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TOWER Urban Oasis: A Tour of Natural UD with Marcy Brown Marsden

UNIVERSITY of DALLAS

The Art of

SCIENCE in Liberal Arts Physics and the Bells of Braniff Tower

Plus Studies in Human Movement Science and the Church SUMMER 2012


FIRST WORD

Science and the Pursuit of Truth

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here is a special grace between faith and the sciences that grows from their shared love and pursuit of the truth. As Sr. Clodovia Lockett (SSMN), mother of the pre-med program at UD, once said, “Science seeks the truth and truth is God.” Science investigates creation in that scientists seek to understand the world that God made for us, and that we have been called upon to nurture and protect. Whether that means studying a microscopic bacteria or finding a new star, science is a celebration of creation and discovery. UD’s mission states that we are dedicated to the pursuit of truth. In this way our academic rigor and our Catholic identity share a common cause. Studying the sciences is an integral part of pursuing truth. How else do we understand the physical realities of the world around us? We are proud of the role science plays in supporting that common cause of the pursuit of truth. Science flourishes here at UD. Our students graduate from UD and go on to do spectacular things. Almost all of our science majors will complete a serious research project while undergraduates. In addition, our students take the Core curriculum, a series of 19 separate courses taken over two years where they write essays on Homer, Virgil, Dante, Shakespeare; they study Aristotle and Plato, European and American history, and foreign languages. They participate in our sophomore Rome Program. Such a rigorous education ensures that our students are second to none. Eighty-five percent of our pre-med track students will be accepted to medical school. Many of our students go on to doctoral programs in the sciences at some of the most competitive universities in the country: Princeton, Harvard, the University of Chicago and many others. Science is studied at virtually every great university in the world. We are grateful for the opportunity to study science at UD in conjunction with the acknowledgement of a supreme being. Here, the process of discovering the miraculous is evidenced by the synergy between the study of science and faith.

Thomas W. Keefe, JD President Sr. Clodovia Lockett

TOWER PRESIDENT

Thomas W. Keefe PUBLISHER

Robert M. Galecke

Executive Vice President EDITOR

Bill Hartley

Director of Marketing & Communications ASSISTANT EDITOR

Christine Carter

Communications Specialist DESIGNER

Scott Morgan CONTRIBUTORS

Joe Howe ’00 Jim Livernois Leah Looten ’09 James Marks III Heather Nelson ’10 Gregory Roper ’84 Danny Sauer ’12 Dani Schumer ’10 Update your address or other contact information. Email jhowe@udallas.edu or llooten@udallas.edu. Send comment, letters to the editor or other communication regarding this publication to Bill Hartley, University of Dallas, Office of Advancement, 1845 E. Northgate Dr., Irving, TX 75062; whartley@udallas.edu. Tower magazine is published twice annually by the Office of Advancement for the University of Dallas community. Opinions in Tower magazine are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the university. Postmaster: Send address changes to Tower, Office of Advancement, 1845 E. Northgate Dr., Irving, TX 75062 The university does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its programs and activities. Any person alleging to have been discriminated against in violation of Title IX may present a complaint to the Title IX coordinator. The coordinator assists in an informal resolution of the complaint or guides the complainant to the appropriate individual or process for resolving the complaint. The university has designated Janis Townsend, director of human resources, as the Title IX coordinator. The Human Resources Office is located on the second floor of Carpenter Hall and the phone number is (972) 721-5382. © University of Dallas 2012 All rights reserved


In This

Issue SUMMER 2012

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COVER STORY PHYSICS AND THE BELLS OF BRANIFF TOWER How Newton’s laws of motion played a pivotal role in breaking the silence of the university’s iconic symbol

FEATURES 07

DART ART Three UD faculty members provide artistic vision for new Orange Line stations in Irving and Las Colinas

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STUDIES IN HUMAN MOVEMENT Biomechanics research at the forefront of fall prevention in the elderly

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URBAN OASIS A tour of natural UD with Marcy Brown Marsden

SCIENCE & THE CHURCH

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A complementary relationship hundreds of years in the making

REGULARS ON CAMPUS

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AKADEMEIA

08

RECOMMENDED READING

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ALUMNI NEWS

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ATHLETICS

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ON THE COVER: Former English Department Chair Louise Cowan is dwarfed by one of the bells named in honor of her and husband, President Donald Cowan. The four Cowan Bells were finally lifted into place on November 22, 1976, and dedicated on December 5.

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On

Campus A Spring Break with Purpose

Students offer disaster assistance to tornado-ravaged Joplin A significant portion of Joplin, Mo., was destroyed when a catastrophic F5 tornado hit the town in May 2011.

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or most, spring break conjures up images of sandy beaches and palm trees. For a certain group of UD students, however, the images are quite different. Last March, a contingent of both students and campus ministers chose to give back during their time off by forgoing the typical annual rite of spring to volunteer for Alternative Spring Break (ASB) in Joplin, Mo. During the week, the group of 15 helped clean and paint Catholic Charities’ new Recovery Center, which is playing a vital role in meeting the immediate and long-term needs of a city that was devastated by an F5 tornado in May 2011.

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Global Book Drive The Army ROTC Club teamed up with Worldwide Book Drive to promote global literacy and education by collecting approximately 1,100 books that will be donated to deserving organizations around the world. “Giving back to others has a lot to do with ROTC’s mission,” said Emma Langley, club treasurer and a junior philosophy major from Houston. “When asked to participate, we thought this service project was fitting for our club.”

“Joplin was a very welcoming community, and this was a great opportunity for our students,” said Scott Chuchla, campus minister and School of Ministry student. Since 1994, through service-oriented activities organized by ASB, hundreds of UD students have helped communities across the country while experiencing, discussing and understanding significant social issues. In order to participate, students must complete an application and interview process, and, once selected, go through faith formation to learn the ASB pillars: service, prayer, simplicity and community.

◉ In Brief Food for Fines During the Sixth Annual Food for Fines, Blakley Library patrons donated nearly 600 non-perishable food items in lieu of outstanding library fines. Donations benefitted the St. Jude’s Catholic Church food pantry in Mansfield, Texas. “There are more than 300,000 people in the DFW area that need food assistance on a daily basis,” said Cherie Hohertz, access services librarian. “Through Food for Fines we are able to help people right here in our community.”

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ON CAMPUS

UNIVERSITY EVENTS

AUGUST 24-28

Crusader Days - Welcome new students and their parents to campus during a full orientation schedule

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First Day of Classes Graduate School of Management

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First Day of Classes

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Mass of the Holy Spirit Begin the academic year with a special Mass by Bishop Kevin J. Farrell

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Men’s and women’s cross country seasons open at UD Invitational Men’s and women’s soccer seasons open at Concordia University (Austin)

10-14

Career Services Week Take part in workshops and events co-hosted with employers; open to all students/alumni

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The Rome Walking Tour Lecture Series begins with Professor Mark Lowery presenting “Black on Gold: The Petrine Texts and their Meaning Emblazoned within St. Peter’s”

Volleyball season opens at the Dallas Invite

SEPTEMBER 01-30

Haggerty Gallery features the works of Fred Spaulding and Waleed Arshad

OCTOBER 01

Family Day - Kick off Charity Week with bounce houses, carnival games, food, face painting, a petting zoo and more

01-06

Charity Week - Proceeds from a week full of imprisoned faculty and students, airband performances and karaoke highlight an annual tradition that benefits local and national charities

NOVEMBER 02

All Souls Day Memorial Mass

09-Dec. 09

Haggerty Gallery features the works of Tanya Synar

Haggerty Gallery exhibit features the works of Eun-Kyung Suh and Julie Tourtillotte

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05-Nov. 04

Oktoberfest - Whether you wear your lederhosen or not, celebrate Oktoberfest on Braniff Mall with German food, beverages and live music

26-27

Odyssey Days - High school seniors (prospective freshmen) are provided a chance to immerse themselves in the UD community

26-27

University of Dallas Ministry Conference - Learn, pray and serve with more than 5,000 Catholic faithful from across the region at the Irving Convention Center

Battle of the Bands Musical acts face off during this much-anticipated tradition that searches for UD’s best

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Chili Cook-Off - Student clubs and organizations compete for the title of “best chili”

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Men’s and women’s basketball seasons open at Dallas Tip-Off Classic

16-17

Odyssey Days - High school seniors (prospective freshmen) are provided a chance to immerse themselves in the UD community

DECEMBER 01

14th Annual Landregan Lecture - This year’s lecture will feature Rev. James Martin, S.J., a Jesuit priest, author and culture editor of America Magazine

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Alumni Advent Mass at the Church of the Incarnation

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Rememberance Day National Roll Call - The ROTC Club and Student Government observe Veterans Day with a moment of silence and a reading of the names of fallen soldiers in marathon fashion

For times, locations and further details, visit the "Upcoming Events" section of udallas.edu

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ON CAMPUS

Career Assistance

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Class of 2012 battling tough economy with success

GRAD 2012

A Global Catholic UD Biblical School GRAD Twenty-nine students from as far away as Singapore made up this year’s online Catholic Biblical School graduating class that received certificates in May during the School of Ministry’s Graduation Mass and Pinning Ceremony. While many of those at the event were local, one graduate, Gilberto Luna of Toronto, Canada, traveled more than 1,000 miles to attend with his family.

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Record-Breaking Graduating Class Retired Navy Admiral Patrick Walsh, who once led the world’s largest fleet command and flew with the famed Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron, addressed more than 300 students who received bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees during the university’s annual commencement ceremony. The class of 2012 is now officially UD’s largest. Also addressing the graduates were senior Jared Rovny and Bishop Kevin Vann of the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth. Among those making up the class of 2012, which officially goes on record as the university’s largest, was Michael McEwen – the youngest of nine siblings, the last to graduate from college and the seventh McEwen to graduate from UD. It would only make sense that he is now a UD undergraduate admissions counselor.

Student Government President Mark Kubisch leads his class of more than 300, the university’s largest ever graduating class.

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s another class of new graduates makes its way into the workforce, they are likely finding the job search process to be somewhat of a challenge because of today’s still wavering economy. Yet, for an increasing number of UD graduates, the financial demands of post-college life have forced them to look for permanent, full-time employment despite the unfriendly climate. “Students are becoming more realistic, delaying graduate school and engaging in the job search a lot earlier,” said Career Services Director Julie Janik, who has noted a decrease in the percentage of UD students enrolling in graduate school immediately after graduation. A recently expanded Office of Career Services, however, is there to help, offering students valuable job search assistance and other resources. Less than a month after commencement, more than a third of recent graduates had already secured employment, a number that, according to the Career Services staff, continues to increase steadily. “Our goal is to help students land a job right out of the gate,” said Janik. For more information on the resources offered by the Career Services Office to both students and alumni, visit udallas.edu/careerservices. 4

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GRAD 2012

Career Services Office (from left): John Christensen, Julie Janik and Adrian Ramirez


ON CAMPUS

A New udallas.edu

Redesigned website features easier navigation, improved design

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ours of focus groups, mountains of survey data and months of planning, designing, migrating and testing gave way to a new university website – udallas.edu – that officially launched in early July. According to Ken Starzer, online marketing and communications specialist, the redesign’s primary challenge was capturing the university’s true spirit visually while making it much easier for visitors to quickly locate the information they need. An uncluttered, classic design that reflects UD’s personality

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Primary navigation based on your association with UD Direct links to the three attributes that most make UD unique Rotating images that highlight UD’s campus life

A more userfriendly calendar of upcoming events A cleaner presentation of the latest news and features

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GRAD 2012

A Celebration of Multiculturalism A global food festival, Aztec and Chinese dance performances, traditional Holi paint party and international Mass were among International Week events that celebrated multiculturalism on campus. The event featured a diverse display of cultures from India and Germany to China and Mexico.

A Tale of 2 Centuries, 4 Sold-out Shows “In Arcadia, like at UD, the nature of truth and ideas is important, and the characters passionately defend these ideas when their vision of the world is threatened,” said Stefan Novinski, assistant professor and director of this year’s spring Mainstage. The production of Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, a tale of two centuries that moves back and forth at the Coverly family estate, sold out four shows and was seen by more than 600 patrons who filled 98 percent of all available seats.

◉ In Brief Barker

A 45-Year Partnership with the College of Business Texas Instruments executive Ellen Barker, MBA ’04, was on hand at the College of Business’ annual spring commencement ceremony to accept from Interim Dean Brian Murray a plaque that commemorated the technology giant’s 45-year partnership with the University of Dallas. Michael Wilson, MBA ’04, who is also a Texas Instruments executive, spoke to the soon-to-be graduates on behalf of alumni to encourage them to use their UD education to the fullest after grauation. SUMMER 2012 l

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ON CAMPUS

A Taste of Rome at Home

A Walk Together in Faith

Cap Bar celebrates more than 30 years as a campus crossroad Baristas like Colleen Slattery ’15 have been serving up cappuccino and more since 1982.

An exploration of the Biblical roots for our approach to migration and immigration will be front and center during the University of Dallas Ministry Conference’s Friday morning keynote address by Cardinal Roger Mahony. The sixth annual event, which will take place Oct. 26-27 at the Irving Convention Center, will also include other keynote addresses and breakout sessions on a variety of topics, Mass and prayer services, exhibits and a liturgical art display, as well as live Christian music. Find out more at udallas. edu/udmc.

Students receive a lesson in cryogenics with ice cream made almost instantly thanks to liquid nitrogen.

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Sunday Sundaes Danny Sauer

n spring 1982, long before the current coffee house craze, UD opened the Cappuccino “Cap” Bar as a pleasant reminder for students who returned from a semester in Rome missing the local cafes. Now, 30 years later, the caffeinated brainchild of Associate Vice President for Administration Pat Daly, BA ’76 MBA ’82, has become a campus crossroad that remains a popular pit stop for those in search of a quick pick-me-up. “Since its creation, the Cap Bar has spanned generations of UD students and families,” said Daly. “Not only has it become a place to socialize and study, but it also employs student workers who use the experience to develop professionally and socially.” To celebrate the anniversary, the Cap Bar displayed memorabilia that told the story of its 30-year history, and offered drink specials at 1982 prices – espresso for 25 cents and cappuccino for 50.

Each Tuesday, the Cap Bar is the setting for a variety of Capp House performances.

It’s no surprise that on a campus like UD even a seemingly routine gathering like Sunday Sundaes could suddenly be transformed from the typical build-your-own-sundae event into a deconstruction and reconstruction of ice cream. Take half and half, vanilla, sugar and a tank of liquid nitrogen, as physics students did recently under the supervision of Professor Rich Olenick, and you get vanilla ice cream in minutes, a pop-up demonstration in cryogenics and the laboratory version of Student Government’s popular weekly “town hall” meeting.


DART Three UD faculty members provide artistic vision for new Orange Line stations in Irving and Las Colinas

CREDIT: PHOTO COURTESY OF UD

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art

hen DART officially opens its new 14-mile, $1.3 billion stretch of light rail on July 28, UD’s influence will be seen through the unique designs of three Orange Line stations. Professor Emeritus Lyle Novinski, Associate Professor Phillip Shore and Assistant Professor Kim Owens were selected to take part in DART’s award-winning Station Art & Design Program by providing artistic vision for the University of Dallas, Las Colinas Urban Center and Irving Convention Center stations, respectively. According to Novinski, who also designed Plano’s 17th Street DART Station a few years ago, “The University of Dallas station reflects UD’s campus as much as possible. Just as the 600-acre campus provides a contemplative oasis in the midst of our highly-urban region, the UD DART stop includes extensive plantings and hardscaping, from brick patterns to wall stones, that incorporate campus details.” Color is added through large steel murals based on Novinski’s paintings of earth, air, fire and water, ancient fundamental symbols which symbolize all learning. “An appropriate connection to an institution of higher learning, I am grateful to the DART staff and the citizens of Irving for their support of these concepts.” “I learned as much I could about Ben Carpenter and his vision for Las Colinas through his letters, writings and wishes,” said Shore about his process for designing the Irving Convention Center Station. “I also looked at what already exists in Las Colinas and the elements found there.” Carpenter, now deceased, was the catalyst for Las Colinas’ development into what is now a thriving master planned community. In addition, Shore wanted to communicate the station’s purpose as a gathering point, so he created a pattern resembling “joined fingers.” That design is repeated in platform pavers made of Texas pink granite, a material commonly found around Las Colinas. Shore shared that, as an artist, he is closely connected to all of his projects, but since this project has involved a different process, he hasn’t seen the final rendering. “It’s been fantastic to have this experience, and I look forward to the grand opening.” “The Urban Center Station is an opportunity to make a lasting impression and create a place that offers a city view for years to come,” said Owens. At the heart of the Las Colinas Urban Center Station will be a windscreen that will use a silhouette of the Las Colinas skyline as an iconic image. “It will be the first impression of Las Colinas for many visitors and it will be the last stop for residents travelling home.”

Columns at the Irving Convention Center Station, incorporate a “joined finger” pattern.

Irving and Las Colinas skylines, including UD’s Braniff Tower, are depicted in the Urban Center Station’s windscreens.

Large steel murals at the UD Station are based on Novinksi’s paintings of earth, air, fire and water.

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Akademeia College of Business Dean Robert Scherer

A School of Ministry Leadership Change

Mark Goodwin, associate professor of theology and department chair, was appointed interim dean of the School of Ministry. Goodwin will fill the school’s top spot while the university undergoes a national search to replace former Dean Brian Schmisek, who left the position to become director of Loyola University Chicago’s Institute of Pastoral Studies. During Schmisek’s tenure as dean, the School of Ministry introduced an undergraduate degree in pastoral ministry, a master’s degree in Catholic school teaching, the University of Dallas Ministry Conference and other programs, as well as made significant strides toward international recognition of the school as a premier institution.

Interim Dean Mark Goodwin

New College of Business Dean

Cleveland State dean to officially take the reins at UD on August 1

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obert Scherer, dean of Cleveland State University’s College of Business, will officially take over the same post at UD on August 1. Among other skills and experiences, he will bring with him significant knowledge of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation process; the College of Business is currently in the application process. “I am thrilled about joining the University of Dallas, and excited to begin collaborating with students, faculty and staff in fulfillment of university and College of Business missions. I am also eager to begin reaching out to the greater Dallas/Fort Worth business community to address their educational and professional needs,” said Scherer. While at Cleveland State, he strategically focused on positioning the college as a vital economic force in the community, building academic programs to meet the market needs of the regional business community. Scherer also introduced new programs to encourage more innovative approaches in teaching, research and service, as well as internal operations. Over the last eight years, he secured more than $6 million in federal, state and local grant and contract funds for international and small business academic and business outreach programs. Scherer holds a doctoral degree from the University of Mississippi, a master’s degree from the University of the Redlands and a bachelor’s degree from Miami (Ohio) University.

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A Visit from the World’s Foremost Dante Scholar Robert Hollander, a professor emeritus at Princeton University who is widely recognized as one of the world’s foremost scholars on Dante, recently spent a week on campus visiting with students and faculty, and lecturing on Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Virgil’s Aeneid, as well as Dante’s Paradiso and Purgatorio.


AKADEMEIA

Computer Crime Prevention

Unique MBA program helps address need for more cybersecurity experts

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world experiencing rapid technological advances has been the catalyst for a significant increase in the use of computers, mobile devices and the Internet as a means of making professional and personal lives more efficient and easy. Unfortunately, that same increasing reliance on technology has resulted in an equally fast growing prevalence of computer crime and, consequently, the need for business professionals trained in the field of cybersecurity, also known as information assurance. “Information assurance is a growing and vitally important field, but it currently lacks trained professionals,” said Brett Landry, associate professor and information assurance program director. “The U.S. government alone currently estimates it needs

more than 100,000 cybersecurity experts to protect its assets from unauthorized access, damage, removal or duplication.” Recognizing the need to fill the void, the university opened its Center for Cybersecurity Education more than nine years ago. Now, it is designated by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as a National Center of Academic Excellence in information assurance, the only such program in Texas and one of only seven worldwide that matches its curriculum to all six national security standards. For more information on the center or MBA, master of science and graduate certificates in cybersecurity offered by the College of Business, visit udallas.edu/cybersecurity.

QUICK FACTS Graduate Programs in Cybersecurity at UD Designated by National Security Agency (NSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance One of seven universities in the world (and the only university in Texas) designated by NSA and DHS to meet all six NSTISSI/ CNSS standards Academic partner with the

National Defense University’s 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfInformation Resources chgikuzseru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciu 84iku4udyigsManagement College (NDU-s IRMC) fbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgikuzseAuthorized to issue graduate ru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciujabgcg6hiseoapohncu3ls certificates on behalf of the 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfU.S. Government for NSA and DHS chgikuzseru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciu 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgikuzseProgram Alumni ru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciujabgcg6hiseoapohncu3ls Among the many successful 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfgraduates of UD’s cyberchgikuzseru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciu 84iku4udyigssecurity programs are: fbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgikuzseKai Axford ’09 Director of Strategic Services l3abv2xuk ru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciujabgcg6hiseoapohncu3ls FishNet Security yh6ciac 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfBrian Wrozek ’08 iz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgk chgikuzseru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciu 84iku4udyigsInformation Technology 6ciacshri7desi848i Security Director fbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgikuzseTexas Instruments cihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuix ru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciujabgcg6hiseoapohncu3ls We want to know about other hcihbguzfheyr 84iku4udyigsfbuy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfcybersecurity successes. iacshrii8 chgikuzseru73ihcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciu 84iku4udyigsfEmail your story to whartley@udallas.edu Brett Landry, Associate Professor & buy4tg5f iuiyh6ciacshri7desi848iworiz8s3cyh87fzs74chfchgikuzseru73iInformation Assurance Program Director hcihbguzfheyrgcgrikl3abv2xuixnuam33hciujabgcg6hiseoapohncu3ls

JPII Faith Formation Program Viewing the United States Conference of Catholic Bishop’s Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord as a commission, the Catholic Diocese of Tyler partnered with the School of Ministry in 2009 to establish the JPII Faith Formation Program, a graduate studies cohort for lay ministers in their diocese. In January, 14 students in this program graduated from UD with a master’s degree in theological studies. “The JPII Faith Formation Program is a prime example of what can happen when partnerships are formed and love is put into action in a concrete way,” said Amy Allen, a Catholic school principal and program graduate. Find out more at udallas.edu/ministry/jp2ffp. SUMMER 2012 l

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AKADEMEIA

New Science Majors

Millennial Challenges Fr. Matthew L. Lamb, presenting the Theology Department’s annual John Paul II Lecture on the “Millennial Challenges Facing Catholic Intellectual Life,” focused on the teachings of John Paul II that address the struggle of modern-day Catholics to remain faithful and to cultivate a strong intellectual life in a rapidly changing culture. He is a distinguished professor of theology at Ave Maria University.

Science focused degree programs address critical shortages

Medical Ethics

A new dual degree plan with Texas Woman’s University will provide students an opportunity to earn bachelor’s degrees in both biology and nursing.

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TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY.

“It is very important to discuss conscience in connection with the practice of medicine,” said William Brownsberger, associate professor of theology, of the first in a series of lectures held in partnership with UT Southwestern Medical Center that address ethics and morality in medicine. The first speaker was Dr. Farr Curlin, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, who explored the effect of religious, theological and philosophical issues on the practice of medicine.

ccording to the Pentagon’s research arm, the United States will face a serious shortage of computer scientists in the near future. Similarly, spurred on by an aging “Boomer” population, the demand for nurses is expected to widen to more than 70,000 nationwide by 2020. This fall, students interested in entering one of these in-demand career areas will be able to do so at UD by choosing computer science or nursing as an undergraduate major. “Computer science requires careful, critical thinking, but also involves a creative and intellectual pursuit that will be well-balanced at the university,” said David Andrews, assistant professor of mathematics and department chair. The nursing major, which resulted from a dual degree plan agreement with Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing, will allow UD students to earn two bachelor’s degrees in a five-year integrated program. “This new dual-degree program in biology and nursing gives UD students an opportunity to combine the liberal arts with a career pathway,” said Dean Charles W. Eaker of the Constantin College of Liberal Arts. Another science-related major, human sciences in the contemporary world, will also be offered. Human and social science theories and concepts will be applied to issues of the contemporary world.

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2012 Aquinas Medal The Department of Philosophy awarded its 2012 Aquinas Medal to Eleonore Stump, the Robert J. Henle Professor of Philosophy at St. Louis University. She received the award during a public lecture, “Love, Forgiveness and Atonement.” Stump has published extensively in medieval philosophy, philosophical theology and metaphysics.

King/Haggar Awards “…seriousness, honesty and an intensity that reflect his extreme concern for students and his desire to do what is right and good for the university” is how this year’s winner of King Fellow Award, Associate Professor and History Department Chair Charles Sullivan was described. The award is the university’s highest faculty honor. Assistant Professor of English Andrew Moran was awarded the Michael A. Haggar Fellow Award as the year’s outstanding junior faculty member.

◉ In Brief The Courage of Rachel De Beer The story of a 12-year-old South African girl who courageously gave her life so that her brother could live was the story told by this year’s Clodecott Medal winner. Student author of The Courage of Rachel De Beer Jessica Williamson claimed the Education Department’s annual award for the best children’s book.

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◉ In Brief Funding for Fuel Cycle Research and Development Nearly $190,000 of an $880,000 federal research grant awarded to the University of Kentucky will make its way to UD as part of a U.S. Department of Energy initiative. Sally Hicks, professor of physics, represents UD in a consortium of three universities and a national laboratory that has been formed to provide the necessary breadth for the three-year project focused on fuel cycle research and development.

Evolution & Faith

Popular core course examines the work of Charles Darwin Elizabeth Lynch ’13 (left) and Rebecca Espinosa ’15 take part in a geological mapping exercise outside the Church of the Incarnation.

Administrative Changes Marcy Brown Marsden is now associate dean of Constantin College, where she is responsible for transfer students, the dual degree nursing program with Texas Woman’s University and retention. Marsden also assists with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accreditation and EPA compliance. In addition, she will continue as associate professor and department chair of biology. Marsden has been a faculty member for 15 years, teaching ecology, ornithology, animal behavior, biostatistics and Darwin. She also studies the rare nonphotosynthetic orchid Hexalectris and conducts research on reforestation and the recovery of bird populations in Costa Rica. Brian Murray, who is currently interim dean and senior associate dean for the College of Business, will become the university’s associate provost on August 1. In his new position he will lead a newly formed UD Information Technology Department, support various offices with both financial and operational analytics support and assist with faculty affairs and academic initiatives. He will continue teaching on a periodic basis and will serve as MBA track director for the Early Career MBA. Murray’s areas of expertise include compensation, careers, retirement, staffing and evaluating human resource programs and employee attitudes. He has taught courses on career development, human resource management and quantitative analysis.

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aught by Marcy Brown Marsden, associate professor of biology and associate dean of Constantin College, this life science course investigates the life and discoveries of Charles Darwin. Commentaries from critics and supporters of Darwin’s work are used to help students understand the theory of natural selection and its influence. The study of evolution and faith allows us to gain a better understanding of the world around us; science seeks to answer the hows, while faith answers the whys.

UD’s chamber music director since 2007, Kristin Van Cleve is now director of the university’s music concentration and program. In addition, she serves as the Crowley Chamber Music director, artistic director and principal violinist for the historical performance ensemble, Texas Camerata, and the Dallas Opera Orchestra’s principal second violin. Van Cleve also performs with the Fort Worth Symphony and traveled with that orchestra to Carnegie Hall in 2008. She is concertmaster for several historical instrument ensembles including the Orchestra of New Spain. SUMMER 2012 l

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AKADEMEIA

Recommended Reading Published works from UD students, alumni and faculty

THE AUTHOR:

Written by UD sophomore Alexa Turczynski, Whispers of Nightfall is the first book of a saga that rages across land and dimensions, questions issues of identity and destiny and reveals the battle between light and darkness. IN A NUTSHELL:

“She heard a hundred undecipherable whispers floating through the atmosphere, surrounding her in an invisible wall, but amongst the murmurs she perceived one distinct voice calling out above the rest. Though her instincts told her to release the unnatural object, she clasped it and stared up at the spectacular spiral that towered above her. The one voice graduated closer to her, growing louder and louder. Slowly, the words became distinguishable, and her ears were pricked to catch them.” START READING:

Available in paperback ($23.99) from amazon.com or digital download ($15.99) from tatepublishing.com

THE AUTHOR:

Leading the Sustainable Organization, written by Professor J. Lee Whittington and Assistant Professor Greg Bell with Tim Galpin, is the first book to combine the topics of leadership and sustainability, and provides readers with a comprehensive overview and pragmatic approach to leading sustainable organizations. IN A NUTSHELL:

“Leading the Sustainable Organization is the perfect tool for executives and managers in small, medium and large companies, and in all industries, to assist with the difficult and confusing topic of leading sustainability efforts. This book will be of great interest to students and academics who want to learn more about corporate sustainability.” START READING:

Available in paperback ($47.98) and Kindle ($38.38) from amazon.com.

THE AUTHOR:

THE AUTHOR:

UD alumnus Leon Neihouse, BA ’61, served seven years in the U.S. Navy during which time he qualified in submarines and as chief engineer on the nuclear powered submarine USS Simon Bolivar (SSBN 641), worked seven years in commercial nuclear power and was employed for 35 years in shipbuilding.

In this historical study of psychology and Catholicism, Professor Robert Kugelmann, who earned master’s and doctoral degrees from UD, aims to provide clarity in an area filled with emotion and opinion.

IN A NUTSHELL:

“Power without Borders introduces the Dirigo Energy Institute (DEI). In that Dirigo means ’I Lead,’ the mission of this nonprofit organization is to lead the world in developing energy sources capable of supplying power in a cost effective and environmentally benign manner. DEI will then make the results available for use by all national governments. The book identifies the development of three independent energy sources (sun, atom and ocean), each of which can be aligned so as to provide all the world’s energy needs in perpetuity.” START READING:

Available in paperback ($6.41) from amazon.com 12

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IN A NUTSHELL:

“From the beginnings of modern psychology to the mid 1960s, this complicated relationship between science and religion is methodically investigated. This fascinating study will be of great interest to scholars and students of both psychology and religious studies, but will also appeal to all of those who have an interest in the way modern science and traditional religion coexist in our ever-changing society.” START READING:

Available in hardback ($115.24) and Kindle ($55) from amazon.com


Studies in

UD students assist with biomechanics research aimed at fall prevention among the elderly

HUMAN MOVEMENT

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f you were to ask Stephen Slaughter, assistant professor of biology, what his current area of research is, the answer would be simple – he studies stability. Slaughter, who devotes much of his time to research on biomechanics, which is the study of human movement, successfully completed the first phase of his research on human movement last October. The ultimate goal of his studies is fall prevention in the elderly, the leading cause of mortality and morbidity for those over the age of 75, according to the American Academy of Family Practitioners. “If you prevent 5 percent of falls, that’s thousands of people a year,” he said. As part of his research, Slaughter created a belt-like device in order to track individual movements. The device, linked to a centralized computer system, captures motion and muscle electrical activity, and is customized for each individual. In the different phases of his research, he

attempts to model how individuals move on a daily basis by monitoring activities like sitting, reaching and getting up. “If I understand what is normal, then I can see what is abnormal.” Through the tracking device, Slaughter can determine how hard an individual fell, if he or she is currently moving and in what direction they fell. Though still in the research phase, he is actively publishing on this topic and has generated several publications out of the human performance lab that he runs at UD. The first phase of his research involved 12 participants, a number that will triple for phase two. Slaughter and students from his classes also built an outdoor research area including three walkways on campus that will examine the effects of various forces on the knee as individuals change walking conditions. Slaughter’s research has received external funding support of more than $70,000.

Extraversion and procrastination “…it seems that some people are particularly subject to procrastination as a form of thrill-seeking. In research by University of Dallas psychologist Erin Freeman and colleagues (2011), undergraduates highest in the personality trait of extraversion were found to be most likely to engage in arousal procrastination. Compared to introverts, who tend to be more highly task-focused, extraverts may need that rush of stimulation to propel them into the higher level of arousal they need to get the task done well.” Erin Freeman, assistant professor of psychology, was cited in an April 10 Psychology Today blog article on procrastination. Arousal procrastination is the feeling of danger that people experience when they live on the edge of not making important deadlines. The excitement of almost failing to complete a task in time seems to have arousing tendencies in some individuals.

A belt-like device linked to a centralized computer system tracks individual movements, capturing motion and muscle electrical activity. Through the device, researchers can determine how hard an individual fell, if the individual is moving and in what direction the individual fell. An outdoor research area is used to examine the effects of various forces on the knee as walking conditions change. SUMMER 2012 l

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Lex I: Corpus omne perseverare in statu suo quiescendi vel movendi uniformiter in directum, nisi quatenus a viribus impressis cogitur statum illum mutare. Lex II: Mutationem motus proportionalem esse vi motrici impressae, et fieri secundum lineam rectam qua vis illa imprimitur. Lex III: Actioni contrariam semper et æqualem esse reactionem: sive corporum duorum actiones in se mutuo semper esse æquales et in partes contrarias dirigi.

How Newton’s laws of motion played a pivotal role in breaking the silence

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n February 3, 1966, when UD’s third president Donald Cowan revealed plans to build a 200-foot-high structure on campus as a “suitable monument in honor of Thomas and Bess Braniff,” the announcement, which came as a surprise to most, set into motion the construction of Braniff Memorial Tower as part of a larger project that included Braniff Mall and the Braniff Graduate Building. Later that fall, on newly prepared land, the tower’s exterior face began to take shape using a painstaking process of building walls in four-foot vertical sections. While it took just months to complete the outer brick structure and its 250-step, circular interior staircase, it took much longer to hoist the eight-ton copper cap to the top. Finally, after a year’s worth of attempts, many of which were foiled by high winds, torrential rain and unstable ground, a specially-ordered, 275foot crane was able to lift the cap into place, completing the first phase of Braniff Memorial Tower at a cost of $147,000. The date was September 26, 1967. For the next decade, the tower, although designed to accommodate bells, sat silent.

“For years, the university lacked the needed funding to outfit the tower with the bells that would ultimately complete the university symbol,” explained Emeritus Professor Lyle Novinski who then chaired the Art Department. “Even after we received the King Foundation gift and the Verdin Company began crafting the four bronze bells, we found ourselves in another situation that threatened to delay the tower’s final completion yet again.” With crafting of the bells already underway and delivery approaching fast, the tower still lacked the two long steel i-beams needed to support them and the financial means to lift them into place. According to Novinski, it would have cost $1,400 – a cost that was thought to be prohibitive at the time – to rent a crane to hoist the i-beams to the top of the nearly 10-year-old tower. Instead, the university relied on Project Architect Duane Landry, who devised a basic pulley system, fully utilizing Sir Isaac Newton’s laws of motion. “We bought $60 of rope and a pulley,” explained Novinksi. “The pulley was then attached to the eave line of the cap and the double rope was extended to

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The Cowan Bells The Braniff Memorial Tower’s four bronze bells, which were a gift from the Carl B. and Florence E. King Foundation, are named in honor of Donald Cowan, the university’s third president, and his wife Louise Cowan, former chair of the English Department. The largest (1) is tuned to a low F and named for St. Columba. The second largest (2), or the A bell, is named for St. Agatha. The second smallest (3) is a C note and named for St. Catherine of Alexandria. The smallest bell (4), named for St. Andrew, sounds a higher F note. All were cast by a 300-year-old Belgian bell company.

The tower is TKT ft. tall- almost as tall as the Statue of LIberty!

the ground where it was attached to a beam. Between the 10 and 11 a.m. classes, we had dozens of students grab a small portion of the rope and they walked down the mall, pulling the i-beam up all 186 feet.” A repeat of this borrowed labor then brought the second beam into place, and with both now raised into their permanent supporting positions, Braniff Memorial Tower stood ready for its crown jewels. On December 5, 1976, after being appropriately blessed and hoisted into place, the Cowan Bells, named in honor of Donald and Louise Cowan, were officially dedicated during a ceremony that ended the tower’s long silence with the ringing of the bells. As much as the tower’s groundbreaking and capping, as well as the blessing and dedication of the bells, have come to be what many consider the most significant milestones of the tower’s 10-year timeline, it’s what happened on that sunny fall day in 1976 that ultimately made possible Braniff Tower’s eventual transformation from an architectural structure into an iconic symbol with purpose. If not for some student elbow grease, creative engineering and, of course, three basic principles of physics, the tower might still be absent its bells – the very same bells that have for generations literally marked the minutes and hours of each and every day, invited the UD community to prayer and helped celebrate the rituals of our lives.


Something shapes the sensibility of the people who spend time on this campus, something of which causes most of them to join – student and professor alike – in the common enterprise.

- 1977 Crusader yearbook on raising the Braniff Tower’s two steal i-beams

The Personalities behind Braniff Memorial Tower William Blakley - A United States senator, loyal UD supporter and philanthropist through the Blakley-Braniff Foundation Thomas & Bess Braniff - Founder of Braniff International Airways; a portion of a $7.5 million gift from the Blakley-Braniff Foundation made construction of the tower possible Donald Cowan - UD’s third president, who first announced plans for the tower in 1966; later, the tower’s four bells were named in honor of him and his wife Louise Louise Cowan - English Department chair and wife of President Donald Cowan O’Neil Ford - Renowned designer of the hexagonal tower, as well as many other buildings on campus; called the “father of southwest architecture” Carl B. & Florence E. King - Philanthropists whose foundation granted the funds needed to purchase the tower’s four bells Duane Landry - Architect and associate of O’Neil Ford; devised the pulley system responsible for lifting the tower’s crucial i-beams into place

(Upper Left) Bishop Thomas Tschoepe blesses the Braniff Tower bells after their arrvial on campus. (Above) Former English Department Chair Louise Cowan sits in the largest of the four bells on the day they were blessed. (Left) Fr. Donald Fischer and Bishop Thomas Tscoppe look on as the bells are lifted into place at the top of the tower.

Sir Isaac Newton - English physicist whose laws of motion were used to construct the pulley system

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URBAN

OASIS A Tour of Natural UD with Marcy Brown Marsden

Because of our location on one of Dallas County’s highest points, the view from certain vantages on campus is dominated by the nearby urban skylines of both Las Colinas, Dallas and beyond. At ground level, however, a more serene environment exists, made possible by a natural buffer of prairies and woodlands. Marcy Brown Marsden, associate dean of Constantin College and professor of biology, takes you on a nature tour of the many diverse habitats that make up our urban oasis.

The Wooded Areas The natural areas of UD are a composite of several north central Texas habitat types including prairies and woodlands, as well as a riparian habitat located alongside the Trinity River. Described as cross timbers or post oak savanna, the land is a blend of trees and grass. This environment and its drought-tolerant trees and plentiful grasses supports tremendous ecological diversity.

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Plant Species

Bird Species

Among the campus’ common plant species is the Hercules’ club, which doubles as a delicacy for swallowtail butterflies and is a citrus relative with leaves that smell like limes and a bark covered in thick spines. Prickly pear cactus, abundant in the UD woods, produces abundant edible fruit in the fall.

An extensive canopy of trees makes UD an ideal nesting habitat or winter refuge for a wide variety of birds. More than 75 species have been identified, ranging from the common Northern Mockingbird to the much more rare Painted Bunting, which lives in Texas only during the summer breeding months.

Mammal Species The often talked about (but seldom seen) bobcat steals much of the limelight from a host of other mammal species that also live quietly on or near the UD campus. Among the most common are rabbits, foxes, opossum, skunks and armadillos – all of which are most active during the early morning or late evening.

Uncommon Plant Species Even the most avid nature lovers may find it hard to spot rare perennials like the foxglove, which blooms on the prairies, and the escobaria cactus that grows hidden and close to the ground. There’s also the death camas, a highly poisonous onion relative that flowers beneath trees in the spring.

Wildflowers

Useful Plant Species Many plants are known to be of tremendous benefit to humans. Mesquite trees, for one, are the source of wood that is the secret to flavorful Texas barbecue and has seeds that can be milled into a protein-rich flour. The bois d’arc is a tree with pliable wood that is perfect for bowmaking.

The state’s signature species Texas bluebonnet is not the only wildflower to color the area’s hillsides and woodlands. Throughout the year the campus is home to native wildflowers, including the winecup, Indian blanket, Mexican hat, plains coreopsis and prairie celestial. Because wildflowers, which are often identified by their flowering times, begin blooming in February and frequently last until late fall, there’s hardly a time when these colorful inhabitants don’t make their presence known.

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cience & Shurch C the

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he relationship between the Catholic Church and science dates back centuries to the Middle Ages when science was linked to universities and medical schools that fell under the banner of the Church. “Medieval universities, and scholars like Robert Grossetste, studied the natural world and laid the foundation for modern scientific method,” said John Norris, associate professor of theology. “Science is one of the Church’s most important elements. Catholic priests and scholars have been strongly involved in scientific exploration for hundreds of years.” According to Rich Olenick, professor of physics and department chair, science tries to seek out the best explanation for natural events through scientific theory, but that’s where science ends. “We’re limited to the physical world,” said Olenick. “Religion, on the other hand, gives us additional insights into the universe and things that we never really could know through scientific pursuit alone.” Both Norris and Olenick acknowledge, however, that for many there is an unnecessary conflict 20

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between scientific thought and religion, noting that science and faith are not contradictory, but complementary. Olenick believes there are ways of knowing about the universe that exceed the material, which is what leads individuals to the religious experience. “Through faith, we get to know additional aspects of our whole universe. Essential to that is a personal and loving God who has concern for each of us. God is one who reveals Himself through the works of other people and through nature.” It will be up to contemporary believers and thinkers on how to reconcile the two, added Norris. “Austrian scientist Gregor Mendel was a Catholic priest, and Galileo was sponsored by Catholic princes and submitted his work to Catholic authorities. He worked in a world where church leadership was sponsoring scientific exploration.” While science explores theories and methods, faith seeks answers to the questions of life – the purpose of creation and the way in which mankind fits into that plan. “Science can give us knowledge of certain aspects of human existence, but it’s not the answer to the deep

questions of human existence,” explained Norris. “Questions of scientific inquiry, ecology and medical research offer ethical guidelines to keep science from becoming inhuman in its goals and projects.” Norris believes UD is fertile ground for science and faith to be examined together. Olenick mentions that there is a papal observatory near UD’s Due Santi campus. Both believe that the Church will continue to offer moral or financial support for the study of science as it has always done. An Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher, Galileo Galilei played a major role in the Scientific Revolution.

A complementary relationship hundreds of years in the making


Alumni

News

Class Notes

1960s Leon Neihouse, BA ’61, published Power without Borders, which is available for purchase on Amazon.com. Send an email request to neihouse@ gwi.net for a free electronic copy. Carolyn (Fuchs) Perry, BA ’65, wrote a memoir, For Better, For Worse: Patient in the Maelstrom, which was published by Sunbury Press. She was the featured speaker at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania’s Academic Honors Convocation in April. Carl Johnson III, BA ’68, is featured in the February edition of Soldiers of Fortune magazine. The article describes Carl’s fight alongside the Purepecha Indians of Cheran, Mexico, against the Michoacan drug cartel. David Card, BA ’62 & MBA ’68, was recognized in the Dallas Morning News for 35 years of excellent music and history as owner of Poor David’s Pub.

1970s Stephen Binz, BA ’77, authored The Mass in Scripture (OSV, 2011), The Sacraments in Scripture (OSV, 2011) and Learning to Pray in Scripture (OSV, 2011). His work has been endorsed by Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Archbishop Timothy Dolan, Archbishop Joseph Kurtz, Archbishop Gregory Aymond and a host of Catholic scholars and pastoral leaders.

Haggar University Center renovations will include remodeling the cafeteria serving area.

Gifts of Transformation

Donors commit $5.5 million to campus revitalization efforts

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he university has announced $5.5 million in financial commitments from corporate, foundation and individual supporters for a $7 million campus transformation package. The revitalization effort includes renovation of the J.M. Haggar University Center, as well as construction of a series of five new campus entrances, a scenic walkway and entry plazas to connect the heart of the university with DART’s (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) soon-to-open University

of Dallas light rail station and upgrades to eight other existing facilities. “We greatly appreciate these financial commitments from both longtime and new donors alike, which will help sustain our ongoing transformation efforts. With the opening of the University of Dallas DART station, as well as enhancements to Highway 114, Loop 12 and other surrounding thoroughfares, the university’s 750-acre campus will be much more accessible,” said President Thomas W. Keefe.

Among the most recent major donors are The Constantin Foundation, the Templeton Foundation and the Eugene McDermott Foundation. The J.L. & L.E. Mabee Foundation has issued a challenge grant. Work has already begun on the Haggar Center, including a remodeled cafeteria serving area, new flooring and a redecorated main common area with new furniture, lighting and artwork. All work is expected to be complete by the beginning of the fall semester.

Br. Bob Warren, MA ’75, was recognized on HudsonReporter.com for his leadership of students at Marist High School. Fr. Peter Verhalen, BA ’77 & MA ’81, was elected Abbot of the Cistercian Abbey Our Lady of Dallas. Hooshang Amirahmadi, MS ’78, was featured in an article on GulfNews.com. In it he “reveals how he will overcome his country’s main challenges if elected president.”

1980s David Chauvette, BA ’80, was executive director of the Spirit of Knowledge Charter School. Brent Hoelscher, BA ’80, authored a book, Jesus Healed Me, about his encounter with a terminal cancer diagnosis. Jeffery Cass, BA ’81, was appointed provost of the University of Houston-Victoria. Satish Gupta, MBA ’81, was honored with a Dallas Business Journal Minority Business Leader Award. Daniel Clark, BA ’84, is vice president of operations and finance at ABPathfinder. Andrew J. Cloutier, BA ’84, was sworn in as 2012 president-elect of the Board of Bar Commissioners, the governing board of the State Bar of

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ALUMNI NEWS

Class Notes

UD’s summer Rome programs are led by UD faculty like Associate Professor of History Susan Hanssen.

New Mexico. Chief Justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court Charles W. Daniels administered the oath of office in the state’s supreme court chambers. Michael Dudzik, MBA ’84, joined the governing board of Flextech Alliance. Darbie Safford, BA ’86 & MA ’10, was nominated to be principal of St. Paul the Apostle School in Richardson, Texas. Brian Conlon, MBA ’87, was named CEO of Inland Real Estate Investment Corporation. Linda Johnson, MBA ’87, received her doctoral degree in public and urban administration from the University of Texas at Arlington. She graduated with highest honors and was also named a University Scholar. John Posey III, BA ’87 & MA ’89, started working with the Texas Legislative Budget Board on the Criminal Justice Data Analysis Team. Sean P. Kelly, BA ’88, BA ’89 & MBA ’91, was recognized by Strathmore’s Who’s Who Registry for his outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of fabricated materials/ supply chain. Tara Silver-Malyska, MBA ’88, was named a principal in the tax department at UHY Advisors. Fr. Paul McCormick, BA ’89, MBA ’91 & MA ’95, was appointed headmaster of Cistercian Preparatory School.

1990s John Swanson, MBA ’90, was appointed by Governor Rick Perry to the Texas Mutual Insurance Company Board of Directors. Jeff Slaughter, MBA ’91, made the news for his leadership at the President of Real Resource Fund, Inc. Julie Weber, BA ’91, was promoted to vice president of people at Southwest Airlines. Doug Darrow, MBA ’92, was appointed head of cinema at Dolby Laboratories. Keith Evashevski, BA 92, was appointed director of the University Counseling Center at the University of Wyoming. Judy Harris, MA ’92, received an Excellence Award from Lone Star College-Tomball (Texas) and from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development. In August 2011, she retired from LSC-Tomball as a professor of developmental studies and English. Dr. Jeffrey Hermann, BA ’92, reprised a role he first played at UD – Tevye the Milkman in Fiddler on the Roof – in a Sherman Community Players Main Stage production. Michael Coulter, MA ’93 & PhD ’99, co-edited the Encyclopedia of Social Thought, Social Science and Social Policy, Volume 3: Supplement. Dr. Emily (Gunn) Hebert, BA ’93, has been hired as a physician at Cooper Aerobics in Dallas.

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Summer in Rome

Study and travel programs popular with alumni, students

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rawing from more than 40 years of experience gained from its Rome Semester Program, UD also offers study and travel summer programs for high school and undergraduate students. High school offerings for 2013 include (in Rome) Latin in Rome and Shakespeare in Italy, as well as (in Irving) Arete: A College Preparatory Course. The new six-week Undergraduate Summer Rome Program has proven to be popular with UD and non-UD students alike. All programs are led by UD faculty. Discounts are available for early applicants and UD alumni. Applications will be available this fall at udallas.edu/travel, (972) 721-5181 or udsummer@udallas.edu.

Alumni: In Their Own Words “The University of Dallas gave me greater confidence in my abilities, helped define who I am and gave me the strength to follow my dreams.” As chief executive officer of PediaPlex Management Company in Southlake, Texas, Sonia Kirkpatrick, MBA ’10, assists families of children diagnosed with autism or other developmental delays by making them aware of available resources. According to Kirkpatrick, leading her team and implementing best policies for future company growth is one of the most important facets of her job.


ALUMNI NEWS

PHOTO ALBUM 1

Spring Events

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Getting a helping hand during the Alumni Easter Egg Hunt.

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Norah Smith ’98 shows off future crusader, Andrew, in his UD gear.

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“UD Sally,” second from left sans limbs, was VIP at the Kansas City Groundhog.

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John Petrucelli ’12 and Laura Talbot ’14 celebrate at the President’s Gala.

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The Groundhog in Kansas City, a fine occasion for groups and their photos.

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Kara Lockridge ’06, Laura Pepin ’05 and Sarah Hogan ’96 in the Twin Cities.

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An Easter egg hunter in his Sunday best, ambushed for photographs.

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Mike West ’06 proudly displayed a bib and onesie at the New York Groundhog.

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Little Groundhog provokes yet more excitement in New York City.

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Kids grabbing all the eggs; the 18-65 age group was terribly disappointed.

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Alumni from the 2000s lend some class to Duke’s in New York City.

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Emily Hyde ’04 and Catherine Podergracz ’11 take the Groundhog west to Phoenix. SUMMER 2012 l 23

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ALUMNI NEWS

Class Notes Rev. Andrew O’Connor, MA ’94, sees success with his Goods of Conscience clothing label as it takes to the runway in New York. H. Neil Matkin, MBA ’94, has been named executive vice president of the Louisiana Community & Technical College System. Christy Rieger, BA ’88, was awarded tenure at Mercyhurst University. Dr. Gregory Padilla, MBA ’94, was inducted into the Rotary Club of Menifee, Calif. He is now the administrator of the Menifee Valley Medical Center. Tim Sullivan, MA ’94 & MFA ’96, held a demonstration for the visual arts students at St. Gregory’s University in Oklahoma. Lloyd Lowe Sr., MBA ’95, donated all proceeds from the sale of his book Life’s Bridges: Building Your Bridge to Financial Wealth to Vogal Alcove, which for 25 years has worked to provide the youngest children of homeless families in Dallas with education and the foundations for success. Andrew DeCaen, BA ’97, was the guest artist for an event at Middle Tennessee State University. Selena Anguiano, BA ’99, moved to Dubai, UAE, in November 2011 and is now head of international development for The Little Art, a Pakistani-based child and youth arts non-profit. Daniel Balen, BA ’99, won first prize at the 10th National Juried Art Exhibit, held at the Ceres Gallery in New York City. Sr. Marie Therese Pitlyk, BS ’99, made her perpetual profession with the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia Congregation in Nashville, Tenn. Ian Redmond, BA ’99, was hired as an attorney at the firm of Trott & Trott. He is joining the firm’s litigation and title department.

2000s Jeff Hedglen, MTS ’00, was named associate director of youth and young adult ministry for the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth and director of campus ministry at the University of Texas at Arlington. Fr. Francis Bitterman, BA ’01, was ordained in the Catholic Diocese of Chicago. Chris Blue, MBA ’01, joined McAfee as the senior director of platinum corporate support. Joseph Miller, BA ’01 & MTS ’08, was hired as the youth services librarian at the Ferndale (Mich.) Public Library. He was also featured on ferndale.patch.com. Tammy Clark, MBA ’02, is teaching in public education full-time and is also a Dallas County Community College adjunct instructor. Ludwig Otto, MA ’02, Tarrant County College professor of English and a publisher with Franklin Publishing Company, spoke at Church of

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NASA Bridge Builder

UD alumna makes cutting edge science more accessible to public

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hen Jessica Nimon, M.A. ’03, thought of being a writer she imagined working at a fashion magazine and went on to study both English and photography. As a UD undergraduate, she worked for the University News, read all of Fr. Maguire’s ’F revisable to A’ comments on her papers and took photographs of the spring 1998 Rome semester. By the time she graduated with a master’s degree in English, however, she had chosen Persuasion as her favorite novel, writing over photography and her future as a communicator had moved far beyond fashion to the stars. Now, after years as a NASA technical writer and editor, Nimon is a research communications specialist for the International Space Station Program Science Office, communicating science performed on the Space Station, which, like UD’s curriculum, is cross-disciplinary. She, as a bridge builder from the Space Station to the nations below, believes in her work to explain the station’s research discoveries and benefits for humanity. “I believe my writing skills

Jessica Nimon

and the liberal arts education I received at UD have given me the ability to help NASA engineers articulate important technical information about their designs,” said Nimon. “While they are all exceptionally well educated, most do not have the background in

written communication that is needed to make their cutting edge science accessible to the public.” Samples of Nimon’s work are available on one of NASA’s blogs. To find her blog, search for “A Lab Aloft” using any Internet search engine.

Alumni: In Their Own Words “A liberal arts education gave me the basis to put health and disease in a framework that goes beyond just the diagnosis and treatment of a patient.” Dr. Michael Albert ’82 is currently chair of the Pathology Department and medical staff president at Buffalo Mercy Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y. He recalls being drawn to the university’s liberal arts education, Core curriculum, a chance to study abroad in Rome and the quality of the pre-med program. “UD instilled in me the love of learning in a wide array of subjects. I was surprised to find out that I was as interested in political science, Western civilization and philosophy as I was in biochemistry and genetics.”


ALUMNI NEWS

PHOTO ALBUM

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12th Annual Golf Tourney

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Brightly colored pants are often in fashion on the green.

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So close.

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Shaun Murphy anticipates driving one close to the hole.

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Executive Vice President Bob Galecke and raffle winner, Warren Andres of Andres Construction.

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The Galecke Cup, the coveted prize, comes with yearlong bragging rights.

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President Tom Keefe and ARAMARK’s Angel Herrera wait for the tourney to begin.

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The Groundhog showed up to entertain and hang out with those not playing.

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Vice President of Enrollment Management John Plotts celebrates a great shot.

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Some participants took to relaxing on the green while waiting for their turn.

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The first place team: Bob Galecke, ARAMARK’s Darren St. Romain and Director of Annual Giving Programs Jim Livernois.

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Darren St. Romain takes in a shot travelling down the green.

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After a great shot, players celebrate, hoping to finish in first. SUMMER 2012 l 25

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ALUMNI NEWS

Class Notes Jesus Christ the Nazareth in Marietta, Calif. Zhenya Huang, MBA ’03, is director of business strategy at Lenovo. Jessica Nimon, MEd ’03, was recognized by NASA’s International Space Station Payloads Office for raising public awareness of ISS utilization by managing the ISS Research Twitter account, the Program Scientist’s blog and the news stories produced from the Program Science Office. Sr. Yolanda Cruz, SSMN, MTS ’04, was appointed vice chancellor of the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth. Elizabeth Barney, BA ’05, was accepted into Stanford University’s residency program. Charles Cooper, MA ’05, was given the Outstanding Teacher of the Humanities Award by Humanities Texas. Gavin Puthoff, BA ’05, was featured in an article in the St. Louis Review for his work in natural family planning. Mutryce Williams, MA ’05, was awarded the Coin Excellence and Service by USVI Homeland Security.

Money Bomb

Innovative 3-day, peer-to-peer fundraising effort raises thousands

U

D’s innovative fundraising effort, Money Bomb, proved successful, raising nearly $75,000 from more than 500 donors. The three-day event, which took place from May 10-12, used a peer-to-peer fundraising model with alumni encouraging and challenging other alumni to financially support the university. At the heart of the mini-campaign’s success were more than 60 alumni who challenged

others to make gifts during Money Bomb by offering additional gifts when specific goals were met. Among the challenges were those from the classes of 1972, 1980, 1990, 1995, 2009, 2011 and the decades of the ’90s and ’00s, as well as the School of Ministry. Funds raised during Money Bomb will support student programs, campus enhancements and faculty salaries.

THANK YOU TO ALL WHO MADE

MONEY BOMB 2012 A HUGE SUCCESS!

Diana Vaughn, BA ’05, has been accepted into the Air Force Officer Training School. Tommy Heyne, BA ’06 & BS ’06, was accepted into the Harvard University residency program at Massachusetts General Hospital, and was profiled by UT Southwestern as a “stellar” student. Rosamund Hodge, BA ’06, signed a two-book deal with HarperCollins. Roberto Landa, MBA ’07, moved with his wife Elizabeth and their two children to Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, in December to take a post in the contracting department of the Saudi Arabian oil company Saudi Aramco. He joins his wife’s brother, fellow alumnus Joseph Duggan, BA ’76, who has lived in Dhahran with his wife Lucía and their daughter since 2009. Duggan is a speechwriter for Saudi Aramco’s CEO. Sarah Crotty, BA ’08, recently accepted a position with law firm Thompson & Knight as a client services practice manager. She has relocated to Dallas from Washington, D.C. Courtney Miles, MA ’08 & MFA ’09, was appointed the artist in residence at The FairmontDallas hotel. David Solis, BS ’08, was the lead author of a paper published in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters. He also received a prestigious National Science Foundation research fellowship. Ashley Crouch, BA ’09, was mentioned in an article in the Huffington Post.

2010s Andrew Cohen, MBA ’10, was promoted to

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Alumni: In Their Own Words “In my career as a professor, I regularly draw on my liberal arts education to make lectures more interesting or to provide context.” Armed with the education he received at UD, Nic Tippery ’00 is able to combine his liberal arts background with the sciences as an assistant professor of biology at the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater. Although he spends most of his time in the classroom, he is no stranger to the lab where he reconstructs the evolutionary history of aquatic flowering plants through DNA sequence comparison and determines the lapse of time since each pair of species shared a common ancestor.


ALUMNI NEWS

Alumni Who Are...

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Class Notes senior software architect at Apptricity.

istorically, Cistercian Preparatory School, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year, and UD have shared a strong relationship for years with the result being the involvement of many UD alumni at Cistercian. Fr. Peter Verhalen, ’77 M.A. ’81, O. Cist., serves as abbot of the Cistercian Abbey, head of the School Board and Fr. Peter Verhalen Fr. Paul McCormick teaches theology and Latin. He was Cistercian Abbey Cistercian Prep School Headmaster ordained a priest in 1981 and appointed Abbot Cistercian’s headmaster in 1996. Fr. Paul McCormick, ’89, M.B.A. ’91 & M.A. ’95, O. Cist., headmaster of Cistercian Preparatory School, was ordained a priest in 1997. He has served as a teacher at Cistercian for 15 years and is the form master of two classes – 2005 and 2013. Other UD Graduates working at Cistercian include:

Katherine Colin, MFA ’10, was awarded one of four 2012 Arch and Anne Giles Kimbrough Fund Awards through the Dallas Museum of Art. This award recognizes exceptional talent and potential in young visual artists who show a commitment to continuing their artistic endeavors.

David Andrews ’90 Br. Anthony Bigney M.Th. ’12 Br. Lawrence Brophy M.Th. ’10 Greg Graham M.A. ’12 Jaclyn Greenfield ’94 Robert Haaser ’71 Fr. Augustine Hoelke ’04, M.Th. ’09 Michael Humphries ’05 Jason Joseph Varghese M.A. ’05 Dylan Key ’11 Christine Medaille ’72 Patrick Mehen M.A. ’01

Christian Liebenow, BA ’11, is a ticket sales representative for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Roberto Munguia M.F.A. ’79 Gary Nied M.A. ’08 Michael O’Brien M.A. ’08 Fr. Philip Lastimosa M.A. ’12 Fr. Ignatius Peacher M.A. ’10 Thomas Pruit Ph.D. ’79 Fr. Mark Ripperger ’90, M.Th. ’93 Peter Saliga M.A. ’96, M.A.S. ’05 Fr. Gregory Schweers ’76, M.A. ’81 Betty Sitton ’68 Fr. Ambrose Strong ’05, M.Th. ’09 Fr. Joseph Van House ’03, M.Th. ’07

Rafael Cuellar, CBS ’10, from St. Luke’s Parish in Irving, Texas, received the Bishop’s Award for Service to the Church for his work in training boys to be altar servers. He is now working towards a certificate in pastoral theology. David Harman’s, BA ’10, work was featured on the Thrillist.com. Monica Lacy, BS ’10, was awarded a fellowship through the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Sr. Juliana Tran, HFN, MPM ’10, was awarded the Pro Ecclesiae et Pontifice Medal from Pope Benedict 16 at a ceremony at St. Patrick Cathedral in Fort Worth, Texas.

Kaitlyn Willy, BA ’11, is the chaplain’s apprentice for the Butler Catholic Community at Butler University in Indianapolis, and was featured on the front page of the Archdiocesan newspaper, The Criterion, for her unconventional approach in connecting with college students.

New Arrivals Maryclaire (Becan) Ireland, BA ’05, and her husband Skyler welcomed a beautiful baby boy on December 12, 2011. They have named him Andrew Joseph Ireland. Rachel Arredondo, BA ’07, had a baby last fall. Jim Barnes, BA ’08, and his wife Jess welcomed their first child James Henry into the world on April 21. Kristen (Sullivan) Clahane, BA ’08, and her husband Andrew welcomed a new baby girl named Elizabeth. Sandra (Ramirez), BA ’09, and Bridger Allen, BA ’09, had a baby girl in December. Celia Clark, ME ’09, and her husband welcomed their first baby, James, in December.

Weddings & Engagements Daniel, BA ’10, and Jacquelyn (Baumann) Knabel, BA ’10, were married on June 4, 2011. G.T. Barvick, BA ’11, is engaged to Susan Gigante.

Cistercian Preparatory School

Submit your class notes at alumni.udallas.edu or by email to UDAlum@UDallas.edu.

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Athletics Winter & Spring Sports Rewind

Women’s Lacrosse (2-10; 0-5 conference) Women’s lacrosse picked up two wins in their final season under Head Coach Will Oakley. Junior midfielder Mary Salotto was named to the AllSCAC Second Team.

Softball (9-27; 1-15 conference) For the second consecutive season, women’s softball was forced to combat a lack of depth. Among the postseason awards was senior outfielder Jessica Mollner, who was named to the USCAA National All-Academic Team. Men’s Basketball (7-19; 5-11 conference) Men’s basketball, although heavily laden with underclassmen, clinched a spot in the SCAC Championship Tournament before falling to number one East Division seed Birmingham-Southern College. Drew Assinesi was named to the SCAC All-Sportsmanship Team, while junior forward Tanner Bruffey made the All-SCAC Third Team. Women’s Basketball (9-16; 4-12 conference) The young women’s basketball team won three of their last seven conference games, but it narrowly missed the SCAC Championship Tournament in its second year under Coach Jina Johansen. Junior guard Kylie Yoshimura was named to the All-SCAC Second Team and USCAA Honorable Mention All-America. Baseball (23-17; 10-10 conference) A 9-0 start to the season, a Crusaders victory over Arlington Baptist College on the Texas Rangers home field and a 7-1 finish in conference play secured a spot in the SCAC Championship tournament. The season ended, however, after an 11-inning loss to the number one seed Trinity University. Numerous postseason awards included junior third baseman Trevor Allred, junior outfielder Nico Caluda, senior catcher Varea Costello and senior outfielder Brian Shelburne being named to the USCAA National All-Academic Team; and Caluda to the CoSIDA Capital One Academic All-District First Team.

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Track & Field A highlight of the track and field season was junior Matt Barber, who set 200m and 400m school records, and was the lead leg of the school-record-breaking 4X400m relay. Both he and freshman Clare Myers were named to SCAC All-Sportsmanship teams. Men’s Lacrosse (2-12; 1-8 conference) In their second-ever season, the men’s lacrosse team battled attrition and injuries. For the 2013 season, Head Coach Matt O’Connell looks to infuse his young team with key additions found on the recruiting trail.

Scholar athlete Senior women’s lacrosse player Becky Williams, who earned a 3.86 GPA as a psychology major, was honored as the 2012 UD Scholar-Athlete-ofthe-Year. The award is handed out annually to the letter-winning varsity student-athlete with the highest GPA.

New coaches Melissa Grant, a former two-year captain and two-time most valuable player at the University of Oklahoma, has been named the women’s lacrosse head coach. In addition to playing lacrosse at OU from 2009-2011, Grant served as the club's temporary head coach during fall 2011 while recovering from injury. She played high school lacrosse at Dallas’ Ursuline Academy. Matt Buchhorn, who most recently served as assistant cross country/ track coach at the University of Incarnate Word in San Antonio, has been named head coach of the men’s and women’s cross country and track and field teams. The Granger, Texas, native was a member of cross country and track teams while attending Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas.


FINAL WORD

Wonder, Science and a UD Education Gregory Roper, Chair & Associate Professor of English

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atural science, because it is a subset of philosophy, is a liberal art; it’s not set against the liberal arts. Science begins in wonder and feeds upon it, wondering at the beauty, variety, complexity and simplicity of the created cosmos. It has been this way since Democritus, Pythagoras and Aristotle. Wonder drove Galileo on as he peered through a tube, Darwin as he pondered finches, Einstein as he wondered how it would be travelling alongside a beam of light. As a 19-year old biochem major in Dr. Eaker’s and Sister Clo’s classes, I was fascinated by the DNA molecule, how a few nucleotides’ difference could shape an earlobe, a crooked smile that is the same in father and son. When my 13-year-old makes solar panels out of doughnuts, or my 10- year-old thrills to the ways of volcanoes, fascinated by the variety of God’s creation, I wonder at their wonder over it. (Dr.) John Alvis always says there are only two questions of a liberal education: “What is the nature of reality?” and “How should a life be lived?” Experimental science - which produced, inter alia, the laptop upon which I am typing these words and the internet through which this file will reach Tower editors - has been one of the great gifts of Western culture to the world largely because of the Western intellectual tradition, fascinated always in nature and nature’s God, a tradition which embraced searching, exploring, questioning, wondering, often just as other cultures were pulling back or shying away from them. (The Galileo affair is widely misunderstood as a reactionary attempt to return to some imagined Dark Ages; in fact, it was those medieval universities which laid the groundwork for the educational system that produced Galileo, and the way his ideas were accepted so quickly speaks to the dynamism of Western culture, not to the ability to check it of a few Church politicos with bruised egos.) Yet it’s also true that, in the explosion of innovation it produced, in its seeming power to change things so quickly, science became as susceptible as any other endeavor to hubris and to the libido dominandi. In the ear-

“UD is one of the few places where students both investigate fully the nature of reality...and also challenge themselves to consider how a life should be lived.”

ly parts of the 20th century, scientism was rampant, and led to many horrors, not least of which was eugenics, a supposedly “scientific” (actually scientistic) attempt to make things better for all, or for the few who “deserved” a better life. It took the obscenity of Auschwitz and the horrors of Mengele’s laboratories to tear the ugly scientistic façade from eugenics. Today, stem-cell technology rightly troubles us, needs our properly philosophical science and our theological attention. None of these troubles, however, should make us dislike or mistrust experimental science per se; we just need, as with all human endeavors, to place this work in historical, philosophical and theological contexts, to live a prudent life in regarding it. I switched to English at age 20 not from a dislike of science - after the switch I took Dr. Doe’s Molecular Genetics just for fun, and sat in on his Bioethics class - but because I wanted to put my love of the natural world in a broader perspective. The sciences need to be taught in this broader perspective, where science majors take history, philosophy, theology and literature, and where students in other majors consider the gifts and questions of the science that dominates their world. Science as much as literature is a gift flowing from the human, rational nature given to us by a loving God, but each can be misused to deleterious effects. UD is one of the few places where students both investigate fully the nature of reality - in matter and spirit, in petri dishes and metaphors - and also challenge themselves to consider how a life should be lived. It’s worth our wonder that UD continues to do so, and does it so well.

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1845 E. Northgate Dr. Irving, TX 75062 1845 E. Northgate Dr. Irving, TX 75062

Join us for Alumni Reunion and Parents Weekend from September 28-30. All alumni are invited, but we have special events for the classes of 1962, ’72, ’82, ’87, ’92 and 2002. We’re looking for class leaders to help us make it the best reunion yet.

We need volunteers and would love your input! If you would like to arrange a special celebration for your class, let us know and we’ll gladly help. Contact Joe Howe ’00 or Leah Looten ’09 to be involved with Reunion planning at udalum@udallas.edu or by calling 972.721.5066.

TOWER Summer 2012  

This is the summer 2012 issue of Tower, UD's alumni magazine.

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