Andes and the humid understory of the Amazon rainforest. One of the best parts of the trip was the opportunity to see the biodiversity of these settings through the eyes of two exemplary UGA professors, while also learning from our tour guides, who grew up depending on the forest for sustenance, entertainment,

and medicine. I brought 100% Deet mosquito spray and a pair of waterproof binoculars, and the Fellowship provided days filled from the first parrot’s call in the morning to a close encounter with a caiman at night.” Lilian Zhu ’18 “Standing on the floor of the Amazon Rainforest you begin to get a sense of how interdependent this world really is.” Elizabeth Wilkes ’18 “From dinosaur chickens and squirrel monkeys to dog-like pet birds and all kinds of creepy crawlies, we were quite literally surrounded by lifeforms. Kelly and Dave were always excited to talk about the organisms right in front of us, research opportunities back home, or anything under the (blazing) sun. Our guides, Dani and Javier, were as game for conversation about the intricacies of the ecosystem as they were for serious discussion of the political and economic context of Ecuador – and especially how the Sani people and their neighboring indigenous Quechua communities hope and plan to survive in the globalized economy.”

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MOROCCO Program Leader: Kenneth Honerkamp, Professor of Religion (Arabic, Islamic Texts, and North African Sufism) Academic Focus: North African Islamic Culture and Traditions Moira Fennell ’17 “The Morocco trip reminded me how unbelievably fortunate I am to be a part of this program. From riding camels through the Sahara as the sun was setting to practicing Arabic with the most loving and welcoming host family in Marrakech, it was an experience that would be hard to replicate. Dr. Honerkamp had an answer to every question we asked and made sure that we weren’t just tourists, but that we got to really experience the culture and become ambassadors of our culture to the Moroccan people and ambassadors of Morocco to our friends and family back home.” Trang Nguyen ’17 “Dr. Honerkamp was so familiar with the country and well-respected by people everywhere we went, so it felt as though we were seeing Morocco from a very unique perspective. Every coffee or rest stop we took while we were on the road ended up being a location of breathtaking natural beauty and/or a historical site with an incredibly rich backstory. My favorite day, though, was when we rode camels into the Sahara desert. We reached our campsite right as the sun was setting, and we climbed to the top of one of the tallest sand dunes to watch the sunset and later to stargaze. After a slightly hectic junior year, this spring break trip gave me the opportunity to slow down and appreciate the irreplaceable college experience the Fellowship has given me, and I was able to do this alongside some of my best friends in one of the most magical places I have ever been.”

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SOUTH KOREA Program Leader: Hyangsoon Yi, Professor of Comparative Literature, Director of Center for Asian Studies Academic Focus: Zen Buddhism in South Korea Justin Payan ’17 “I learned the most about Buddhism during the most understated parts of the trip: a private chat with the abbot of Hongbeopsa Temple about Buddhism’s application to artificial intelligence, war, and changing cultural values; taking a formal meal with the nuns of Unmunsa amid the peaceful silence of the mountains; laughing at stupid jokes with my best friends and our new friends, the nuns. Although we saw truly breathtaking temples, palaces, and religious artifacts, for me those larger attractions simply reinforced my commitment to finding meaning in the fleeting moments of the trip.” Mollie Simon ’18 “Nothing in life prepared me for the simultaneously exhausting, peaceful, and moving experience of waking up at 3:45 am in a Buddhist temple nestled in the mountains to bow 108 times and share in a zero-waste formal meal and learn about a culture and lifestyle strikingly different from my own. Visiting the beautiful, unadulterated Unmunsa Temple, made me think about everything from how I consume food and what I throw away to how easy it can be to get lost in one’s own thoughts. Dr. Yi organized a trip which displayed contrasting sides of the country from modernity to ancient ruins and burial grounds. From Seoul to the capital city of the ancient Sila Empire, we learned about the intersection of government and religion throughout Korea history.” Gabrielle Pierre ’17 “At Unmunsa Temple, there is such a sound self awareness and mindfulness and a unique lens for seeing the world through compassionate eyes for yourself and others. The Abbess said it best, ‘I don’t travel just to see the world, I travel to see how other people live and use this as a lens to learn more about myself.”

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NEW YORK, NY and WASHINGTON, DC (First-Year Fellows) Program Leader: David S. Williams, Associate Provost & Honors Program Director Academic Focus: Public Health, the Arts, Law, and Politics Stephanie Stewart ’19 “I was ecstatic to be going on my first trip with the other first-year Fellows. I foresaw that we would leave the trip closer than ever after a week of amazing experiences. What I did not expect was how much we already felt like a family at the beginning of the trip.” Zoe Li ’19 “Visiting Goldman Sachs, the Greater New York Hospital Association, NYU Langone, and Congressional offices was an invaluable experience. The most valuable part of the trip, however (possibly even more than getting to spend an hour and a half with a Supreme Court Justice), was getting to know the first year class of Fellows better.”

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Laurel Hiatt ’19 “When we met with Justice Clarence Thomas, it took only a few minutes before we were all fully comfortable and laughing. His love of UGA was easily apparent, as well as his desire to make us comfortable and have candid conversation.” Kavi Pandian ’19 “Getting to speak with alumni in each city was one of my favorite parts of the trip, as it exposed us to all the incredible things alumni have gone on to do, and it also showed us how, even after graduating, they cared so much about UGA and the Fellowship that they took the time to meet us and share their experiences.”

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First-Year Maymester 2016 Study Abroad at Oxford University Courses  Biomedical Ethics – David Birks, Kellogg College  Environmental Economics – George Bitsakakis,

Pembroke College  Satire and Dystopia in Modern and Contemporary

Fiction – David Bradshaw, Worcester College  Rights and Liberties in English Common Law

– Claire Palmer, Department of Politics and International Relations Kavi Pandian ’19 “Besides the incredible teachers, being surrounded by a town so steeped in history created a truly unmatched learning environment. Additionally, having the chance to live in and explore a foreign country for a month with great friends, both old and new, was fantastic and a key part of what made our time at Oxford so enjoyable. From studying in the Bodleian to wandering the streets of Oxford to cooking (or at least attempting to) in the house kitchen, I’ll never forget the memories I made while at Oxford.”

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Zoe Li ’19 “Studying the English Common law system and writing about the cases opened my eyes to a genuine interest in law that I was unsure about before this course. The opportunity to travel to London to see the actual Royal Courts of Justice, listen in to a terrorism trial at the Old Bailey, and speak with two barristers in person was also priceless.” Nirav Ilango ’19 “Oxford’s location makes it ideal for day trips around the United Kingdom. During the Maymester, I went on fun day trips to London, Cambridge, Brighton, and Bath. But by far my favorite adventure was when a friend and I took an overnight train to the Isle of Anglesey in Wales. We arrived at three in the morning and immediately began hiking up a local mountain to watch the sun rise over the horizon. The surreal views that day – the morning glint on the Irish Sea, the jagged walls of the ancient Welsh castle at Caernafon, the sunset on an endless sand beach – are something that I will never forget.”

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U N D E R G R A DUAT E R ESEAR CH

As a major research institution, the University of Georgia encourages undergraduates to participate in research with faculty in all academic disciplines. From their first moments on campus, Foundation Fellows are introduced to top-tier faculty members who can direct them to people and projects that complement their interests. With funding from the Fellowship, many Fellows also pursue research opportunities off campus at institutions in the United States and abroad. These experiences bring classroom subjects to life, confer practical skills, and guide students toward the next steps in their academic and professional careers.

Graduating Fellows Highlight the Influence of Undergraduate Research Experiences Engaging in research has shifted my education from the acceptance of predetermined facts to the exploration of a world of questions. My experiences at UGA have prepared me to continue to pursue research next fall in graduate school at the University of Oxford.” — Meredith Paker ’16

Meredith Paker ’16 – Economics “As an economics major intending to go into academia, the research I’ve done at the University of Georgia has helped me affirm and develop my goals. I have worked with faculty members Dr. David Bradford, Dr. Jonathan Williams, and Dr. Bill Lastrapes on numerous health economics research projects, learning about the research process while helping to answer policyrelevant questions about U.S. prescription drug usage. “The support of older Foundation Fellows and faculty mentors helped me connect with Dr. Williams and Dr. Bradford, who were just beginning a large project on off-label prescriptions. I spent much of sophomore and junior year working with them to develop an interesting research question, to prepare a massive dataset, and to conduct a preliminary analysis. “With funding from the Fellowship, I presented our work at the Southern Economic Association annual conference in Atlanta, Georgia. As one of the only undergraduate presenters at this conference, it was a fantastic networking opportunity and a great way to learn about all of the different fields in economics. I loved sharing our work with other interested economists, and we received extremely useful feedback from my session. We incorporated this feedback into my first co-authored paper, ‘Patterns in OffLabel Prescription Drug Use,’ which is currently out for review. “The Fellowship also supported a trip to Milan, Italy, where I presented an extension of this work at the International Health Economics Association world congress. At this major conference, I shared my work with a large and diverse global audience who offered many new ideas and suggestions. I incorporated these broader perspectives in a senior thesis project this year, ‘The Effect of Off-Label Promotion Prosecution,’ which pursued a related question to my existing research.” Lauren Dennison ’16 – Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Genetics “For as long as I can remember my academic interests have been in the sciences. At the beginning of sophomore year, I joined the Hajduk lab researching African sleeping sickness. With Tony Szempruch as my mentor, my project has focused on investigating the role played by extracellular

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vesicles in transferring serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) between different subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei. At present, our findings show that cell-cell communication, mediated by EVs, can alter the pathogenicity of African trypanosomes through the transfer of SRA and may help explain the observation of mixed human infection between pathogenic and nonpathogenic African trypanosome subspecies. I presented these results at the CURO Symposium, and this work is included in a manuscript, of which I am a co-author, published in Cell. “My experience in the Hajduk lab was very rewarding. Any setback faced was an opportunity to hone my creativity and problem solving abilities, sparking discussion and collaboration with others. Dedicating many hours a day fully immersing myself in experiments and literature was no chore as I followed the trail of hypothesis driven questions. However, my strongest interest was in understanding the causes and progression of cancer. Through two competitive summer internship programs, I followed this interest. Summer 2014, I worked in the lab of Dr. William Carroll at NYU Langone Medical Center conducting research on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). My project investigated whether relapse-specific mutations found in the gene NT5C1B conferred resistance to nucleoside analogue therapies used in ALL maintenance treatment. I presented this work at the Leadership Alliance National Symposium and was awarded top marks in all categories. While results showed this mutation did not affect chemosensitivity, I had never been more enthralled with a topic, and I knew I wanted to continue delving into the underlying causes of cancer with the hope that my research could directly translate into medical advances. “The following summer, I further explored translational cancer research in the lab of Dr. Ross Levine through an internship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. My project, with Dr. Lindsay LaFave as my mentor, focused on investigating the collaborative role of JAK2V617F and ASXL1 loss in myeloid disease transformation. “Experience in multiple labs has exposed me to a large variety of techniques that are prevalent in my chosen field, allowing me to conduct both in vitro and in vivo research. It has also helped refine my future research interests. Moving forward I plan to pursue a PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology with the goal of uncovering knowledge about the genetic basis of different cancers in order to identify additional therapeutic targets that limit toxicities.”

Kelsey Lowery ’16 – German, Linguistics “I came to UGA knowing that I wanted to do research. It just ended up being nothing like what I expected or what I thought I wanted. But that’s one of UGA’s great strengths as an undergraduate research university – even if, like me, you completely change direction halfway through your college career, there will still be great professors who want to work with you and amazing research opportunities open to you. “I entered UGA intending to major in biotechnology. For a number of reasons and after a lot of deliberation, I switched to a major in German at the start of junior year. Big jump, I know. But fortunately for me, my faculty mentor, Dr. Martin Kagel from UGA’s German Department, was there to help me with the transition. I started doing research during my very first semester as a German major. “I spent the summer before junior year in Germany, taking a course on business language in Duesseldorf. More than just a refresher class, it solidified confidence in my decision, and allowed me to hit the ground running that fall when I returned to UGA and began research on an author with whom I was already familiar, Bertolt

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Brecht, and another of whom I had never heard, the Hungarian-Jewish playwright George Tabori. Under Dr. Kagel’s supervision, I read a select handful of Tabori’s writings alongside a few Brecht plays that were closely related to them, both thematically and because the two authors knew each other personally. “That semester of research culminated in the presentation of a paper at the CURO Research Symposium in the spring. That paper dealt with the concepts of virtue and victimization and how they relate to socially constructed positions of gender in two of Tabori’s writings dealing with the Holocaust. “That wasn’t the end of it, though. I’d been taking classes on Bertolt Brecht since I first started at UGA, and I knew by that point that I wanted to write my senior thesis on his works. The summer after junior year, thanks to the incredible amount of freedom UGA allowed me in my research, I set off to Germany alone, with nothing but a Staatsbibliotek library card, an email address for the Brecht archives, and a reading list a mile long. Because of my previous research and connections at UGA, I had access to the Bertolt Brecht Archiv in Berlin. I was even allowed to handle the original production books, handwritten by Brecht himself. It was an experience rarely offered to undergrad students.” 50

Seth Euster ’16 – History, Political Science (BA/MA) “The depth of the undergraduate research opportunities at UGA was a major factor in my decision to attend the university. Per the suggestion of my Honors advisor, I enrolled in a Multicultural Georgia class that centered on recasting the history of the South in a more multiracial light. Filling the ‘silence in the archives’ about the lives of the slaves who built our state would facilitate such a recasting. The course instructor, historian Dr. Christopher Lawton (who would eventually become my research mentor), challenged me to do what I could to fill these voids, even if only on a small scale. In what eventually became a funded project through the CURO Summer Fellowship, I worked to recast the history of a local plantation in a multiracial light. “Twenty minutes down Prince Avenue in Jackson County is the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. In the 1980s, while the plantation house was being insulated, workers in the attic stumbled upon a wooden box that contained hundreds of tightly rolled documents detailing the history of the farm from 1799 through 1865. I had the pleasure of sitting in the plantation house and combing through these documents for any clues about the lives of the slaves and eventually freedmen who lived and worked on the farm. The purpose of creating these biographies was

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to produce a narrative on the farm that was more inclusive of the African American community and less romanticized than what then existed. “Another component of the project was mapping the genealogy of the slaves on the farm. I traced the genealogy of the first slave, Leah, purchased by the family in 1799, to modern times. I participated in the family reunion of Leah’s direct descendants and connected cousins, living in close proximity to one another, who were previously unaware of each other’s existence. “Junior year, I began graduate coursework for a combined BA/MA in political science. In the field of American politics, my research interests focus on executive-legislative inter-branch relations (Congress and the president), as well as the politics of race in the U.S. South. I have also done work on the interplay of social contract theories with various events in U.S. history. “I began working on a quantitative project to investigate the effect of changes in the president’s approval rating on the success of his agenda in Congress. On the political theory side, I wrote a paper interpreting the political legitimacy of the Confederacy’s secession through the lens of Rousseau’s conception of popular sovereignty (government by the people). With funding from the

Fellowship, I presented the two papers at the annual conference of the Southern Political Science Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico. I was the youngest participant and likely the only one without a college degree. At the conference, I received valuable critiques of my research and solid advice on pursuing an academic career, and I networked with political scientists from universities across the country. “I am attending law school next year, with the eventual goal of becoming a law professor. With a social science background, I hope to incorporate an empirical component in my legal scholarship. With the assistance of my master’s thesis committee chair, Dr. Michael Lynch, I chose a thesis topic that is relevant to both law and politics. I developed a model that will test whether or not the time it takes a judicial nominee to be confirmed has decreased since the Senate began using the ‘nuclear option’ to bypass the filibuster of lower federal court judicial nominees. Ideally, a version of my master’s thesis will be published in a law review journal in the near future. “Conducting meaningful research has given me a clearer perspective on the research and publishing demands of a tenure-track academic position— a job I hope to obtain one day.”

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C O N F E R E N C E S , P R E S E NTAT I O NS, P UB LI CAT I O NS

Research and Conference Grants 2015-2016 Fellows Attend Professional and Academic Conferences and ExtraUniversity Courses with Funding from the Fellowship Swapnil Agrawal International Studies Association Annual Convention, Atlanta, GA Tristan Bagala International Conference on Administrative and Political Science, Paris, France Logan Campbell International Studies Association Annual Convention, Atlanta, GA Seth Euster Southern Political Science Association 2016 Annual Conference, Puerto Rico

Domestic and

Mallory Harris Ecology and Evolution of Infections and Disease Conference, Ithaca, NY

international conferences add to Fellows’ professional education and introduce them to academic communities near and far. They learn to communicate their research findings through presentations

Laurel Hiatt Camp Pride Conference, Charlotte, NC Erin Hollander Harvard National Collegiate Research Conference, Cambridge, MA Kirstie Hostetter International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic, and Social Sustainability, Portland, OR Nirav Ilango Icubesat Conference, Oxford, UK Glenn Jacoby American Humanist Association Conference, Chicago, IL Jacob Kennedy Society For Applied Anthropology, Vancouver, Canada; The Running Event Conference, Austin, TX Zoe Li International Studies Association Annual Convention, Atlanta, GA

guided by their research

Katie Lovejoy AISEC Latin American Conference, Bogota, Columbia; AISEC European Congress, Bucharest, Romania; AIESEC Board Of Directors Meeting, New York, NY

mentors.

Mallika Madhusudan Duke Law Summer Institute, Washington, DC

and publications,

Emily Maloney Southern Sociology Society Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA; Presented “Successful Strategies for Goal Setting with Families” at Head Start Region IV Annual Training Conference, Atlanta, GA; Presented “Family Goal Setting with Vulnerable Populations: Strategies for Success” at Georgia Association on Young Children Conference, Lawrenceville, GA Vijeth Mudalegundi Invest Like A Monster Conference, San Antonio, TX Trang Nguyen CDC Millennial Health Leaders Summit, Atlanta, GA Meredith Paker Empower Change Yoga Conference, Burlington, VT Eytan Palte AIPAC Policy Conference, Washington, DC

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Kavi Pandian Southern Sociology Society Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA; Student Leadership and Diversity Conference, Columbia, SC Justin Payan Re.Work Deep Learning Summit, San Francisco, CA John Rawlings Wall Street Workshop, Athens, GA; Wall Street Journal and Deal Forum, Athens, GA Hannah Reiss Bridging to a Sustainable Future in Global Health, San Francisco, CA Leighton Rowell UNESCO Mobile Learning Week, Paris, France Sierra Runnels International Conference on Administrative and Political Science, Paris, France Eli Scott Yale Rebellious Lawyering Conference, New Haven, CT Caroline Shearer Jane Goodall Lecture, Gainesville, FL Mollie Simon International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic, and Social Sustainability, Portland, OR Aditya Sood Student Leadership and Diversity Conference, Columbia, SC Karishma Sriram SPARC Research and Education Conference, San Antonio, TX Treva Tam Academic Affairs Faculty Symposium, Helen, GA Luke Thompson American Economic Association/ Allied Social Science Associations (AEA/ASSA) Conference, San Francisco, CA Chenee Tracey Understanding the Colombian Peace Process Conference, Washington, DC Elizabeth Wilkes Yale Food Systems Symposium, New Haven, CT; Food Energy Water Nexus, Washington, DC Kathleen Wilson Tufts University Institute for Global Leadership, Boston, MA; ISA Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA

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in a Piglet Model Laura Courchesne Psycho-Social Impact of Drone Strikes on Non-Combatant Populations: The Cognitive Mechanism Underlying ProGroup Endorsement of Extremist Violence; The Psychology of Nazism and Genocide: The Role of Religion and Symbolism Tarun Daniel Neural Network Formation and Response to Pharmacological Stimulation Lauren Dennison Extracellular Vesicle Dependent Transfer of a Virulence Factor Confers Human Infectivity to Trypanosoma brucei brucei Guy Eroh Analysis of Hybridization in Chattahoochee Bass (Micropterus chattahoochae) Populations below Lake Lanier Susan Jones Quantitative PCR Detection of the SRY Gene of Male Dog Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Female Dog Brains with Experimentally Induced Ischemic Stroke Hammad Khalid O-Linked Glycosylation Patterns of Cervical Mucins in HIV Infection Kelsey Lowrey Motherhood, War, and Ownership in Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children and The Caucasian Chalk Circle Mallika Madhusudan Eradicating Food Insecurity in Metro Atlanta Emily Maloney Reducing Teacher Turnover in Georgia Public Schools; Correspondence between Family Needs and Family Goals: Implications for Early Childhood Interventions for Low-Income Families Morrison Nolan Re-Evaluating Proposed Identities of Brooksella alternata of the Conasauga Shale of Georgia and Alabama Meredith Paker Psychiatric Drug Use and the Business Cycle Justin Payan Keyword Extraction Using Artificial Neural Networks and a TextRank Variant

Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) 2016 Symposium Presenters

Joy Peltier Functions of the Discourse Marker “Bon” in Spoken French

Cali Callaway Optogenetic Control of a Neuromuscular Junction Model on a Chip

Bert Thompson The Doctrinal Development of SeaLaunched Nuclear Capabilities

Caroline Coleman Use of a Spatial T-Maze Test and an Object Recognition Test to Assess Learning and Memory

Elizabeth Wilkes Fracking Governance and Resistance in Western North Carolina

Caroline Shearer Parasite Infection and Host Behavioral Complexity

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Additional Publications Lauren Dennison

Szempruch AJ, Sykes SE, Kieft R, Dennison LW, Becker AC, Gartrell A, Martin WJ, Nakayasu ES, Almeida IC, Hajduk SL, and Harrington JM. 2016. Extracellular vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei mediate virulence factor transfer and cause host anemia. Cell 164:246-257

Rand Pope

Han, Sang-oh, Pope R, Li S, Kishnani PS, Steet R, and Koeberl DD. A betablocker, propranolol, decreases the efficacy from enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 2016 Feb 3; 117(2): 114-9. Epub 2015 Oct 3

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INTERNSHIPS

Internships give students hands-on experience and professional connections they can build on for years to come. As undergraduates, Fellows hold internship positions in for-profit, non-profit, academic, and governmental organizations throughout the U.S. and around the world. They gain valuable skills and test out possible career paths, often while earning credit toward graduation. Kevin Sun ’16 – Citigroup, New York, NY

I spent spring semester working as the personal intern to the Superintendent of

“During ten weeks as a summer analyst in Citigroup’s Sales & Trading division in New York, I spent time on different desks across product areas and functions, including structured rotations on convertible bond sales and trading, spot foreign exchange trading, and investment grade credit trading. Financial markets are exciting and dynamic, and I learned and absorbed a tremendous amount by being in the middle of it all at one of the largest, most global financial institutions in the world. The openness of the trading floor – you can see and hear everything going on as traders and salespeople react to the endless stream of information hitting their Bloombergs – makes it a unique environment, and the camaraderie on the floor made days fly by. At the end of the summer, I accepted an offer to return full-time (definitely not a bad way to start senior year).”

Atlanta Public Schools.

Katie Lovejoy ’16 – MD Assist; State Farm Insurance, Petersburg, VA

I interacted with district

“With the objective of learning more about the insurance and banking industries, I worked as a Banking & Auto intern for six weeks at State Farm Insurance in Petersburg, Virginia. I first had to equip myself with the human capital and certification for the job. In my role, I was responsible for customer-service and upselling existing clients to optimize coverage and discounts, as well as re-financing loans. As an aspiring entrepreneur, I value accumulating a variety of industry knowledge and exploring successful business models. Working in an agency and shadowing the agent exposed me to the pros and cons of being an independent contractor, owning a portion of a large corporation. It also taught me a lot about risk management and financing in business from the insurer and lender’s perspective. “Passionate about social entrepreneurship, I jumped at the opportunity to work as an Account Manager with a fantastic start-up, MDAssist, that is powered by Aionex and was founded with the technology to efficiently screen for depression and provide primary care doctors with helpful diagnostic information. Today, it contains an online library of healthcare screenings and related scoring algorithms and other tools that increase practice revenue and improve the care provided to patients. I learned a lot from both the founders and from clients in the field about how technological innovation is shaping the medical profession.”

administrators and local students, some of whom face unbelievable obstacles in their schools and daily lives. This internship was an unparalleled view into the demands and rewards of education policy, and each day at work made me more certain that I had finally found the field for me.” — Shaun Kleber ’16

Lee Folk ’16 – Roark Capital Group, Atlanta, GA “I spent ten weeks interning as a Summer Analyst at Roark Capital Group, a middle-market private equity firm based in Atlanta. Roark invests in private companies in the Consumer and Retail Sector, with a particular focus on franchise

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and multi-unit businesses. After some initial training, I was staffed on a live deal. I went into the summer with the goal of furthering my financial knowledge through real-world experience, but I never anticipated I would be fortunate enough to spend such a considerable portion of my summer working on a deal that would progress so far. In addition to the deep dive I took on that transaction, I saw different projects ranging from planning unit expansion to mergers with Roark’s current holdings to take-private acquisitions across several industries. Each provided exposure to different forms of valuation, acquisition strategy, and due diligence. My internship at Roark served as an excellent introduction into the dynamic fast-paced environment of related fields in financial services.” Chris Lewitzke ’16 – UGA Athletic Association, USTA, Imagem Corporativa “My internship with the internal operations department at the UGA Athletic Association started with the mundane task of data entry, but I was soon able to participate in more exciting duties, including helping to grow and coordinate the process of group tours in Sanford Stadium. While trying to get a hundred 10-year-olds to listen to me as we walked through the stadium wasn’t without stress, those were some of my favorite days. In total, I spent five semesters interning with Internal Operations at the Athletic Department, which helped me secure a job with the US Tennis Association’s Mid-Atlantic Section as a marketing and communications intern. My internship culminated in representing the USTA at the Citi Open, a major tennis tournament in Washington, DC, which was an unforgettable experience. “At the same time as I was working with the Athletic Association and USTA, I was also learning Portuguese with the ultimate goal of spending 10 months in Brazil with the Portuguese Flagship Program. After years of preparation, I finally headed down to Brazil and interned at Imagem Corporativa, a full-service public relations agency headquartered in São Paulo. As the only non-Brazilian in the office, I wasn’t sure what to expect when I walked in the first day, but the entire agency immediately welcomed me with open arms. Throughout my four-month internship, I worked with a range of clients, including Uber, Audi, Lindt and the São Paulo Police Department. Working in a second language and in a new media market certainly made for a steep learning curve, but I can safely say playing futebol with Brazilians on the company soccer team was the biggest challenge of the whole semester!” John B. Stroud ’16 – Encompass Home Health and Hospice, Stadion Money Management 58

“I worked as a Business Development Intern at Encompass Home Health and Hospice based in Dallas, Texas. Encompass is one of the largest home health companies in the country. Over the summer, I helped analyze the profitability of and then facilitate the purchase of smaller home health and hospice firms. I also worked on a longterm project that gathered health statistics and population data to assess the profitability of potential purchases in the home health and hospice markets for every county in the United States. This project was my biggest accomplishment of the summer, and my supervisors are still using an updated version of it today. “This past summer, I interned at Stadion Money Management, based out of Athens, GA. My work primarily involved discovering and improving upon existing trading strategies and then testing them with current data to find patterns and discover what strategies were the most profitable with the least amount of volatility. I primarily used the Python programming language to import large amounts of data and perform these simulations of strategies before outputting desired results including interactive graphs that showed how strategies were performing on multiple dimensions over time.” Shaun Kleber ’16 – Center for American Progress, Atlanta Public Schools “Last fall, I interned in Washington, DC with the Center for American Progress, an action-oriented progressive public policy think tank, through UGA’s Washington Semester Program. More specifically, I worked on their National Security and International Policy Team with the Middle East group. I monitored daily news updates in Saudi Arabia through one of the country’s most volatile financial periods, compiled research memos on economic development in the West Bank and Gaza, and interviewed national security officials for a best-practices report for the next administration’s National Security Council. This experience provided an opportunity to gain practical work experience in the field of foreign policy and explore other policy areas covered by CAP, including immigration, poverty, and education. This helped me realize that education policy is the better field for me. “As a result, I spent spring semester working as the personal intern to the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools. I interacted with district administrators and local students, some of whom face unbelievable obstacles in their schools and daily lives. This internship was an unparalleled view into the demands and rewards of education policy, and each day at work made me more certain that I had finally found the field for me.”

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Foundation Fellows Internships 2015-2016

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Jonathan Adelman

Central Reserve Bank of Peru, Lima, Peru; White House Council of Economic Advisers, Washington, DC; Citi, New York, NY

Kerri Andre

Groote Schuur Hospital Cardiothoracic Surgical Unit, Cape Town, South Africa

Tristan Bagala

BeaverTails, Montreal, Canada

Laura Courchesne

Unit for Relations with Arms Carriers, International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva, Switzerland; Changing Character of War Programme, Pembroke College, University of Oxford, Oxford, England

Tarun Daniel

Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, England

Madison Dill

South African Education Department, Cape Town, South Africa; Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Athens, GA

Alex Edquist

The New Georgia Project, Atlanta, GA

Moira Fennell

PCALP, New York, NY

Lee Folk

Roark Capital Group, Atlanta, GA

Shuchi Goyal

Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York, NY

Jack Hall

Sportsrisq Capital, London, England

Mallory Harris

Girlology, Greenville, SC

Kirstie Hostetter

Sustainable Investment Group, Atlanta, GA

Nirav Ilango

Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Athens, GA

Glenn Jacoby

Patriots Ghana, Kasoa, Ghana

Susie Jones

Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota, Roseville, MN

Joshua Kenway

Athens Ark UMOC, Athens, GA

Shaun Kleber

Center for American Progress, Washington, DC; Office of the Superintendent, Atlanta Public Schools, Atlanta, GA

Torre Lavelle

Bureau of African Affairs, Office of Economic Policy, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC

Bruce Li

Citigroup Inc., New York, NY

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Krystal Lo

J.P. Morgan, New York, NY

Mallika Madhusudan

Freedman Consulting LLC, Washington, DC

Emily Maloney

Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Athens, GA; Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, Atlanta, GA

Reilly Megee

Community Connection, Athens, GA; Paragraph, Inc., Philadelphia, PA

Vijeth Mudalegundi

UBS, New York, NY

Trang Nguyen

Publicis Healthcare Communications Group, New York, NY; Helen Keller International, New York, NY

Justin Payan

HPE Vertica, Cambridge, MA

Gabrielle Pierre

Breedlove Land Planning Inc., Atlanta, GA

Hannah Reiss

The Carter Center, Atlanta, GA; Zooarchaeology Lab at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, Athens, GA; US Consulate in Mumbai, US Department of State Virtual Student Foreign Service, Remote

Ruth Schade

Atlantis Project, Ponferrada, Spain

Eli Scott

Lawyers Without Borders, Nairobi, Kenya

Mollie Simon

Voice of America, Washington, DC

Madison Snelling

Children for Change Cambodia, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; New York Law School, New York, NY

John B. Stroud

Stadion Money Management, Athens, GA

Treva Tam

Insightpool, Atlanta, GA; University of Georgia Press, Athens, GA

Luke Thompson

Citi, New York, NY

Sam Tingle

Next Academy, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Matthias Wilder

New York Institute of Technology, New York, NY

Elizabeth Wilkes

Real Food, Washington, DC

Kathleen Wilson

World Bank Inspection Panel, Washington, DC

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CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Graduating Fellows Highlight Their Service and Leadership Experiences Kirstie Hostetter ’16 – Roosevelt Institute, Lunchbox Garden Project, Energy Concept

When I began college as an environmental economics and management major, I knew that I wanted to use my time at UGA to acquire the skills necessary to communicate the importance of environmental issues to others. While I was learning the economic rationale for environmental sustainability in class, I searched early on for opportunities to put both these and other justifications into practice within and beyond campus.”

— Kirstie Hostetter ’16

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“When I began college as an environmental economics and management major, I knew that I wanted to use my time at UGA to acquire the skills necessary to communicate the importance of environmental issues to others. While I was learning the economic rationale for environmental sustainability in class, I searched early on for opportunities to put both these and other justifications into practice within and beyond campus. “Freshman year I discovered the Roosevelt Institute, a student-led policy think tank, and in this organization I saw an opportunity to solidify my visions for environmental progress through an intensive research and writing process. As I sat in my first Roosevelt meeting and became entranced by the idea of catalyzing change through policy, I did not imagine that I would later publish a policy piece in the national Roosevelt 10 Ideas Journal on the benefits of urban rooftop gardens, thereby reaching a national network with my idea. Policy afforded a method of communication that justified reasons for action and also provided a plan for action that could be implemented on any scale. “The Lunchbox Garden Project provided the opportunity to enact change within my own community through its work teaching elementary school students how to plant, care for, and harvest their very own vegetable gardens. When I became Executive Director of the organization junior year, it seemed only logical that we begin introducing sustainability lessons into our program. The kids made the leap from gardening to sustainability easily. When I think back on one of our first sustainability lessons, an activity where we built paper pinwheels and ran around with them to replicate the power of wind turbines, I smile remembering the wonder on the students’ faces when we explained that nature could help keep the lights on in their homes. “On campus, while conversations about energy were happening within the engineering, economics, and international affairs departments, no conversations were happening across these disciplines. Energy has become the cornerstone of global society. No environmental discussion can ignore the importance of energy, but our current methods of energy production are unsustainable. “To foster a nonpartisan, interdisciplinary discussion of energy resources and our energy future, I helped found a group on campus called The Energy Concept. Through documentary showings, expert panels, and speaker series, we create a space to explore the many aspects of energy– finance, security, technology. The discourse at these events creates a level of awareness among UGA students regarding the importance of energy in all aspects of our lives, empowering them to become more aware consumers of energy. “In my college experiences, I have learned how to communicate with national networks through policy writing, with elementary school children through sustainability lessons, and with fellow students through facilitated discussion. When I entered college, I knew I felt called to effect environmental change, but I did not know why. In working with these seemingly disconnected communities of people though, I have realized how deeply the health of the

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environment affects each of us. By striving for a more sustainable world, we strive to provide a higher quality of life for every person on this planet.” Hannah Reiss ’16 – The Roosevelt Institute “I came to UGA intending to become a doctor. As I took the necessary pre-med courses, I realized that I wanted to study medicine as a lens to examine and address political, economic, and social inequalities. Much of this realization stemmed from my involvement with the Roosevelt Institute, a student-run policy think tank I joined freshman year. This past year, I served as one of its executive directors. “What drew me to Roosevelt was the individualized research format coupled with mentorship from professors and older classmates. Through Roosevelt, I developed policy interests within global health. In the semester-long Roosevelt Scholars course, I wrote a policy on maternal health in India. I began to appreciate the impossibility

of improving health without addressing the social determinants of health – the factors that leave certain populations with disproportionate disease burdens. “I now study anthropology in addition to biology to learn the history of global health efforts and the politics that determine which diseases receive attention and funding. I also volunteer at Mercy Health Center, a clinic that serves uninsured patients in Athens and surrounding counties. “At Mercy, I scribe for doctors, some of whom arrive after a full day at work. I find myself most affected by their ability to hear what each patient is saying. Whether it’s giving credence to a patient’s interpretation of the illness or listening for subtle cues that fill in parts of a missing story, I want to develop these same abilities as a doctor. “Volunteering at Mercy has provided an excellent complement to Roosevelt. It has demonstrated to me that health can be discussed in policy terms on the global, national, and state levels but that disparities manifest themselves in individuals within local communities.”

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L I S A A N N C O O L E AWA R D

The Lisa Ann Coole Award was established in 1999 to honor the memory of an extraordinary young woman and to inspire Foundation Fellows to translate into their lives the compassion, joy, courage, and excellence that defined Lisa’s presence in the Fellowship, at UGA, and in her communities both in Georgia and in Illinois. Lisa was a model Foundation Fellow. She graduated from The University of Georgia magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in biology in 1997. She was a 19-time All-American swimmer, won two NCAA titles, and was selected as the 1997 NCAA Woman of the Year. Lisa had just completed her first year of veterinary medicine at the University of Illinois-Champaign when she died as a result of injuries received in an automobile accident. In 1999, she was inducted into the UGA Athletic Association Circle of Honor, the highest tribute paid to former Bulldog athletes and coaches.

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This Year’s Recipient – Kirstie Hostetter & Chris Lewitzke Kirstie Hostetter – Environmental Economics & Management “Even among a class of unbelievably wonderful people, all of whom embody various characteristics of what this award aims to honor and encourage, Kirstie serves as a shining but humble example of putting compassion over competition. Between her demanding schedule and her inspiring success in everything she puts her mind to, she has no shortage of reasons or excuses to focus on herself, but she never stops working to better the people and places around her. It is appropriate that her area of interest is the environment, because everything she does – both in her professional and personal life – seems to be geared toward making the world a better place for others.” Chris Lewitzke – Marketing, Public Relations “Chris has throughout the four years of the Fellowship demonstrated academic and leadership distinction and also demonstrated a knack for letting this distinction go unheard of. Whether it was through his sports marketing internship with UGA athletics or during his flagship program in Brazil, we always knew he was doing cool things...we just never knew what they were exactly. Instead of talking about things he was doing, he would spend his time listening to what we were doing. Our class is huge, but Topher was able to be a friend and confidante to every one of us. He embodies everything that the Fellowship represents: love of adventure, compassion, intellectual curiosity across all disciplines, and the ability to empathize with anyone.”

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Previous Award Recipients 2015 Eilidh Geddes

2006 Chloe Thompson

2014 Jesse Chan

2005 Krisda Chaiyachati

2013 Sara De La Torre Berรณn

2004 Vanessa Reynolds

2012 Hank Schwartz

2003 Chris Gibson

2011 Mir Inaamullah & Alex Squires

2002 Cathy Lee & Tina Rakkit

2010 Betsy Allen

2001 Laquesha Sanders & Kyle Wingfield

2009 Elizabeth Godbey

2000 Bronson Lee

2008 Anant Mandawat

1999 Lacy Feldman & Torre Mills

2007 Helen Smith

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Caroline Grace Coleman Major(s): Economics Minor(s): Biology Hometown: Orlando, FL Research: Social Recognition and Open Field Cognitive Testing in a Piglet Model; Object Recognition and T-Maze Cognitive Testing in a Piglet Model Travel-Study and Internships: Bali, England; Japan; Mongolia; South Korea; Thailand; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Regenerative Bioscience Center Undergraduate Research Fellow; Athens Regional Medical Center Volunteer; Kappa Kappa Gamma Vice President of Academics; Terry College of Business Student Ambassador; Whatever It Takes at UGA Executive Board, Special Projects Director, Clarke Middle School Mentorship Founder, After-School Program Mentor; Terry College of Business Leadership Connection; Roosevelt Institute; UNICEF at UGA Community Outreach Chair Honors and Awards: Freeman Asia Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Dean Tate Honor Society, Order of Omega, Honors in New York, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, magna cum laude with High Honors Lauren Wesley Dennison Major(s): Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Genetics Hometown: Maineville, OH Research: Investigating the Collaborative Role of JAK2V617F and ASXL1 Loss in Myeloid Disease Transformation; Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia; Relapse-Specific Mutations in NT5C1B in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 Resistance in Mammalian Systems Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Italy; New York, NY; Cincinnati, OH Campus/Community Activities: Biochemistry Department Journal Club; UGA HEROs; Gamma Phi Beta Enrichment Committee, Community Service Committee, Bible Study; UGA College Life; UGA Honors Ambassador; Girls on the Run Mentor; CrossTrainers Mentor Honors and Awards: Barry M. Goldwater Scholar, CURO Assistantship, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Palladia Honor Society, Order of Omega, Phi Beta Kappa, First Honor Graduate, summa cum laude with Honors

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Alexandra Rae Edquist Major(s): Economics (AB/MA) Hometown: Alpharetta, GA Research: Todd Sweeney is Fiction: Removing Anticompetitive Professional Licensing; Capital-Intensive Punishment: Making Prisons More CostEffective; The Need to Control Adderall Abuse on University Campuses; Signaling Soft Skills: The Effect of Occupational Skills on Wage Variation Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; England; Tanzania; Uruguay; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: The Roosevelt Institute; Run for America Institute at UGA; Georgia Political Review Operations Officer and Senior Writer Honors and Awards: Palladia Honor Society, Deer Run Fellow, Corsair Society, Hollingsworth Award, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Blue Key Honor Society, Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma Society, Terry Student of the Year Finalist, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

Seth Isaac Euster Major(s): History, Political Science (BA/MA) Hometown: Dunwoody, GA Research: Public Prestige and Presidential Success in Congress: Testing the Marginal Effect of Electoral Vulnerability; Rousseau’s Social Contract and Assessing the Political Legitimacy of the Confederate Secession; Uncovering Roots at the Shields-Ethridge Farm: Memory, Identity, and Heritage Tourism; The Heritage of Slavery on the Shields-Ethridge Farm; Jordan Family Reunion: A Past to Remember, a Present to Celebrate, a Future to Generate Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Slovakia; South Africa Campus/Community Activities: Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity President; Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Philanthropy Committee Chairman; Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Rush Chairman; UGA Honors Teaching Assistant; University Judiciary Student Justice Honors and Awards: Joe Brown Connelly Scholar, Dean’s List, Phi Kappa Phi, magna cum laude with High Honors

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Lee Handly Folk Major(s): Finance, Mathematics Hometown: Nashville, TN Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; England; Morocco; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY; Nashville, TN Campus/Community Activities: Student Managed Investment Fund Energy Sector Leader; Whatever It Takes at UGA Executive Director; Sigma Chi Fraternity Treasurer Honors and Awards: Corsair Society, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude with Honors

Kirstie Dolores Hostetter Major(s): Environmental Economics & Management Minor(s): Spanish Hometown: Collierville, TN Research: Measuring Willingness to Pay for Sea Level Rise in Coastal Communities of Georgia; Rooftop Gardens: An Energy Saver for Businesses and Outdoor Haven for Communities; The Negative Side Effects of Organophosphate Pesticide Usage in Thailand; An Innovative Source of Affordable Housing in a Poverty-Stricken Community Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; Costa Rica; England; Nicaragua; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: The Energy Concept Co-Founder, Executive Director of Industry Relations; Roosevelt Institute Teaching Assistant, Regional Conference Planner, Environment Center Director; The Lunchbox Garden Project Senior Advisor, Executive Director; Carl Vinson Institute of Government Research Fellow; Athens-Clarke County School District ParentTeacher Conference Translator; Richard B. Russell Teaching Awards Selection Committee; OASIS Catรณlico Tutor Honors and Awards: Rhodes Scholar Finalist, Harry S. Truman Scholar Finalist, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellow, Palladia Honor Society, Dean Tate Honor Society, Sigma Delta Pi Hispanic Honor Society, summa cum laude with Highest Honors 68

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Caleb Alexander Ingram Major(s): Genetics Hometown: Richmond Hill, GA Research: Evolution and Function of a Signaling Pathway in Plants, Using an Arabidopsis Model; Morphological Data on Mosquito Fish for the Purpose of Exploring the Evolution of Invasive and Non-Invasive Species; Methods for Attaching a Thrombolytic Protein to Nanoparticles for Treatment of Ischemic Stroke Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; England; Tanzania; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Red Cross Volunteer, Honors Medicine in Literature Discussion Group Honors and Awards: Nelson Lab Summer Research Fellow, UGA Plant Center Undergraduate Research Award, Dean’s List, cum laude

Jacob Randall Kennedy Major(s): Anthropology Minor(s): Arabic Hometown: Albany, GA Research: Arabic Phonology and Applied Socio-Linguistics; Migration of Ethiopian and Kenyan Runners: Transnationalism through Sport; Concept Mapping as an Evaluation Tool: A Case Study of Girls Gotta Run Travel-Study and Internships: Ethiopia; Morocco; Tanzania Campus/Community Activities: Girls Gotta Run; UGArden; Anthropology Society President; Arab Cultural Association Treasurer; Athens Oral History Music Project Co-Founder and Manager Honors and Awards: Princeton in Asia Graduate Fellow, Phi Kappa Phi, Blue Key Honor Society, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude with Highest Honors

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Shaun Henry Kleber Major(s): Economics, International Affairs, Political Science Hometown: Atlanta, GA Research: Why Summer Matters in Keeping Kids Smart Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; Costa Rica; England; Slovakia; South Africa; Uruguay; Oakland, CA; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: UGA Mock Trial Team President, Treasurer, A-Team Captain, and Student Attorney; American Mock Trial Association Student Advisory Council; Georgia Political Review Staff Writer; Athens Peer Court; Thomas Lay After-School Program; Men’s Club Rowing Team Honors and Awards: Roosevelt Scholar, Sphinx Society, David S. Barr Award, Blue Key Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership and Service Honor Society, AT&T Student Leadership Award, Dean Tate Honor Society, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

Torre Elisabeth Lavelle Major(s): Ecology, Political Ecology Hometown: Macon, GA Research: Innovative Tech Solutions to Fight Wildlife Trafficking; Applicability of Market-Based Instruments for the ACF Basin; Implementing Energy Efficiency Standards to Meet Emissions Targets in Georgia; How to Tackle the Bike Share Helmet Problem Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; England; Fiji; Tanzania; Thailand; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Roosevelt National Campus Network Senior Fellow for Energy & Environment, Journal Editor; UGA Roosevelt Campus Network Community Policy Director, Scholar, Executive Board; Campus Scouts at UGA Executive Director, Co-Founder; Journal for Undergraduate Research Opportunities Executive Editor, Discipline Editor for Civic Policy; Athens Area Spay and Neuter Clinic Volunteer Honors and Awards: Schwarzman Scholar, Udall Scholar, University System of Georgia Academic Recognition Day Honoree, White House Policy Panelist, Federal Congressional Delegation Student Panelist, Roosevelt Institute 10 Ideas Policy of the Year Finalist, Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professorship Selection Committee, UGA Amazing Student, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Blue Key Honor Society, Palladia Honor Society, Presidential Scholar, Dean’s List; magna cum laude with High Honors

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Christopher Thomas Lewitzke Major(s): Marketing, Public Relations Minor(s): Portuguese Hometown: Third Lake, IL Travel-Study and Internships: Brazil; Cuba; England; South Korea; Washington, DC; New York, NY; Reston, VA Campus/Community Activities: University of Georgia Athletic Association Internal Operations Intern; WUOG 90.5 FM Producer and Host; Georgia Political Review Assistant Senior Editor; Math Counts Head Coach Honors and Awards: Portuguese Flagship Program, National Diversity Case Competition 4th place winner, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Marketing Academic Excellence Award, summa cum laude with Honors

Katherine Ann Lovejoy Major(s): Economics Hometown: Charlotte, NC Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; Botswana; England; South Africa; Uruguay; Zimbabwe; Washington, DC; New York, NY; Petersburg, VA Campus/Community Activities: Board of Advisor for Kennesaw State Entrepreneurship Program; AIESEC United States, 2016 Local Committee Development Team Coach and 2015 Local Committee President; AIESEC Georgia (UGA) 2014 Vice President of Business Development; Published Author for Roosevelt Southern Regional Journal, Food for the Future; 1st Annual Georgia Youth to Business Forum 2013, Vice President of Finance and Logistics; Classic City Grocery Co-Founder and Head of Sales Honors and Awards: PwC xTREME xTax Competition 1st Place, Presidential Scholar, UGA New Venture Launch Competition Runner-Up

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Kelsey Jane Lowrey Major(s): German, Linguistics Hometown: Dunwoody, GA Research: Virtue, Victimhood and Gender in the Holocaust-Centric Works of George Tabori; Motherhood and Gender in Exile in Bertolt Brecht’s Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder and Der kaukasische Kreidekreis Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; England; Germany; Tanzania; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: SAT/ACT/AP Tutor; WUOG 90.5FM Volunteer Staff, Radio DJ; Girl Scouts of America Volunteer Troop Leader Honors and Awards: Kicklighter Study Abroad Travel Grant, National Merit Scholar, Dean’s List, cum laude with Honors

Sandip Kaur Minhas Major(s): Genetics Hometown: Toronto, Ontario Research: Purification of Hirano Bodies in Dictyostelium discoideum Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Ecuador; England; Mongolia; Morocco; Peru; South Korea; Washington, DC; Savannah, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Athletic Tutor for UGA Athletic Department; UGA Honors Teaching Assistant; UGA Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Student Researcher; Athens Regional Medical Center Volunteer; Thomas Lay Middle School Program Head Mentor, Special Events Coordinator, and Volunteer; RefUGA Volunteer; Be the Match UGA Chapter Executive Board and Volunteer; UGA MathCounts Outreach Volunteer Honors and Awards: Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Gulfstream Corporation Goldie Glenn Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude with High Honors

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Caroline Elizabeth Moore Major(s): Advertising (ABJ), Journalism & Mass Communication (MA) Minor(s): Sociology Hometown: Myrtle Beach, SC Research: Sexy or Sexist? Racy or Racist? Getting to the Bottom of Kim Kardashian’s Attempt to #BreaktheInternet Travel-Study and Internships: Cuba; England; France; South Korea; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: UGA AdClub; Talking Dog Strategic Planner; Georgia Museum of Art (GMOA) Family Day Volunteer; Georgia Political Review Layout Staff; GMOA Student Association; Whit Davis Elementary School Media Center Volunteer; Thomas Lay After-School Program Mentor; KidsArt Program Volunteer Honors and Awards: Omnicon/Grady Future Leaders Fellow, George M. Abney Honors Award, National Merit Scholar, Presidential Scholar, Ocean View Memorial Scholar, Shirley Boone Scholar, Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce Youth Leadership Award, Elks Club Scholar, Prentiss Courson Scholar, SCHBSIF Scholar, James W. Woodruff Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, summa cum laude with Highest Honors Meredith Marie Flood Paker Major(s): Economics Minor(s): Mathematics Hometown: Madison, WI Research: Effect of Off-Label Promotion Prosecution on Off-Label Prescribing Rates; Patterns in Off-Label Prescription Drug Use, 2007-2011; Welfare Effects of Off-Label Prescriptions; Psychiatric Drugs and the Business Cycle; Theatrical Imagery in Nabokov’s Invitation to a Beheading Travel-Study and Internships: Cuba; England; Italy; South Korea; Tanzania; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: UGA Honors Seminar Instructor; Girl Scout Troop Leader; University of Georgia Economics Society Vice President and Public Relations Officer; WUOG 90.5FM Campus Radio Training Director, Executive Board, and DJ; Len Foote Hike Inn at Amicalola Falls State Park Volunteer; Clarke Central HS Economics Volunteer Tutor; Axon Tutoring Peer Tutor; UGA Student Tech Support Tier II Network Support Specialist Honors and Awards: Marshall Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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Eytan Aaron Palte Major(s): International Affairs Minor(s): Biology, Spanish Hometown: Atlanta, GA Research: Fulfillment of the Human Right to Health among Democracies Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; England; Israel; Peru; South Korea; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Executive Board Scribe, Alumni Committee Co-Chair; Students Supporting Israel at the University of Georgia Co-Founder, Co-President; Whatever It Takes at UGA Site Director, Head Tutor; JHealth Treasurer, Club Manager; Dawgs for Israel Vice President, Director of Cultural Affairs; Interfraternity Council Scholarship Committee; Honors Teaching Assistant Honors and Awards: Alpha Epsilon Delta Pre-Med Honor Society, Dean Tate Honor Society, Order of Omega, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, CURO Research Distinction, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

Rand Warren Pope Major(s): Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Minor(s): Spanish Hometown: Barwick, GA Research: Beta-Blocker, Propranolol, Decreases the Efficacy from Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Pompe Disease Travel-Study and Internships: Cuba; England; Japan; Mongolia; South Korea; Thailand; San Diego, CA; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: OASIS Católico; The Memory Project Volunteer; Mercy Health Clinic Volunteer Interpreter; Prelude Dance Ensemble; UGA Ballroom Performance Group; AIESEC Team Leader Honors and Awards: Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude with High Honors

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Hannah Mary Reiss Major(s): Anthropology, Biology Hometown: Decatur, GA Research: Developing a Chimeric Chicken Resistant to Newcastle’s Disease Virus; Neonatal Mortality in Uttar Pradesh, India and Possible Policy Solutions Travel-Study and Internships: England; India; South Korea; Spain; Tanzania; San Francisco, CA; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Roosevelt Institute Campus Network Executive Director of UGA Chapter; Journal of Undergraduate Research Opportunities (JURO) Operations Manager; Mercy Health Center Scribe Volunteer; Georgia Museum of Natural History Zooarchaeology Intern; Duke University TIP Residential Counselor Honors and Awards: Fulbright Scholar, Blue Key Honor Society, Honors in Washington, Palladia Honor Society, Dean’s List, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

Giovanni Righi Major(s): Ecology, Economics (AB/MA) Hometown: Lawrenceville, GA Research: First Steps to Addressing Overallocation in the Flint River (Roosevelt Institute); Developing a Model for Natural Noise-Induced Phase Transitions in Aphanizomenon flos-aquae Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; England; Italy; Nepal; Panama; South Korea; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Real Food UGA; Sierra Student Coalition Beyond Coal Honors and Awards: Eagle Scout, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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Leighton Michele Rowell Major(s): History, Romance Languages Hometown: Sandy Springs, GA Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Brazil; England; France; Morocco; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Georgia News Lab Investigative Reporter; Red & Black Managing Editor; Athenia Producer; WUGA-FM Production Assistant; Honors Program Student Council Programming Committee; Georgia Political Review Staff Writer; Raise Your Hand Week at UGA Organizer; Honors Program Teaching Assistant Honors and Awards: Peabody Fellow, Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, UGA Amazing Student, Phyllis Jenkins Barrow Scholar, Boren Scholar Alternate, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

Madison Grace Snelling Major(s): International Affairs, Religion Hometown: Lexington, KY Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Cambodia; England; South Africa; South Korea; Tanzania; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: RefUGA Founder, President; Roosevelt Institute Refugee Policy Expert; UGA Housing Program Immigration Panelist; Lunchbox Garden Volunteer; Lyndon House Arts Center Art Student Honors and Awards: Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Order of Omega, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude

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Minhyuk Michael Song Major(s): Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Statistics Hometown: Lawrenceville, GA Research: Detecting Early Radiation Exposure via Changes in Serum Glycosylation; Generation of O-Glycan Profiles for Human Hap1 Cells and CRISPR-Cas9 Edited DAG-1 Knockout Hap1 Cells Travel-Study and Internships: Ecuador; England; Morocco; Tanzania; Washington, DC; Duluth, GA; New York, NY; Weimar, TX Campus/Community Activities: Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) Junior Researcher; Vitamin C Startup Analyst, Consultant; Gwinnett Medical Hospital Inpatient Ward Volunteer; UGA Young Dawgs Lab Assistant, Junior Researcher; MathCounts Head Coach; SAKC Youth Choir Pianist, Sunday School Teacher Honors and Awards: National Merit Scholar, cum laude with Honors

Karishma Sriram Major(s): Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Hometown: Athens, GA Research: Bone Fracture Putty: A Combined Lentiviral and Stem Cell Approach; Increasing Physical Education in American High Schools Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; Bolivia; England; Morocco; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Office of Vice President for Instruction (OVPI) Student Advisory Board; Young Dawgs Research Assistant; Dawg Camp Counselor; Arch Society; UGA MathCounts Coach and Curriculum Coordinator; UGA Campus Scouts Mentor; Honors Teaching Assistant Honors and Awards: Barry M. Goldwater Scholar, UGA Amazing Student, Roosevelt Scholar, Presidential Scholar, Palladia Honor Society, UGA Commencement Speaker, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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John Bradley Stroud Major(s): Economics, Mathematics Hometown: St. Simons Island, GA Research: The Monkey Saddle; Bargaining within Social Networks Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; England; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY; Dallas, TX Campus/Community Activities: Corsair Society; MathCounts Outreach at UGA Coaching Coordinator and Tutor; Economics Society; Talmage Close Homeowners Association Secretary and President Honors and Awards: Kossack Calculus Prize, 3rd place for UGA in annual Putnam Exam, nominated for the Charles M. Strahan Award, cum laude with Honors

Kevin Hongyi Sun Major(s): Economics (AB/MA), Mathematics Hometown: Johns Creek, GA Research: The Effect of Quantitative Easing on Emerging Market Credit Expansion: Transmission Channels and Idiosyncratic Factors Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; England; Morocco; Taiwan; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Corsair Society Head of Sales and Trading; UGA Economics Society President; UGA MathCounts Outreach Executive Board and Coach; UGA Economics Department Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant Honors and Awards: Dean’s List, cum laude with High Honors

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Treva Chung-Kwan Tam Major(s): Advertising, Sociology Hometown: Roswell, GA Research: Influence of Parental Educational Expectations on Teenage Mothers; Research Assistant at UGA’s Laboratory for the Study of Social Interactions Travel-Study and Internships: Bali; England; France; South Africa; South Korea; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: University of Georgia Press Design and Production Intern; Georgia Political Review Design and Layout Director; AIESEC Youth to Business Forum Vice President of Sponsorship; AdClub Executive Board Publicity Chair; Talking Dog Creative Director; UGA Sociology Department Research Assistant, Newsletter Editor; Asian Children Mentoring Program Vice President; University Judiciary Justice, Alpha Gamma Delta Fraternity Publications Coordinator Honors and Awards: Fulbright Scholar, Palladia Honor Society, Monte Jade Science and Technology Association Outstanding Youth Award, Georgia United Credit Union Scholar, National Merit Finalist, Dean’s List, Alpha Kappa Delta, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Honors

Bert Ferguson Thompson, Jr. Major(s): History, International Affairs Hometown: Macon, GA Research: Doctrinal Development of Sea-Launch Nuclear Capabilities; Policy Battles of al-Qaeda’s Senior Leadership; Xi Jinping’s Looming State Visit; Money and Politics and Confederates, Oh My! Deepening the Savannah Harbor; Jihadi John and the ISIS Beatles; Which Way Back to Russia? And Other Helpful Advice from Twitter; 100% Chance of Blackout: The Weather Channel’s Fight with DirecTV; Never Say Anything, Unless It’s Scripted on CBS; Flying High Once Again: The Military’s Newest Weapons; Failure Is Always an Option: Use of Special Forces Operations Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; England; Italy; Tanzania; Uruguay; Washington, DC; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Office of the Vice President for Instruction Student Advisory Board; UGA Athletic Association Board of Directors Student Athletic Representative; UGA Student Government Association Executive Cabinet; Arch Society; Georgia Political Review Assistant Senior Editor and Staff Writer; Honors Program Teaching Assistant Honors and Awards: Carnegie Junior Research Fellow, Honors in Washington, Eagle Scout, Dean’s List, Presidential Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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La’Ron-Chenee Heidi Tracey Major(s): International Affairs, International Policy (MIP) Minor(s): Spanish, Portuguese Hometown: Lawrenceville, GA Research: Impact of Pacific Alliance, MERCOSUR, and TransPacific Partnership on the Economy of Various Latin American Countries; Comparative Analyses of Nuclear Policy in Brazil, Argentina, Iran, and South Africa Travel-Study and Internships: Argentina; Bali; Brazil; England; Israel; Palestine; South Korea; Uruguay; Washington, DC; Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Oak Ridge, TN Campus/Community Activities: Georgia Political Review Staff Writer; Center for International Trade and Security (CITS) Leadership Scholar; Center for American Progress Intern; Athens Latino Center for Education and Service English Teacher; Athens-Clarke/Oconee County Schools Translator for Parent-Teacher Conferences; Linguistic Atlas Project Research Assistant; Spanish and Portuguese Language Tables Honors and Awards: Boren Scholar, Richard B. Russell Security Leadership Scholar, Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow, Project Interchange Scholar, Palladia Honor Society, Presidential Scholar, Dean’s List, National Achievement Scholar, magna cum laude with Highest Honors

Kathleen Elizabeth Wilson Major(s): Arabic, Economics, International Affairs Hometown: Beaumont, TX Research: Policy Interventions to Decrease Child Marriages within Refugee Populations; Policy Analysis: Female Literacy Programming in Afghanistan Travel-Study and Internships: Jordan; Morocco; Oman; Spain; Washington, DC; Chicago, IL; New York, NY Campus/Community Activities: Roosevelt Institute Campus Network Economics, Education, and Equal Justice Center Director, Economic Development Policy Journal Editor-in-Chief; Women’s Outreach and Resource Collective (WORC) Executive Director; Interfaith Youth Core Coach; Georgia Political Review Staff Writer; Peace by Piece UGA President, Communications Director; Student Government at UGA Senator for Religious Organizations; Athens-Clarke County Schools Parent-Teacher Conference Volunteer Interpreter; OASIS Católico Honors and Awards: Erasmus + Scholar, Harry S. Truman Scholar, US State Department Critical Language Scholar, Rhodes Scholarship National Finalist, Marshall Scholarship National Finalist, Honors in Washington, UGA Amazing Student, Carl Vinson Institute of Government (CVIOG) International Center Fellow, Blue Key Honor Society, Delta Sigma Pi, Terry Excellence Award for Outstanding Achievement in Economics, Presidential Scholar, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, First Honor Graduate, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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Jonathan Paul Adelman Pace Academy Marietta, GA Economics, Mathematics

Tristan Paul Bagala Vandebilt Catholic HS Lockport, LA Management, Political Science

Catherine Mahala Callaway Woodward Academy Johns Creek, GA Biology, Cognitive Science, MS Artificial Intelligence

Laura Agatha Courchesne Rumson Fair Haven Regional HS Fair Haven, NJ Cognitive Science, Economics

Jonah Stephen Driggers Glynn Academy St. Simons Island, GA Geography, MS Conservation Ecology & Sustainability

Nathan Andrew Farr Webb School of Knoxville Knoxville, TN Chemistry

Moira Elizabeth Fennell Suncoast HS Palm Beach Gardens, FL Finance, Mass Media Arts

Carver Lowell Harris Goodhue Clarke Central HS Athens, GA Anthropology

Shuchi Goyal Northview HS Johns Creek, GA Economics

Erin Elizabeth Hollander Cedar Shoals HS Athens, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Genetics

Glenn Anderson Jacoby George Walton Academy Social Circle, GA English

Susan Margaret Jones North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Hickory, NC Animal Science

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C L A S S

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2 0 1 7

Hammad Ahmed Khalid Peachtree Ridge HS Duluth, GA Biology, Master of Public Health

Bruce Li Milton HS Milton, GA Computer Science, Economics

Krystal Lo Alan C. Pope HS Marietta, GA Economics

Vijeth Mudalegundi South Forsyth HS Cumming, GA Economics

Trang Xuan Nguyen James Madison Memorial HS Madison, WI Communication Studies, Master of Public Health

Morrison Robert Nolan Gwinnett School of Math, Science and Technology Stone Mountain, GA Chemistry, Geology

Justin Samuel Payan Woodward Academy Douglasville, GA Cognitive Science, Mathematics, MS Artificial Intelligence

Joy Phyllis Gabrielle Peltier Douglas County HS Douglasville, GA Cognitive Science, French, Spanish, MA Romance Languages (Linguistics)

Gabrielle Antoinette Pierre American International School of Kingston Kingston, Jamaica Environmental Engineering

Elijah Hunter Scott Lakeside HS Martinez, GA Economics, International Affairs

Jason Patrick Terry Druid Hills HS Atlanta, GA Astrophysics, Computer Science

Luke Tellis Thompson A.C. Flora HS Columbia, SC Economics

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Kerri Ellen Andre Fort Walton Beach HS Destin, FL Environmental Health Science

Michael Logan Campbell Camden County HS Saint Marys, GA Economics, International Affairs

Lorin Janae Crear Chattahoochee HS Johns Creek, GA Biology, Spanish

Thomas Andrew Desoutter The Westminster Schools Dunwoody, GA History

Madison Caroline Dill Dunwoody HS Dunwoody, GA Anthropology, Spanish

Kalvis Erik Golde Pace Academy Atlanta, GA Mathematics

John Miles Hall Cape Elizabeth HS Cape Elizabeth, ME Economics, International Business

Mallory Jessica Harris Dunwoody HS Atlanta, GA Biology, Mathematics

Rachel Ann Kelley Campbell HS Marietta, GA International Affairs

Joshua Edward Kenway The City of London School London, United Kingdom Economics

Mallika Madhusudan The Westminster Schools Atlanta, GA Economics BA/MA, Spanish

Emily Kathleen Maloney Wheeler HS Marietta, GA Cognitive Science, Geography

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Samia Montese McEachin Mills E. Godwin HS Glen Allen, VA Exercise and Sport Science

Reilly Ayres Megee Cab Calloway School of the Arts Newark, DE Advertising

Sierra K. Runnels Baton Rouge Magnet HS Baton Rouge, LA International Affairs

Mollie Rose Simon Chamblee HS Atlanta, GA Public Affairs Journalism

Samuel Jackson Tingle Alcoa HS Louisville, TN Geography

Matthias Stephen Wilder Campbell HS Powder Springs, GA Computer Science, English, Mathematics

Elizabeth Francina Wilkes North Springs Charter HS Atlanta, GA Anthropology, Geography

Victoria Ayse Yonter Marshfield HS Marshfield, MO Economics, Mathematics

Lilian Lin Zhu West HS Coralville, IA Romance Languages

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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2 0 1 9

Swapnil Agrawal Chamblee HS Dunwoody, GA International Affairs

Ashley Uchenna Amukamara North Forsyth HS Cumming, GA Biology, Psychology

Trisha Dalapati Centennial HS Roswell, GA Anthropology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Tarun Daniel Northview HS Johns Creek, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cognitive Science

Guy Darrell Eroh Riverdale HS Portland, OR Biology

Steven W. Feng Deerfield-Windsor School Albany, GA Computer Science, Mathematics

Laurel Hiatt iAchieve Virtual Academy Suwanee, GA Psychology

Nirav Ilango Chattahoochee HS Johns Creek, GA Computer Science, Geography

Christina Corrine Lee Kennesaw Mountain HS Marietta, GA Biology

Zoe Yan Li Bulloch Academy Statesboro, GA International Affairs

Divine Chukwumelie Ogbuefi South Cobb HS Powder Springs, GA Cellular Biology

Kavi Pandian Chamblee HS Chamblee, GA Economics, German

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C L A S S

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Jessica Kate Pasquarello Saints John Neumann and Maria Goretti Catholic HS Philadelphia, PA International Affairs, Romance Languages

John Michael Rawlings Forsyth Central HS Cumming, GA Business

Ashley Elizabeth Reed Hudson HS Hudson, OH Anthropology, Psychology

Ruth Anne Schade Marlborough HS Marlborough, MA Dietetics

Caroline Laura Shearer Escondido Charter HS Fallbrook, CA Ecology

Aditya Sood Alpharetta HS Alpharetta, GA Biology

Stephanie Alexandra Stewart Norcross HS Norcross, GA International Affairs, Women’s Studies

Abigail Elizabeth West Classen School of Advanced Studies Arcadia, OK Art

Ashley Henehan Willard Holton Arms School Derwood, MD Economics, Political Science, Psychology

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Avni Sheel Ahuja Alpharetta HS Alpharetta, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

McKenna Aliya Barney Indian Springs School Venetia, PA Environmental Economics & Management

Rebecca L. Buechler Greater Atlanta Christian School Duluth, GA Mathematics

Claire Martha Drosos Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Cincinnati, OH Finance

Montgomery Lloyd Fischer Henry Sibley HS South Saint Paul, MN Mathematics

Emma Marie Goldsmith Deerfield-Windsor School Albany, GA Journalism

Nicole Marie Googe Clarke Central HS Athens, GA Mathematics

Griffin Scott Hamstead West HS Knoxville, TN English, Journalism

Mackenzie Rose Joy Sequoyah HS Woodstock, GA Physics

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C L A S S

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2 0 2 0

John Gabriel Kolb Atherton HS Louisville, KY Biology

Aditya Krishnaswamy George Walton Comprehensive HS Marietta, GA Statistics

Nicolas Leis Cambridge HS Milton, GA Economics

Jessica Yan Ma Northview HS Johns Creek, GA Biology

Jon Mallory McRae III Grace Christian Academy Bainbridge, GA Chemistry

Nina P. Reddy Lambert HS Suwanee, GA Management

Margaret Grace Russo Blue Valley North HS Overland Park, KS English

Andrew Dunivin Schmitt Brighton HS Rochester, NY Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

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FOUNDATION FELLOWS NEWEST ALUMNI – CLASS OF 2016

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Caroline Coleman

Emory University School of Medicine

Lauren Dennison

PhD, Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Alex Edquist

Business Analyst, McKinsey & Company, Atlanta, GA

Seth Euster

Special Assistant to the President and CEO, Atlanta History Center; Duke University School of Law

Lee Folk

Investment Banking Analyst, SunTrust, Atlanta, GA

Kirstie Hostetter

MS, Sustainability Systems, University of Michigan

Caleb Ingram

Research Assistant, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Georgia

Jacob Kennedy

Princeton in Asia Fellow, Thailand

Shaun Kleber

Business Analyst, McKinsey & Company, Atlanta, GA

Torre Lavelle

Schwarzman Scholar, MPP, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

Chris Lewitzke

Social Media, Engagement & Marketing Coordinator, U.S. Tennis Association/Mid-Atlantic Section, Reston, VA

Katie Lovejoy

VP Finance, Executive Board, AIESEC U.S., Brooklyn, NY

Kelsey Lowrey

PhD, German, Vanderbilt University

Sandip Minhas

Medical College of Georgia/Georgia Regents University

Caroline Moore

Omnicom/Grady Future Leaders Fellow, FleishmanHillard and BBDO, Atlanta, GA

Meredith Paker

Marshall Scholar, MPhil, Economic and Social History, University of Oxford

Eytan Palte

Columbia University School of Medicine

Rand Pope

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Hannah Reiss

Fulbright Scholar, India

Giovanni Righi

Research Assistant, Department of Economics, Stanford University

Leighton Rowell

Intern, Investigations Team, Channel 2 Action News (WSB-TV), Atlanta, GA; Olympics Coverage Intern, NBC Sports, Stamford, CT

Madison Snelling

Corporate Engagement and Development VISTA, MENTOR, Boston, MA

Michael Song

Medical College of Georgia/Georgia Regents University

Karishma Sriram

Duke University School of Medicine

John B Stroud

Analyst, GC Insights, Atlanta, GA

Kevin Sun

Sales and Trading Analyst, Citi, New York, NY

Treva Tam

Fulbright Scholar, Turkey; PhD, Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

Bert Thompson

Carnegie Junior Research Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, DC

Chenee Tracey

MIP, International Policy, University of Georgia

Kathleen Wilson

Erasmus Mundus Scholar, Joint Master’s Degree, Education Policies for Global Development, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, University of Oslo, University of Malta, University of Amsterdam

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S A LU M N I Class of 1977 John Ernest Graves Robert Richardson Rice Joseph Allan Tucker, Jr. Class of 1978 Michael Thomas Bohannon Audrey Shields Crumbley Class of 1979 William Arthur Ball John Weldon Harbin Harold Bobby Lowery Class of 1980 Sara Ruth Shlaer Bryan Jay Whitfield Class of 1981 Cornelia Isabella Bargmann Class of 1982 Fred Holtz III Peter Lumpkin Patrick Michael Brian Terry Catherine Leigh Touchton Class of 1983 William Mark Faucette Frank Joseph Hanna III Betsy Lyons McCabe Judson “Jay� Watson III Class of 1984 Stephen Robert Ellis Denise Lamberski Fisher Sara Voyles Haddow Liebel Jessica Bruce Hunt Charles William McDaniel Robert Brad Mock Kevin Brett Polston Leslie Williams Wade Class of 1985 Charles Victor Bancroft II Frank Eugene Glover, Jr. Shannon Terrell Gordon Margaret Crowder Lawrence Marjorie Dixon Mitchell Tab Eugene Thompson Christopher Lamar Vickery Sharon Anderson White

Class of 1986 Grace Elizabeth Hale Andrew Madison Martin Stephen William Smith Mark Edward White Class of 1987 Rebecca Elizabeth Biron Bruce Edward Bowers Anne Davison Dolaher Kirsten Jarabek Franklin John Edward Fowler, Jr. Mary Ruth Hannon Noel Langston Hurley Elizabeth Ford Lehman Robert Marcus Reiner Margaret Ruth Sparks Class of 1988 Cathy Luxenberg Barnard Thomas Christopher Cisewski Sharon Blair Enoch Linda Leith Giambalvo India Frances Lane Neil Chandler Thom John Eugene Worth Class of 1989 Courtney Cook Angeli Lisa Caucci Amy Lee Copeland Kimberlee Walkenspaw Curley Julie Kathleen Earnhart Nancy Letostak Glasser Susan Golden James Leah Deneen Lowman Adena Elder Potter Kyle Wayne Sager Andrew William Stith Class of 1990 Maitreya Badami Felton Jenkins III Gwen Renee Kaminsky Mark David Sheftall John Carlyle Shelton Alicia Elsbeth Stallings Class of 1991 Susan Shackelford Dawes Elizabeth Hebert Day James Ansley Granade III

Paul Harvey Matthews John Phillip Piedrahita Marc Lane Silverboard Lougene Williams III Class of 1992 Robert Geoffrey Dillard Chris Gunter Anne Marie Hargaden Robert Kirk Harris Martin Allie Hollingsworth Robin Ann Kundra Laura Jane Calhoon Lyttle Andrew McSwain Millians Charles Andrew Mitchell Christina Stewart Payton Class of 1993 Jennifer Lee Cathey Arbitter L. Christine Darden Brennan Michael Herman Burer Albert Vernon Dixon III David Michael Hettesheimer Peter James McBrayer Mia Noerenberg Miller Christen Wheeler Mitchell Nevada Waugh Reed Spencer Allen Rice Thad Andrew Riddle Philip Rodney Webb H. Thomas Willman III Class of 1994 Sonja Victoria Batten Stephen Spratlin Bullock Anne Kissel Harper Pamela Ann Hungerbuhler Michael Paul Jones, Jr. Eric Marvin Overby Brett Jerry Pellock Jennifer Tracie Calvert Rosser Jennifer Marie Rubin Laura Anne Shepherd Caroline Placey Smith Katherine Anne Smith Julie Lynne Steiner Class of 1995 Laura Barbas-Rhoden Harold Dean Green, Jr. Scott Allen Haggard Joshua Eric Kight

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F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S A LU M N I

The Foundation Fellowship gave me the wonderful opportunity to travel abroad, pursue undergraduate research, and explore new academic areas. I am a far more successful and well-rounded person because of the environment I had as a Foundation Fellow.” Rebekah Rogers, Fellows Class of 2006, Evolutionary Geneticist, working on woolly mammoths, Neanderthals, and poison dart frogs

Molly Meghan McCarthy Darren Howard Pillsbury Andrew Rhea Schretter Amanda Wojtalik-Courter Class of 1996 Keith Robert Blackwell Thomas Andrew Bryan Robert Compton Cartwright Timothy Paul George Bomee Jung James Benjamin Kay IV Bradley Scott Malcom Michael Justin Shoemake Robert Matthew Sutherland Stephen Jefferson Tate Robert Thomas Trammell, Jr. Class of 1997 Ryan Paul Bartlett Christie Mew Jan Leilani Cooksey Lisa Ann Coole William Stephen Steiner Andrew Abell Wade Class of 1998 Jay Chugh Adrian John Daigle Brandon Edward Kremer Robyn Andree Painter Vijaya Rangan Palaniswamy Beth Alison Shapiro Catherine Allison Evans Webb Class of 1999 Leona Nichole Council Tzu-Chuan Jane Huang Ellen Sutherland Irby

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Laura Lacy Feldman McCurdy Torré Deshun Mills Class of 2000 Melissa Bugbee Buchanan Dhruti Jerry Contractor Tiffany Celena Earley-Spadoni Matthew Scott Eckman Bronson Hurst Lee Michael Eugene Morris Ethan James Sims Holly Gooding Tran Class of 2001 Laura Ann Adang Dustin Joseph Calhoun Christopher Macdonald Caruso Semil P. Choksi Fruzsina Csaszar Di Ruggiero Corey Scott Gill Amita Ramesh Hazariwala Kathryn Jessica Hull Robert Gardner Linn Thomas John Ludlam Francis Joseph Martin Amy Mulkey McGowan Joseph Adams Perry-Parrish Laquesha Shantelle Sanders Andrew Clark Thompson Kyle Burton Wingfield Class of 2002 Divya Balakrishnan Alyssa Holmgren Craigie Laramie Elizabeth Duncan Amy Elizabeth Early Eric Jonas Gapud Julie Dotterweich Gunby

Allyson Elizabeth Harper Rachel Kassel Cathy A. Lee-Miller Marc Paul Lindsay Caitlin Christine Martell Lorina Naci Tina Rakkhit Nandi Kameko Lanilaura Nichols Kathryn Stepp Nicolai Mary Catherine Plunkett Suzanne Elizabeth Scoggins Steven Christopher Smith Andrew John Sucre Lakshmi Swamy John Andrew Wright Emory Paul Wright Class of 2003 John Anthony Asalone Maria Anderson Booth Marshall Martin Chalmers Timothy Tianyi Chen Adam Steven Cureton Brian Matthew Dunham Christopher James Gibson Jennifer Gibson Gill Leah Rose Givens Tanya Martin Hudson Eirin K. Kallestad Dmitry Sergeevich Kolychev Robin Elizabeth McGill Meredith Neal McCarthy Moore Jeffrey Daniel Pugh Robert Province Quinn Kimberly Council Sheridan Jennifer Srygley Sucre Chung “Gemma” Suh Buudoan “Doannie” Vinh Tran Melanie Monroe Venable Joseph Brendan Wolpin Class of 2004 Ellen Downs Beaulieu John Carnes Boggan Virginia Barton Bowen Amanda Morgan Casto William Cullen Conly Blake Linton Doughty Corrin Nicole Drakulich Deepti Gupta Vanessa Reynolds Hale Sarah Nicole Julia Hemmings

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S A LU M N I Bliss Immanuel Khaw David Alan Kross Daniel Michael Ludlam Evan James Magers Megan Jean McKee Kunal Mitra Jane Adaeze Okpala Julie Walsh Orlemanski Satya Hiru Patel Nathan Willis Ratledge Daniel Winfield Reed Travis Daniel Reeves Randolph Lines Starr Carson Wayne Strickland Manoj “Sachin” Varghese Josh Alan Weddle Charles Elliott Willson Class of 2005 Allison Carter-Agnotti Raechel Keay Anglin Benjamin Samuel Bain Jeanette Eva Thurber Barzelay Krisda H. Chaiyachati Eugenia Gina Chu Charles Philip Ciaccio, Jr. Renee Claire Contreras Kathryn Kay Coquemont Matthew Tyler Crim Kacie Schoen Darden John Thomas DeGenova Anne Zimmerman Hawkins Jeremy Paul Johnson Ivy Nguyen Le Ashley Marie Lott Thomas Michael Mittenzwei Brendan Francis Murphy Allison Scott Roach Sarah Ellen Sattelmeyer Amy Nicole Sexauer Matthew Buckley Smith Adam Martin Sparks Charles Thompson Tuggle III Katherine Helen Anne Vyborny Leslie S. Wolcott Tuquyen Mach Yee Class of 2006 Jennifer Andrea Bartmess Jason Michael Brown Simon Flax Ferrari Daniel Joseph Gough

Warren Brandon Holton Jana Dopson Illston Chloe Thompson Kelley Melissa Cabinian Kinnebrew Lisa Ann Last Joseph Robert LeCates Jenny Page Linton William Michael Lynch III Patrick Joseph Maher Elizabeth Grams Margalis Brian Patrick Quinif Katherine Morgan Ragland Heather Michaela Ripley Rebekah Lee Rogers Laura Emiko Soltis Robert Christopher Staley Matthew James Stewart Nathan Joseph Stibrich David Carson Turner Sara Pilzer Weiss

Benjamin Tyler Cobb Anureet Cheema Copeland Rachel Elizabeth Whitaker Elam Katherine Elizabeth Folkman Adele Handy Goodloe Matthew Wood Grayson Shannon Snead Hiller Donald Ray “DJ” Johnson, Jr. Joseph Robert Kapurch Peter Tomlinson Klein Mindy Cara Lipsitz Anant Mandawat William Giles Mann Jordan Elizabeth Myers Bryan Scott Overcarsh Adam Podowitz-Thomas Tyler Blalock Pratt Deep Jayendrakumar Shah Gabriel Rehman Shaukat George Valentinov Vulov

Class of 2007 Mary Patricia Alvarez William Brooks Andrews Franklin Edwin “BJ” Ard John Christopher Binford Yves Wolfgang Laurent Bouillet Priya Chandan Lesley Marie Graybeal John Floyd “Jay” Howell Douglas Michael Jackson Joseph Edgar Lariscy IV Michael James Levengood Robert Bradley Lindell Andrew Campbell McKown Erin Alicia Mordecai Yannick Beale Morgan Amulya Nagarur Jayanthi Lakshmi Narain Corrine Allison Novell Caelin Cubenas Potts Sarah Brown Puryear Anna Harrison Saffer Helen Caples Smith Zachary Philip Smith Jake Everett Turrentine Katrin Usifo

Class of 2009 Craig Chike Akoh Payton McCurry Bradford Kevin Kyong Chang Chuan “CiCi” Cheng Christopher John Chiego Rebecca Yeong Ae Corey Colleen Helen Cotton Jordan Allen Dalton Christina Lynn Faust Elizabeth Riggle Gargaro William “Beau” Gilmore III Elizabeth Anne Godbey Nithya Natrajan Hall Clare JoAnna Hatfield Chadwick Parker Hume Brittany Lee McCall Caitlin McLaughlin Poe Kevin Christopher Poe Paul Andrew Ruddle II Milner Owens Staub Marlee Jean Waxelbaum Sana Hashmi Zahiruddin

Class of 2008 Lynzi Jacqueline Archibald Maria Alejandra Baetti Sarah Ritchey Bellamy

Class of 2010 Elisabeth Allen Adams Thomas Matthew Bailey Amanda Nicole Brouillette Sarah Marie Caruana Kevin Peter Copp Amy Patricia Davis

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F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S A LU M N I David Dawei Fu Peter Carswell Horn David Martin Howcroft Connor Lawson McCarthy Jasmaine Williams McClain Sharon Aileen Marie McCoy Laura Elizabeth McDonald Joshua Ivan McLaurin Zoe Eva Fadul Meroney Allon Mordel Virginia Susan Newman Cleveland Alcides Piggott, Jr. Kelsey Jones Pratt Lucas Llanso Puente Jennifer Ann Taylor Lila Elisabeth Tedesco Robert Barton Thrasher Class of 2011 Stephanie Lee Chapman Katherine Sara Cuadrado Ryan Michael Friday Lucy Fu Katherine Geales Goodwin Claire Underwood Hailey Marcus Jamel Hines Mir Mohamed Inaamullah Anne Helene Karam Matthew Henry Levenson Xiaofeng “Phoeny” Li John Benjamin Marshall Aaron Bartow Marshburn Calley Aileen Mersmann Phillip Charles Mote Muktha Sundar Natrajan Rachel Hannah Pocock Sabrina Ann Ragaller Robert Nalls Rosenbleeth Robert “Trey” Sinyard III Alexander David Squires Tracy Jane Yang Sheena Shiyi Zhang Class of 2012 Victoria Suzanne Akin Juliet Elizabeth Allan Juan Carlos Cardoza-Oquendo Dana Lynn Higgins Cox Patrick Joseph Fitzmaurice Hillary Dolores Kingsley Logan Hunter Krusac

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Morgann Ashley Lyles Tatum Danielle Mortimer Luke Hensley Mosley Saptarsi “Rohan” Mukhopadyay Bryn Elise Murphy Jaime Ayers Patterson Jacob Hunter Rooney Henry Louis Schwartz Matthew Richard Sellers Anuj Atul Shukla William Harry Stephenson Hemali Prakash Vin Thomas Matthew Ward David Michael Zweig Class of 2013 Sara De La Torre Berón Megan Unger Caudill Camille Parker Gregory Bethany Cotten McCain Ryan Patrick McLynn Todd Warren Pierson Derek Anthony Ponticelli Reuben Arthur Reynolds Matthew Wyatt Saltz Waring “Buck” Trible III Lawrence William White Addison Von Wright Brittany Anne Young Class of 2014 Sara Thomas Black Jesse Yuen-Fu Chan Smitha Ganeshan Joseph Elliott Gerber Philip Joseph Grayeski

Osama Shariq Hashmi Anisha Ramchandra Hegde Paul Alexander Kirschenbauer Marianne Morris Ligon David Richman Millard Clara Marina Nibbelink Rachel Claire Sellers Blake Elizabeth Shessel Jeremiah Hudson Stevens Matthew Telford Tyler Jacqueline Elizabeth Van De Velde Kishore Pavan Vedala Cameron Saeed Zahedi Yuliya Bila Zarnitsyna Class of 2015 Joshua Andrew Chang Savannah Elyse Colbert Maria Gardner Cox Parker Timothy Evans Eilidh Geddes Sophie Helene Giberga Allison Nicole Koch Ronald Jackson Kurtz Michael Tyler Land Kameel Mir Sarah Aneese Mirza Davis Reynolds Parker Camir Neville Ricketts James Alexander Rowell Grace Maastricht Siemietkowski John Henry Tab Thompson Megan Ernst Tipton Megan Frances White Avery Elizabeth Wiens

One of the ways we show each other that we are a true family is by meeting up for Friendsgiving in middle November before Turkey day. It’s a time to reflect, joke, and (of course) honor Bernie Ramsey, who made it all possible. Truly my life wouldn’t be the same without each of the wonderful and inspiring members of FF ’11.” Phillip Mote, Fellows Class of 2011 – Pediatric Resident, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, St. Petersburg, FL; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Class of 2015

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F O U N DAT I O N F E L LO W S A LU M N I Remembering Coastal Retreats UGA Foundation Fellows in recent years have visited some pretty exotic places during spring break, including Tanzania, Uruguay, Morocco, Bali, and South Korea. But it hasn’t always been that way. In the 40-year history of the Fellowship, the early years included travel that was a bit closer to home. Fellows from the 1980s traveled together to the Georgia coast that to this day remains alive with history and serves as the home of the University of Georgia Marine Institute.

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THE RAMSEY HONORS SCHOLARSHIP

The Ramsey Scholars program was life changing. It provided me with opportunities

The Ramsey Honors Scholarship was created by the trustees of the University of Georgia Foundation in 2000 and is named for the University’s most generous individual benefactor, the late Bernard Ramsey (BS ’37), long-time chairman of the board of Merrill Lynch. Ramsey Scholars are selected through the Foundation Fellows application process. The program welcomed 7 new students in 2015-2016, bringing the total number of Ramsey Scholars to 26. The average SAT score for the incoming class was 1535 (math + verbal only), and the average ACT score was 35. Their high school grade point average was 4.15 on a 4.0 scale, which indicates extra points for Advanced Placement classes. The Ramsey Scholars also have impressive high school academic and extracurricular credentials. Students enjoy Ramsey community events throughout the year, including a weekend retreat in the mountains of North Georgia, book discussions and seminars with premier faculty, kayaking down the Broad River, the Ramsey graduation banquet, and a spring break service trip (past destinations include Austin, Miami, New Orleans, Asheville, and Charleston).

I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else. It introduced me to some of the best people I’ve ever crossed paths with, many of whom I still consider my best friends. I am

The Benefits of Being a Ramsey Scholar  Annual stipend: $5,857 plus the Zell Miller Scholarship (currently

worth $9,362 per year) for in-state students; $9,832 plus an out-ofstate tuition waiver (currently worth $18,210 per year) for out-of-state students  First-year housing supplement of $579

incredibly grateful for

 Four domestic spring break service trips (valued at $2,000)

everyone who worked so

 Individual travel-study grants of $3,000 (closely related to students’

hard to build the Ramsey

academic and professional goals, can be combined with semester stipends for study overseas for a full semester or academic year)

program into what it is

 Special seminars and book discussions with UGA and visiting

today.”

professors

— Glenn Branscomb, Ramsey Class of 2013, MBA Candidate,

 Faculty and peer mentoring  All-scholar retreats  Participation in a community of young scholars who stimulate each

The Wharton School, University of

other’s intellectual and personal development through the exchange of ideas and experiences

Pennsylvania

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RAMSEY SCHOLARS – TELLING THE STORY

Journalism assumes many forms – dispatches from the front, reports on irregularities at city hall, write-thrus from the Super Bowl. But regardless of the source and regardless of the subject, journalism is really just storytelling. Thanks in no small part to the many memorable experiences UGA Honors students have in their college careers, many become expert in the art of telling a story and telling it well, and some find fulfilling careers in the pursuit of news and the people who make it. Here’s a look at three Ramsey Scholars who are already well on their way to legendary storytelling status. Jenny Alpaugh ’18 – Athenia

Storytelling is such a vital part of a community. Sharing the stories of humans who are affected by certain issues helps to create understanding and break through negative rhetoric that sometimes surrounds these issues.” — Jenny Alpaugh ’18

“I grew up listening to NPR with my mom. When my sister and I were younger, we would beg her to turn to a more interesting radio station. In college, however, I began to ravenously consume episodes of This American Life. I was enthralled by both the extraordinary and seemingly mundane stories. So when I found out about This Athenian Life (the previous name of Athenia) I had to find a way to become involved. “This Athenian Life began as a way to share both the factual and fictional stories of Athenians in an hour-long episode. We have now moved towards creating four-minute news segments that air on WUGA. But our goal remains the same. We aim to give voice to a variety of Athenians and provide perspective on the events and issues that affect the people of Athens. We have covered everything from Sunday Bus Service to Slender Man. “I work as a producer, which means I am responsible for coming up with story ideas, conducting interviews, writing scripts, and recording voiceovers. I hope to one day work as a producer for NPR, and Athenia allows me to practice becoming Ira Glass (the host of This American Life.) Storytelling is such a vital part of a community. Sharing the stories of humans who are affected by certain issues helps to create understanding and break through negative rhetoric that sometimes surrounds these issues. “Athenia has helped me realize that journalistic storytelling is something I want to do for the rest of my life. Whether it is telling the story of Syrian refugees living in Athens or the story of an open mic poetry night, I want to continue to create compelling content that forces my audience to think about issues from a human perspective.” Emily Giambalvo ’18 – Sports Editor, The Red & Black; First Place, Best Sports Story, Georgia College Press Association; Communications Intern, USA Track & Field; Intern, Associated Press/Paralympic Games “Even if it hadn’t been dark outside, I wouldn’t have been able to see out the windshield. That’s how hard it was raining. I had just spent two hours interviewing an 88-year-old stranger in his motorhome and was driving in circles around an Athens RV park that had turned into a maze. I knew I had to be willing to get lost in unfamiliar territory all in the hope of finding something meaningful. I wouldn’t know if it was worthwhile until I saw the finished product. That’s journalism.

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“My high school didn’t have a newspaper, and even if it did, I probably wouldn’t have joined. It was never something I imagined myself doing. But in my first week of freshman year, I was convinced to attend an information session at The Red & Black, UGA’s student-run newspaper. “I was formerly a level 10 gymnast, and both my parents were college swimmers at Georgia. As a teenager, every night I watched classic college football games before bed. I just never recognized something as enjoyable as sports could turn into a career. I was the designated storyteller of my group at gymnastics whenever something wild occurred. I didn’t understand this all added up to sports journalism until I started writing for a newspaper. “At The Red & Black, I have been fortunate to have encouraging editors who have been instrumental in teaching me how to become a better journalist, while also showing me how to enjoy the process. They taught me how to accept criticism and prompted me to venture outside my comfort zone. “In the spring of sophomore year, I became the assistant sports editor. In addition to exponentially increasing the time I spent in the newsroom, I learned the intricacies of what goes into making a paper and producing consistent online content. This fall, I will be the sports editor as I also cover football. While I still get to write, which I’m not sure I’m ever going to be willing to give up, I also now delve into the backstage work that goes unnoticed. Through it all, The Red & Black has become the ideal unofficial classroom with friends who double as mentors. “I spent the summer in Indianapolis interning with USA Track & Field. In the communications department, I furthered

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my journalism training by writing feature stories for the USATF website and covering the 2016 Olympic Trials in Eugene, Oregon. I broadened my field of expertise by diving into this new role where I witnessed the public relations efforts of a National Governing Body with a massive audience.

“Through Grady Sports I have had a story published in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and wrote two articles for the U.S. Olympic Committee. It’s surreal to see my name next to a story that is distributed to such a vast audience. Moreover, in September I will travel to Rio de Janeiro and write for the Associated Press at the Paralympic Games. From sitting in the press box at G-Day to frequently hearing Professor Michaelis’ stories about covering Michael Phelps’ historic races, I am continually reminded that I am in an exceptional program. “While the topics in sports journalism appear to be narrow, I have never felt limited. There’s a lot more to explore than routines and touchdowns. Sports can be used as a mechanism to write about the world, and the stories where that is evident are the most enjoyable to write. In Professor Michaelis’ class, I wrote about a UGA cross country runner who was a refugee from Rwanda. The article was published just as the Syrian refugee crisis sparked a worldwide conversation, and it was rewarding to know I was writing about something far bigger than sports. “I’d ultimately like to write about Olympic sports for a major news outlet. I’m also interested in writing long-form feature stories about sports or possibly working with data-driven journalism. Regardless, I feel very confident that I will enjoy spending my career telling stories about sports.”

“On UGA’s campus, the Grady Sports Media program has shaped my college experience and how I want to spend the rest of my life. Professor Vicki Michaelis, who covered eight Olympics, directs the program, and Dr. Welch Suggs is the associate director. Both have phenomenal passion and dedication to preparing their students to become sports media professionals. “Grady Sports focuses on gaining real-world experience, and I have never felt I am completing an assignment solely for a grade. We receive in-depth feedback for everything we write, and many of our assignments are published in local media outlets. Professor Michaelis’ Multiplatform Storytelling for Sports was the best course I’ve taken at UGA, and the work gave me a better sense of what it would be like to work in the sports journalism industry. For one assignment, I had finally finished a profile about a UGA runner. When he suffered a season-ending injury two days before my story was due, I rewrote it. That’s what I would have done if this were an assignment for a news outlet, so that’s what I did in Grady Sports.

Zoe Schneider ’18 – Spoon University

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“During freshman year, my roommate and I strove to be known as the baking dorm room. We kept an absurdly large box of mixing bowls, dry ingredients, and pans in the bottom of a wardrobe, and we became competent at smuggling the occasional apple or lump of cream cheese out of the dining halls to fuel our baking adventures. Since my roommate was a journalism major and I enjoyed photography, it was only logical that when we heard about Spoon University, an online foodie publication for colleges, we worked together to bring Spoon to UGA. “As someone who has no intention of participating in journalism in the future but does intend to write scientific articles to be published, Spoon was a fascinating insight into a very specific area of publishing. Being a writer and photographer for Spoon University was also a great way to get involved in two areas I am very passionate about – photography and food! Getting to meet and interact with people whose fields are completely different from mine is an additional bonus of participating in Spoon University that I always look forward to.”

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FINE ARTS ENGAGEMENT

Julie Saxton ’16 – Violin Performance, Psychology “Before coming to UGA, I had over ten years of experience playing piano, six years of experience playing violin, a vague dream of becoming an orchestral musician, and serious doubts about pursuing such a notoriously unreliable career. I met with Dr. Michael Heald, Associate Professor of Violin, who had done several clinics at my high school. He convinced me to give music a try, assuring me that if I decided it wasn’t for me, I would certainly have the ability to pursue something else. Fortunately, I decided a violin performance major was for me and I have run with it ever since. “The UGA Hugh Hodgson School of Music has provided me with so many opportunities to learn new repertoire and gain experience in performance. Upon coming to UGA, I had only had four years of private lessons and about three solo performance opportunities. In the four years I have been here, I have performed two solo recitals (soon to be three), played in numerous concerts with the UGA Symphony Orchestra, performed multiple chamber ensemble recitals, premiered several student composers’ works, and played in five different operas. “With funding from the Ramsey Scholarship and the Honors Program’s HISP grant, I went with the School of Music in 2014 to Alessandria, Italy, to study music at the conservatory there. I had the privilege of performing with the conservatory orchestra in Alessandria and the conservatory orchestra in Torino (Turin). I took lessons from several different teachers, participated in master classes, and had a few solo performance opportunities. I also formed connections with other UGA music students, as well as students from different music schools around the country. “For nearly a year, I have been privately teaching violin at 106 West School of Music in Winder, GA, and I recently began teaching at the UGA Community Music School. I freelance when I can, playing local weddings and receptions with my friends and colleagues from the School of Music (by far, the coolest gig I played in college was with local Athens favorite Kishi Bashi as part of a 21-piece string orchestra in a show at the Georgia Theatre).” Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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RAMSEY SCHOLARS – INTERNSHIPS

Ramseys Highlight Their Work Experiences Heather Huynh ’17 – Google, Pittsburgh, PA (2015); Google, Mountain View, CA (2016)

Going into the internship, I wanted to get a good feel for the company and their values. Personally, I wanted to grow my skills, both IT and programming, as well as learn about the work structure within big companies. This experience helped solidify what I want to do in the future, and I’m looking forward to returning in summer 2016 to intern at Google headquarters.” — Heather Huynh ’17

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“My first summer with Google (a 12-week, paid internship) started in Mountain View, California at Google’s headquarters. After orientation week, I worked in TechStop in the Pittsburgh Office. We basically made sure all the engineers could continue to do their jobs even when their computers were not cooperating. The work environment at Google was amazing; I was always encouraged to try something new or pursue something that piqued my interest. I also got the chance to travel to Moriarty, New Mexico to visit Titan Aerospace and learn about their drone initiative. It was really interesting to see how different their IT infrastructure was from the infrastructure at other Google offices (since they are a company acquired by Google). I also learned about dealing with government data that can’t be stored on replicating servers. “Going into the internship, I wanted to get a good feel for the company and their values. Personally, I wanted to grow my skills, both IT and programming, as well as learn about the work structure within big companies. This experience helped solidify what I want to do in the future, and I’m looking forward to returning in summer 2016 to intern at Google headquarters.” Bailey Palmer ’18 – Office of Arabian Peninsula Affairs, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC; Al Qaeda in Yemen Team, American Enterprise Institute’s Critical Threat Project, Washington, DC “During the spring semester of 2016, I interned at the State Department at the Arabian Peninsula Desk through the UGA Washington Semester Program. The program provided housing and night classes in a great location in the heart of DC. WSP provided me with the perfect opportunity to explore the city as a local while also living with other UGA students. The classes were engaging, and the program director did a fantastic job of helping us meet established professionals with similar interests and create a network. “At my internship, I gained valuable experience and connections in the State Department and learned a lot. I worked most closely with the Yemen desk and became well versed in the political dynamics of region as well as the situation on the ground during the civil war. I wrote daily briefings, summarizing the night’s cables into digestible highlights, which is an incredibly important skill. I also worked on various other projects throughout the semester, usually preparing background and policy briefings for my supervisors. The hours were long and unpaid, but it was well worth it!”

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Ramsey Scholars Internships 2015-2016 Melissa Cousins Teaching Assistant, Intro to Jewelry & Metals, Cortona, Italy; Jewelry Intern, Aurum Studios, Athens, GA; ECU Material Topics Symposium, Greenville, NC; Enamelist Society Conference, Beverly, MA; Society of North American Goldsmiths Conference, Boston, MA Shreya Ganeshan Intern, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC; Energy Intern, UGA Office of Sustainability, Athens, GA; Research Fellow, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Athens, GA; National Collegiate Research Conference at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; EPA International Youth Environmental Symposium, Atlanta, GA Emily Giambalvo Intern, Associated Press, Paralympic Games, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Communications Intern, USA Track & Field, Indianapolis, IN; MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, Boston, MA Heather Huynh Information Technology Intern, Google, Mountainview, CA; Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 2015, Houston, TX Megan Murphy Medical Intern, Friends for Asia, Chiang Mai, Thailand Ray Paleg Intern, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; Urban Agriculture Intern, UGA Office of Sustainability, Athens, GA Bailey Palmer Intern, Office of Arabian Peninsula Affairs, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC; Al Qaeda in Yemen Team, American Enterprise Institute’s Critical Threat Project, Washington, DC Mihir Patel Undergraduate Researcher, USDA Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, Athens, GA Vineet Raman Summer Research Intern, National Institute of Epidemiology, Chennai, India Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort

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R A M S E Y S C H O L A R S – FA C U LT Y M E N T O R S

Graduating Ramseys Highlight Their Service and Leadership Experiences Thomas Johnston ’16 “I first contacted Dr. Dorothy Fragaszy after freshman year to join her lab. She allowed me to join the UGA Primate Lab as a lab technician for the first semester. Soon after I conducted my own research on social networks in captive capuchin populations under her guidance. In three years I learned about capuchin monkeys through primary literature and data processing, and I conducted animal behavior data collection in the field at Boa Vista, Brazil. Dr. Fragaszy is an integral part of my fuller research experience and undergraduate education. Her guidance has allowed me to participate in the entire process of conducting research and has prepared me for medical school.”

I first contacted Dr. Dorothy Fragaszy after freshman year to join her lab. [She] is an integral part of my fuller research experience and undergraduate education. Her guidance has allowed me to participate in the entire process of conducting research and has prepared me for medical school.” — Thomas Johnston ’16

Emily Giambalvo ’18 “Professor Vicki Michaelis continuously presents me with new challenges in sports journalism and is always nearby with guidance and support. Whether it’s the determination to pry anecdotes from athletes during interviews or the now omnipresent voice in my head that says to talk to another source, Professor Michaelis has played an integral role in my development as a writer. She leads Grady Sports Media students to numerous experiences we wouldn’t receive elsewhere. In September, I will be a part of a team of students covering the Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro for the Associated Press. Professor Michaelis organized the opportunity and will attend as our editor. Our tangential discussions in class about her experiences covering the Olympics are captivating, and every day I leave class excited about my future.” Heather Huynh ’17 “Dr. Brad Barnes has been a big part of my undergraduate career in the UGA Computer Science Department. I can always depend on him to support me in any endeavor I am interested in pursuing. I first met Dr. Barnes in my Introduction to Programming class sophomore year. I approached him about being my faculty mentor for a Roosevelt Scholar class research project and he agreed, even though it was not his specialty. Even now, he continues to encourage me to create Women in Computer Science groups and pursue other opportunities to improve the department.” Katie Googe ’17 “For many years my goal has been to get a PhD and teach at the university level. When choosing a college, UGA was attractive because I knew about the joint bachelor’s/master’s degree program and saw it as a way to get closer to my goals. I decided on comparative literature and Romance languages as undergrad majors and religion for my master’s degree. Almost as soon, I met Dr. Carolyn Medine, an amazing mentor who also focuses on religion and literature. She is a wonderful source of information, guidance, support, and opportunities, and it is amazing to be

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able to take her lessons and apply them to the areas of literature and religion that interest me (everything from Frankenstein to Isaac Asimov’s Robot stories to The Matrix). I have worked with her, as well as Dr. David Williams from Honors, to write papers about the ways science fiction writers use religion, and I’ll be presenting my master’s thesis on Asimov in spring 2017.” Ray Paleg ’16 “Dr. Dainess Maganda has been my professor for three semesters of Swahili and has helped me to fall in love with the language and culture. She focuses on creating a community among the students and sharing life lessons during each class. After

sophomore year, she inspired me to spend a summer in her home country of Tanzania and supported me through every step of the process. Even while abroad, she called me weekly to hear what I was up to and see how my Swahili was coming along. This semester, she is leading a one-on-one directed studies course, focusing on technology and environmental education in Kenya, allowing me to dive into the topics that interest me most. Dr. Maganda continually goes out of her way to make each student feel respected and cared for, enabling each student to grow both personally and academically.”

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R A M S E Y S C H O L A R S – R E S E A R C H & T R AV E L- S T U DY

Ramsey Scholars Describe the Impact of Their Travel & Research Experiences Malcolm Barnard ’18 – Ecology, Forestry (MS)

I presented my research at multiple conferences in 2015. At the Odum Graduate Symposium, I received second place in the undergraduate poster session. I then presented at the UGA Sustainability Symposium, receiving first place in the student poster session. A talk I presented at the Georgia Association of Water Professionals meeting in March has led to a potential opportunity to test my algal filtration device at a water treatment plant.” — Malcolm Barnard ’18

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“Research has been an integral part of my experience at UGA. From hydrology to entomology and from marine science to tropical ecology, I have learned crucial research skills and participated in many amazing projects under fantastic professors. “My primary research area and the focus of my master’s research is investigating the effects of algae on water quality in freshwater lakes and rivers. Beginning the first semester at UGA, I was able to continue my research from high school utilizing my patent pending algal filtration device to utilize algae to create potable water from polluted freshwater lakes. I am currently working in Dr. Susan Wilde’s lab in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, as well as with Dr. James Porter and Dr. Alan Covich in the Odum School of Ecology and Dr. Todd Rasmussen in Warnell. The tremendous opportunities for discussion and one-on-one learning have transformed my research and educational experiences here at UGA. Mentors have encouraged me to consider new ideas; suggested interesting courses, seminars, and contacts; and have worked together to create the best path for me to reach my goals. I am currently working in Dr. Wilde’s lab as a research assistant and preparing my algal research for publication. “I presented my research at multiple conferences in 2015. At the Odum Graduate Symposium, I received second place in the undergraduate poster session. I then presented at the UGA Sustainability Symposium, receiving first place in the student poster session. A talk I presented at the Georgia Association of Water Professionals meeting in March has led to a potential opportunity to test my algal filtration device at a water treatment plant. At UGA’s CURO Symposium, I shared research with students and faculty from across campus. Selected as a student moderator and poster presenter, I was sponsored by IECA to attend the International Erosion Control Association’s Environmental Connection Conference in Portland, Oregon, where I met professors, students, and professionals from around the globe. My favorite conference was the Ecological Society of America (ESA) Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland in August 2015. Sponsored by Warnell, I was selected for presentation at ESA’s Centennial Meeting. This conference was an incredible opportunity to learn from top ecologists and receive their feedback. In 2015, I was also selected to give a TEDxUGA talk about the global water crisis at the TEDx UGA Student Idea Competition. “I also study Tachinid fly parasitism of horned passalus beetles under Dr. Andrew Davis in the Odum School of Ecology. The larval parasite that we are studying has not previously been reported in adult horned passalius beetles. We hope to publish this study sometime later this year. “With a Ramsey travel grant, I traveled to Costa Rica to study tropical

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ecology. I researched leaf cutter ant behavior in the tropical rain forest at the La Selva Biological Station and the impacts of herbivory on the rate of plant pollination in the cloud forests of Monteverde. From Costa Rica, I went to the UGA’s Marine Institute on Sapelo Island, where I researched the effects of tides on marine phytoplankton. This program also included coursework at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography and an oceanic research cruise on the R/V Savannah.” Evan Knox ’18 – Physics, Psychology “The summer after first year, I participated in interview-based social science research, examining the methodological and communicative inconsistencies in precipitation forecasts (in conjunction with the Geography Department). I had the benefit of learning the fundamentals of research in social science from a thoroughly excellent and supportive mentor in Dr. Alan Stewart, as well as from my classmates, who were universally older and more experienced in such research. In fact, my experience in this class helped me decide to add a psychology major. “My interests became more focused on the physical

aspects of the discipline than the social – ideally, I was hoping for a way to utilize both a continued appreciation of physics and newfound research interest in psychology. Thanks to a suggestion from a former research assistant of his, I found Dr. L. Stephen Miller, current head of the UGA Bio-Imaging Research Center, as well as the Neuropsychology and Memory Assessment Laboratory in Psychology. As part of Dr. Miller’s lab, I’ve worked with UGA’s MRI machines and the fMRI data our lab takes, as well as the psychometrics and non-imaging physical data necessary to better understand dementia, the neuroprotective effects of dietary supplements, and the impact of concussions on later life. “I intend to complete an Honors thesis in Dr. Miller’s lab next school year. That gives me time to further learn the minutia of rigorous professional research and time to explore other research interests of mine – mathematics and chaos theory in social psychology, behavioral genetics, and surface molecule formation in the universe. Whatever the case may be, I know I can count on both the plethora of innovative and interesting research opportunities present here at UGA, as well as the helpfulness and support of our research mentors.”

Ramsey Research Presentations 2015-2016 Jenny Alpaugh Examining Diversity in High School Publication Staffs. Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA Melissa Cousins Optimizing Plique-à-Jour Enameling. Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA Shreya Ganeshan What Good is a Low-Carbon City if No One Can Afford to Live There? Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA Heather Huynh Closing the Diversity Gap: Creating Support Programs for STEM Minority Students. Presented at Roosevelt Institute, Athens, GA Evan Knox Effects of Cognitive Reserve and MPOD Levels on Personality in Older Adults. Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA Megan Murphy White Matter Structure Differs Between Schizophrenia and Healthy Comparison Groups as a Function of Cognitive Control and Age. Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA Vineet Raman Eliminating Cultural and Linguistic Boundaries in Healthcare: Creating Standards and Funding for Medical Interpreters. Presented at Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) Symposium, Athens, GA and The Tomorrow People Public Health Conference 2016 in Kuching, Malaysia 114

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Berta Franzluebbers ’16 – Linguistics, Physics “I chose to major in physics but also wanted to fulfill a personal goal of studying as many foreign languages as possible. I knew that UGA’s AP credit policy would give me the time necessary to pursue this dream. My first class at UGA was Arabic 1001, a fitting start to four years full of exploring new languages both on campus and abroad. I was able to continue studying three foreign languages I had studied in high school, as well as begin seven new languages! I began with Arabic and continued to Portuguese and Swahili in the following semesters. When I took Hebrew, I found that the class was much more translation focused. This class proved to be a turning point for me, and I continued to become more interested in ancient languages and translation, taking courses in Greek, Latin, and Old Icelandic over the next years. “Although these new languages were intriguing, learning the introductory material of a single semester was a completely different experience compared with the more advanced classes I took in German, Spanish, and French. I knew that being immersed in the language would be essential. While I had experience with German through travel with my family, I was excited to take advantage of the UGA en France program, which I funded using the Ramsey Scholarship travel stipend. “While in France, I was fully immersed in the language, as I had hoped, speaking French with my home-stay family, during classes, and everywhere else around the cities of Montpellier and Paris. My French family welcomed me completely, including me in visits to relatives and the points of interest of nearby towns, in addition to daily breakfast and dinner conversations. As a part of this program, I also took advantage of the option to spend two weeks in Morocco, staying with Moroccan families. Being submerged so wholly

in the ‘world’ of two different languages in one summer was incomparable. “Academically, taking linguistics classes made it possible for me to learn new languages more easily. The patterns of language change discussed in Historical Linguistics were invaluable when studying Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. Conversely, taking classes in varied languages made linguistics classes more accessible.” Davis Coleman ’18 – Spain, France, Croatia, Italy, Germany, England “Coming into the University of Georgia as a Ramsey Scholar, I was in awe of all the experiences around the world that the older students had enjoyed. Before college I never thought that I would have the resources available to travel the world, but I quickly found myself planning my own trip around Europe to advance my professional skills and to grow as a person, as well. “I was primarily going for the London School of Economics. I spent three weeks studying Risk Management and Management right in the heart of London, with leading professors from all over the world. I cemented an interest in financial services and learned so much about international economics with hands-on experience. “Beyond LSE, I found myself on the Camino de Santiago, hiking through the Pyrenees Mountains on the centuries-old pilgrimage, the start of my 800-kilometer trek through Spain. I created lifelong friendships with amazing people from South Korea to Peru, all while staying in hostels every night, saddled with just a guide book and a 13-kilogram backpack. I even ran with the bulls in Pamplona in the famous San Fermin Festival. “I am no longer in awe of the experiences other students in the program have had, because I created one of my own.”

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R A M S E Y S C H O L A R S – P R E - M E D I C A L P R E PA R AT I O N

Ramsey Scholars Describe the Impact of Their Travel & Research Experiences Mihir Patel ’16 – Applied Biotechnology, Biology, Microbiology, Psychology

With each experience, I have broadened my horizons and built a solid foundation for future studies. Each class I have taken, each research project I have worked on, and each doctor-patient interaction I have seen has solidified my goals for the future. Now, as I stand at the threshold of a new journey through medical school, I am thankful for all of the opportunities I have had over the past four years.” — Mihir Patel ’16

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“When I first arrived at the University of Georgia, I was fairly certain that I wanted to attend medical school. Looking back four years later, I could not have picked a better atmosphere to develop and pursue my interests. The university has provided a wide range of courses to take (from virology and immunology to African drumming) to augment my knowledge of science and to branch out into other fields I may not have otherwise encountered. The sheer size of the university fits in perfect harmony with the close-knit, well-supported community found within the Ramsey Scholar/Foundation Fellows program. “This program has connected me with other students on similar paths for guidance when needed and has provided awesome seminars including one where I was able to learn the basics of medical suturing. Outside of the university, my interests in medicine led me to volunteer at St. Mary’s Hospital assisting with MRI and CT scans. Also, over the course of a couple of summers I shadowed an oncologist and hematologist at the GRU Cancer Center. While shadowing, I rounded with physicians in the hospital, sat in on weekly interdisciplinary meetings, observed surgeries, and shadowed a family doctor. “One of the areas I have placed the most emphasis on throughout college is research. I have tried to focus on areas that easily hold the potential for clinical integration. However, I believe that regardless of the field, research helps to build the critical thinking and teamwork skills that are invaluable as a physician. Freshman year, I started researching ovarian cancer with Dr. Mandi Murph in the College of Pharmacy. We focused on investigating several different molecular pathways involved in ovarian cancer progression. In particular, we were interested in the effects of inhibiting mTOR signaling on ovarian cancer cell morphology. Working the following summer at Georgia Regents University with Dr. Lin Mei, I switched fields from oncology to neurology and researched TMEM108, a protein associated with schizophrenia susceptibility. I investigated the developmental expression of this protein in the brain and also its effects on hippocampal and dentate gyrus growth. Most recently, in a third and final switch, I made the jump from neurology to virology. I currently work with the United States Department of Agriculture to develop reverse genetic models of the influenza virus. “With each experience, I have broadened my horizons and built a solid foundation for future studies. Each class I have taken, each research project I have worked on, and each doctor-patient interaction I have seen has solidified my goals for the future. Now, as I stand at the threshold of a new journey through medical school, I am thankful for all of the opportunities I have had over the past four years.”

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


Megan Murphy ’17 – Biology, Psychology

created programs that could cater uniquely to their

“If you had told me on orientation day about the countries I would visit, the research I would do, I would never have believed you. My plan was simple: get good grades and a good MCAT score, shadow my doctors a little back home, and go to medical school to be a pediatric oncologist. Research was too scary, because I had no idea how to begin, and traveling abroad was just another unattainable dream (when I came to UGA, I didn’t even have a passport). The route I’m taking to medical school now is so different from what I intended it’s almost comical, and it’s been influenced by the two things I never thought I would do. “My two internships abroad had a dramatic effect on my plans. After shadowing doctors in both Peru and Thailand, I realized that I adored learning about different healthcare systems, the different public health obstacles and diseases that they faced, and how they

needs. I decided to add a master’s certificate in global health to further supplement my majors and minor. “Research in the Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab has been the other major part of my college career. I joined as an undergraduate research assistant in August of my sophomore year and have worked there every semester since. There I’ve learned to use diffusion tensor imaging, a type of MRI, to analyze structures in the brain in patients with schizophrenia. My lab has encouraged me to learn how to present and publish my work and has allowed me to conduct my own research over the course of last year and during the summer (with funding from the CURO Summer Research Fellowship). The research I have done has taught me how to use some of the latest in neuroimaging technology, and I hope one day to continue using this technology when I’m a pediatric oncologist treating brain tumors.”

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Melissa Carlene Cousins

Berta Maria Franzluebbers

Major(s): Art – Jewelry & Metals

Major(s): Linguistics, Physics

Hometown: Midland, GA

Hometown: Watkinsville, GA

Research: Optimizing Plique-à-Jour Enameling

Travel-Study and Internships: France; Morocco

Travel-Study and Internships: Costa Rica; Italy; Columbus, GA; Athens, GA; Beverly, MA; Boston, MA

Honors and Awards: Ted L. Simons Memorial Award for Outstanding Junior Physics Student, Presidential Scholar, First Honor Graduate, summa cum laude with Honors

Campus/Community Activities: Phi Beata Heata Student Jewelry Association; UGA Fencing Team Honors and Awards: CURO Summer Research Fellow, MJSA Educational Foundation Scholarship, Women’s Jewelry Association June Herman Award, Vince Dooley Art Scholarship, UGA Honors International Scholar, cum laude

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Samuel Thomas Johnston

Rachel Hana Paleg

Major(s): Statistics

Major(s): Geography

Minor(s): Spanish

Hometown: Silver Spring, MD

Hometown: Birmingham, AL

Travel-Study and Internships: China; Singapore; Tanzania; Thailand; Vietnam; Los Angeles, CA; Mountainview, CA; Washington, DC; Pearl Harbor, HI; Greenbelt, MD

Research: Social Network Analysis among Capuchin Monkeys Travel-Study and Internships: Brazil; Spain; Birmingham, AL; Athens, GA Campus/Community Activities: Honors Program Student Council Secretary; Myers Community Council Treasurer; Oasis Católico Tutor Honors and Awards: CURO Summer Research Fellow, National Merit Scholar, Buick Achievers Scholar, Dean’s List, cum laude with Honors

Campus/Community Activities: UGA Swahili Club (UGASWA) Student Coordinator; UGA Office of International Education (OIE) Peer Advisor; Lunchbox Garden Club Volunteer; UGA Prelude Dance Ensemble Choreographer and Dancer Honors and Awards: UGA Amazing Student, Sigma Delta Tau Personality Award, Hypepotamus Star Student, UGA Honors in Washington, Freeman-ASIA Foundation Scholar, Keds Brave Career Grant Award, UGA Honors International Scholar, Palladia Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society, Gamma Theta Upsilon, Crane Leadership Scholar, Kenyon Memorial Award, Blue Key Honor Society, magna cum laude with High Honors

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Mihir B. Patel

Juliana Jianquan Saxton

Major(s): Applied Biotechnology, Biology, Microbiology, Psychology

Major(s): Psychology, Violin Performance

Hometown: Martinez, GA

Travel-Study and Internships: Italy

Research: Suppression of the GTPase-Activating Protein RGS10 Increases Rheb-GTP and mTOR Signaling in Ovarian Cancer Cells; Developmental Expression of Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene TMEM108 and Its Function in Dentate Gyrus Dendritogenesis; Reverse Genetic Modeling of Avian Influenza for Transmissibility Studies and Vaccine Development

Campus/Community Activities: UGA Symphony Orchestra; UGA Summer Music Camp Resident Assistant; Asian Children Mentoring Program Historian; String Quartet Chamber Music Ensemble; Athena Quartet Chamber Music Ensemble; Piano Trio Chamber Music Ensemble; UGA Women’s Outreach and Resource Collective Staff Writer

Travel-Study and Internships: Miami, FL; Athens, GA; New Orleans, LA; Asheville, NC; Austin, TX

Honors and Awards: Presidential Scholar, Dean’s List, UGA Honors International Scholar, summa cum laude with Honors

Campus/Community Activities: Journal of Undergraduate Research Opportunities (JURO) Discipline Editor; Athens Regional Medical Center Clinical Volunteer

Hometown: Marietta, GA

Honors and Awards: Watson Brown Distinguished Scholar, National Merit Scholar, Energy Solutions Foundation Scholar, Presidential Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, First Honor Graduate, summa cum laude with Highest Honors

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C L A S S

Prentiss Rachel Autry Baconton Community Charter HS Hinsonton, GA Biology

Katie Michele Googe Clarke Central HS Athens, GA Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, MA Religion

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Jenny Elizabeth Alpaugh Clarke Central HS Athens, GA Biology, Journalism

Malcolm Alexander Barnard Johns Creek HS Johns Creek, GA Ecology

Evan Knox Cedar Shoals HS Athens, GA Physics, Psychology

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Heather Kimberly Huynh Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science & Technology Loganville, GA Chemistry, Computer Science

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Davis Jarratt Coleman William R. Boone HS Orlando, FL Finance, Statistics

Isabel Bailey Palmer North Atlanta HS Atlanta, GA Economics, International Affairs

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Megan Nicole Murphy Grovetown HS Grovetown, GA Biology, Psychology

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Shreya Ganeshan Northview HS Johns Creek, GA Economics, Statistics

Timothy Allen Ruiter Thomas Jefferson HS for Science & Technology Centreville, VA Biochemical Engineering

Emily Christine Giambalvo Easley HS Easley, SC Management Information Systems

Zoe Irene Schneider Henry W. Grady HS Atlanta, GA Cognitive Science, Genetics

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


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Jessica Ziling Ho Lakeside HS Martinez, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Manasa Lakshmi Kadiyala Chattahoochee HS Alpharetta, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Jacqueline Grace Kessler Eastside HS Gainesville, FL Management Information Systems, Mathematics

Vineet Sundar Raman George Walton Comprehensive HS Marietta, GA Biology, Spanish

Hayley Marie Rutchow Franklin HS Thompson’s Station, TN Early Childhood Education BSEd/MEd

William Jessie Walker Bainbridge HS Bainbridge, GA Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, History

Prabhjot Kaur Minhas Richmond Hill HS Richmond Hill, GA Anthropology, Biology

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Evan Chandler Barnard Johns Creek HS Johns Creek, GA Ecology

Sara Elizabeth Cagle Morgan County HS Madison, GA Genetics

Benjamin Thomas Giebelhausen Bennington Public HS Bennington, NE Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Emma Danielle Hope Cherry Creek HS Englewood, CO Genetics

Sarah Aven Hartwell Jones Collegiate School Richmond, VA Art

Grant Harrison Mercer Harrison HS Marietta, GA Biology, International Affairs

Carl Thomas Miller III Grovetown HS Grovetown, GA Computer Science

Benjamin Crawford Starks Celebration HS Celebration, FL International Affairs

Foundation Fellows & R a m se y Honor s S chol ar s A nnual R ep ort


Ray Paleg ’16 – Geography “After graduation I will begin my career working for Google as a recruiting coordinator at their headquarters in Mountain View, California. Google Earth has been an integral part of my geography studies, and Google – a company that has revolutionized data accessibility, including geographical data, around the world – quickly became my dream place to work. From the many different opportunities I experienced thanks to the Ramsey Scholarship, I learned that it was crucial for me to work in an engaging and personal work culture with likeminded individuals. “I spent a summer volunteering at an elephant sanctuary, a semester working in a child development center on the Pearl Harbor Naval base in Hawaii, a summer interning at an HIV/AIDS center in Tanzania, a semester interning at a shark research center in Thailand, and a summer interning at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. While these experiences may seem unrelated, they have taught me the skills to thrive in various types of cultures and work environments and demonstrated the importance of adaptability in all settings. Time and time again I have found my greatest strength to be building communities, and my biggest motivation to be ensuring happiness among my peers. During interviews with Google, these were the stories that were most compelling. The personal skills and knowledge that I gained during various experiences in the field set me apart and were only made possible by the flexibility and support of the UGA Honors and Ramsey Scholars programs.”

RAMSEY SCHOLARS NEWEST ALUMNI – CLASS OF 2016 Melissa Cousins

Bench Jeweler, Aurum Studios, Athens, GA

Berta Franzluebbers

Gap Year before applying to graduate school

Thomas Johnston

University of Alabama School of Medicine

Rachel Paleg

Recruiting Coordinator, Google, Mountain View, CA

Mihir Patel

Medical College of Georgia/Georgia Regents University

Juliana Saxton

Violin Teacher, Athens, GA; Gap Year before applying to graduate school

Julie Saxton ’16 – Violin Performance, Psychology “After graduation, I am taking a year off from school to continue teaching, freelancing, performing, and studying violin in preparation for graduate school. I intend to pursue a Master of Violin Performance, potentially followed by a Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) in Violin Performance. I would love to be on faculty at a university much like UGA someday. However, my ultimate goal is still to become a professional orchestral musician. Though it seemed like a faraway dream in high school, my education at UGA has made this goal seem so much more real and attainable. I am forever grateful for the faculty members, guest performers, colleagues, and friends who have helped, supported, and inspired me along the way.”

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R A MSE Y SCHOL AR S ALUMNI Class of 2004 Ladson Gaddy-Dubac Andrew Ely Guthrie Virginia Wood Pate Daniel Anthony del Portal Samuel Winters Richwine III Rachel Elizabeth Wahlig Class of 2005 Katherine Elizabeth Bugg Andrew G. Crowley Lawrence Robert Ficek Matthew Eric Hickman Ngozi Christie Ogbuehi James Christoper Tarr Brian William Teplica Class of 2006 Molly Martin Anderson Staci Hutsell Cannon Elizabeth Kate Davidson Jarrett Roux Horne Jackson Charles Dillingham May Class of 2007 Mary Beth Bereznak Jonathan Andrew Charles Brian Lee Claggett Kelly Eaton Gladin Hope Carrell Ham Maggie McQueen Hodges Brian Louis Levy Daniel Suresh Mathews Lamar Houston Moree Lauren Elizabeth Sillery Oberg Teerawit “Tim” Supakorndej Rebecca Rahn Vahrenwald Andrew Jay Vesper

Class of 2008 Matthew Charles Agan Brent Lewis Allen Molly Beatrice Pittman Babineaux Jeffrey Craig Elrod James Tristan Gordy Annie Ming Huang Joseph Stuart Knight John Thompson Matthews James Lucas McFadden Noah Reuben Mink Gregory James O’Connell Blake William Shealy Karen Christina Wong Class of 2009 Nneka Alicia Arinze Shannon Chen Jonathan Brown Chestnut Nisha Gupta Jeremiah Douglas Johnson Jeremy Howard Jones Lindsay Beth Jones Elizabeth Alexandra Katzmann Madison Moore Pool Peter Samuel Shoun Joseph Dempsey Turrentine Class of 2010 Alexander Linton Brown Peyton Clark Edwards Carole Noelle House William Daniel Jordan III Halina Maladtsova Nicholas Anthony Passarello Lauren Elizabeth Pinson Caitlin Gail Robinson Emily Frances Reed Underwood Zao “Michael” Yang

The community of excellence within the Ramsey Scholars and Foundation Fellows programs not only drove me to succeed both in school and after graduation, but also created lasting, meaningful relationships with some of the best people I’ve ever met.” Griffin Rice, Ramsey Class of 2011, Marketing Manager, Bank of America

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Class of 2011 Jonathan William Arogeti Jason Daniel Berkowitz Christopher Jordan Floyd Haylee Nicole Humes Mark Paul Johnson Jung Woong Kim Nicole Elizabeth Nation Erika Parker New Griffin Daniel Rice Joseph Cataquiz Rimando Stephen Bradford Thompson Andrew George Watts Laura Ann Wynn Class of 2012 Samantha Colleen Gray Aisha Mahmood Haley Tiffany Ying Hu Whitney Marie Ising John Bradley Otwell Anna Catherine Savelle Ryan Oliver Sheets Catherine Lois Shonts Sheila Vedala Class of 2013 Glenn Ryan Branscomb Frank Logan Butler IV Trevor Hunter Hohorst Yiran Emily Peng Alexander Collins Vey Class of 2014 Catherine Jane Backus Emily Elizabeth Backus Victoria Lynn DeLeo Amanda Jane Holder Stephen Edward Lago Mariana Lynne Satterly Pranay Kumar Udutha Class of 2015 Cody James Baetz Carmen Orpinas Kraus Tuan Anh Nguyen Abigail Taylor Shell

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e p o r t

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Dorothé Otemann DESIGN

Sam Pittard Bulldog Print + Design

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PROJECT MANAGER

P H O TO G R A P H Y

Jason Thrasher Wingate Downs TEXT AND EDITING

Jessica Hunt Elizabeth Sassler Emily Myers P H O TO C O O R D I N ATO R

Kate Belgum PRINTED BY

Bulldog Print + Design


The University of Georgia Foundation Fellowship 215 Moore College 108 Herty Drive Athens, Georgia 30602-6127 706-542-5482 honors.uga.edu

Foundation Fellows Annual Report, 2015-2016  

The annual report of the University of Georgia's Foundation Fellows and Ramsey Honors Scholars program, 2015-2016

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