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TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE FREE BUS ZONE... SEE LIFESTYLE PAGE 6 WHILE IT’S STILL FREE VOLUME 47, ISSUE 5

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013

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Petascale Computer Receives $12 Million The ERC Supercomputer Center will begin work on a new petascale model named Comet this year. BY aleksandra konstantinovic

associate NEWS  EDITOR The San Diego Supercomputer Center at Eleanor Roosevelt College in UCSD received a $12 million grant from the National Science Foundation to begin working with a new petascale supercomputer named Comet. A petascale computer system is capable of performing over one petaflop, or one quadrillion operations per second. At peak performance, Comet can perform at two quadrillion operations a second. High-performance computing is a staple of scientific research in the fields of physics and astronomy, according to a UC newsroom release. According to SDSC Director Michael Norman, who serves as the project’s principal investigator, Comet will provide the same depth of research to other fields. “Comet is all about computing for the 99 percent,” Norman said. “As the world’s first virtualized HPC cluster, it is designed to deliver a significantly increased level of computing capacity and customizability to support dataenabled science and engineering at the campus, regional and national levels and in turn support the entire science and engineering enterprise, including education as well as research.” Comet is built as a Dell-based computer cluster on Intel Xeon processors. It features 1.5 terabytes of memory and NVIDIA graphics processing units. The computer serves as a successor to the Center’s previous computer cluster, Trestles. SDSC Deputy Director Richard Moore believes Comet will be just as accessible as Trestles, which is retiring after four years. “Comet will have all of the features that made Trestles so popular with users but with much more capacity and ease-of-access,” Moore said. NSF grants are merit-based, awarded after review by a panel of scientists and educators. NSF receives 40,000 research proposals every year, funding about 10,000 of them. Like other government organizations, NSF has been affected by the federal government shutdown. The agency currently cannot process new applications for grants, nor respond to phone and email inquiries and has furloughed 98.5 percent of its employees. According to the shutdown procedure on the NSF website, the agency will also not be able to make any payments on existing awards until the government resumes normal operations. Comet is scheduled to begin operations in early 2015.

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ALEKSANDRA KONSTANTINOVIC

ALKONSTA@ucsd.edu

PHOTO BY JI KIM /GUARDIAN

TRANSPORTATION

A.S. President Launches Transportation Campaign Called “Keep it Moving, We Decide, Let’s Rise,” the initiative aims to inform students about ongoing transportation changes and solicit students’ involvement. BY GABRIELLA FLEISHMAN

A

.S. Council launched a new campaign to solicit more student involvement in resolving the transportation crisis at a special meeting Wednesday evening. The campaign, called “Keep it Moving, We Decide, Let’s Rise,” aims at informing students in hopes of receiving as much student input as possible to instate a democratic decisionmaking process for transportation services. Transportation and Parking Services says it has experienced a $2.2 million deficit since

contributing WRITER

the introduction of the free UCSD Bus Zone program in 2006. Students do not pay for bus or shuttle services, but TPS is charged $1.16 for each student that rides the MTS buses. Because revenue only comes from parking permits, parking citations and parking meters, both council and administration have searched for ways to increase revenue.At Wednesday’s meeting, council heard suggestions from the Transportation Task Force, including the possibility of consolidating Arriba and Nobel into

a single route and reducing Campus Loop to run in only one direction. The administration proposed to charge $10 per month for free Bus Zone stickers and a 10- to 15-percent parking rate increase. Council has taken many steps to make UCSD a more bike-friendly campus, an issue that is relevant to many students. Projects that are en route to being actualized include painting bike lanes as well as creating bypasses on Library Walk and on unsafe hills, See COUNCIL, page 3

ARCHITECTURE

Campus Buildings Win “Orchid” Architecture Awards The three buildings won awards last week for exemplary design, innovation and creativity. BY Mekala Neelakantan

News Editor UCSD buildings won three prizes for exemplary design and artistic innovation at last week’s San Diego Architectural Foundation “Orchids and Onions” awards. The annual ceremony, organized by the “Orchids and Onions” foun-

dation — a nonprofit organization promoting design and architecture in San Diego — consisted of a professional jury that awarded 16 “orchid” prizes for buildings with outstanding architecture and seven “onion” awards to those with haphazard and unimaginative design. UCSD’s “Fallen Star” art installment, seen as the house installed atop the Jacobs School of Engineering, received the 2013 Grand Orchid Prize. Artist Do Ho Suh created the piece in 2012 as the 18th addition to the university’s Stuart Collection. According to the jury, “Fallen Star” won the award for its creativity,

sophistication and dynamism. “Needless to say, we are thrilled with this very high honor,” UCSD Stuart Collection Director Mary Beebe said. “The idea of making a project about the idea of ‘home’ seemed especially relevant for a university, and the amazing image of Do Ho Suh’s house and the experience of entering it are truly memorable for people of all ages.” UCSD’s Galbraith Hall also won an award for interior design, following its complete renovation in May 2013 by architects Kevin deFreitas and Manish Desai. “I’m really, really proud of it, and I think it just speaks volumes about

what UCSD is trying to accomplish,” deFreitas said. “They have an established reputation for demanding from their architects and their designers and landscape artists what they expect from their academics and researchers, which is excellence.” Galbraith Hall was recognized for its use of space and color, as well as for its incorporation of old and modern designs. “The jury enjoyed Galbraith Hall’s fresh, bright, cheerful space and appreciated that the building was repurposed in such a sensitive and thoughtful way,” leaders of the See AWARDS, page 3


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NEWS

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FLEETING THOUGHTS By Irene Chiang Laira Martin

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Surgeons Perform First Robotic Procedure in San Diego BY helen hejran STAFF Â WRITER

UCSD Health System surgeons performed the first robotic gastrectomy in the San Diego area on Sept. 17. Gastrectomies are a procedure that removes part or all of the stomach of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer. Surgeons use a da Vinci surgical system — created to remove malignant tissue, operate reconstruction and extract lymph nodes for testing. “The patients who are well suited for robotic gastrectomy are people who are in early stages of the disease,� UCSD surgical oncologist Dr. Kaitlyn Kelly said. “I thought doing the procedure robotically, which is a minimally invasive way, allowed people a quicker recovery than open surgery and would be a better option for her.� Kelly performed the operation on a woman who was in the early stages of gastric cancer. During surgery, Kelly removed the lymph

nodes, and, afterward, the pathology showed that the lymph nodes did not have cancer in them. “She went home on the fifth day following surgery and began a regular diet with no problem, and she has very tiny incisions.� Kelly said. Kelly previously performed the surgery while training in New York, though robotic gastrectomies are not very common in the United States. Gastrectomies can be performed as open surgery, laparoscopic surgery or robot surgery; laparoscopic and robotic are the least invasive. In laparoscopic surgery, vision is two dimensional, as opposed to the robotic surgery, where vision is three dimensional. “I am hoping to incorporate the robot where I think it is appropriate in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers,� Kelly said.

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The UCSD Guardian is published Mondays and Thursdays during the academic year by UCSD students and for the UCSD community. Reproduction of this newspaper in any form, whether in whole or in part, without permission is strictly prohibited. Š 2013, all rights reserved. The UCSD Guardian is not responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the opinions of the UCSD Guardian, the University of California or Associated Students. The UCSD Guardian is funded by advertising. Don’t let Voncent touch you.

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AS Council New Business Appointment Sean Kennedy ASCE Festivals Coordinator Jamie Millar ASCE Festivals Coordinator Dorothy Chow ASCE Chief of Staff Alexander Goldshteyn ASCE Bear Garden Coordinator JD Laugin ASCE Special Events Coordinator Kevin Tran ASCE Special Events James Shih KDST Sound Engineer Aaron Tumamao AS Speaker

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Graham Richardson ASCE Production Coordinator Rochelle Lorkovic ARCH Advisory Committee Representative Robby Boparai Academic Senate Admission Committee Gerardo Narez Academic Senate Committee on Diversity & Equity Representative Colin King Academic Senate Committee on International Education Representative Daniel Juarez Chief of Staff for the 6MĂ„JLVM,_[LYUHS(MMHPYZ Janelle Leano Triton Tide Director

Council Proposes ASUCSD Move Transportation Commission â–ś COUNCIL, from page 1

like Peterson Hill. Proposed projects for the future are bike parking, a bike “cleanse� that would rid campus of old, abandoned bikes to make way for new bikes, theft prevention, locked bike storage and bike sharing.“We identified the problems with students, met with admin, were in agreement and made a lot of progress,� Director of Urban Development and Transportation Kyle Heiskala said. “If this project were to be implemented, it would be the best thing to happen to bikes at UCSD so far.�Another new introduction at the meeting was ASUCSD Moves, a proposed new commission to be voted

on next week that would work with the transportation advisory board. The commission would aim to give students the power to influence decisions made by TPS.“The other big issue that we, as undergrads, have had [is] that the decision-making process to get us where we’re at, so far, has not been a democratic one,� Revelle Senator Soren Nelson said. “Because we don’t pay fees into the system as a student body, we don’t have a role, and that’s something we need to change.�As a part of the push for student input, council launched a survey to better understand which transportation issues are important to students. In distributing the survey, council intends to address

these salient issues with TPS to better serve students and the community. Robert Holden, Director of Auxiliary Business Services, which oversees Transportation and Parking Services, also values open discussion with the community.“We have reached out to students, student groups and student government, and we continue to welcome ongoing input from students,� Holden said. “We are looking at viable solutions. Changes to the program are necessary, whether they are service reductions or changes to the way programs are paid for.�

readers  can  contact

GABRIELLA FLEISCHMAN

gfleisch@ucsd.edu  PHOTO BY BRIAN MONROE /GUARDIAN FILE

NEWS

Galbraith Hall Wins “Orchidâ€? Award â–ś AWARDS, from page 1

Orchids and Onions foundation said on their website. UCSD Director of Space Planning Tom Allen praised deFreitas’s design. “It far exceeded our expectations, and I think we have great admiration for our architect who was able to put together such a fantastic design,� Allen said. The Structural and NanoMaterials Engineering Building was

the last campus structure to receive an “Orchid� this year, winning for innovative architecture. “The idea behind combining the engineering and visual arts departments in one building to promote innovation and collaboration among two decidedly different subjects clearly influenced the design of this multi-dimensional and thoughtful building,� the jury said.

readers  can  contact

MEKALA NEELAKANTAN

MNEELAKA@ucsd.edu Â

Galbraith Hall won an architecture award following renovations that took place throughout 2012 and 2013.

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OPINION

CONTACT THE EDITOR

LAUREN KOA opinion@ucsdguardian.org

An iPhone App Is My Pro Bono Therapist

EDITORIALS

Funds For All

UCSD should refocus fundraising efforts toward pressing student needs alongside academic improvement.

technically speaking lauren koa lkoa@ucsd.edu

T

U

ILLUSTRATION BY LYNN HAO

CSD released its annual report of fiscal year donations last week — perhaps the last significant amounts of money we will see come into our university for a while, given the government’s current financial outlook. The 30,289 private donors who gave to UCSD this past year brought in a pretty large amount; UCSD now has a whopping $150.3 million in private support, a 15-percent increase over the previous year. But even though the donations are rolling in, money just isn’t being funneled into the right places. The question is whether or not we can do anything about it. Since these funds are from private donors kind enough to give us money in the first place, the university is obligated to use the money as the individual donors see fit — we’re not at the liberty to spend it elsewhere unless specified. This means that if a billionaire alumnus decides to gift $1 million to UCSD for the installation of a second house on top of the Jacobs School of Engineering (just in case the first one is feeling a little lonely), that’s exactly where the money will go, regardless of whether or not the university would like to see that same money go toward something different. Of course, these donors — especially those who attended UCSD — are looking out for the university’s best interests, and we are definitely grateful. However, it’s sometimes hard not to wish that those immense amounts of money would go toward some often-neglected areas that might benefit students in more tangible ways. The uni-

versity needs to allocate funds to develop a more positive undergraduate education and experience at UCSD — one that future graduates will remember and want to contribute to in the future. Chancellor Khosla commended the donors’ contributions, as he should, saying that they would strengthen the university. “Private gifts fund support for students, construct academic and medical buildings, ensure excellent patient care, fuel research, foster the arts and promise a diverse student experience,” Khosla said. However, that the aforementioned statement is not exactly true. Looking at statistics, it’s easy to see that the fields in which the donations are directed to are consistent. In the 2012–13 year, nine of the 13 largest gifts made by donors went toward the sciences. The computer science and engineering department received an unprecedented $18.5 million from a single benefactor to create new endowment chairs and lab programs, and according to a report from the UCSD News Center, half of the total private support was aimed at continuing UCSD’s research tradition. On the other hand, a mere two out of the 13 donations were specifically directed to aspects unrelated to research: $300,000 from the Triton 5K Fundraising Run was gifted toward student scholarships, and $50,000 was gifted by alumnus Karen Moraghan to support student lounge “The Zone.” It’s hard not to miss the pattern.

EDITORIAL BOARD Laira Martin EDITOR IN CHIEF

Zev Hurwitz MANAGING EDITOR

Allie Kiekhofer DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

Lauren Koa OPINION EDITOR

Kelvin Noronha ASSOCIATE OPINION EDITOR

Mekala Neelakantan NEWS EDITOR

Aleksandra Konstantinovic ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR The UCSD Guardian is published twice a week at the University of California at San Diego. Contents © 2012. Views expressed herein represent the majority vote of the editorial board and are not necessarily those of the UC Board of Regents, the ASUCSD or the members of the Guardian staff.

See FUNDS, page 5

);;TI\M8WTQ\QK[,Q[\ZIK\.ZWU.]TÅTTQVO+IUXIQOV8ZWUQ[M[ Last April, this year’s A.S. Council said goodbye to slate-dominated politics, but judging by recent activity on council, you wouldn’t guess that was the case. Now-former Associated Students Speaker John Weng’s resignation from council on Wednesday, Oct. 2 was not preceded by any formal calls for his departure; however, this signals that tempers on council are still flared. Weng said he resigned because he felt that council was “moving away from its original mission to serve the students” and that that he felt he “could no longer stay impartial.” If his accusations are valid, councilmembers need to stop fighting among themselves and move forward. Personal issues should not prevent them from enacting the campaign promises that got them elected in the first place. Weng is not the first council-

member whose differences have taken center stage at A.S. Council. His resignation follows months of speculation about the fate of Vice President of External Affairs Vanessa Garcia, who has recently been the subject of informal calls for impeachment. Garcia’s trouble with council was most recently illuminated when council released a motion for the “Resignation of Vice President External Affairs Vanessa Garcia for Failure to Perform Duties, Improper and Unethical Use of Authority, and Willful Violation of ASUCSD Rules, Regulations, and Procedures” on Oct. 2. The resolution has since been moved to “unfinished business.” While council’s official argument was that Garcia violated A.S. policy by listing Raquel Morales instead of Brianna Nelson as a legislative liaison at the UC Student Association’s

summer congress, the motivation behind the call for resignation reeks of old, slate-dominated politics. There seems to be a clear link between the council’s motion for resignation and slate partisanship. Garcia’s mistake, which did cost UCSD a vote at the summer congress, could have been intentional, a clerical error or a simple misunderstanding, but the reaction of a mostly Keep it Real-dominated A.S. Council feels extreme. Just after the election results were announced, we encouraged the elected councilmembers to let go of their slate-affiliations and learn to work together despite their initial differences. Keep it Real’s Facebook page still states that its goal is to build “councils ... that don’t necessarily have to agree on everything 100 percent, but are willing to be agreeable and

work toward concrete solutions.” But it seems like council is increasingly letting its actual agenda take the backseat in favor of battling out disagreements that are increasingly moot. Perhaps council’s bickering this year — and every other year — indicates that slate-dominated elections simply can’t translate to a council that can work together to form a cohesive agenda. Three weeks into the school year, it looks as if things may be hopefully moving forward: Andy Buselt released his Undergraduate Bike Report this week, and we’ll look forward to see what his Transportation Town Hall leads to. We know the beginning is always the hardest part, but it’s time for council to snap into gear. After all, they’ve got just 20 more weeks in office until next year’s council comes in, their own differences in tow.

his year, when I finally had the opportunity to write my own column, I was so excited I didn’t know what to do with myself. But when I opened my laptop to start writing, I got stressed thinking about what I’d even write about. So I did what comes naturally to me whenever I feel overwhelmed: I went on my iPhone and opened “Bakery Story,” one of my many games. And, voila. Anyone who knows me knows that I have been dedicated to bakery simulation games for years. Before my current go-to, “Bakery Story,” there was “Bakery Life,” which left me heartbroken when it was removed from Facebook in 2011. And while many gaming addicts lament how playing their games have ruined their lives, I’m going to tell you the exact opposite. My loyalty to these kind of games is not only due to the simple fact that they are fun, but because these games keep me sane. Like its popular cousin, “Farmville,” the premise of “Bakery Story” is simple. You bake cute simulated sugary-sweet goods, wait for them to finish cooking, serve them to in-game characters who buy them, and make money. There are extra options to decorate your bakery, fulfil some goals and objectives, save gems for mystery prize boxes or the occasional corgi statue; enough to keep you invested, but not to keep you mindlessly playing all day. There’s no pressure of an impending time limit, no responsibility to save your work before quitting. I rest assured that when I open my bakery, I’ll be greeted with the day’s earnings and gifts from neighbors, most of whom are strangers. There’s no need to post embarassing and awkward Facebook posts asking for lives to continue playing my bakery. The benefits of the game don’t even end there. My bakery fits with the routines of my day and even helps me get up in the morning. If I need to wake up at 6 a.m. but find myself getting into bed at midnight, I can just choose to bake some servings of Fruit Tart that will be ready to serve in six hours. And though I am the world’s worst morning person, I do get up to serve my food and prevent it from burning. “Bakery Story” is my dose of therapeutic relaxation at the cost of free-ninety-nine. After working all day, spending hours studying for midterms or writing another daunting paper for Making of the Modern World, I instantly feel calmer once I have the opportunity to take a break and open my bakery. Some may call this procrastination, but baking zero-calorie simulated chocolate chip cookies definitely beats consuming real comfort food calories in my book. People have told me countless times to quit playing these juvenile games, and they’ve heard me reject them with this explanation far too often. It may seem childish, but I don’t really see why I should. I don’t tell them to stop crushing candies or running through Mayan temples. But to each their own, and at least on the days that I feel crazy, I’ll have my version of therapy in the palm of my hand.


OPINION

HALCYON DAYS By Christie Yi

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Israel Looking to Grow Ties with U.S. Economy

UCSD Needs Funding To Address Current Campus Concerns ▶ FUNDS, from page 4

Although it is immensely important to maintain UCSD’s tradition of top-notch research and cutting-edge scientific discovery, the university cannot overlook the less glamorous aspects of student life. We certainly appreciate a new building now and then, but we need to refocus our fundraising drives on more pressing matters. Undergraduate education, student organizations, university centers, housing and transportation are all suffering due to the lack of financial support. Obviously, administrators are in no place to make pointed requests to these benefactors whose numbers are increasingly being made up of alumni; they must therefore begin more tar-

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geted fundraising toward these massive issues that affect students’ lives. What is disappointing about the current situation, however, is that Chancellor Khosla came to this university under the banner of fundraising. He was recognized for playing a role in major campaigns directed toward energy and engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and has done the same for UCSD’s Moores Cancer Center, the Jacobs School of Engineering and other science and technology ventures — but what we do not hear about as much is his work toward other campus-related issues, like student housing and transportation. Day in and day out, students discuss the temporary double housing situations and street-circling lines

for buses, but the status quo persists. Campus organizations languish under heavy debt, university centers struggle with securing even small referendums for maintenance and undergraduate tuition continues to cruise upward. It would be unfair to blame Chancellor Khosla and the administration for not holding fundraisers aimed at improving campus issues like housing and transportation, and it would be even more unfair to blame donors for failing to recognize these aspects of our university’s financial deficiencies. However, the fact remains that these student concerns need to be prioritized, and unless Jacobs agrees to sublet its dangling house to incoming freshmen, the action has to start now.

Dear Editor, New York City Mayor Bloomberg has awarded a spy campus contract on Roosevelt Island (plus a $100 million sweetener) to Cornell University and fellow billionaire, Irwin Jacobs. “I launched Qualcomm’s first international R&D Center in Haifa, Israel, in 1992, staffed entirely with Technion graduates and purposely located near the campus to take advantage of its great education and research,” said Irwin Jacobs. Technion graduates the year before last held 59 of 121 Israeli companies listed on the NASDAQ, and these companies held a combined market value of over $28 billion — Israeli companies headed by Technion graduates employed 85 percent of Israel’s technical workforce. Israel would have become the third largest arms exporter in the world last year behind Russia and America had not its billion-dollar deal with China for an early warning system been blocked by the Pentagon. An obvious conclusion is that Technion is an arm of the Israeli government. Intellectual property vital to our defense may be whisked out of the country. Admiral Sumner Shapiro, himself a Jew, whom Jonathan Pollard had tried to recruit as a spy or at least align with his rationale for spying (for Israel), stated that he was troubled by the support of Jewish-American organizations in New York for Pollard: “We work so hard to establish ourselves and to get where we are and to have somebody screw it up. And then to have Jewish organizations line up behind this guy and try to make him out a hero of the Jewish people, it bothers the hell out of me.” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle research has been carried out at Jacobs School of Engineering for a dozen years.

“Our challenge in San Diego is access to FAA-approved airspace for flight testing autonomous UAVs,” said Prof. John Kosmatka at the 183,000-squarefoot Structural and Materials Engineering Building. Israeli security forces are relying on technological means and developments that facilitate a continuation of the occupation of Palestine with less manpower and government support. Drones allow for the daily operation of instruments of occupation, such as checkpoints, with fewer soldiers. Israel is looking to polish its image in the United States by strengthening economic ties. Ido Aharoni, Consul General of Israel in New York, said that: When Americans think of Israel, overwhelmingly the first thing that comes to mind is the association with conflict, the fact that Israel is in dispute with its neighbors. UCSD Professor [and] Qualcomm Executive Officer Nathan Fletcher is running for Mayor of San Diego. His election is of strategic importance in terms of positioning Israel not only in America but all over the world as a bastion of creativity and innovation. How can a municipal executive cede 31 percent of an island on the border, or any amount of property, offshore, inland or elsewhere, to a foreign intelligence gatherer of scientific and technological information? — Richard Thompson Alumnus ‘83 ▶ The Guardian welcomes letters from its readers.

All letters must be addressed, and written, to the editor of the Guardian. Letters are limited to 500 words, and all letters must include the writer’s name, college and year (undergraduates), department (graduate students or professors) or city of residence (local residents). A maximum of three signatories per letter is permitted. The Guardian Editorial Board reserves the right to edit for length, accuracy, clarity and civility. The Editorial Board reserves the right to reject letters for publication. Due to the volume of mail we receive, we do not confirm receipt or publication of a letter. email: opinion@ucsdguardian.org

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Your Guide to the San Diego MTS Public transport has never offered so many opportunities. BY VINCENT PHAM LIFESTYLE EDITOR

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ith all the wonders that San Diego offers, it can feel frustratingly inaccessible for those who do not have a reliable form of transportation. Luckily, the Metropolitan Transit System runs directly to UCSD so students have the opportunity to take a weekend outing and get to see why San Diego, beyond campus, is truly a unique and exciting place to be.

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These two buses, which run from the bus stops near Gilman Parking Structure (traveling counterclockwise and clockwise, respectively), will take you in a small loop around La Jolla. Along the route is the La Jolla Village Square shopping center, which has food (California Pizza Kitchen, BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse, Sprinkles Cupcakes and more), an AMC movie theater and grocery stores (Ralphs and the beloved Trader Joe’s). If you stay on the bus past the shopping plaza, University Towne Center will be your next noteworthy destination. The recently rennovated outdoor mall has the usual assortment of fast-ish food restaurants, stores and entertainment in a compact location. Accessible from multiple bus stops around campus (the VA medical center, Revelle College), the Route 30 serves as your route to reach Downtown La Jolla and the surrounding area. En route to Downtown, be sure to stop by La Jolla Shores if you’re in the mood to hit the beach. Further along the route will lead you to many notable food stop favorites of UCSD students (George’s at the Cove, The Cottage, Cody’s and Puesto). For those who want to enjoy a more visceral experience, take a ride down to Pacific Beach, where tatto shops are as common as restaurants and bars on the packed Garnet strip — just make sure you’ll have a ride back because the MTS won’t run when you’re done. Download the app Lyft and grab a ride back with a car adorning a pink mustache.

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Accessible from the bus stops next to Gilman Parking Structure, the Route 101 is the bus to ride for Southern California locals. The 101 runs by the Solana Beach Amtrak station for those who want to go home for the weekend but can’t catch a ride. Other than going home, the 101 runs through Del Mar, Encinitas and Carlsbad — all places worth visiting for food and cultural events.

921

Accessible from the VA medical center and near Gilman Parking Structure, the 921 is the bus to take if you want to head east toward Mira Mesa. While Mira Mesa isn’t exactly well known for shopping malls and similar attractions, what it has to offer is an impressive selection of ethnic cuisine. Punjabi Tandoor (Indian), Siam Nara (Thai), Pho Ca Dao (Vietnamese) and Kebab Shop (Turkish) are all easily accessible along the 921 and will confirm Mira Mesa as a worthy place to visit when you and your friends want to try something new.

41

Accessible from the bus stops near the Gilman parking structure, one of the first stops that should be known to all UCSD students is Vallarta Express. This 24/7 fast-food Mexican establishment is a must-try for the tired, the poor and the wasted. From the 41, bus riders can also access Route 44 or Route 27 to get to Convoy Street in Kearny Mesa. This locale is a well-known center of Asian commerce, with a good supply of restaurants and specialty markets.

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Taking the 41 to the end of its line will lead students to the vast outdoor shopping mall, Fashion Valley. UTC won’t likely be sufficient to provide shoppers the most satisfying consumer experience, so take a day trip to Fashion Valley to explore countless shops and enjoy the high-quality dining experience that’s provided in the area.

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The Suite Life of a Freshman’s First Year Freshmen faux pas vincent pham vnp003@ucsd.edu

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Traveling from the VA medical center and bus stops near Gilman Parking Structure, the 150 will bring you into the heart of San Diego. A stop certainly worth taking is the one at the very end of the line at Balboa Park. Built in 1868 and a landmark of San Diego ever since, the park serves as a cultural hub for art, architecture and history. Balboa Park is also a convenient location for those who want to branch out and explore Downtown San Diego, where the Embarcadero and Gaslamp Quarter are not too far out of reach.

emember that one time when your suitemate threw up just as he walked through the front door? It happened to be on the carpet, in front of your room. You’d only assume that someone spilled water the night before, until another suitemate informed you of the aforementioned partygoer’s dignity spewed across the carpet. Or remember that other guy who found it too difficult to make it to the bathroom, so he threw up on your wall? I had noted that having a room closest to the bathroom had its few pros against its many, many cons. But most of all, no one would ever forget that guy who microwaved pizza for not three but 30 minutes. As smoke rushed out of the microwave every nook and cranny of our living space, the fire alarm blared and my suite woke up our whole building at 12 a.m. What may have possibly ruined a couple’s rustle between the sheets actually made for a pretty memorable Valentine’s Day for having spent it with 10 other guys. This all happened my freshman year and may seem like it’s bound to happen to you yet, but within my series of columns, I’ll piece together how all of this came to be. If this has all ready happened, I applaud you for getting properly intoxicated during your first-year endeavors. But if you were like me during my freshman year, it took a while to build those bonds between suitemates. It was a lot of time, a little social coaxing and the realizations that I was with these nine other guys for the whole year and that I might as well make the most of it. A thought that never struck me before was that when you first meet people — be it for seconds or a few minutes — there is always a chance that your initial connection can grow into something much more. You really hope for these rich, fruitful conversations to arise and from there, by means of actively pursuing the individual (in the non-stalker and wantto-be-friends sense) or happenstance a bond will form. These are hard to come by, but when it does happen, you’ve unknowingly created your lifelong friends. Fortunately, dorm life presents people with the groundwork for a friendship like this to form. If you’re brushing your teeth, and a suitemate walks in, talk. If you’re stopping at the market, invite the girls across the hall to tag along. If you finally decided to hit the gym, bring a buddy. Granted, you feel like you haven’t been dealt the best suitemate hand — and you might be right. But you don’t want to come to that conclusion until you have at least given them a fair chance. What turned my freshman year from good to great was that I slowly and unknowingly changed my dorm, my suite, into my home. I no longer treated that corner of the campus I lived in just as a place to sleep but as a place where I could build relationships, grow and learn. That’s where I stand as a sophomore. I surely do not want this column to act as a road map for a first year but to serve as an experienced opinion when it is needed. I say this because although my freshman experience was a mix of trial and error, great friends and a pinch of what common sense I had, there was always someone I could refer to when I needed to see out of my bubble. So here in this column, I delve back in time and recount the stories from sad to happy to absolutely unforgettable and hope that with this, freshman year becomes not just memorable but that year when you really set out to do all you ever wanted to do.


A&E

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A Change of Heart, a Change of Art

AIMING FOR HER LEVEL BEST

Between the FrameS sebastian brady sebrady@ucsd.edu

S

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, singer-songwriter Vienna Teng talks college, her heritage and her latest musical effort.

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e’ve all heard the run-of-the-mill before-they-were-famous stories that musicians like to dust off their resume of accomplishments (and downfalls). Usually, there’s the fast food chain worker tale, with million-bucks-a-week earners fondly reminiscing their days of living under minimum wage. Once in awhile, we get a slightly more interesting variant to the rags-toriches trope, like living in a car until nabbing a record deal (looking at you, Jewel). But graduating with a computer science degree at Stanford and working full-time as a software engineer before pursuing a music career is unheard of. Unless, of course, you are songstress Vienna Teng. “By the time I graduated with my degree, I knew that I was going to work at it for a while, but basically, it was a faster way of waiting tables until I [could turn music into a full-time career],� Teng — the stage name of Cynthia Yih Shih — said. For the past four years, however, her music had been put on hold. A self-professed nerd, Teng took a hiatus from music to attend graduate school in business and environmental science and sustainability at the University of Michigan in Detroit. She returned to the

BY JACQUELINE KIM

A&E  EDITOR      

studio this year to record a new album “Aims,� released Sept. 24. “Coming back to grad school is definitely a very different experience from my undergrad experience, where I have a music career already, and if I set up a web-streaming concert then there will actually be a couple hundred people who will tune in,� Teng said, whose fans recently quadrupled her Kickstarter campaign’s goal of $20,000 to fund a music video and an international tour. Earlier this summer, she kicked off her “Aims� tour in Del Mar, but almost half a decade is a long time for a musician to be away from the stage. As she arrived at an Ann Arbor venue, Teng humbly joked that she may forget how to perform some of her songs. Needless to say, there’s no doubt that her musical delivery is anything short of her potential. Aside from her famed use of a cappella and innovative live-looping (as demonstrated in her Eminem-Ben Withers medley) which are staples of her onstage performances, Teng’s latest album will introduce her newfound love for Detroit. The ode to her time in graduate school reveals an unprecedented eclectic, vibrant side to her music. “I used to call my music ‘chamber folk,’� Teng said, recalling the Dvorak-influenced sounds of her earliest records. “It

o, we’re in college. We’re broadening our horizons, as it were. The idea, I’m pretty sure, is that we’re supposed to meet people who aren’t like us, hear ideas that are new to us and basically get tossed into a big, confusing melting pot to teach us how to cope with the big, confusing thing that is life. For just a moment, reserve any judgment on whether college actually achieves any of these things and consider something much more basic. Think about how your musical tastes have changed since you arrived at school. You’ve started listening to a whole bunch of different artists and genres, probably. You might want to attribute this to your superbly refined taste, but at least part of this expansion is due to all the new music you can’t avoid hearing at college, whether it be from your hipster roommate worshipping Animal Collective, fratty DJs on Library Walk pumping out Avicii or Danny Brown screamrapping at Sun God. Even if you don’t want to, by the sheer volume and range of the music assaulting you, you’re going to leave college with a better grasp of music than you had when you got here. And that’s great. But at that same time, music is only a fraction of art as a whole. Being a good music listener is like being able to make one food dish really well: You’ll be a hit at potlucks, but during the quotidian business of eating, you’ll be stuck eating the same damn thing every day. All of which is really a long way of saying that it’s important to branch out. Right now all of us have a unique opportunity to do that. Beyond having less responsibility than you will ever have again, our city is a great place to explore different forms of art. On See CHANGE, page 8

See AIMS, page 8

    

  

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MOVIE REVIEW

"Don jon" Joseph Gordon-Levitt shines in his major motion picture debut as a screenwriter and director.

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ll he needs is his church, his car, his family, his girls and his porn — and lots of it at that. Don Jon, as many of his party friends call him, goes day and night revamping his narcissistic ego and sharpening his personal count of one-night stands in order to avoid his dissatisfaction with life. Jon Martello, Jr. (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, “500 Days of Summer”), a bratty stud, finds an unusual passion for vast amounts of pornography, downloading and streaming it on his computer or phone. His fetish becomes an obstacle when he is met with the conundrum of choosing porn over a long-term relationship — even as he falls in love with

Barbara, (Scarlett Johansson, “The Avengers”), who attempts to set him straight. Yet Jon’s life turns upside down when his newfound love Barbara catches him masturbating to porn after having sex with her for the first time. Barbara, with her unrealistic perception of love based on stereotypical romantic comedies, finds that Jon’s interest in porn falls short of anything promising. Needless to say, the lovers’ conflicting desires end up push-

"Old" by danny brown

▶ AIMS, from page 7

Release Date Oct. 8

Danny Brown creates an insidiously dark party record that is catchy, electrifying and tortured all at once.

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greaser hair, the less-than-classy ItaloAmerican accent and the Snookilooking outfits can be hit-or-miss for this film, but its strong meaning acknowledges Gordon-Levitt’s writing and directing debut as above par. The film succeeds with a brilliant cast, outstanding acting and a mind-bending storyline. “Don Jon” dares to speak of obsession, addiction and compulsion, and illustrates how the elements that drive and define our lives can impede nor-

mal, productive behavior. The film illuminates this view by submerging the audience in a tunnel vision of emotions. The characters’ personalities enhance the viewer’s connection to the film with sadness, hatred and pain. Nonetheless, the film does a great job in subduing the darker aspects of the morality of pornography, non-monogamous relationships and sexual objectification of women with an unorthodox style of acting that makes “Don Jon” a forthcoming cinematic beauty. “Don Jon” confronts pornography as a medium by putting it in the context — and in the way — of love. Porn surfaces as an escape from any meaningful physical interaction with a person, and love becomes a fact of fiction as a result. Two extremes — Jon’s purely erotic view of “love” and Barbara’s romanticized fairytale perspective — collide to explain that love can be whatever you make of it. All in all, “Don Jon” will be sure to spice the box office as a film for daring couples, singles and Joseph Gordon-Levitt aficionados. The film is not for the faint of heart, but it promises to prompt hordes of conversations about what love can be.

— MAnUEL FLORES

Staff Writer

From Pipe Dream to Reality: Stanford Grad Turns to Music

ALBUM REVIEW

hen Danny Brown performed at the Sun God Festival last year, his act was a sweaty clamor of bouncing beats and over-the-top lyrics. The “molly rap” infusion of trap and EDM-style production fit well with the frantic spitting from the Detroit rapper. This year, he gives us a twosided album that is at odds with itself: Brown is drowning in party mania for some tracks, but on others, he explores an understated, jaded side of himself that is associated more with his older albums. Brown battles between letting go of his “old” self and trying to enjoy his new life as a (more) accessible rapper and a notorious party monster. He described his sound in a recent Rolling Stone interview: “It’s like hiding a pill in ice cream or something. Give motherfuckers the sweets first before giving them the medicine.” This wild dichotomy makes for quite a maniacal listen. Side A presents Brown exploring his preoccupied psyche before fame and critical success jettisoned him into online success. His ‘hood in Detroit doesn’t offer many fond childhood memories: “Got rocked in his dome/ Mama picked me up and ran home” he says on “Torture,” a jarring song with a haunting vocal sample backed up against a racing snare. No matter where Danny goes, his childhood isn’t far behind. “I feel like a prisoner of war/ Reacting sporadically to what the mind absorbs.” It’s a sobering reflection that takes place just before the album’s adrenaline kicks in.

ing them away from each other. A battle between reality and fantasy drives Jon to seek his religion as an escape but ultimately turns to his family and an acquaintance Esther (Julianne Moore, “Boogie Nights”) to help him escape and wake up from his superficial lens. The film is reminiscent of a “Jersey Shore” and “Grease” abomination at first, but pushes to speak of deeper issues of sexual objectification, pornography. The slicked back

A&E

However, even the harder molly rap songs on Side B, while displaying unrelenting, thizzed out beats, hit us with lyrics that are less than carefree. “I done drunk too much I might throw up in a hotel bathroom sink,” he croaks over the grimy SKYWLKR-produced single, “Dip.” “I’m blown, I’m zooted/ Can’t believe that I’m even moving.” This hardcore imagery of his life is matched by the booming 808s throughout this side of the album, which could turn any crowd into a mosh pit. Danny’s schizoid shtick is on full display with conflicting themes of fun and horror. His music is as manic as he is, but it’s far from boring. “Old” is an enthralling project and a solid conceptual follow up to “XXX,” in which Brown gave us a glimpse of a life lived in excess. Listeners got the party and the comedown — in that order. This album accomplishes a similar feat but is even more introspective and candid, laced with drugged-out rhymes and a delivery that ranges from low-key to turned-up. It’s a musical allegory for who he is as a rapper and as a person, appealing to his underground base while creating a colorful, obscure and — at times — mind-bending album. Despite all of its gloom, however, “Old” is catchy, engaging and just plain berserk.

— brian iniguez

Staff Writer

features a lot of classical instruments, so it’s definitely more rooted in that music. With [“Aims”], I’ve been describing it more [as] ‘pop’ or ‘indie pop,’ and now I mention it there are obviously some electronic elements to it.” Although her genre crossover has proved a great contrast to her past hits, like 2002’s Baroque pop “Gravity,” Teng’s new electronica pop sounds won’t be booting out her beloved piano in favor of synthesizers anytime soon, given that her lifelong classical education in piano was what drove her to pursue a music career. “When I was in high school, I had a really great piano teacher who one day had me write down all the different dreams I had … [and] the goals and strategies for achieving them. It was … life changing. One of the things I wrote down was, ‘I want to be a performing musician, a composer.’ … By the time I got to college, I really wanted to make that happen,” Teng said. However, Teng also promises that her tour will highlight a genre switch. “The new set is so dense and complex and electronically driven,” Teng said. “[But] there will also be moments with just the piano [so the audience can] feel like they remember the kind of thing I used to do.”

For years, Teng’s aspirations seemed like a pipe dream at the time to skeptics, including her Taiwanese parents. “It was a cultural struggle for them, because they were like, ‘Well, we don’t know artists and entertainers,’” Teng said. “It’s taken some time for me to introduce them to the idea that creative people aren’t all crazy, and they’re not all people who are oblivious to financial reality.” Though her family’s discouragement didn’t deter their daughter from the path of a music career, Teng also attributes her personal interests as well as the content of her signature literate lyrics to her parents’ influence. “I think that it’s important to my parents that their kids be intellectual in some way and to present themselves as intelligent, empathetic human beings,” Teng said. “So I think that it does come across in my music that they instilled that in me. It is something that I genuinely want to communicate: […] there’s also something really important to look at in the wider world and to be involved in where humanity is going and to figure out what my place is in it.” Certainly the sort of intellectual discourse that Teng strives to achieve in her songs branched into all aspects of the making of “Aims,” including her decision to use a map depicting population changes in Detroit — her home

during her musical hiatus — for the album’s cover art. “When I look at that map, … there was the notion that that map looks like so many other things, [such as depicting] some people who are really trying to work together across Democrat-Republican lines,” Teng said. “Also that map [made me think] this accounts for a lot of things that are going on in the world right now. You can look and first [think], ‘Wow, there’s a lot of bad stuff going on.’ It can seem like [the people of Detroit] should just give up. On the other hand, you can look closer and say, ‘You know, people are really fighting their way to stay on top of [it].’” Indeed, this describes her message in “Aims” in a nutshell. Teng sings in her latest single “Level Up,” “Begin again/ Dynamite the dam on the flow/ … / Lord, we are all cinders/ From a fire burning long ago/ But here it is the knock knock knock of your own heart that matters.” The Renaissance woman’s novel approach to music and her vision to shape the world into a better place makes her a standout — not to mention that she may be the only musician who knows how to use “sustainability” in a sentence several times coherently.

readers can  contact JGK002@ucsd.edu  

Confusion and Disturbance Needed for Artistic Understanding ▶ CHANGE, from page 7

campus, we have the free University Art Gallery, just past Sun God Lawn, and the La Jolla Playhouse, a theater started by Gregory Peck. (Not sure who he is? Check out his Oscar-winning performance in “To Kill A Mockingbird!”) A few minutes away, there’s the La Jolla branch of the Museum of Contemporary Art, where you can get in with nothing but your student ID. That same ID will get you into the main museum branch in downtown San Diego for free, too. These museums rotate through must-see installations from world-famous artists; for example, “Lifelike,” an exhibit featured at the La Jolla branch this spring, brought in works from Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei. The San Diego Symphony (OK, I know I just said to move beyond music, but let’s face it: Radiohead and Rachmaninoff are not the same) has student ticket prices for a ridiculous $10 for most concerts. And these are just a cou-

ple of the more accessible options for students. But one of the reasons not everyone takes advantage of these opportunities is that the artistic experience you get in these places is, frankly, harder than what we’re used to. In most popular music, lyrics are in standard English. The instruments are much the same. The musical structure rarely varies. The uniformity of it all is comforting, and whatever message is contained within the song is impossible to miss. In a contemporary art museum, though, things get trickier. It’s harder to “get it.” I’ve spent a lot (or really, all) of my visits to museums feeling like I’m on the outside of some sophisticated, beautiful inside joke. I doubt that I’m alone, and I bet that’s a big reason why people get turned off by “high art.” That feeling is disconcerting. It’s even downright disturbing. But that’s kind of the point. Somebody once said, “Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb

the comfortable.” While that seems a bit dramatic for this conversation, it’s still relevant. The whole reason behind art, in many ways, is not to make us feel better about our cushy situations; it’s to make us feel uncomfortable in them. And while this has implications for the actual content of artwork, it also means that it can’t just beat us over the head with its meaning or significance. To fulfill its purpose and help us fulfill ours, art sometimes needs to confuse us. Simply because the art we encounter outside of popular music and television is so foreign to us, it will do exactly that. That’s good. So to wrap up the pedantry, don’t let the remarkable opportunity of being a college student in a city full of accessible artistic life go to waste. Walk around a photography exhibit with the requisite crossed arms and furrowed brow. Go see some abstract paintings and nod knowingly at them, even if you’re lost. You’ll probably be confused. Embrace it. Do it enough, and maybe, hopefully, you’ll even be disturbed.


LIFESTYLE SITE SEEN

RESTAURANT REVIEW

Beer, Babes and Brats: Oktoberfest in San Diego

fat sal's deli

BY vincent pham

T

lifestyle editor

oss on your dirndl, crank up that Schlager and Prost — it’s Oktoberfest! Although the traditional celebration of Oktoberfest (or “die Wies’n,” to the European originators) ended with the first weekend of October, San Diego is keeping the beer flowing and the party going with another weekend of the annual celebration. Ocean Beach will hold its two-day celebration on Friday, Oct. 11 from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 12 from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Located right beside the coast and along the pier, the festival will feature cash prize-based events like a battle of the bands ($3,000) and the even bigger Sausage Toss ($10,000), where you really just throw a sausage in a tub. Ocean Beach will also hold its second annual Brat Trot Beach Run — the proceeds will go toward funding local sports programs.

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Coinciding with the Ocean Beach event is St. Elizabeth’s Annual Oktoberfest in Julian on Saturday, Oct. 12 and Sunday, Oct. 13 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (2033 Main St., Julian). If the long drive doesn’t scare away visitors, all who attend will enjoy the quaintness of Julian itself. And while you’re there, check out its annual Apple Celebration (Sept. 1 to Oct. 15), which is a town-wide event of all things apple related. As fall quarter picks up, take your chance now and go out one last time for a weekend before real school commitments kick in. And if you’re a real beer connoisseur, think of these as pregames to the much bigger San Diegocentric event — San Diego Beer Week (Nov. 1 to Nov. 10). So grab a friend and a pint, and get yourselves in gear for the best autumn of your college career.

readers can  contact

vincent pham

vnp003@ucsd.edu

Hours Monday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location 956 Garnet Ave., San Diego, CA 92109 Recommended Fat Jerry BY shelby newallis

Editorial Assistant

F

at Sal’s is Pacific Beach’s own New York-style deli, co-owned by Joshua Stone, Salvatore “Fat Sal” Capek and Jerry Ferrara (most famous for playing “Turtle” in HBO’s “Entourage”). Open every day from 11 a.m. to 3 a.m., Fat Sal’s is the place to go to refuel after a long day of biking, working or at 2 a.m. when you’ve got a severe case of the “drunchies.” As a vegetarian who tries to eat fairly healthy, I never thought a restaurant with the name “Fat” in its title would top my list of go-to eateries, but the menu does accommodate vegetarians, carnivores and health nuts alike. Fat Sal’s’ main attraction is its meat-heavy sandwiches, so I brought along my friend, Muir College sophomore Martha Gutierrez, as my onsite carnivore. Martha tried the most popular sandwich on the menu, the Fat Jerry ($8.95), which is made on extra-wide hero bread and is stuffed with cheese steak, chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, bacon, fried eggs, fries, ketchup and mayonnaise. Although the combination seemed outlandish, after a couple of bites, Martha gave it a thumbs up. I was pleasantly surprised by the vegetarian offerings: Fat Sal’s serves a veggie burger ($3.25) made in-

house with fresh veggies and grains, layered with thin slices of onion, lettuce and pickles and topped with homemade mayonnaise. The staff is very attentive, making sure we had plenty of sandwiches to try. We also tried Strawberry Sprite ($2.25) and enjoyed free refills from their infamous freestyle soda machine, which offers more than 120 different soda flavors at the press of a button. After trying an array of sandwiches, it was time for the shakes. The staff brought out four of their five Fat Shakes ($5.95). The most unique creation was the coffee ice cream shake, which had dark chocolate and pretzels crumbled on top. The strawberry milkshake — a creamy combination of strawberries, graham cracker crumbs and a whole slice of N.Y. cheesecake — is also not to be missed. The layout of the restaurant is open and modern, with a front patio that overlooks Garnet Avenue, an indoor seating area and a large, covered patio seating area lined with flat screen TVs. Two and a half blocks away from the beach and surrounded by bars, Fat Sal’s’ location is optimal for hanging out

after a day at the beach or after a long night of bar hopping in PB. With fun menu items like Pepperoni Pizza Fries ($5.95) and a soundtrack of Kendrick Lamar and Biggie Smalls, Fat Sal’s is definitely geared toward college students and young adults. Fat Sal’s is the place to go after you’ve worked up a big appetite; it is comfortable and affordable for the massive amount of food you get. Though PB may seem like a trek, it’s only a 15-minute drive from campus and there is plenty of street parking. On Monday nights there is even more of a reason to go. “We just started Monday College Night, where students with a UCSD student I.D. get a free order of fries and a soda with the purchase of a sandwich,” Stone said. The craftsmanship that goes into each item, the care from the staff and the over the top menu gives the place a fun environment and provides an eating experience you can’t get from your average sandwich shop.

readers can  contact

Shelby Newallis

Snewallis@ucsd.edu


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MEN'S GOLF

Golf Places Eighth at Chico Invite

The Tritons participated under the direction of new head coach Jim Ragan. BY brandon yu contributing writer

The UCSD men’s golf team finished in eighth place at the Wildcat Classic Tournament season opener this Monday, Oct. 7, in Corning, Calif., with sophomore Clayton Yamaguchi leading the way for the Tritons. The 15-team tournament included host school and tournament champion Chico State, which shot a 5 under 571, the only school that finished below par. Chico State senior Ricky Owaki led the Wildcats, winning the individual title with a seven under par, three strokes ahead of Cal State Stanislaus’ Anthony Manguray. The defending champions Cal State Stanislaus finished second, coming eight strokes behind the Wildcats. Other notable conference opponents included Cal State East Bay and Cal State San Bernardino, which finished third and 11th, respectively. The Tritons were in eighth place at the end of day one, hitting 31 over par for a total score of 607 on the par-72, 6,917-yard course. Yamaguchi, UCSD’s top finisher, tied for seventh place out of a field of 81. After a 5-over 77 in the first round, Yamaguchi bounced back to hit a respectable 5 under 67 in the

second round, hitting a birdie on the fifteenth hole and missing the tournament record by only one stroke. “My eagle on [the 15th hole] was probably the highlight of the tournament for me,” Yamaguchi said. “I hit a great drive down the middle of the fairway and had 224 yards left … I hit a great hybrid onto the green about 25 feet away from the hole. At that point in the round, my putting had really clicked in and I was confident.” Fellow Tritons who also competed include sophomore Daniel Yang finishing 34th overall, senior Jacob Williams placing 40th, senior Lewis Simon, who tied for 57th and junior Jay Lim, who ended up 62nd. Making his Triton debut was first year head coach Jim Ragan, who had arrived to the La Jolla campus only a week ago. “I really enjoyed seeing our guys compete today for the first time,” Ragan — former head coach at the University of Oklahoma, the University of Texas and Vanderbilt University — said to the UCSD Athletics Department. “We had a couple of bright spots, including Clayton’s 67 in the second round and Jacob (Williams) shooting a 29 on the front nine in round one. On the other

hand, we lost a lot of shots out there and hopefully we can settle down to post a strong team score tomorrow.” Yamaguchi said that even though the team has had only limited time with its new coach, Ragan was still able to prepare the players mentally for the tournament. “Coach hasn’t really prepared us for a tournament as he normally would given the situation,” Yamaguchi said. “He has mostly prepared us by creating a clear mindset for us. This mindset helps us to develop clarity and allows us to really just go out there and play our best.” Extremely windy conditions forced the tournament to end early, preventing the Tritons from completing the second half of the tournament. The team ended up tying for eighth with Northwest Nazarene University. “It’s disappointing that the final round was cancelled, because I believed that my team and I could have used it to move up the leaderboard,” Yamaguchi said. “But the winds were pretty gusty, and the course was not set up correctly for the conditions. Once the winds started blowing balls off the greens,

PHOTO COURTESY UCSD ATHLETICS

the course really became unfair and unplayable.” The team looks to rebound next week as it travels to Santa Rosa Golf and Country Club for the Sonoma State Invitational which will be held on Oct. 14 and Oct. 15. “I think this past week was a good time for preparations for next

week’s tournament,” Yamaguchi said. “All of us have our own individual things to work on in order to improve for next week, and with Coach helping to provide clarity for us, we expect to play much better.”

readers can  contact brandon yu

b2yu@ucsd.edu

Tritons Return Home to Face San Bernardino and Chico State, Second Half of the Season Begins ▶ SOCCER, from page 12

hasn’t let a goal slip by since mid-September and the strength of a veteran attack — the Tritons took the 2–0 win against Cal State East Bay. In the 27th minute, Bauman — an offenseminded winger and a nice new addition in Pascale’s starting 11 — found junior transfer Alessandro Canale in

the 16-yard box. From 10 yards out, Canale put away his fourth goal of the season in just seven appearances. Barely a minute later, Bauman worked his way down the sideline and crossed a ball to senior defender Alec Arsht — named the CCAA Player of the Week — who found the back of the net. “The one thing that I thought

we did well with this weekend was not getting complacent,” Cohen said. “We’re always staying hungry. The wins we’ve got now were hard-fought wins, and we’re not going to let up.” UCSD is now halfway through its conference schedule and is preparing to double-back on its CCAA opponents. And with eight games left in the regular season, Pascale says he hasn’t

“seen the best of [his] team yet.” “I don’t think [the second half of the season] will be too much different,” Pascale said. “Every game we’ve played has been really challenging and very much a grind-it-out kind of game. We’re a veteran team, and the guys all know that there are no days off, no easy games and no one’s just going to hand us the win.”

This weekend, the Tritons will return home to face Cal State San Bernardino (4-6-2 overall, 2–6 in the CCAA) on Friday. On Sunday, UCSD will face Chico State — just one point behind the Tritons in the conference standings.

readers can  contact RACHEL UDA

RUDa@ucsd.edu


12

T H E U C S D G U A R D I A N | T H U R S D A Y, O C T O B E R 1 0 , 2 0 1 3 | W W W . U C S D G U A R D I A N . O R G

SPORTS

UPCOMING

UCSD

CONTACT THE EDITOR

RACHEL UDA sports@ucsdguardian.org

GAMES

follow us @UCSD_sports

WATER POLO 9/11 MEN’S/WOMEN’S SOCCER 10/11 10/13 WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL 10/11 10/12

AT Cal Baptist VS CSU San Bernardino VS Chico State VS CSU East Bay VS CSU Monterey Bay

MEN'S SOCCER

Six Straight With six wins in a row, the UCSD men’s soccer team is now ranked No. 6 in the country and first in conference. BY RACHEL UDA SPORTS EDITOR

F

PHOTO

BY N O L AN

THOMAS

/GUARD

IAN FILE

away a goal on a ball played from junior midfielder Brandon Bauman. The Tritons followed up with a goal from senior midfielder Andisheh Bagheri early in the second half to seal the win. “We played a really solid game against Stanislaus,” UCSD senior goalkeeper Josh Cohen said. “We had a lot of opp or tunit ies to score, and Stanislaus d i d n’ t really put too many chances together. We played our style and put together a good performance.” In similar fashion — relying on a defense that

or a team that hasn’t qualified for the conference tournament in eight seasons, the Tritons now find themselves in unfamiliar territory — ranked No. 6 nationally and sitting in first place in the California Collegiate Athletics Association standings. With last weekend’s pair of shutout wins against Cal State Stanislaus and Cal State East Bay, the Tritons improve to 8-1-1 overall and 6-1-1 in the CCAA. “It was not an easy road trip, facing both the defending conference tournament champions and an East Bay team that’s been hot,” UCSD head coach Jon Pascale said. “We’ve had problems playing [at Stanislaus] in the past, and I thought the guys did a great job and did what we needed to do.” On Friday, the Tritons topped last season’s CCAA tournament champions Stanislaus 2–0. In the 22nd minute, senior midfielder Cory Wolfrom tucked

See SOCCER, page 11

Conference GP

PTS Records Win %

UCSD

8

19

6-1-1

CHICO STATE

8

18

cAL STATE L.A.

8

cal state dominguez hills

Overall GF

GA

GP

0.812

10

2

10

8-1-1

6-2

0.750

12

6

10

17

5-1-2

0.750

10

5

8

14

4-2-2

0.625

17

cal poly pamona

8

11

3-3-2

0.500

cal state san bernardino

8

6

2-6

0.250

Records Win %

GF

GA

0.850

15

3

8-1-1

won  6

8-2

0.800

15

6

8-2

won  3

10

7-1-2

0.800

19

6

7-1-2

won  1

9

10

5-2-2

0.700

22

9

5-2-2

WON  1

11

8

10

5-3-2

0.600

18

9

5-3-2

LoST  1

4

10

12

4-6-2

0.417

10

10

3-4-1

Lost 6

Last 10 Streak

MEN'S TENNIS

PHOTO BY NOLAN THOMAS /GUARDIAN FILE

Tritons Face Tough Competition at SDSU Men’s tennis fell at the San Diego State Invitational. BY DANIEL SUNG CONTRIBUTING writer

In the second week of preseason action, the UCSD men’s tennis team began October with eight lost singles matches at the Aztec Invitational at San Diego State University, facing tough competition against a slew of Division-I teams — including the University of Arizona, Grand Canyon University, Loyola Marymount University, the University of the Pacific, SDSU, UC Irvine, UCLA and USC. As a young team at the start of a new season, the Tritons seemed overwhelmed, with eight losses during the first two flights of tournament play alone. UCSD head coach Timmer Willing felt unsatisfied with his team’s overall performance. “I think it was pretty average,” Willing told The Guardian. “We have a lot of work to do. Of a total of 16 singles matches, the Tritons won only three. Not until their 10th singles match did the Tritons find victory with senior Maxence Dutreix’s win against Grand Canyon’s Rafael Lira with scores of 7–6, 0–6,

10–8. However, Dutreix lost his subsequent match 6–3, 6–4 against UCLA’s Michael Guzman. Junior Guy Giubilato also earned the Tritons a win against Grand Canyon’s Jacob Spizman, dominating the match with scores of 6–2, 6–0. UCSD’s third win meant little, as it came from junior Andrew Malozsak’s match against fellow Triton teammate and junior Kona Luu. Malozsak won with commanding scores of 6–3, 6–2. “I think there’s some glaring weaknesses we need to focus on,” Willing said. In the doubles bracket, Malozsak paired up with senior Devin Sousa for the first time. Together, the duo had a standout performance on an otherwise lackluster weekend, upsetting Grand Canyon’s Meidy Chazeau and Jacob Spizman with a convincing score of 8–1 in the doubles round of 32. “I thought me [sic] and Malozsak played pretty well considering it was our first time playing together in a match,” Sousa said. “We worked well together.” Other than one singles match last

February, this weekend was Malozsak’s first opportunity at any collegiate action. Willing said he was surprised by the Sousa-Malozsak performance but glad to see the result. But the pair was eliminated in their round of 16 contest, losing to Arizona’s Fredrik Ask and Naoki Takeda with a score of 8–4. Malozsak and Sousa’s round of 32 victory was UCSD’s only doubles win out of five matches. “The beginning of the preseason is tough with our first tournaments,”

Sousa said. “The competition has proven to be a little bit tougher than previous years.” This early in the season, Sousa said they have yet to determine their final pairings and lineups, but the Tritons certainly hope to work out the kinks early on. “Our goal is to return to the NCAAs, and I think that is attainable with this group. But it is up to us,” Willing said. “If we can work out some of the details and kinks we had in the offseason and be ready at

the start of the season, we can control our situation.” The Tritons will head to Santa Barbara this coming weekend to take part in the UCSB classic starting Friday. The team, however, will be without Sousa — out with an injured groin — and sophomore Ganesh Alagappan — sidelined with a bad back — for the tournament.

readers can  contact DANIEL SUNG

DSUNG@ucsd.edu

101013  

VOL 47, ISSUE 5 Thursday, Oct. 9, 2011

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