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+ 47 YEARS OF TEACHING AT UD. WHAT INSPIRED DR. DOE’S DEDICATION? | P. 6

TRADITION Forging into the Future While Honoring Our Roots

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FIRSTWORD

TOWER PRESIDENT

Thomas W. Keefe, JD VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT

Joan S. Canty

THE POSSIBILITY INHERENT

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT

Erin Dougherty

When we talk about tradition at the University of Dallas, we talk about the pursuit of wisdom, truth and virtue. We talk about our faith and our community. With honor and integrity, you, our alumni, go forth to spread your love and wisdom to the world. These are our traditions.

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Bill Hartley

ASSISTANT EDITORS

Aaron Claycomb Callie Ewing, BA ’03 DESIGN

Sarah Oates PRODUCTION

Roberta Daley

We will preserve these traditions that make us what we are. However, transformation of our physical appearance is necessary if we wish to present to the world a face equivalent to the amazing things we do here. Take, for instance, our new student services and administration building, Cardinal Farrell Hall, which will enable UD to become to those looking in what it already is to those looking out: a cohesive whole. Visitors will be drawn into an obvious focal point, one that is the embodiment of the rigorous academics and tight-knit community for which UD stands. The enhancement of our soccer facilities aims to support and preserve that part of the pursuit of wisdom, truth and virtue that is not purely mental, because the development of the whole person means soul and body. Moreover, a soccer field with spectator seating means a place for our community to gather in fellowship to uphold a common cause, which preserves tradition as well. We cannot forget about Rome, one of our most loved and honored traditions. We are expanding the Eugene Constantin Campus in Rome because we do not want anybody to be excluded from this tradition due merely to lack of space. We want to keep Rome an inherent part of the UD experience. Here in Irving, with SB Hall on the northern end of campus, Cardinal Farrell Hall on the southern, Vilfordi Plaza on the east side, and Clark Hall on the west, we are finally well on our way to presenting ourselves the way we want to be seen. In 2018, we will break ground on an auditorium/arts center to replace Lynch Auditorium. Whereas once one might have been surprised by the educational results yielded by such an unassuming assortment of structures, our transformation will provide the immediate impression of inherent possibility. Because of buildings, gateways, a bridge and a field — on our Rome campus, because of increased opportunities to enrich our Italian experience and presence — recognition will grow. When you say, “the University of Dallas,” others will respond, “Oh, yes, what an amazing education,” as they picture the place where that education began. This will be our transformation.

Killian Beeler, BA ’15 Sherry Daniel, MBA ’14 Laura Kuhlman Kim Leeson Jeff McWhorter Kathleen Miller, BA ’17 Sybil Novinski Chris Petrawski Justin Schwartz, BA ’16 Larisa Thelen, BA ’13 John Wilson Nathan Yacovissi To update your address or other contact information, email udalum@udallas.edu. Send comments, letters to the editor or other communication regarding this publication to Bill Hartley, University of Dallas, Office of Advancement, 1845 E. Northgate Dr., Irving, TX 75062; whartley@udallas.edu. Tower magazine is published twice annually by the Office of Advancement for the University of Dallas community. Opinions in Tower magazine are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the university. Postmaster: Send address changes to Tower, Office of Advancement, 1845 E. Northgate Dr., Irving, TX 75062.

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

Thomas W. Keefe, JD President LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

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The university does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its programs and activities. Any person alleging to have been discriminated against in violation of Title IX may present a complaint to the Title IX coordinator. The coordinator assists in an informal resolution of the complaint or guides the complainant to the appropriate individual or process for resolving the complaint. The university has designated Jeff Taylor, coordinator of disability services, as the Title IX coordinator. The Human Resources Office is located on the second floor of Carpenter Hall, and the phone number is 972-721-5382. © University of Dallas 2017. All rights reserved.

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INTHISISSUE WINTER 2017

FEATURED

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TRADITION & TRANSFORMATION Moving Campus Forward While Remembering What’s Behind

He Stayed for the Students06 With retirement looming, Dr. Doe ponders his 47 years at UD.

Boomtown10 UD sits near ground zero of IrvingLas Colinas’ recent resurgence.

REGULARS FIRST WORD ONCAMPUS

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FACULTY REWIND

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RECOMMENDED DIVERSIONS

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Enjoy our recurring look at a few distractions worth your while.

ALUMNI NEWS

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ALUMNI WHO ARE ...

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MY (NEW ORLEANS)

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Take an alumni-guided tour of the Crescent City.

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FINAL WORD Alumni Karla (May), BA ’65, and Martin, BA ’64 MBA ’70, Warborg share their thoughts of UD past, present and future.

ON THE COVER The Eugene Constantin Campus has been an integral part of the Rome experience for the 5,000 or so who have lived and studied there since it opened in 1994. In February, the campus will start to see significant changes.

Rather than seeing a group of buildings that give no clear indication of which the main building might be, visitors will be drawn into campus through Cardinal Farrell Hall, our new front door. WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 1


ONCAMPUS

PEOPLE l EVENTS l PROGRESS

CALENDAR

POINTS OF PRIDE

JANUARY

Rewarding Achievement

27 — Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business Hall of Fame Induction | 6 p.m. | SB Hall

When it comes to merit aid, UD is the land’s most generous private university, according to Money magazine. On average, the university doles out the most aid per award based on academic achievements, test scores, overall grades and other factors rather than financial need.

FEBRUARY

YOUTH MINISTRY LEADERS SEEK SPIRITUAL GROWTH

Workforce Preparation The American Council of Trustees & Alumni’s annual “What Will They Learn?” report cites our Core curriculum as the primary reason for identifying UD as one of 25 schools that best prepare undergraduates for the workforce. No. 12 with a Bullet 04 — Groundhog 2017 8 p.m. | Behind Madonna Hall

MARCH 03 — Spring Braniff Salon 6 p.m. | On campus (TBD)

Advancing three spots when you’re already ranked highly is next to impossible, but UD has managed to move from 15th to 12th in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of the West’s best regional universities. Top 10 is next. WEB EXTRA. Dozens of other UD achievements await at udallas.edu/rankings.

PHOTO: JUSTIN SCHWARTZ

29 — McDermott Lecture: Reading Signs of Time in Our Days; presenting renowned film director, scriptwriter and producer Krzysztof Zanussi | 7:30 p.m. | Las Colinas Country Club

APRIL

DISCOVER MORE ABOUT OUR YOUTH MINISTRY PROGRAM.

09 — Easter Egg Hunt TBD | On campus (TBD) 10 — Galecke Open Golf Tournament 11 a.m. | Las Colinas Country Club 22 — Distinguished Alumni Awards 2017 6 p.m. | Omni Dallas Hotel udallas.edu/daa

MAY 02-04 — Cor Challenge udallas.edu/donate WEB EXTRA. To learn more about these alumni or university events as well as many others, visit udallas.edu/thingstodo.

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Visit udallas.edu/ youthministy

YOUTH MINISTRY LEADERS SEEK SPIRITUAL GROWTH The Ann & Joe O. Neuhoff School of Ministry announced a new online Master of Pastoral Ministry - Youth Ministry program for youth ministry leaders across the nation. The two-year program is set to begin in fall 2017. Through online theology and ministry courses, a study abroad experience

with classmates in Rome, and a unique capstone project, youth ministers will be prepared to stand with, by and for young people in today’s rapidly evolving culture. “We’re thrilled to be able to help meet the church’s need to form ministers capable of responding to the demand for a vibrant

ministry for the next generation of Catholics,” said Dean Theodore James Whapham. Students will learn from nationally recognized UD faculty, as well as renowned youth ministry experts Bob McCarty, D.Min., and Elizabeth Madeo. Together, McCarty and Madeo will bring more than 50 combined years of experience to the new program.


AN ETERNAL INFLUENCE

A MAN TO WHOM MUCH CREDIT IS DUE (ABOVE) Initiated by Galecke in 2001, UD’s annual golf tournament was rebranded this past year as the Galecke Open in his honor. Among the gifts distributed to tournament participants were Galecke Open groundhog golf club covers. (BELOW) According to Galecke, “The view of campus from the west side is so different.” His work in the past 20 years has been geared largely toward providing good views and first impressions, which SB Hall helped him accomplish.

PHOTO: UD ARCHIVES

Former senior adviser to the president Robert M. “Bob” Galecke, the man largely responsible for so much of UD’s success and upgraded improvements; for whom the university’s annual golf tournament, the Galecke Open, is named; and who has kept the No. 2 parking spot next to the president since his arrival in 1996, retired last fall to spend more time traveling and with his family. Galecke served twice as interim president, as well as in a number of other executive-level administrative positions. He helped generate substantial increases in the endowment funds, and he worked side by side with the university’s last three presidents. Perhaps Galecke’s most significant contribution is the Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s (DART) University of Dallas light rail station on the north side of Highway 114. His other notable contributions include renovations to and the expansion of the Ed Maher Athletic Center, a major expansion of the Haggerty Art Village, and, most recently, the not-quite-one-year-old SB Hall and the under-construction Cardinal Farrell Hall.

“Teachers affect eternity through the children and young people they influence,” said Professor Emeritus of Education Cherie Clodfelter. As the daughter of the superintendent of schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, she learned early on to value teachers. After arriving at UD in 1972, she struggled to make the rest of the university see that teachers and teaching were the basis of everything for which UD stands.

“Education was what we were all dealing with,” she explained. “Shifting the focus around this foundation would benefit everyone.” She eventually won her argument that education was a legitimate concern of all majors. Through a bequest for tuition assistance, Clodfelter has set up an endowment for interdisciplinary studies (elementary education) students during their last semester of student teaching. With her scholarship, Clodfelter hopes her wisdom, experience and stories will persist in influencing these future teachers and, through them, the world and eternity. GIVING OPPORTUNITY. Leave a lasting legacy of your own. Contact Director of Planned Giving Elizabeth Murray at emurray@udallas.edu.

Galecke has also been an active community leader for the city of Irving, coming to know the city council members and senior staff and strengthening UD’s relationship with Irving as a director on the Irving Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce and the Irving Convention and Visitors Bureau as well as president and director of the Irving Flood Control District 1.

PHOTO: JUSTIN SCHWARTZ

A PATHWAY FROM CIVIL UNREST Bashar Warda, the Chaldean archbishop of Erbil in northern Iraq and one of the last practicing Catholic bishops to remain in his country following the ISIS takeover of Mosul, believes education is the surest path to bring his country out of civil unrest. Recently, President Thomas Keefe met with Archbishop Warda on UD’s Irving campus, offering to aid the bishop by providing support and access to the university’s graduate programs for students who have completed undergraduate studies at Iraq’s first Catholic university. WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 3


ONCAMPUS OUTSTANDING BOARD LEADERSHIP

TREMENDOUS GROWTH

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

Board of Trustees Chairman Joseph C. Murphy was one of 10 North Texas leaders to receive a Dallas Business Journal Outstanding Director Award. “I proudly accept this honor and award, not only for myself, but also for the entire University of Dallas Board of Trustees,” said Murphy.

IT ALL DEPENDS ON LEADERSHIP

RECORD-SETTING UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT

In fall 2017, the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts will introduce a new program: the Master of Leadership. For executives, aspiring leaders and anybody else who’s interested in leading with integrity and innovating with vision, this program will combine case-study analysis, organizational studies, behavioral science and the liberal arts. And good news for working adults: you’ll be able to complete the program through a combination of online and oncampus courses. To highlight the interdisciplinary nature of the program, its directorship is shared by Associate Professor of English Brett Bourbon and Professor of Business J. Lee Whittington. WEB EXTRA. Accelerate your career and deepen your engagement with the world. Discover more at udallas.edu/ leadership. 4 l TOWER l WINTER 2017

KEEP UP WITH THE LATEST NEWS & INFO RELATED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS AT UDALLAS.EDU/NEWS

ONLINE & IN THE NEWS THE BEST OF SOCIAL MEDIA CONVERSATIONS AND MEDIA MENTIONS “A promising master’s program could help charters hire and train more teachers” was the subhead of a U.S. News & World Report article, “How to Solve Charter Schools’ Biggest Challenge.” Said master’s program was none other than Braniff Graduate School’s new classical education graduate program, which was mentioned in the article at length. In July, Associate Professor of History Susan Hanssen provided expert commentary to Britain’s Sky News just 18 hours after the shooting of five Dallas police officers during a Black Lives Matter protest. See the interview with Hanssen by visiting udallas.edu/skynews.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION Follow these social media sites and stay up to date on what’s happening in the UD community.

PHOTO: UD ROME OFFICE

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

“The tremendous growth #UDallas is experiencing confirms our status as the Southwest’s leading Catholic university,” said Executive Vice President John Plotts. On Oct. 26, we shared news of the university’s largest-ever undergraduate population. Nearly 350 likes, loves and wows later, the post was eventually seen by more than 9,000 people.

THE COMPANY WE KEEP. Best College Reviews included UD on its list of the “The 20 Best College Summer Programs for Gifted Students,” placing our summer high school programs among those of Ivy League schools and other elite institutions.

instagram.com/ udalum

Search for us on LinkedIn

facebook.com/ udallasalumni

twitter.com/ udallasalumni


ONCAMPUS

Retired U.S. Gen. Colin L. Powell, 65th secretary of state, during the Braniff Graduate School’s Eugene McDermott Lecture at the Meyerson Symphony Center, ushered Dallas into a cultural shift, urging dedication to and continued investment in the future of children. The evening was a collaborative effort with Early Matters Dallas, the city’s newly launched coalition dedicated to boosting business support of prekindergarten education, and was sponsored by The Moody Foundation. During the lecture, Powell shared stories from his tenure as secretary of state and of his own early childhood. He told the story of when he first realized that the future rests with children, which didn’t fully dawn on him until after being relieved of his duties as secretary of state. He began campaigning across the country for the future success of children through early childhood education initiatives by joining nonprofit and corporate boards, speaking in schools and cities, and sharing his stories and vision. “Make these kids feel valuable,” said Powell, commanding action from Dallas’ businesses, bankers, executive business leaders and city officials. “Don’t screw it up.”

PHOTOS: KIM LEESON

A WORTHWHILE GATHERING

(ABOVE) Gen. Powell, Margaret McDermott (who, with her husband, Eugene, established the McDermott Lectureship in 1974) and President Thomas Keefe convene after the program. (BELOW) More than 1,000 alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends of the university, as well as some of Dallas’ most prominent civic leaders and education advocates, gathered at the Meyerson Symphony Center to hear Powell speak.

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“I had a list of things I was looking for. I wanted a small liberal arts school near a big city; a Catholic school was a plus. I had never heard of Irving, never heard of UD, but it fit the criteria.”

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- Dr. Doe

He Stayed for the Students

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ssociate Professor of Biology Frank Doe admits to missing Lynch Auditorium and the 8 a.m. General Biology I class he used to teach there. “No one else misses that 8 a.m. class,” he said. “But I do. And Lynch Auditorium — World War III, heaven forbid, could be going on right outside, but inside Lynch we’d never know it — we’d just be carrying on.” This coming summer, Doe will retire, just before his 80th birthday, after 47 years of teaching at UD. Sometimes students and alumni ask him why he’s stayed here for so long. “You guys,” he’ll tell them. “I stayed because of you guys.” He has often considered what characteristics he’s most enjoyed in UD students while teaching and associating with them; the list includes cooperation, empathy, fidelity, integrity, loyalty and responsibility. “Now, I’ve only ever taught here,” he said. “So maybe this is true of students everywhere. But I do think that displaying these qualities in such prevalence is somewhat unique to UD.” He believes that the greatest gifts UD gives students are a strong sense of responsibility and a work ethic. “That’s so boring,” he admitted. “You can’t sell that to prospective students. But it’s the truth. I watch these students grow from freshmen to seniors, and some of them are hardly recognizable. And that’s a good thing.”

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If you want to talk to Doe, you’ll probably have to get in line; as the health professions adviser, he has a steady stream of students awaiting his advice and guidance. The fall, especially, is a busy time, between teaching General Biology I and assisting seniors with medical school applications. When students manage to secure those highly competitive med school interviews, Doe said he has four words for them: “Don’t mess it up.” He and another biology faculty member, the late Bill Germann, became the health professions advisers more or less by default upon the death of longtime UD Biology Professor and Chairwoman Sister Clodovia Lockett, SSMN, in 1994. “We just took over,” said Doe. “There were no meetings, no one asked us to — it’s just how it happened.” He and Germann had been somewhat involved in the process prior to Sister Clo’s death, but she was the mainstay, Doe explained. “After her death, pre-health advising became a big part of the job,” he said. Doe came to UD in August of 1969, just out of graduate school; a postdoctoral fellowship wasn’t required in those days for tenure-track positions. “I had a list of things I was looking for,” he said. “I wanted a small liberal arts school near a big city; a Catholic school was a plus. I had never heard of Irving, never heard of UD, but it fit the criteria.”

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He wanted to be near a big city so that he would have opportunities for training in genetics; his research work prior to that had been mostly in cell biology. At the Southwest Center for Advanced Studies (SCAS), which is now the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) but then was a non-degreegranting think tank and research center for chemistry, mathematics, molecular biology and physics, he found the experience for which he was looking. Two or three days a week, he would finish teaching at UD and head up to Richardson to his second, unpaid job, where he would work until 8 p.m. or so. Eventually, once he’d established relationships at SCAS, it became a paid gig; the connections he made there also helped open doors for some of his students, who went on to UTD to pursue graduate degrees in biology. “It was a good choice,” said Doe

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of his decision to pursue research opportunities with SCAS — and to teach at UD. Doe isn’t sure how he’ll spend his retirement. He’ll probably play golf and spend some time with his grandkids, who are 10 and 7 years old. He won’t be doing any part-time work, however. “I know one of my character defects is that I would take a part-time job and make it full time,” he said. “If I’m going to do that, I might as well stay here and work with you guys.” He also plans to go with his wife to visit New England in the fall and see all the trees in their autumn colors — which he hasn’t done for the better part of the past five decades, since fall has always been his busiest time. “There’ve been some tough moments,” he says of his decades teaching here. “But for the most part, it’s been very rewarding.”

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In 47 years, Doe has worked with many UD colleagues and legends, including John Sommerfeldt, UD president 1978-80 and longtime history professor (bottom left), and Warren Pulich, biology professor and ornithologist (bottom middle, left), and he has guided more of “you guys” than anybody could count toward their futures.

PHOTOS: UD ARCHIVES

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“I watch these students grow from freshmen to seniors, and some of them are hardly recognizable. And that’s a good thing.” WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 7


Let us count the ways ... UD is being enriched by our many intellectual endeavors.

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CELEBRATING SHAKESPEARE “I was marinated in the joy of that play,” said American Shakespeare Center co-founder and Director of Mission Ralph Alan Cohen, the keynote speaker at UD’s Second Biennial Shakespeare Conference. Among other conference highlights, Associate Professor of Drama Stefan Novinski, BA ’92, directed a dramatic reading of As You Like It, the play that was the conference’s focus. According to the conference organizer, Professor of English and Constantin College Associate Dean Scott Crider, other highlights included alumni panelists Clint Brand, BA ’89, and Rafael Major, BA ’90 MA ’94, and a high school monologue competition overseen by Assistant Professor of Education Carmen Newstreet.

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

“Education is sometimes more exciting through technology, although I’ve been teaching online for 10 years,” said Affiliate Assistant Professor of Theology Dan Luby, S.T.L., S.T.D., who’s taught at UD since 1980. “I can witness its impact all over the country: a student in Central Texas talking to students from New Jersey and on the West Coast. I’m literally watching the Gospel expand.” | WEB EXTRA. Witness more at udallas.edu/luby.

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BREWING BUSINESSES Five years ago, there were only two breweries in North Texas. Since then, the market has grown to more than 50, with the brewing industry showing no signs of slowing as 10 to 15 more prepare to launch in 2017. Starting a brewery is a multimillion-dollar enterprise with many complexities. It requires large amounts of capital and significant work before even starting production. Curious about the factors that motivate an individual to open a brewery, Assistant Professor of Operations Management Richard Miller partnered with Associate Professor of Marketing Laura Muñoz to study the North Texas craft brewing industry. “Understanding the journey brewers go through hiring knowledgeable people, building a solid team and learning to exude leadership will help us guide future entrepreneurs planning their own businesses,” said Muñoz. “Because of the wide range of business functions the brewing industry touches, there are a trove of lessons we can pull from this research,” said Miller. The pair has already received attention for their research. The United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship has invited Miller and Muñoz for a second time to present a paper in January based on this research.

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▶ Sculpting His Next Move

After teaching at UD for more than four decades, internationally recognized ceramicist and Professor of Art Dan Hammett is retiring at the end of this academic year to spend more time working on his sculptures at his private studio in Irving, Handcrafted Ceramics. Hammett, who served as Art Department chairman for a decade and has helped the department and its students excel during his career at UD, has himself received numerous awards, grants and commissions from organizations such as the Texas Commission of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. For the 1982 Olympics, he was commissioned by Dallas-based Southland Corp., 7-Eleven’s parent company, to construct 330 limited-edition 523 B.C. Greek replica amphoras (vases) that were awarded to each 1982 United States Olympic gold medalist. “It’s been pretty remarkable. I’m very prideful,” said Hammett. “It’s been wonderful to have been a part of the UD family. Everything we do is for a cause, and it’s the students who truly matter.”

PHOTO: UD ARCHIVES

FACULTY REWIND


Chad Engelland, philosophy graduate program director and assistant professor of philosophy, was drawn to his discipline by big questions, like what being human means. | “Contemporary culture’s view seemed bleak. It doesn’t account for factors that make up the transcendent human experience,” said Engelland, who pursues these questions in his book “The Way of Philosophy: An Introduction” — his attempt to show people the path in life and faith he was fortunate enough to stumble upon. | WEB EXTRA. Visit udallas.edu/engelland to discover more.

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

STORY AS A WAY FORWARD

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“My daughters and I made a home through our shared stories,” said Associate Professor of English Brett Bourbon. “When they were struggling, I’d tell a story. These stories form our moral and cognitive atmosphere, keeping us alive, helping us find ways forward.” In addition to teaching, Bourbon consults on strategy and technology with the Silicon Valley design firm Slanted Light, helping tell the stories of clients that include Nike, Microsoft and Nerdwallet. Next semester, Bourbon will combine his business acumen and love of story to teach a class on storytelling in business and in life.

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▶ Supporting Scholarship PHOTO COURTESY: ELIZABETH ROBINSON

THE BIG QUESTIONS

“As a scholar in the beginning of my career, it’s particularly important to introduce my ideas to colleagues through conferences and publications, and the Milligan Fellowship has allowed me to do both,” said the UD Rome Program’s Affiliate Assistant Professor of Art Elizabeth Robinson, Ph.D., the first recipient of the Milligan Faculty Development Fellowship. Robinson’s research focuses on Roman art and archaeology. WEB EXTRA: Dig a little deeper at udallas.edu/robinson.

President Thomas W. Keefe congratulates Professor of Psychology and Human Sciences Scott D. Churchill on being named a 2014 Minnie Stevens Piper Professor.

▶ Bound toof Teach Business Defense Human Diginity Every Gupta College of Business graduate recalls at least one class “After 35came years together. at UD, I couldn’t not​​that be influenced by theinhigh where it all For many, moment began the moral standards,” finance said Professor Psychology and Human Sciences Scott D. managerial course of taught by assistant professors of finance Churchill. Fernando Arellano and Lynn Kendall. ast summer, a lawyer by the For the uninitiated, in commissioned that course groups areAmerican assignedPsychological a simulated Association founddecisions that prominent had cooperfirm to make(APA) managerial in real APA time.psychologists The simulation, develated with government officials to assist with harsh post-9/11 oped by Arellano, is used by several colleges and has helped interrogacounttion students techniques. less learn the foundations of business management. This was admits no surprise to Churchill APA and but a council repArellano he never planned(an to be anFellow instructor is aware resentative the Society of Humanistic Psychology), whojust hadthat. been that his life’sfor trajectory somehow prepared him to become working to extract the APA from thisasituation forinyears. In the early 1970s, Arellano began small farm Lima, Peru, exHe was key sponsor of a bill adopted by the APA to banpolitical involvepecting toagrow it into a commercial business. Shortly after, ment offorced psychologists in national security interrogations, a historic reform him to stop operation, at which point he decided to motion approved with an unprecedented 157-1 vote in what Churchill called pursue a finance career (including serving as CFO of the Agricultural “an emotional, moment.” Bank of Peru). Itcathartic wasn’t until he took a teaching assistant job while The resolution prohibits psychologists from working in settings pursuing a doctorate at Colorado State University that he realized the United Nations in violation oflife international law; Discover teaching was fardeclared more rewarding than in the corporate world. magazine named its implementation No. 34 in 2015’s top 100 science stories. Arellano began teaching full time. Nearly three decades later, he describes his work as a mission. “It’s all about guiding students through the learning process,” he said. “What brings me joy is using my business and consulting experiences to find creative ways to teach finance.”

WEB EXTRA. Continue the story at udallas.edu/bourbon.

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PHOTO: UD MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

PHOTO: WIPF & STOCK PUBLISHERS

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University Stands to Gain From Development Surging All Around

fter the Dallas Cowboys played their last game of the Texas Stadium era in 2008, many contemplated Irving’s future and its ability to attract more residents, visitors and development. Now, nearly a decade since America’s Team left town, the area, like the University of Dallas, is undergoing a transformation of its own on a scale not seen in Las Colinas since its formative years decades ago. Right before our very eyes, one of North Texas’ first mixed-use, planned communities is remaking itself into a powerhouse entertainment destination, much to the delight of the UD community, which sits less than three minutes away. Major developments are expected to be completed or begin construction in 2017. Those include the 250,000-square-foot Music Factory, anchored by an 8,000-seat indoor/outdoor amphitheater; the highly anticipated mixed-use waterfront development Water Street; and Hidden Ridge, a state-of-the-art urban development that will incorporate telecom giant Verizon’s expanded campus. With these new developments, Irving-Las Colinas will undergo more than just a physical transformation, and it will undoubtedly benefit UD students as it becomes a magnet for more jobs. In fact, city officials

expect the area to exponentially build upon the more than 20,000 jobs added since 2009. “These new developments are going to attract a whole new generation of millennials to Irving,” said Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce Director of Intelligence, Innovation and Education Dexter Freeman, MBA ’11, who also happens to be president of UD’s National Alumni Board. “Irving has already been identified by WalletHub as one of the top places to start a career, and these new projects will make that even more so.” According to Freeman, Irving-Las Colinas already claims the second-largest office market in Dallas/Fort Worth and is North Texas’ third-largest employment center; 54 Fortune 500 companies operate from headquarters located in Irving. Because success breeds success, and because Irving-Las Colinas sits at the center of America’s fourth-largest metro area, the city has been able to replace the economic doom and gloom with a boost of confidence from innovative mega-developers like the ARK Group (The Music Factory) and Dallas-based KDC (Hidden Ridge). So, what will Irving-Las Colinas’ retail and entertainment landscape look like when all is said and done around 2020?

TOWN

North Texas’ newest entertainment destination, the 250,000-square-foot Music Factory, featuring an 8,000-seat indoor/outdoor amphitheater operated by LiveNation, is expected to officially open Labor Day 2017.


2017

WATER STREET ON LAKE CAROLYN

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Water Street: Located on the edge of Lake Carolyn in the core of Las Colinas’ Urban Center, Water Street is Irving’s latest lakefront development, and once complete, it will add more than 60,000 square feet of retail shops and eateries, including an Olivella’s Pizzeria and a Twisted Root Burger Bar. The $100 million project will also include 316 highend apartments.

“UD students will now be just one DART stop away from upscale retail shops and restaurants on Water Street,” said Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce Vice President of Economic Development & Operations Don Williams. “If you’re a student located next to this much activity — that’s just gravy on top.”

MUSIC FACTORY AMPHITHEATER

MUSIC FACTORY BETWEEN LAS COLINAS BOULEVARD AND HIGHWAY 114

The Music Factory: Costing roughly $173 million, the 350,000-square-foot Music Factory, with its location adjacent to the Irving Convention Center off Highway 114, will expand Las Colinas’ Urban Center and create one of North Texas’ largest entertainment districts. An all-in-one dining and entertainment destination, the new development will feature an indoor-outdoor music venue operated by LiveNation, a comedy house and a dining movie theater, plus more than 20 restaurants and retail shops.

“Most students don’t have access to this sort of destination unless they attend a university in the downtown area of a major city,” said Williams. “The Music Factory will give UD students convenient access to world-class entertainment virtually in their own backyard.” Both Water Street and The Music Factory will be serviced by the DART Orange Line via the Las Colinas and Irving Convention Center stations. They are expected to open Labor Day 2017.

HIDDEN RIDGE

MUSIC FACTORY RETAIL AND RESTAURANTS

Hidden Ridge: A partnership between the city of Irving and Verizon, construction on Hidden Ridge is slated to begin early next summer and will include the company’s 900,000-square-foot expanded campus. The 157-acre mixed-use development is expected to cost $1.5 billion. Pioneering Verizon’s “Smart Cities” technologies — aimed at improving quality of life using technology — Hidden Ridge is being planned as a walkable, transit-oriented development.

“Verizon’s objective is to make this one of the most unique sites in the world,” said Williams. The development will have room for an estimated 10,000 employees and will include a 150-room hotel, 85,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and apartments and homes. Also serving Verizon’s campus, Hidden Ridge will include its own DART station.

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“We will preserve the traditions that make us who we are while transforming our physical appearance to present to the world a face equivalent to the amazing things we do here.”

Named to honor Cardinal Kevin J. Farrell, former bishop of the Diocese of Dallas, Cardinal Farrell Hall is being constructed primarily of brick, zinc panels and glass, and will complement the architectural style of the university’s existing buildings and landscape, many of which were designed by the late “father of Southwest architecture” O’Neil Ford. Twelve thousand square feet of patio and terrace space and a two-story pergola running along the entire length of two sides of the building will help integrate indoor and outdoor environments and will create an abundance of natural light inside.

- President Thomas Keefe

TRADITION

A Vision of Future UD

Often it isn’t in the residence halls but rather in other campus buildings and spaces where the best studying, learning and collaborations happen, where the closest friendships are formed; the various nooks and crannies become the roots, memories and comforts that students carry with them throughout their lives and later point out to their children. UD’s tradition has always been one of family, community and a deep appreciation for truth and beauty. This campus transformation will create a physical aspect that matches the one alumni already carry in their hearts and memories.

Former Bishop of the Diocese of Dallas, Cardinal Kevin J. Farrell


Once completed, Cardinal Farrell Hall’s three uniquely designed classrooms will offer students enhanced educational experiences; first-floor “storefronts” will create a “Main Street” of sorts that will provide easy, one-stop access to financial aid, registration, student accounts and student employment services.

ike Notre Dame’s golden dome and Harvard’s Memorial Hall, Cardinal Farrell Hall will be our icon, the symbol that immediately comes to mind when people think of the University of Dallas. It will be the front door that draws visitors in, the obvious entryway to campus. With an architectural style that complements existing buildings and landscaping, it will catch the eye without looking out of place. On the lawn and on the 12,000 square feet of patio and terrace, students will study or enjoy downtime with each other; professors will hold classes on the lecture steps when weather permits.

Cardinal

Farrell Hall


JULY 2012

DART’S UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS STATION

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Years of road closures and detours give way to hasslefree public transportation at the campus’ doorstep as UD celebrates the long-awaited opening of the Dallas Area Rapid Transportation (DART) Orange Line’s University of Dallas station. The opening not only represents a chance for students to more easily access the greater Dallas area, but it also presents the university with new opportunities to connect with thousands who live near or pass by campus daily. AUGUST 2012

HAGGAR RENOVATION

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A significant renovation of the heart of the UD campus, the Haggar University Center, results in a new Visitor’s Center and a remodeled Haggar Cafe, as well as renovated restrooms and study and common areas. The Haggar project is the start of a $4.2 million initial phase of construction that also includes Vilfordi Plaza and campus gateways. APRIL 2014

VILFORDI PLAZA

TIMELINE OF A CAMPUS TRANSFORMAT Since President Thomas Keefe’s arrival in 2010, the university has experienced a period of growth rivaled only by that seen during the university’s formative years just after its founding in 1956.

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The Eugene Vilfordi Plaza, which honors the longtime UD trustee and local philanthropist’s contributions to the Dallas/Fort Worth area, officially opens, connecting the University of Dallas DART Orange Line station to the campus core and making the university more accessible to the greater community. APRIL 2014

GATEWAYS

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Campus gateways – constructed at each of five major campus entrances along E. Northgate Drive, Tom Braniff Drive and State Highway 114 – create a distinct visual boundary that identifies the campus as the University of Dallas. MAY 2015

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE SHRINE

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Hundreds gather to witness the dedication of the Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine on May 16, 2015. JANUARY 2016

SB HALL The new $16 million SB Hall opens, providing a state-ofthe-art home for the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business. The 45,000-square-foot academic building honors the service to the university and community rendered by Dallas-based global steel entrepreneurs and UD alumni Satish and Yasmin Gupta, whose generous gift funded its construction.

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DRAMA BUILDING The Drama Department moves into its new home, ushering in a fresh era of growth and potential for the program. More rehearsal space and upgrades to the light and sound systems make the new Drama Building production-ready for performances.

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ATION

JULY 2016

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OPENING JANUARY 2018

CARDINAL FARRELL HALL In August 2016, the university breaks ground on a $15 million student services and administration building that will become the campus’ new “front door” and will symbolize all that is the University of Dallas. The iconic structure — Cardinal Farrell Hall — will honor Cardinal Kevin J. Farrell, former university chancellor and former bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas.

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PROJECTED GROUNDBREAKING FEBRUARY 2017

ROME RENEWAL & EXPANSION Enabling more students to share in the transformational adventure offered by the Rome Program is the fundamental purpose of a planned renewal and expansion of the university’s Eugene Constantin Campus. Construction of additional villa residence, mensa and dormitory space, which is expected to begin by February 2017, will help accommodate the program’s growing popularity.

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TBD

SOCCER FACILITY ENHANCEMENTS Covered stadium-style seats and team benches, elevated filming platforms, and a lighted field are all components of the first project of a more wideranging campaign to upgrade athletic facilities.

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AUDITORIUM As never before at UD, this auditorium will cater to the performing arts, specifically music — both ensemble music and musical theater. This building is the first step in incorporating the performing arts into UD’s campus and community culture, with the hope of inspiring a true dedication to music and the performing arts in the coming decade.

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PROJECTED GROUNDBREAKING 2018

TBD

LIBRARY The Cowan-Blakley Library will undergo its own transformation, becoming “the place to go” for research and other types of academic support, the place where students will come for reference services, university history and archives, rare books and special collections, as well as to visit centers that might possibly include the Writing Center and the Center for Thomas More Studies.

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In this future, there will be no need for cash- and transportation-strapped students to leave campus seeking entertainment. Instead, depending on the season, the community will gather together in top-notch athletic facilities. In the autumn, relishing crisp October evening air, they’ll root Crusader Soccer on to conference championships. On warm spring days, it will be baseball. Traditions will take hold; a culture will evolve.

The mensa annex will make the space both more comfortable and more functional, including 20 additional seats as well as more kitchen and service areas, not to mention a sala and a new patio.

And when these same future students go to Rome to take their part in the dream that is Rome, the legend told by alumni and upperclassmen to freshmen … they will find a campus that, even more so than now, enriches UD’s Italian experience and presence, hosting pilgrimages and conferences, expanding the dream and the legend to a vaster part of the community and the world. This future campus will have the capacity to accommodate our growing undergraduate classes, so that no one will miss out on the tradition — the dream, the legend — that is Rome.


The dormitory annex will house more students, with five additional rooms and space for 15 beds, as well as a large courtyard.

The villa annex will accommodate more faculty and their families with a casa, a residence with two additional two-bedroom apartments.


The 500-seat auditorium will serve the community in the way Lynch did, hosting lectures and other events, but with expanded opportunities to provide this type of venue due to its larger size. The building will also provide for the performing arts, particularly music, in a manner new to UD, with the goal of incorporating a music major within the next several years.


Back in Irving, where Carpenter Hall now stands, students of the future — some of them music majors — will perform in a new auditorium filled to capacity with an audience consisting of the greater UD, Irving and Dallas communities, preserving and furthering the UD tradition to support cultural and artistic endeavors.

Altogether, students of the future will find a campus in Irving that stands in appearance for what UD has always represented academically and spiritually, and one in Rome that exemplifies these qualities even more than it always has: truth and beauty.

Finally, students of the future will find the expanded CowanBlakley Memorial Library their ultimate source for research support, with additional study spaces, academic services and centers catering to different needs and interests.

Visit udallas.edu/transform to learn more about naming and other opportunities to support these projects.


RECOMMENDED DIVERSIONS

ARTISTIC l PHILOSOPHICAL l SPIRITUAL

LARGE PHOTO: RACHEL MULDEZ

SMALL PHOTOS: ADDISON DOTY

PROTAGORAS: ANCIENTS IN ACTION

FANTASÍA FANTÁSTICA: IMAGINATIVE SPACES AND OTHER-WORLDLY COLLAGE The Artist: Rachel Muldez, MA ’10, is participating in her first major sculpture exhibit. Along with three other Latino/a artists, Muldez explores what New Mexican, Hispanic and Latino/a art and subject matter look like. In a Nutshell: “The sculptures ... resonate with evolving understanding of our world and the study of other worlds, galaxies and nebulas. Fantastical worlds are created both by my hand and also in the viewer’s imagination as each visually navigates the compositions I have prepared for them,” said Muldez. Start Viewing: This exhibition can be seen at the National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through May 28, 2017. Admission is $6 for adults and free for children 16 and under. Reserve tickets at nhccnm.org. Muldez will be at the museum March 2 and 4 giving talks and demonstrations. She also has two upcoming solo exhibitions in Dallas, at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center Jan. 21 through Feb. 24 and at 500X Gallery April 8 through 30.

The Author: Daniel Silvermintz, MA ’98 MA ’02 PhD ’06, considers the life, ideas and lasting legacy of the pre-Socratic philosopher Protagoras of Abdera (490–420 BC). Still relevant to contemporary society, Protagoras is in many ways a precursor to the postmodern movement. In a Nutshell: “In this short, elegant and readable work, Daniel Silvermintz brings alive one of the most elusive and enigmatic thinkers of the ancient world,” said Steven B. Smith, Alfred Cowles Professor of Political Science at Yale University. Start Reading: Available on Kindle ($9.99) and in paperback ($22.80) on Amazon.com.

BEHOLD THE MAN: A CATHOLIC VISION OF MALE SPIRITUALITY The Author: Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, MTS ’00, provides a unique, comprehensive exploration of Catholic spirituality for men, rooting Catholic male spirituality in a covenant relationship with God and the cross of Jesus Christ. In a Nutshell: “Deacon Burke-Sivers draws from Scripture and the teaching of the church to encourage men both to ‘man up’ as the heads of their families and share their faith in their households and in their marketplaces,” said Father John McCloskey. Start Reading: Available electronically ($11.67) and in paperback ($15.26) on ignatius.com.

LET THE UD COMMUNITY KNOW ABOUT YOUR PUBLISHED WORK. ARE YOU AN ALUMNUS OR FACULTY AUTHOR AND WANT US TO KNOW ABOUT IT? EMAIL ALUMNI RELATIONS AT UDALUM@UDALLAS.EDU. 20 l TOWER l WINTER 2017

UD ARTISTS & WRITERS


LIFE EVENTS l MEMORIES l ACHIEVEMENTS

ALUMNINEWS Class Notes

The Distinguished Alumni Awards have been given by the university since 1992.

1960s

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

HONOR OUR DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI.

Visit udallas.edu/DAA for sponsorship and ticket information.

FOR SUSTAINED CONTRIBUTION TO HUMAN ENDEAVORS This spring, five community and business leaders will receive UD’s highest alumni honor, the Distinguished Alumni Award, which recognizes alumni who have demonstrated sustained and distinguished accomplishments and contributions to any field of human endeavor. Award recipients will be honored during a reception and dinner Saturday, April 22, 2017, at the Omni Dallas Hotel. A recognized leader in real estate, University Trustee Chris Bright, BA ’78, is CEO of the Dallas-based commercial firm Bright Realty and has directed the firm’s real estate activities through hundreds of projects. Bright serves on the boards of A Weekend to Wipe Out Cancer, Big Brothers Big Sisters of North Texas and the McKinney Avenue Trolley Association. Among the first to receive a doctorate from UD’s Institute of Philosophic Studies, former University Trustee Joanne H. Stroud, MA ’72 PhD ’75 MA ’80, was an adjunct professor at UD for 12 years before co-founding the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, where she teaches and has served as director of publications for more than three decades. ALUMNI.UDALLAS.EDU

¨

For 35 years, Ray Khirallah, BA ’72, has led a distinguished law career, building a large real estate practice as a partner in the Dallas law office Thompson Knight LLP and receiving numerous awards for his work, including being named one of The Best Lawyers in America (2007-17) by Woodward/White. Barbara, MPM ’03, and Steve T. Landregan, MA ’73, are recognized for their commitment to the founding and develREAD MORE opment of the Neuhoff ABOUT THIS School of Ministry, their YEAR’S REsupport of the Landregan CIPIENTS OR Lectures for the past 18 NOMINATE years, and their combined A FELLOW ALUMNUS service to the Diocese of FOR NEXT Dallas. Steve served as YEAR’S archivist and editor of the AWARD AT Catholic Diocese of Dallas’ UDALLAS. newspaper, The Texas EDU/DAA. Catholic, for nearly five NOMINAdecades and received the TIONS ARE Ecclesia et Pontifice Papal ACCEPTED YEAR-ROUND. Award from Pope John Paul II. Barbara served the Diocese of Dallas for more than two decades as director of both the Catholic Conference and Formation Center and Safe Environment. She also served on the university’s National Alumni Board.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

¨

facebook.com/udallasalumni

George Berzsenyi, BA ’65, received the Gung and Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics in January 2016 at the annual Joint Mathematics Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), the American Mathematical Society (AMS) and various other mathematical organizations. For this and his other successes, George is indebted to his wife, Kay (Markey) Berzsenyi, BA ’65, who has been his partner in the various extracurricular activities he has pursued in addition to teaching and research. Both went on to Texas Christian University for graduate studies in mathematics after finishing their undergraduate degrees at UD; Kay got an M.A., while George earned a doctorate and went into academia. Years later, Kay earned a B.S. in informatics as well in order to get a job in the industry and earn enough to ensure the schooling of the couple’s four children. Jim Burnham, BA ’65, CEO of the Law Offices of Jim Burnham, was selected for inclusion in The Dallas 500, a D Magazine publication of Dallas/Fort Worth’s 500 most powerful business leaders. Additionally, Jim has been involved in the banking business for the past 20 years as part-owner of three different banks and on the executive committee and board of directors of Grand Bank. He also takes part in a commercial real estate business managed by his wife, Diane. Jim has two daughters, Anne and Amy, and one granddaughter, Elise, who turned 1 in August. Neal J. Robinson, MBA ’69, was awarded the 2016 Gupta College of Business Tower Award.

1970s Alexandra C. Wilhelmsen, BA ’71, professor of Spanish, published her fourth book in Madrid, El ser y el conocer en Cervantes: un realismo renovado de cariz peripatético (Being and Knowing in Cervantes). A retired Spanish professor from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Elizabeth was a Spanish major at UD. Her specialty is Spanish Golden Age literature. As an undergraduate, she took many courses in philosophy from her father, UD’s own Frederick D. Wilhelmsen. The book is very philosophical. Steven T. Landregan, MA ’73, journalist, archivist and historian, retired from the Diocese of Dallas this past summer after beginning his career there nearly 50 years ago. The Most Rev. Robert Coerver, BA ’76, was ordained a bishop and installed as bishop of Lubbock on Nov. 21. He is the 10th UD alumnus to be ordained a bishop. WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 21


ALUMNINEWS Robert Nelson, MBA ’76, will be inducted into the Gupta College of Business Hall of Fame in January 2017.

1980s Dan Flaherty, BA ’83 MBA ’84, will be inducted into the Gupta College of Business Hall of Fame in January 2017. Richard Lindsey, MBA ’85, was named co-head of the Windham Liquid Alternative Strategies for Windham Capital. Father Peter Mangum, BA ’86, was inducted into the Loyola College Preparatory School of Shreveport’s Hall of Honor. Father Peter is a 1982 graduate of the school as well as its current chaplain. Joseph E. Morris, MBA ’86, most recently an IT financial analyst with Raytheon Corporate and formerly Largo, Florida, manufacturing site controller for Raytheon’s space and airborne systems business, retired after 34 years in the defense industry (working with Texas Instruments, E-Systems and Raytheon) in July.

On North Texas Giving Day 2016, UD benefactors contributed more individual gifts than any other North Texas college or university for the fourth consecutive year — and raised 45 percent more in donations for UD than last year. Here’s how it’s done:

588

generous alumni, parents, faculty and staff donate

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155,146

CELEBRATION

ENSUES!

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Generous 2 parents of alumni propose a challenge...

NORTH TEXAS

The challenge:

an additional

$60,000

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to honor UD’s 60th anniversary

The challenge is met at

8:18

Donations reach the $100,000

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P.M.

Susan “Suzy” Williams, MBA ’81, was named executive director for Connecting Point of Park Cities.

HOW TO TROUNCE A GIVING RECORD

mark

GIVING DAY

I CONSIDER GIVING BACK TO UD EACH YEAR A PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY THAT IS IMPARTED TO ME AS AN ALUMNA OF THIS INSTITUTION. LIKE OTHERS’ GIFTS, OURS COMES DIRECTLY FROM OUR FAMILY BUDGET, GIVEN FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF OUR UNIVERSITY. MY HUSBAND AND I FEEL GOOD ABOUT SUPPORTING THE SUCCESS OF EVERY STUDENT AT UD. THIS IS WHY WE GIVE.”

–Join university trustee Laura Felis Quinn, BS ’86 MS ’18, as a member of the President’s Society by giving $1,000 or more to any area of the university. Give today at udallas.edu/donate.

1990s Ellen Barker, MBA ’94, will be inducted into the Gupta College of Business Hall of Fame in January 2017. Andrea Davis, BA ’94, is working at Children’s Medical Center Dallas as a clinical art psychotherapist. She published a chapter titled “Professional and Ethical Use of Expressive Arts Therapy” in the newly released book Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Children and Adolescents (Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group). Andrea is working to start an art therapy nonprofit in Dallas. Bob Kelly, PhD ’95, joined Ignition Partners — an early-stage, business software venture capital firm — as a managing partner in October. Rachel Black, BA ’98, exhibited new paintings in the Medical Center of Lewisville’s Grand Theater. Burke Ingraffia, MA ’99, released “Christmas Carol Lullabies,” an album of Christmas carols sung by himself, simply with his guitar, in a very soft voice, perfect to help kids of all ages (from 1 to 99) slow down during the holidays. Burke lives in New Orleans and works as a software developer, but still plays music on the side in jazz clubs and wine bars around the city. Gail Warrior, MBA ’99, was one of only four to be awarded Beta Gamma Sigma’s Medallion for Entrepreneurship.

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WORLD THROUGH ART Dominican Sister Bernadine Egleston, MA ’78 MFA ’80, always loved best the medium of wood for her sculptures. “I loved the invitation and challenge the different grains offered me,” she said. Among many other sculptures in her career as an artist, Sister Bernadine — better known by her friends and colleagues as “Bernie” — created the altar, lectern, sanctuary lamp and holy-water font for the sisters’ worship space at the Dominican motherhouse in Kentucky, where she lives. She joined the Dominicans in February 1955. One of Sister Bernadine’s favorite sculptures is the “bent woman,” based on the Gospel of Luke and inspired by a woman who attended her church and was unable to stand upright. “I will always be grateful for the education I received at the University of Dallas,” she said. “It’s good to remember all the places and opportunities art has opened up for me and the places it’s taken me. I hope I’ve made a contribution to the world through my art.”

PHOTOS COURTESY: ROSE MARIE CUMMINS

David E. Young, MBA ’90, was named chairman of the board for Faros Healthcare, a rapidly growing provider of artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics solutions.


ALUMNINEWS 2

Scenes from Alumni & Family Weekend

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PHOTO ALBUM

2. Alumnus Michael Terranova, BA ’85 MA ’93 MA ’16 PhD ’20, addresses the crowd at the Braniff Graduate School Alumni Reception. The event was a part of a larger ongoing celebration of 50 years of graduate liberal arts education at the university.

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The next generation of Crusaders makes a dash for it before the rugby game.

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Alumni, families and students enjoy the Alumni vs. Student Rugby Game.

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Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business Alumni Committee members Atoy Strawder, MBA ’00, Michelle Klocinski, MBA ’11, Hank Cofield, MBA ’15, and Michael Lewis, MBA ’11, at the College of Business Dean’s Reception.

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Members of the classes of 1960-67 gather for the annual Golden Crusaders Dinner, which honors alumni who have celebrated 50 years or more as graduates of the university. This year, members of the Class of 1966 were inducted.

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Members of the Class of 1986 celebrate their 30-year reunion. As the class with the highest giving participation, they earned a complimentary party at the president’s house.

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University historian and longtime staff member Sybil Novinski (pictured right) catches up with alumni during a tour of the university archives.

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The alumni rugby team prepares for the game against current students.

9. Alumnus Paul Spring, BA ’11, and his band rock the crowd at the Cookout on the Mall. 10. Members of the Class of 2011 celebrate their five-year class reunion in the Rathskeller.

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ALUMNINEWS

Nicole (Lahey) Cardin, BA ’01, was featured in Envoy Air’s “Women with Wings” series in September; Nicole, who was a drama major with a French concentration at UD, is a captain (pilot) with Envoy; only about 6 percent of all U.S. pilots are women, and Nicole, whose father was also a pilot, has been flying planes since she was a teenager.

In November, UD’s Athletics Hall of Fame inducted its 19th class. Tennis champion Bastian Vaandrager was recruited from the Netherlands in 1979-80 and holds UD’s third-best winning percentage in singles. Edgar Tavares, BA ’06, was the midfield engine on the men’s soccer team that won UD’s first men’s soccer championship. “UD meant everything to me. I met my wife and so many great friends here,” said Tavares.

“The job I have now is because of the network I built.” Kelli Fuentes, BA ’11, was the mainstay of UD volleyball from 2007 to 2010, claiming three most valuable player awards, leading the Crusaders to the North Eastern Athletic Conference championship and helping the team achieve the best record in school history. “UD gave me so much more than athletics,” said Fuentes. “The classes, studying abroad, the community; it’s truly a one-of-a-kind place.”

Aubrey Lively, BA ’01, published a book, A Fairly Creative Guide to Telling Tales: An Introduction to Creative Writing, available through Royal Fireworks Press. Deborah K. Heisz, MBA ’01, was appointed president of Nerium International in September. Margaret (Wilson) and Matthew Bronzi, BA ’03, welcomed their sixth baby (fifth boy), Thomas Xavier (aka “Tex”), in August. Bazzekuketta Nganga Njiinu, MBA ’01, was named CEO of TransCentury. Mary Edmonds, MBA ’03 MS ’07, was named director of web development for Fort Worthbased Allied Electronics. Mariel (Garcia) Molina, BA ’03, and her husband, Andres, welcomed their first child, Sebastian Paul, in October.

RETURN OF THE SISTERS

Nine Nashville Dominican sisters in perpetual profession are UD alumnae; eight are pictured here, as Sister Anna Laura Karp, O.P., was at World Youth Day when the photo was taken.

Mary Morales-Barberena, BA ’03, is owner and director of Amiguitos Spanish Immersion Academy in Austin, Texas, which will open the doors to its second location in January 2017. Tori (Kaspareit) Pelz, BA ’03, and her husband, Mike, welcomed their adopted baby, Lula Rae, in March. Jennifer Chandler, MBA ’04, was named to the Dallas Business Journal’s 2016 40 Under 40 list. Gary Malaer, MBA ’04, will be the new CEO for the Carolinas Hospital System starting in January 2017. Steven Voynich, BA ’04, was named partner at the accounting firm Robinson, Grimes, and Co. He and his wife, Sara (Hellkamp) Voynich, BA ’04, just welcomed their fifth child. Mutryce A. Williams, MA ’05, was awarded a doctorate in public policy administration with a double concentration in homeland security policy and coordination and terrorism, mediation and peace from Walden University. Mutryce completed the program with a 3.88/4.0 GPA. Cara (Vaughn) and Mark Abide, both BA ’06, welcomed their third child, Ian David, in October. Older siblings are Isabelle and Luke. Ian was born the week after Cara and Mark’s 10-year reunion and a good ol’ climb up Braniff Memorial Tower. Rosie (Wilson), BA ’06, and Mitch Boersma, BA ’08, welcomed their second son, Jerome Timothy, in July.

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This fall, students were greeted by a different combination of white and black on the Mall: that of the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia — more commonly known as the Nashville Dominicans. Nuns on campus, so common in UD’s early days, have not recently been as prevalent. Then, last spring, Associate Professor and Chairman of Theology Mark Goodwin invited alumna Sister Jane Dominic Laurel, O.P., to teach systematic theology — which led to President Thomas Keefe and the Nashville Dominican mother general arranging for a small community of sisters to serve here. Now, three Nashville Dominicans have established a convent in Irving. Sister Mary Edith Humphries, O.P., another UD alumna, teaches Literary Tradition I while working on

her doctoral dissertation on Shakespeare for The Catholic University of America; Sister Rosemary Esseff, O.P., leads the Schola Rosa Mystica (UD’s Gregorian Chant and sacred polyphony choir) while working on her doctoral dissertation in sacred music composition for Rome’s Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music; and Sister Jane Dominic, of course, teaches theology. The alumnae sisters are happy to be back. “The caliber of UD students makes teaching a joy. I’m often invigorated after class discussions,” said Sister Mary Edith. “It’s a homecoming filled with the nostalgia of my own intellectual awakening.” “Vocations are taken seriously here, and the intellectual, spiritual and human formation is invaluable,” said Sister Jane Dominic.

PHOTOS: UD SPORTS INFORMATION

Irvin Ashford Jr., MBA ’00, was named national director of financial literacy for Comerica Bank. Irvin will also continue his role as senior vice president of external affairs for Texas, Arizona and Florida.

LEGENDS OF THE GAME

PHOTO: DOMINICAN SISTERS OF ST. CECILIA

2000s


ALUMNINEWS 2

PHOTO ALBUM

Scenes from summer and fall alumni events

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Susan Hanssen, associate professor of history, shares her wisdom on “Patriotism, Education and Religious Liberty” at the “Wine and Wisdom” event in Washington, D.C., in October at the home of UD alumnus parents Thomas and Amy Spence.

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National Alumni Board member Joseph Cyr, BA ’97 MBA ’99, alumni parents Larry and Elizabeth Rolwes, and President Thomas W. Keefe enjoy the St. Louis and Alumni Parent Reception. Both Cyr and the president spoke to alumni, parents and prospective students at the event about the state of the university and its future.

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Some of the older “children” sneak a picture at the Santa Social with Saint Nick, who bears a striking resemblance to Professor of History Thomas Jodziewicz.

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DFW area alumni reconnect over happy hour drinks and appetizers at the Alumni Summer Kickoff on June 25.

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Britton St. Onge, BA ’04, William Frank, BA ’06, Jane (Fiegenschue) Frank, BA ’04, and Molly (Hunker) St. Onge, BA ’05, catch up at the St. Louis and Alumni Parent Reception.

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Alumni from France come together for the annual Paris Alumni Reception.

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Alumni, students, families and friends celebrate Our Lady of Guadalupe’s feast day with live mariachi music at the oncampus shrine.

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Mary Hinze, Class of 2018, testifies to the transformative UD experience during the 2016 Parents’ Reception held in August.

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UD family member Clare O’Brien, Mary Jane O’Brien, BA ’15, and UD family member Anna Krewett pose for a picture at the St. Louis and Alumni Parent Reception on Sept. 12. The event was held at the home of UD parents Jean and Frank O’Brien.

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10. The Brazil Alumni Chapter celebrates their first meeting during an evening reception in Sao Paulo on June 18.

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ALUMNINEWS ARE YOU YOUR OWN BOSS?

ALUMNI WHO ARE...

Barry A. McCain, BA ’06, joined McGlinchey Stafford PLLC in September as an associate. Barry’s commercial litigation practice focuses primarily on consumer financial services litigation, including alleged violations of state and federal consumer statutes.

...their own bosses FARRELL

Dwight Lindley, MA ’08 PhD ’11, was awarded Hillsdale College’s Emily Daugherty Award for Teaching Excellence in November. Dwight is assistant professor of English at Hillsdale College. Benaye Rogers, MBA ’08, was awarded the 2016 Gupta College of Business Tower Award. Belle (Swaja), BA ’09, and Tommy Kniest, BA ’08, welcomed their second child and first son, Clayton Thomas, in November. Mariana (Carbonell) and Tommy Ryan, both BA ’09, welcomed their second son, Peter Javier, in May.

2010s Matt Cardenas, BA ’10, was hired by the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal as niche audience manager, overseeing special publications and digital products. Matt married Jes Fyall Cardenas in June at St. Martin de Porres in Dripping Springs, Texas. Shannon Glaser, MBA ’10, was named vice president of franchise and concept development for the fast-growing Bombshells Restaurant & Bar chain. John Hoffmann, BA ’10, was promoted to transportation security inspector for aviation in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security/ Transportation Security Administration at Denver International Airport in July. Lyndsay Joson-Mayeux, BS ’10, and Nick Mayeux, BA ’10, welcomed a daughter, Charlotte Rose, in August. Serena (White), BA ’11, and Anthony Sigillito, BS ’11, welcomed their first baby, Lucy Anne, in January 2016. Anthony is doing research in quantum computing and finishing his dissertation for a doctorate in electrical engineering at Princeton University, and Serena is managing editor of Public Discourse, the online journal of the Witherspoon Institute. Jennifer Mackay, BS ’12, just got engaged to marry Lukasz Jarochowski in November 2017. They are buying a house in Murphy, Texas. Todd Strosnider, MBA ’12, was appointed to the Foundation for Community Association Research Think Tank in September. He is the vice president of leadership and organization development for Associa.

26 l TOWER l WINTER 2017

with a cross-country move or, along with his wife, Kathy, start his own design firm. For 30 years, FigDesign has used a blend of information, aesthetics and technology to quickly connect to clients’ potential customers and convey positive messages with few words. “I combine ideas, trends, bits of culture, etc., to solve clients’ problems visually; in this I’ve benefited from the ‘all things considered’ approach and encouragement to experiment at UD,” said Fiegenschue, a UD printmaking alumnus whose extensive design work includes UD’s Cap Bar logo and University Historian Sybil Novinski’s UD history book, 50 Years of Vision & Courage.

Fortifying the Maker Movement

Commemorating Moments

Celina Muire Farrell, BA ’11, a woodworker, explained that because of the powerful shift to sustainable, ethically produced goods, many retailers now cater to this emerging “maker” market; however, makers often find themselves unable to keep up. That’s where her Austinbased startup, Hound, comes in. “If we want to fortify the maker movement, independent makers must have adequate resources,” said Farrell. “Hound assists makers in every aspect of business ownership, improves production velocity and allows them to focus more time on their craft.” With constantly changing markets and technology, Farrell believes adaptability is the key to success — and the one-time politics major appreciates that her UD education has proven so beneficial in the real world.

Maria (Murdock) Walley, BA ’10, wanted to help people live in the moment rather than spend their kids’ birthday parties and family reunions snapping pictures with their phones. Kandid.ly, of which she is co-founder and marketing director, is an online service that connects people with photographers so they can enjoy their moments but still commemorate them. “We bridge the gap between selfie/ phone cameras and high-end professionals,” explained Walley, who studied English and art history at UD and believes that successful entrepreneurship has a lot to do with “sheer willpower.”

Designing Connections In 1986, David Fiegenschue, BA ’76, was faced with a decision: uproot his young family

FIEGENSCHUE

PHOTO COURTESY: DAVID FIEGENSCHUE

Anne Marie Streett, BA ’07, married Alex Wignall on Nov. 17.

PHOTO COURTESY: CELINA FARRELL

Edward “Ed” Hardy, BA ’07, was awarded the 2016 Gupta College of Business Tower Award.

We want to hear from other UD alumni who answer to themselves at work. Email your story to udalum@udallas.edu.

PHOTO COURTESY: MARIA WALLEY

Rebecca (Gonser) Farrer, BA ’06, is the business development manager for Dallas/Fort Worth at The Mark Travel Company. Rebecca married Omar Farrer on Feb. 5.


ALUMNINEWS

MY (NEW ORLEANS): ALUMNI CONNECT IN ‘THE BIG EASY’ From Bourbon Street to Royal Street, more than 150 UD alumni live life up in the Crescent City, the birthplace of jazz and the red-beans-and-rice capital of the South. THE WINNER: THE WORLD-RENOWNED FRENCH QUARTER OTHER HOT SPOTS CITY PARK UPTOWN

“AREAS I FREQUENT ARE UPTOWN, THE UNIVERSITY HUB WHERE TULANE UNIVERSITY AND LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS ARE LOCATED, LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN, WHERE I SET CRAB NETS AND FISH, CITY PARK, AND THE FRENCH QUARTER.” - RALPH BERGERON, BA ’77

PHOTO: NEW ORLEANS CVB

“IF YOU GET A CHANCE TO LISTEN TO SOME LIVE JAZZ MUSIC AT PRESERVATION HALL IN THE FRENCH QUARTER, DON’T MISS IT. PLUS, YOU CAN DRINK A HURRICANE FROM PAT O’BRIEN’S WHILE YOU WAIT IN LINE, IF THAT’S YOUR JAM.” - ELIZABETH LYNCH, BA ’13 “FRENCHMAN STREET! IT’S OUTSIDE THE FRENCH QUARTER AND THE CITY’S BEST SPOT FOR LIVE MUSIC.” - KATE WYMAN REUTHER, BA ’08

GOOD

“If you’re visiting New Orleans and staying downtown or in the French Quarter, I recommend taking the green streetcar all the way to Oak Street, where you’ll find several good restaurants, such as Chiba, Jacques Imo’s, Pho Bistreaux and Cowbell. These establishments don’t serve the cliché New Orleans fare.” - BURKE INGRAFFIA, MH ’99 | “In New Orleans, we don’t eat to live – we live to eat! Some of my favorite restaurants are Mandinas, which has the best shrimp po-boys in town; ACME Oyster House, if you like oysters broiled on the half-shell with andouille sausage; Gumbo Shop, which has the absolute best bowl of gumbo anywhere; and Drago’s Restaurant for some fried oysters and boudin sausage.” - RALPH BERGERON

EATS FOR UD ALUMNI

PHOTO: NEW ORLEANS CVB

MOST LIKELY TO SEE UD AT... “Sunday Mass.” - BURKE INGRAFFIA

CAFE DU MONDE “While not a locals-only restaurant, it’s a sin to pass up beignets at the Cafe du Monde in the French Quarter or at the Morning Call in City Park. I also love Angelo Brocato’s, where New Orleanians go for their gelato, espresso, cannoli and spumoni.” - ELIZABETH LYNCH

“I would probably run into a UD alumnus at Sunday Mass at the Cathedral or St. Patrick’s Church, or at one of our awesome craft breweries, like NOLA Brewing, Second Line Brewery or 40 Arpent.” - THERESA WATSON RAWICKI “I own a little shop in the Warehouse District, the Grove Street Press. I have been incredibly touched by the number of UD alumni who have visited my shop!” - KATE WYMAN REUTHER

GETTING INVOLVED WITH NEW ORLEANS-AREA UD ALUMNI “New Orleans has a lot of parties. One thing I miss about UD is the continual intellectual stimulation. New Orleans could use a few doses of that.” - BURKE INGRAFFIA

“There are so many amazing clubs and events organized by alumni in the area, like Catholic Book Club.” - THERESA WATSON RAWICKI, BA ’13 Ensure that you’re invited to UD events held in New Orleans. Keep your contact information, including email addresses, up to date by visiting alumni.udallas.edu.

NEXT FEATURED CITY: SAN DIEGO The next issue of Tower will feature San Diego. If you live in the San Diego area, email udalum@ udallas.edu for details on how you can share your favorite off-the-beaten-track restaurants, hangout spots and tourist attractions; the most common places to run into UD alumni; and the best ways to get involved with other local alumni. WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 27


ALUMNINEWS Dana Thompson, BA ’12, and Gregory Schneid, BA ’10, were married on June 4. Nicole (Villalobos), BS ’13, and Andy Dickson, BA ’13, welcomed their first baby, Joanne Marie, in June. Kristina Domazetoska, MBA ’13, founded the nonprofit Mentor2Empower, aiming to reduce youth unemployment in Macedonia. Doug Tooke, MPM ’13, received the Diocesan National Catholic Youth Ministry Award from the National Conference on Catholic Youth Ministry for making a significant contribution in youth ministry on a diocesan level and serving as an outstanding model of service to others in youth ministry. Doug works with the Diocese of Helena, Montana, serving as a “keeper of the vision” for comprehensive youth ministry. Patrick Archer, BA ’14, was recognized by the Arizona Society of CPAs for receiving the ninth-highest CPA score in the state, with an average of 89.5 on all four parts. Sherry (Flores) Daniel, MBA ’14, was named communications manager for Nice World, USA.

RETURNING TO COACH A NEW GENERATION

“To be able to come back and coach current studentathletes, helping them through the same things I went through, means a lot and is a responsibility I don’t take lightly,” said Assistant Baseball Coach Michael Schweiss, BA ’12. Schweiss, who pitched for the UD baseball team from 2009-12 as a four-year letter winner and the program’s all-time leader for saves (nine), was a volunteer coach at UD for two seasons before officially joining the staff this year. After earning his B.A. in economics and finance, Schweiss signed with the Normal Cornbelters out of Normal, Illinois, pitching four summers (2013-16) and logging a 25-23 record, 4.03 ERA, 71 appearances (61 starts),

375 innings and 330 strikeouts. In 2016, the Colorado native was named to the West Division All-Star Game. During off-seasons, he worked for the Dallas Independent School District building databases. “UD has played such a huge role in my life,” said Schweiss. “I’m looking forward to this next phase and am thankful that UD has given me the opportunity to be a full-time coach.”

Colleen (Slattery), BA ’15, and Joe Beatty, BA ’14, welcomed their firstborn son, Finnian Joseph, in October. Vallery (Bergez) and Joseph Hrbacek, both BA ’14, were married Nov. 26.

Taylor Hampton, MBA ’15, was named one of D Magazine’s “Best Mortgage Professionals” for the second year in a row. Kathleen Ramirez, BA ’15, was elected as the chair of programs and social media chair for the Texas Visual Arts Association in Dallas for 2017. She was selected for these positions particularly because of her past experience in gallery work/curatorial projects in the UD Art Department and for her social media work for various clubs and organizations.

As a student-athlete, Michael Schweiss was named to the NCAA Division III Baseball First Team in 2010 and 2011.

Michael Hoff, BS ’15, graduated early from the University of California, Los Angeles, with an M.S. in electrical engineering.

HONOR EXCELLENCE

Michelle DeRoche, BA ’15, graduated from the University of Notre Dame with a master’s in accounting in May.

In need of prayer? If you or someone you love is in need of prayer, let the alumni community pray for you. Prayer requests can be submitted at alumni.udallas.edu/letuspray.

Keep in touch... Submit your class note at alumni.udallas.edu or by email to udalum@udallas.edu.

LYNCH

HAGGERTY BARKER

NELSON

FLAHERTY

Honor our 2017 Gupta Hall of Fame inductees by attending the awards dinner on Friday, Jan. 27. For tickets or more information, visit udallas.edu/halloffame.

MY EDUCATION AT UD INSPIRED AND TRANSFORMED ME IN WAYS UNIMAGINABLE, THANKS TO THE GENEROSITY OF DONORS WHO MADE MY SCHOLARSHIP AID POSSIBLE.

AS AN ALUMNUS, IT IS BOTH MY RESPONSIBILITY AND A DEEP PRIVILEGE TO BE ABLE TO GIVE BACK TO UD, SO THAT CURRENT AND FUTURE GENERATIONS MAY SHARE IN THE RICHES OF UD’S CORE CURRICULUM AND HER OUTSTANDING FACULTY.”

–Join Associate Provost and Associate Professor of Theology John Norris, BA ’84, as a member of Crusaders to the Core by giving to the university in consecutive years. Give at udallas.edu/donate. 28 l TOWER l WINTER 2017

PHOTO: UD SPORTS INFORMATION

Selena (Puente) and Killian Beeler, both BA ’15, welcomed their firstborn daughter, Stella Rose, in September.


ALUMNI KARLA (MAY) & MARTIN WARBORG

FINALWORD A CRUSADER SPIRIT

1956

As we learned of the need to replace Carpenter Hall with a new student services and administration building, we began to reflect on what UD was like when we arrived over 50 years ago. The girl from North Texas and the boy from Iowa arrived just as the first graduating class was stepping out into the world with enhanced faith and a Crusader spirit.

PHOTOS: UD ARCHIVES

1985

PHOTO: JEFF MCWHORTER

2014

We were there during the addition of the third boys’ and girls’ dorms, the cafeteria, and the library. Plywood walkways were replaced by concrete. The Art Department moved into the original cafeteria. We were there for the first Groundhog Day celebration, the death of President Kennedy and the birth of the MBA program. From the very beginning, there has been an ongoing flux of change to better facilitate the space needed for administration, faculty and students. The Braniff Memorial Tower, additional housing, parking, the Rome campus, the Core curriculum, athletics programs, the graduate schools and the Neuhoff School of Ministry are all positive changes. What hasn’t changed is the excellent quality of education that is offered. Our UD years prepared us to understand and benefit from a good education. With business, finance and education as our degreed fields, we became part of mobile corporate society. Being transferred around the United States provided our family

experiences and friendships for a lifetime. After retirement, we returned to the Dallas area, where we can visit UD, be proud of the traditions and see the transformations that have taken place. We give our thanks to those who had the UD vision, those who supported it, those who built it and those who continue to make it one of the best Catholic liberal arts schools in the country. Planning for the future of UD requires support. We are proud to be counted among the Golden Crusaders. Karla (May) Warborg, BA ’65, native of Denison, Texas, and Martin Warborg, BA ’64 MBA ’70, native of Iowa, were married by Fr. Damian Fandal, O.P., who was then UD’s dean of students. She worked in the UD Registrar’s Office before starting a teaching career. After 38 years of service and living in five states, Martin retired as general manager and CEO of Lafarge Dakota. The couple now lives in Lucas, Texas; they are members of St. Anthony Parish in Wylie. With eight children and 10 grandchildren, both are deeply involved with family and in church and community volunteer work. WINTER 2017 l TOWER l 29


Office of Advancement 1845 E Northgate Drive Irving TX 75062-4736

GROUNDHOG NOSTALGIA In the not-so-distant past — 2015, in fact — this was the scene as determined partygoers trudged their way home through three inches of mud at the end of another unforgettable Groundhog Party in the Park. This year promises to be much less treacherous, as Party in the Park will take place on Madonna Hall Field.

PHOTO: JUSTIN SCHWARTZ

With that in mind, please join us for the 53rd annual Groundhog party from 8 p.m. until midnight on Saturday, Feb. 4. Look for the new alumni tent. Official Groundhog sweatshirts may be purchased at udallas.edu/groundhog.

Profile for University of Dallas

Tower Magazine | Winter 2017  

Tower Magazine | Winter 2017  

Profile for udallas