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VOLUME LXXV., ISSUE I

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THURSDAY, september 22, 2011

UC BUdget

Tuition Increases by 10 Percent, May Rise Again Next Year University of California tuition may increase by as much as 16 percent by 2016.

by as much as 16 percent by the next academic year. The UC Board of Regents met Sept. 15 at UC San Francisco to discuss methods of compensating for a projected systemwide budget deficit of $2.5 billion by 2015. Depending on the amount of state funding, students could be paying anywhere from an eight to 16 percent fee increase yearly. According to Executive Vice President of Business Operations Nathan Brostrom and Vice President of Budget and Capital Resources Patrick Lenz, there are three proposed methods for raising revenue. The Regents favors a 50-50

By Rebecca Horwitz Associate News Editor The University of California Board of Regents has raised in-state tuition by 9.6 percent and an additional increase of 16 percent by the 2015-16 school year is now being discussed. University of California tuition could increase

People

split in which students would pay an eight percent fee increase, with the state funding the remaining eight percent. A second option has students paying 12 percent of the increase while the state pays four percent. The final scenario would require tuition to increase by 16 percent each year until 2016. “This scenario that we’re looking at is not what we want,” Sherry Lansing, UC Board of Regents Chairman, said in Bloomberg Businessweek. “There’s not a person around this table that wants to increase tuition. We’ve done enough.”

Under the last scenario, undergraduate tuition for California residents would rise to $22,068 from the current $12,192 by the 201516 academic year, if state funding for the UC system does not increase, according to the UC Board of Regents. UC Office of the President Spokesperson Ricardo Vasquez said that the Regents has not made any concrete decisions. “It’s not even a proposal yet,” Vasquez said. “It’s just a discussion. The idea was to create See Tuition, page 3

PROTESTS

Student Dies Due to Heart Complications Professor to work toward establishing scholarship in her memory. By Margaret Yau Managing Editor Cristina Torres, a Warren College senior, died Sunday, Aug. 21 due to medical complications relating to a pre-existing heart condition. She was 23. “[Cristina] was a very lively person — she would brighten up the room,” Torres’ sorority sister Kim Garcia said. Literature professor Jorge Mariscal is hoping to create a CRISTINA Torres scholarship in Torres’ name, to be given each year to a promising Latina undergraduate student. The scholarship is being planned. “[Cristina] was always inquisitive and eager to learn. I know that, given more time, she would have become a fierce defender of the Latino community,” Mariscal said in an email. Torres was pursuing a double major in Spanish literature and political science, with plans of attending law school. She was also the social chair and an active member of the Sigma Pi Alpha sorority. “She was the center of attention, the life of the party,” Marisabel Salinas, Torres’ sorority sister, said. Salinas and a few of her fellow sisters plan on getting Torres’s college degree awarded to her posthumously. Torres’s family held a memorial service for her in Sun Valley on Aug. 25. Her family and sorority members also hope to have a memorial service on campus, but a date has not yet been determined. Torres is survived by her sisters Karina and Fabiola Torres, her mother Irma Torres and her father Gregorio Torres.

P hoto C ourtesy of RE ne G oldfarb - ilyashov

Students Protest

for Education in Chile

S

By Nicole Chan | Associate News Editor

tudent-led demonstrations to reform Chile’s national education system are drawing international media attention for mob violence and subsequent arrests: the BBC reported approximately 900 arrests that were made following a 60,000-strong Aug. 4 protest. Even with such staggering numbers, all 59 University of California Education Abroad Program students studying in Santiago have remained in the program and are actively attending class at this time, according to UCEAP communications representative Emilia Doerr. Despite EAP administration’s warning to avoid protests as a safety precaution, some EAP students have even chosen to participate in alongside local students. Recent protests interfered with Muir College senior Megan Young’s studies at the public university, la Universidad de Chile. Young was required to transfer to the private university Pontificia Universidad Católica — also located in capital city Santiago — for her second semester abroad. Young, one of six UCSD students in Chile, describes her experience as witnessing history in the making.

Although Young resides in an apartment in central Santiago where the protests are largely concentrated, she said she has never felt unsafe. “The protests have never affected me in a negative way, nor have I ever felt like my life was at risk because of the protests,” Young said. “I’ve gone to a few in June and one just this morning.” BIG Chilean students are protesting the PICTURE privatization of education in the form of See more marches, hunger strikes and tomas, a Spanish pictures term that refers to students occupying a from Chile university building so that the administration on PAGE 11. is unable to function as normal, Young said in an email. Tomas are different from sit-ins in that they can last for indeterminate periods of time, sometimes lasting for months until the protesters’ demands are met. The protests — which originated in May — started See PROTEST, page 11

Readers can contact Margaret Yau at m1yau@ ucsd.edu.

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2011


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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

BIRDLAND By Rebekah Dyer Angela Chen

Editor in Chief

Arielle Sallai Margaret Yau

Managing Editors

Laira Martin Nicole Chan Rebecca Horwitz Margaret Yau Madeline Mann Rachel Uda Mina Nilchian Ren Ebel

News Editor Associate News Editors Opinion Editor Associate Opinion Editor Sports Editor Associate Focus/Leisure Editor Hiatus Editor

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SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Snape kills Dumbeldore. Tyler Durden isn’t real. Soylent Green is people. It may be considered a social sin to reveal spoilers such as the ones previously mentioned, but a recent study at UCSD discovered that contrary to popular belief, spoilers actually enhance one’s reading experience. UCSD department of psychology graduate student Jonathan Leavitt tested the effects of spoilers in short stories that have themes including ironic twist, mystery and evocative literary stories on UCSD students. Results show spoilers enhance readers’ enjoyment rather than detract from them. Upon entering UCSD’s graduate program with an MFA in writing fiction, Leavitt was encouraged to start this study by psychology professor Nicholas Christenfeld, who helped him develop the project. Leavitt and

Christenfeld began designing the test in September of last year — testing and analysis of the raw data took months to complete. They performed a total of three experiments with 12 different short stories by authors such as Roald Dahl and John Updike. To be a part of the study, subjects were only required to be fluent and able to read in English. Due to such simple qualifications, subjects were chosen at random. All participants received versions of the same story that were unspoiled, with a separate spoiler on another sheet of paper and a version that had a spoiler that was put in the beginning, as if it was the opening of the story. They would read all three versions and rate how much they enjoyed each one on a scale of one to ten. “We were interested in the experience of suspense and why people think that the excitement of reading a story depends on not knowing the ending, but then they reread the same

stories and can enjoy them just as much, even when everything is already known,” Leavitt said. “You’re focused on outcomes and how things will turn out, and that gives readers the impression that if they already knew how it turned out, they would find the story less or not interesting.” All story genres proved to be more enjoyable despite being spoiled. “We found very little difference,” Leavitt said. “It seemed that what was most important was that the spoiler was clear and understandable. Across different genres, it seems like spoilers were making people enjoy stories more.” The only story that did not benefit from being spoiled was Anton Chekhov’s The Bet, an ironic twist story. However, Leavitt feels that enjoyment was reduced not because it was spoiled, but because the spoiler was poorly written. Readers found the spoiler to be difficult to understand and were

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Researchers Prove Spoilers Enhance One’s Reading Experience By Michael Chang Staff Writer

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uncertain on how the story would end based on the spoiler. The rest of the data still indicates that spoilers enhance reader enjoyment. Leavitt’s next goal is to apply his theory to other narrative media and to find out why spoilers are having this particular effect. He has developed two theories to explain the trend. “One is that having a spoiler makes a story easier to read and understand,” Leavitt said. “The other theory is that people tend to focus on suspense regarding the outcome, and once you know how the story will end, it enables you to broaden your focus and appreciate the other aspects of the story, like the language and development of characters.” Readers can contact Michael Chang at mac005@ucsd.edu.

The UCSD Guardian is published Mondays and Thursdays during the academic year by UCSD students and for the UCSD community. Reproduction of this newspaper in any form, whether in whole or in part, without permission is strictly prohibited. © 2011, all rights reserved. The UCSD Guardian is not responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the opinions of the UCSD Guardian, the University of California or Associated Students. The UCSD Guardian is funded by advertising. I found it in the trash.

General Editorial: 858-534-6580 editor@ucsdguardian.org

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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

LIGHTS & SIRENS Sunday, Sept. 11 12:05 a.m.: Welfare check ▶ A 24-year-old male on the intersection of Voigt Drive and Hopkins Drive was arrested for taking mushrooms and was taken to medics, but was cleared by hospital staff. Closed by adult arrest. Monday, Sept. 12 6:10 a.m.: Grand theft ▶ Unknown suspects stole the hardtop of the victim’s convertible, worth $1,000, at Lower Muir Parking Lot. Online report. 4:46 p.m.: Citizen contact ▶ The reporter at Peterson Hall forgot which parking lot she parked her vehicle in. Information only. Tuesday, Sept. 13 5 p.m.: Grand theft ▶ Unknown suspects stole over $2,000 worth of construction tools and copper wire at the Neal Electric construction site. Report taken. Wednesday, Sept. 14 4:46 a.m.: Fire alarm ▶ The police initiated a fire watch when heat from a hot water pipe busted a gasket in RIMAC and caused water to leak from a ceiling sprinkler. Referred to other agency. 10:24 a.m.: Vandalism ▶ Unknown suspects used black marker to deface the bathroom wall in Pepper Canyon Hall, causing $25 worth of damage. Report taken. 10:49 a.m.: Citizen contact ▶ A confused female was attempting to locate her brother at the International Center. Subject released to brother. 2:27 p.m.: Burglary ▶ An unknown suspect attempted to break into an ATM machine at UNEX K. Report taken. 3:40 p.m.: Threaten crime/terrorize ▶ An unknown male in Lot 416 threatened the parking representative after he received a citation. Report taken. 10:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m.: Fraud ▶ An unknown suspect used the victim’s student ID number to obtain $2,662.10 worth of property without the victim’s knowledge at the Bookstore. Report

taken. Thursday, Sept. 15 2:08 p.m.: Disturbance ▶ Two females had a dog in noncompliance with the lifeguard kennel at the Scripps building. Referred to other agency. 2:50-3:00 p.m.: Shoplifting ▶ A 19-year-old male was caught shoplifting $175 worth of products at the Bookstore. Closed by citation, adult. Friday, Sept. 16 5:38 a.m.: Welfare check ▶ Two subjects were sleeping at Gilman Parking Structure. Field interview administered. 2:30 p.m. - 6:00 a.m.: Petty theft ▶ An unknown person(s) caused $200 worth of damage and removed a part worth $20 from a UCSD street sweeper at Spanos Athletic Training Facility. Report taken. 3:36 p.m.: Non-injury accident report ▶ A bike fell off a shuttle bus at Garnet Avenue and was run over. Report taken. 9:06 p.m.: Welfare check ▶ The reporting party at Muir Apartments was looking for a son, who was possibly playing tennis. Information only. Saturday, Sept. 17 10:06 p.m.: Medical aid ▶ A male at Muir Commons had a mild seizure but was conscious and breathing. Referred to other agency. 11:15 a.m.: Assist other agency ▶ The police were ordered to locate the spouse of an injured Deputy Sheriff at the Biomedical Library. Information only. 11:15 p.m.: Driving under the influence ▶ The police arrested a 22-year-old male for drunk driving at Lot 102. Arrest misdemeanor. Sunday, Sept. 18 11:17 p.m.: Possession of marijuana ▶ Marijuana was found under a vehicle in Lot 208 and was confiscated. Report taken. — Compiled by Sarah Kang Staff Writer

UCOP: Fee Increase Would Lead to More Enrollment in 2016 ▶ Tuition, from page 1 with what to do in respect to fees.” According to the UCOP, such a fee increase would lead to increased faculty and enrollment, as well as continued investment into expanding academic programs and facilities. However, Lansing said that this scenario was less than ideal. The percentage of the fee increase is dependent on the amount of funding the UC system receives from the state. According to Lenz and Brostom, the decline in state funding began in the 1990-91 academic year, when the UC system lost 20 percent of its financial support from the state. Currently, state support for the UC system is 10 percent higher, not adjusted for inflation, than the 199091 year, though the number of California high school graduates has increased from 68.6 percent in 1990 to 74.4 percent in 2011, spurring enrollment growth. In 2005, UC and CSU officials entered a six-year agreement with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to have the state provide the minimum resources the system would need to reaffirm the UC’s high standards for education while increasing enrollment with their main intentions dependent on institutional accountability and state funding. The agreement was meant to expire during the 201011 fiscal year but lasted only two years because of the state’s budget crisis. At the meeting, the Regents also suggested alternate methods of raising money, which include an emphasis on corporate and alumni donations, as well as seeking new tax revenues. Other alternatives include planning classes with a higher student-faculty ratio and cutting faculty salaries. These alternatives are considered as efforts that “would destroy UC’s historic commitment to quality,” the Office of the President said in a statement. The Regents was scheduled to vote on a new budget plan in November 2011, but Lansing said she was doubtful the board would be able to decide on a plan by then. Vazquez said the earliest the Regents would vote on any fee increase would be in January 2012.

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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

UC EAP Students Work With Chilean Students to Mobilize for Student Funding ▶ Protests, from page 1 and a “Thriller” reenactment. However, recent protests have furthered divisions between the police and the students. According to an Aug. 26 story published in the Guardian UK, police used tear gas and water cannons against protesters. The same story reports that a 16-year-old boy was shot in the chest during the protests. According to local media, witnesses said the police were responsible for the boy’s death. “I have participated in some of the protests and am in full support of the students,” Warren College senior Jordan Dalton said in an email. “Many Chilean political concepts have been exported from the United States and the concept of education is no different. Chilean students are extremely politically informed, especially about the United States.” Dalton — who also spent her first semester in Chile at la Universidad de Chile and is now at Pontificia Unviersidad Católica — sees the protests as a way for students to demand better funding for schools, debt reduction for former students and an increase in transparency in the government. While Chilean students are organizing and mobilizing largely online with social media, Dalton said the campus remains an important location for debates and discussions. “A paro [an unauthorized strike] doesn’t mean the students don’t go to school,” Dalton said. “In a well-run paro the students are at the university discussing ideas for furthering their cause or preparing for the next demonstration.” Despite frequent UC tuition increases drawing criticisms of privatizing public education, student response has been largely

underwhelming. The UCSD campus didn’t organize for last year’s system-wide March 2 event, according to a March 3 Guardian article titled “Campus Fails to Mobilize for March 2 Day of Action.” UC students can learn something from Chilean students, Young said.   Young attributes Chilean students’ political presence as a response to its political history and the country’s structure of education — the U.S. government supports 35.8 percent of higher education, while Chile’s government supports 14.4 percent. “The government in Chile hasn’t been established for as long as the United States, so the younger generation who didn’t experience repression during Pinochet’s regime have a kind of fearless hope and opinion for their vision of the future that they want for their lives,” Young said. According to Doerr, UCEAP says it is too early to say how the nation’s events are impacting applications or interest for next year. Despite the circumstances, Young and Dalton both agree that witnessing the social movement is an important education in and out of itself. “The student movement has the slogan ‘Educación Gratuita y de Calidad,’ which means ‘Education that is free and of quality,’” Young said. “Chile is at a crucial point of change, and if we hope to become conscious global citizens and take a role in shaping the kind of society we want as well, it would do a world of good to be informed about what’s going on and take a leaf out of the students’ book to defend what’s important on a bigger picture.” Readers can contact Nicole Chan at n3chan@ucsd.edu.

P hotos C ourtesy of UNIVERSIDAD DE CHILE

Mental illness can affect anyone.

Read up to recognize the signs. At first I didn’t recognize my symptoms as mental illness – I thought I was just having some bad days. Then, I learned that 1 in 4 adults experience mental health challenges such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and others. I got help and now I am moving forward with my life. Recovery is possible and getting help is an important first step.

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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

Yau CONTACT THE EDITOR Margaret opinion@ucsdguardian.org

OPINION Free Furniture: a Dumpster Diving Saga

M

oving off campus is great. Not only do you finally have a place to call your home away from home, but it’s also far, far away from the stifling confines of the prison they call on-campus housing. So I was jazzed about moving out, that is, until I kicked in the door of my new home and discovered that the house was nearly as barren as Sarah Jessica Parker.

Free

for All Margaret yau m1yau@ucsd.edu

I needed furniture. But a quick glance at my bank account told me that short of rummaging through a dumpster, it looked like I would be eating my meals whilst squatting around an overturned cardboard box. And that’s what I did — for the first two nights. The next night, my friends and I left our dignity in our empty house and headed for the Costa Verde dumpster. If you’re disgusted by the idea of dumpster furniture, then you obviously haven’t seen my sweet IKEA coffee table (retail value: $50). Or my awesome collection of folding deck chairs, my roommate’s desk, three of my trash cans or the vast array of cleaning products that I used to scour the furniture of stranger-danger germs. The cherry on top of my furniture shopping experience was when I discovered my storage unit had a dropoff zone for unwanted and forgotten junk. There, the phrase “one man’s trash, another man’s treasure” rang true. I snatched up a gigantic painting of the Grand Canyon that would tear down a section of drywall if I tried to hang it up. Ah, the aesthetics of interior decoration. If you’re actually going to take this column seriously and you’re currently en route to the nearest dumpster, flashlight in hand, keep these tips in mind: Only look in dumpsters near large apartment complexes during popular move-out and move-in days. There, you are more likely to find actual furniture than dozens of not-so-carefully tied up bags of food scraps and mold. People who simply can’t cram their beloved desk vanity into the moving truck will often tearfully toss it in the nearby dumpster. And nothing says vanity like a dumpster, right? Please, for the love of god, don’t take anything home that has a cloth surface. Ignore that heavily brokenin mattress — just assume that it’s riddled with bed bugs and unsightly stains that you wouldn’t want to confront under a black light. Cleaning is key. Your stockpile of Clorox will finally pay itself off handsomely — anticipate devoting the next hour or so to cleaning your newly acquired treasures. Some of your furniture may have come from a dumpster, but if you want to effectively impress, not repulse your guests with just how miserly you are, clean up. When I stop to think about it, dumpster diving is a revolting concept. But after taking a long look at my thoroughly cleaned, completely free swag, I decide to take pride in doing the impossible: I’ve managed to out-hipster the guy who got his desk chair at the local Salvation Army.

Summer in Review

Tuition increases, a chancellor departure and equal access for undocumented students have at least one thing in common — they will have an untold impact on students at UCSD in the coming year.

S

chool may have been out for the summer, but political developments took no break. Among the relevant — the UC Board of Regents announced further tuition increases, Marye Anne Fox announced her plan to step down as UCSD’s chancellor in the following year and Gov. Jerry Brown signed the first half of the California Dream Act into play while the second half awaits his signature. Tuition Woes Increase For anyone tracking the financial status of the University of California, one thing is clear: This year is the beginning of the end. For the first time, the UC system is receiving more income from student tuition than state funding, a development that points to the increasing privatization of our university. In 2011 alone, income from tuition has risen $360 million, and according to the Los Angeles Times and the UC Board of Regents, it’s only going to go up. On top of a 30-percent tuition increase since 2009, the Regents, as of Sept. 15, are considering a further 8 to 16-percent increase over the next four years. UCSD is attempting to raise income through tried-and-true methods. This year, 18 percent of UCSD’s freshman class comes from outside California — an admittance rate up 36 percent from last year. While the higher tuitions of out-of-state students may increase funding, this solution shuts in-state students out of a UC education. The unprofitable (read: mostly humanities) university programs that face the deepest cuts will look to private funding to escape extinction, an attempt that mirrors the University of Michigan’s use of private help to keep their business school afloat. Despite these grim reminders — there is still hope. Student action has yielded definitive budgetary changes in colleges such as San Diego State. When SDSU’s new president was offered a salary that was a $100,000 increase from his predecessor, protests over this issue led to a review of state educational salaries and a cap on CSU president salaries. While student activism has proven successful for SDSU and could indeed galvanize action at UCSD, students and the UC Regents have options beyond marches and demonstrations. Threeyear degrees and less stringent general education requirements are valid plans that have the potential to save the UC

system. The options are out there. Now it’s just a matter of taking action. Chancellor Steps Down Over the summer, Chancellor Marye Anne Fox announced plans to renounce her administrative position and return to the chemistry classroom after seven years on the job — eight years after June 2012, when she is scheduled to set down. Given that the average tenure of a chancellor is 4.5 years, she’s been here longer than most university leaders. Which isn’t to say her tenure wasn’t successful. Since her appointment in 2004, UCSD has launched $3.5 billion in construction projects — among them, Fox achieved her goal of building transfer housing. Recognition followed suit: Awards have been bestowed upon the UCSD community — Nobel, Pulitzer and MacArthur prizes — and Fox received the National Medal of Science at the White House last fall. But Fox’s tenure wasn’t all sunshine and awards. Budget cuts, rising student fees and racial conflict were the source of heated protests, and we lost three top professors to Rice University because they offered them more money — a clear step backward for us academically. Most notably, the “Compton Cookout” and the string of racially charged incidents that followed in February 2010 left UCSD students with an indelible image of their university and those who run it. The Black Student Union roared outside the Chancellor’s Complex that winter, demanding that Fox address the lack of support and outreach for minority students. That’s the kind of job that can wear a former professor out. So as much as Fox has done for UCSD, it’s fair to expect her successor to be someone who understands the demands of the job. Preferably, the new chancellor can focus on internal conflicts like those that shaped Winter 2010, before they turn into national news, in addition to keeping the university competitive. The big successes for UCSD —  acclaim, high-enrollment, big-budget projects — aren’t as bright in the face of student unrest. Now that we’re paying more for our education than ever, it’s time students demanded some input in the choice of our leader and figurehead — or at least choice in the issues we See Summer, page 5

Editorial Board Angela Chen Editor In Chief

Arielle Sallai Margaret Yau Managing Editors

Laira Martin News Editor

Madeline Mann Associate Opinion Editor The UCSD Guardian is published twice a week at the University of California at San Diego. Contents © 2010. Views expressed herein represent the majority vote of the editorial board and are not necessarily those of the UC Board of Regents, the ASUCSD or the members of the Guardian staff.

R ebekah H wang /G uardian


5

THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

The Mental fishbowl By Alex Nguyen

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Protests Another Facet of Study Abroad Learning

Dream Act a Worthy Investment in Student Minority ▶ Summer, from page 4 want prioritized — and the opportunity to offer feedback during this new appointment would be a great start. Senate Passes Dream Act In the midst of many political developments this summer (California redistricting, the debt ceiling crisis) came a big win for undocumented students. Assembly Bill 130 passed through Congress, giving said students access to privately funded scholarships. It’s a great victory for undocumented students, but it’s not over yet. Assembly Bill 131, a sister bill that would grant undocumented students access to state scholarships and

grants, is now waiting on Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature. Brown’s initial support for the bill is waning due to the bill’s potential strain on the state budget, but that hasn’t stopped both sides from rehashing old — but perfectly legitimate — arguments. One side stands by the reasonable assertion that the state barely has enough money in its coffers to support its legal citizens — much less a wave of undocumented ones. The other side, and the side we ultimately fall on, claims that the state investment in undocumented students would pay off in the long run. Many of these students did not come to this country of their own volition, and because they already have roots here, an education is the solid boost they need to become a productive

member of society. This has already been proven with rulings in Plyer v. Doe and the passage of Assembly Bill 540, which allows undocumented students access to California public schools through the 12th grade and in-state tuition rates for state colleges, respectively. Not allowing these students to finish what they (and the state) have started will only damage the state economy and push these students into a permanent lower class. Even if the bill is signed, the battle is far from over. These bills may give undocumented students a freshly minted college degree, but they still won’t be citizens — that’s still under Congressional jurisdiction. But until then, passing AB 131 will be a worthy step towards creating a more inclusive American dream.

Dear Editor, Articles written by American newspapers have suggested that the Chilean protests are dangerous and are hindering American foreign exchange students from advancing in their studies. As a UCSB student studying at a public university in Santiago, I feel the reverse, that this is a unique educational opportunity. Isn’t that the most important part of studying abroad — to experience a foreign culture? Otherwise, why not stay in the comfort zone of your home university? While studying in a foreign place, you will be adjusting and adapting daily to the new culture around you. We “viejos” (second semester students) who were around when the strikes started, had an adjustment period, but we now accept it as just one more adjustment that comes with the territory. It is a historic time in Chilean history, and I am lucky to witness it firsthand, learning more outside the classroom than inside. Every Chilean is current on the student protests, whether they agree with them or not. They will give you a history lesson about the past forty years to explain the value of democracy in Chile. They are an incredibly informed public, far more than the majority of Americans. Even more sadly, the average Chilean probably knows more about American politics than the American public. Is it possible to study in Santiago? Absolutely. Though the Chilean students are on strike, foreign students are still obligated to attend class, as are the professors, who are not officially on strike. While there definitely were nuisances in trying to arrange semester schedules, the directors of EAP Chile and the international students offices at the universities are working

diligently to ensure that everyone has enough classes to meet their educational goals, including the option of special studies projects with Chilean professors to make up for classes that were cancelled. Compared to California, the class size can’t be beat. When was the last time all your classes contained two to five students? We know our professors on a personal level and have more flexibility in the class. Open discussion is the norm, making classes more interesting and creating a supportive environment for those still learning Spanish. Students in California could learn a lesson from the Chilean youth. UC tuition has risen more than 75 percent in three years. Our higher education system has tanked. Classes are being cancelled, majors/minors are dropped and students crashing over-enrolled classes is now a way of life. But the difference is, they are doing something about it. The student demonstrations are all about providing affordable, quality education for every Chilean. Rather than feel inconvenienced by the protests, American students should take advantage of this moment in Chilean history! Spend your time observing how students can democratically make a difference in improving the educational system that is failing them. Even more important, bring those lessons back to the U.S. —Elena Allen Senior, UC Santa Barbara ▶ The Guardian welcomes letters from its readers. All letters must be addressed, and written, to the editor of the Guardian. Letters are limited to 500 words, and all letters must include the writer’s name, college and year (undergraduates), department (graduate students or professors) or city of residence (local residents). A maximum of three signatories per letter is permitted. The Guardian Editorial Board reserves the right to edit for length, accuracy, clarity and civility. The Editorial Board reserves the right to reject letters for publication. Due to the volume of mail we receive, we do not confirm receipt or publication of a letter.

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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

NILCHIAN CONTACT THE EDITOR MINA leisure@ucsdguardian.org

leisure

lifestyle

Single White Female Seeks Atheist Big Spoon

what you should know when the eight shots O from last This Modern Love night’s rager hit you

ne week in, and I can already tell my first, and likely last, online dating account (on the popular website OkCupid) is the best possible version of myself. Yes, I chose

Laira martin lmm002@ucsd.edu

s p Cu d n a s e c n e u q e s n Co

or e Edit

na By Mi

Leisur e t a i c • Asso lchian

Ni

F

or both newbie freshmen and wizened old-timers, the hangover is an inevitable consequence of a night of the true college experience. While the nausea, headaches, fatigue and general sense of dread are rarely enough to convince you to give your binge-drinking the boot, not being able to finish the three MMW papers you wisely decided to leave off until the day before can be apt reason to figure out some new tricks for dealing with the morning after. But before you start eating burnt toast and taking more shots, tune into the advice of two San Diego bartenders, David and Tina Abott*. David and Tina, who respectively have five and six years of experience behind the bar, dished in (with their fair share of disagreement) on the specific hangovers caused by common college drinks, as well as which tricks they use to ensure a smooth recovery. Vodka

David says that because of its purity, high-quality vodka won’t give you the nausea that other liquors will, but the high concentration of alcohol makes for greater dehydration, which, as the shots add up, will probably cause an aching headache later on. To avoid the worst, however, steer clear of the cheap stuff. Sugary Cocktails Both Tina and David also agree that the sugary, fruit cocktails are the worst concoctions when it comes to hangovers. “Sugar See hangover, page 7

*

Names have been changed

a flattering photo. Yes, I refrained from including the sarcastic answers I personally find endearing, but are undeniably interpreted as bitchy to those that are not well versed in Grade-A Los Angeles sass. And yes, I did click the button that said I like dogs even though I don’t, in fact, like dogs. I can tolerate them. But so far online dating has been anything but difficult. Talk about myself (no problem), answer numerous nonsensical emails (that’s basically my everyday job description) and get hit on — all from the comfort of my own home. The notion of online dating came about when a fellow Guardian editor asked me to share my thoughts on the phenomenon. I wasn’t sure if her question was prompted due to her own personal manhunt (turns out that it was) or if it was her sneaky way of proposing a column idea (it was not, but so it became). I quickly replied to her instant message with a “don’t knock it ‘till you try it” type response, along with the personal note that I had not tried it thus far due to my lingering “hopeless romantic sentiment.” Now, this sentiment definitely still exists. But if I find my Romeo in a trite yet intimate Parisian scene or over a cup of coffee at Pete’s (in broad daylight might I add), isn’t he Romeo nonetheless? But once I created my profile, I quickly began to notice some things about the slew of twenty-something San Diego boys online. First, I learned that intuition is going to be a key factor in making this experience successful. With only a few hundred words and a handful of photos to make a decent first impression, many of these guys aren’t using their best judgment when it comes to leaving out details about their World of Warcraft habits and choosing photos that aren’t taken in front of their bathroom mirrors. After some browsing, I next realized that my intuition is more shallow than I’d like to admit. I began to wonder if these men even lead lives outside of their laptops. But if anything, OkCupid was to blame. After taking a few personal quiz questions (i.e. Would you rather be the big spoon or little spoon? Do you believe in God? etc.), the website quickly weeds out all the potential suitors that don’t fit your interests through their matching process. So once I answered my fair share of questions, I was left with a long list of atheist big spoons and the only thing left to do was look at their photos. How could you not be superficial?  All the work was done for me. Now before we get too far into this social experiment, let’s get a few things clear. I will not openly discuss said newspaper column with said dates but I will not lie about my affiliation See modern, page 7


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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

RESTAURANT REVIEW • BY ARIELLE SALLAI

THE BISTRO

Tips for the Morning After Navigating the World of Online Dating ▶ HANGOVER, from page 6

always hurts,” David said. Sugar makes for greater absorption of alcohol, and the mix of all the artificial fruit flavorings will not bode well on your stomach after the third margarita, adding nausea to the headache that has already been caused by the liquor.

▶ modern, from page 6

Beer

A

especially compared to the dry patties s much as the average college dished up at other on-campus eateries. student might enjoy a tastefully The slaw, also served on the side, only prepared meal, Ramen noodles works in the two mega-juicy burgers; othwill always reign supreme. Sure, price has erwise it’s just spice-less cabbage. everything to do with it, but there’s someThe soba noodles with lemongrass thing to be said for the delight of dripping shrimp skewer ($10) are less recompowder-flavored broth over that chem mendable. The heavy noodles have a textbook mid slurp-and-study. The Bistro disarmingly heavy wheat flavor and the at the Strand — UCSD Housing, Dining vegetarian broth, carrots, snow peas, red & Hospitality’s first full-service, sit-down bell pepper and baby bok choy do little restaurant (that takes meal points!) — to cover up the cardboard-like aims to change that, giving taste. Fortunately, the Bistro does the dorm-room staple and well with meats, and the shrimp college dining in general a Hours: skewer has enough bite for the serious upgrade. Mon-Thurs rest of the dish. Plus, as part of the newly 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. The spicy red curry seared revamped Village Housing, Fri tofu ($9) is a good choice for just past Eleanor Roosevelt 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sat & Sun vegetarians on a menu that’s College on the far north Closed mostly carnivore-dominated. corner of campus, The Bistro has the swanky decor to Price Range: $5-$18 It’s tofu for those who fear tofu — completely smothered in the match. Modern, surprisingly Recommended: right amount of pungent sauce. comfortable pod chairs, shiny Angus beef sliders The service is schizophrenic windows all around and fur— during our dining experinishing that’s inspired more ence, the staff flitted from looks of pure by IKEA than by the restaurant’s self-pronaivete to sheer disdain as they attempted fessed Asian roots, create an atmosphere to make it through a seemingly manageperfect for the cheap freshman who wants able rush — but that’s to be expected from to use meal points on a first date. an under-staffed, new eatery with only a Among the more traditional Pancrop of stressed-out students to hire from. Asian options, the Angus beef sliders ($9) We’ll give the Bistro some time to grow; are a surprising standout. Topped with for now, it’s still a pleasant alternative to mild kimchee slaw and an artisan potato the dining hall fried chicken otherwise roll, served with taro chips on the side, available. they are packed with some serious flavor,

Each body will have it’s own physical reaction to various brands of beer, but overdoing any brew will give you a more nauseous hangover the next day. Due to its gaseous nature and the fact that it expands your stomach as the night goes on, a beer-induced hangover will probably consist of more stomach pain and nausea than anything else. As for which brand, Tina sticks to Coors while David prefers Budweiser. It’s all about personal taste and limiting yourself to what you can handle. Avoiding and curing hangovers “Have some Jaeger and Redbull, and then drink water,” Tina recommends. “It counteracts the effects of the hangover. The ‘bomb’ part of it really gets you up and any caffeine helps with the headache.” Commonly known as “eating the If you know you’ll hair of the dog that bit you,” drinkbe drinking, get a ing more alcohol the next morning couple Gatorades is generally thought to be a bad idea, and pop them succeeding only in putting off your in the fridge. If hangover symptoms until later. you can manage “It makes the eventual hangover to pound them go by more smoothly,” David admits, in before you although he doesn’t personally abide by go to bed, you the Jaegerbomb remedy. His own trick won’t wake up is waking up in the morning, taking with such a bad Tylenol with plenty of water and going hangover.” back to sleep. “It’s good to hydrate and just sleep a lot of it off.” tina abott Admittedly, the best way to cure a bartender hangover is to avoid it entirely, Tina said. “If you know you’ll be drinking, get a couple Gatorades and pop them in the fridge. If you can manage to pound them in before you go to bed, you won’t wake up with such a bad hangover.” She also recommends that for every drink consumed, you accompany it with a cup of water. “When I’m at the bar and I see someone drinking a lot, I’ll just slide them a water,” she said. Both say that the most important thing is to know your own drinking limitations. All it takes is some planning. “Be conscientious of what you’re drinking,” Tina said. “Know your limit and what works best for you, and just stick to that, and you’ll be fine.”

with the Guardian (because let’s be real, that’s usually the first thing my subconscious blathers out). And I will in no way sacrifice my personal morals for the sake of this column. That means I will not send or positively respond to winky face emoticons. I will not have sex on the first date and I will in no circumstance respond to someone whose profile states they are good at “playing with yo’ vaginal receptacle!” (true story) or with the initial message “hey dorky! you the random type?” (also another painfully true story). And I will carry pepper spray. As a young woman on a dating website, much of my experience was predestined. A week into my OkCupid experience, I had already done exactly what one of the cofounders of OkCupid would later suggest in his welcome email; I had contacted the guys I was interested in. With a plethora of men that seemed less than appealing, I had found a grand total of two guys I found both attractive and interesting. I did my best to reply to the litter of suspiciously vague yet complimentary messages from users on the site (many of which I later compared with coworkers’ messages to find that the ambiguity was a mere way of disguising a mass message we had all received). But the two coffee dates I’ve already set up upon my return to San Diego were both initiated by me. So loyal readers, wish me luck as I embark on the dubious journey that is online dating. And if I miss my deadline or don’t answer my phone, just know that I was last seen with musicluvr21 from Escondido.


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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

EBEL CONTACT THE EDITOR REN hiatus@ucsdguardian.org

hiatus

arts&entertainment

Tim, Eric and the War on Humor

CONCERT PREVIEW

H

umor isn’t funny. When you’ve second-guessed friendships discussing “The Big Lebowski” and can respectably choose a life partner based on “a good sense of humor,” clearly, it is some serious shit. And though we’d like to believe in putting our differences aside to see our Christopher Guest in

Beer and

Loathing

Ren ebel rebel@ucsd.edu

R I L G TALK Y T R I D DUO TAKES DITTIES TO COMEDY Y ARIELLE SALLAI THE LOFT B garfunkel & oates

F

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performers’ career plans. or two days, female musical Where: the loft Both Lindhome and Micucci comedy duo Garfunkel & Tickets: $15 (reserved), moved to LA from the east Oates brainstormed what a $12 (ga) coast  (Lindhome from penis looks like. The girls, Phone: (858) 534-8497 Portville, N.Y. and Micucci actresses Riki Lindhome (Garfunkel, from Nazareth, Pa.) to pursue 32) and Kate Micucci (Oates, 30), Online: artpwr.com careers in acting. Since then, were writing the lyrics for “I Don’t Lindhome has appeared in Understand Job” — a little ditty about films such as “Million Dollar Baby” and the uncovering the mysteries of third base. Their remake of “The Last House on the Left,” while mission: A clever way of describing male geniMicucci is best known for her ukulele-playing talia. character Stephanie Gooch on “Scrubs.” They eventually settled on “Silly Putty Pac They were first introduced at the Upright Man ghost” and “Darth Vader Pez dispenser,” Citizens Brigade improv theatre in 2006, where though the song still took them a total of five they were “going to see a friend’s show so we months to write, Lindhome told the Guardian met in the audience and became friends really during a phone call from Los Angeles. quickly,” Lindhome said. “Sometimes things will just come to us,” A few years later Lindhome wrote and Lindhome said. “It will be quick. We’ll write it in directed a short film for the two of them to star an hour and then maybe rewrite it the next day. in, decided to turn it into a musical and asked And then sometimes it’s a five-month process.” Micucci to co-write songs with her. And so Clearly, Garfunkel & Oates are serious about Garfunkel & Oates was born. their dick jokes. “Acting was always the primary focus,” “I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we had Lindhome said. “[Garfunkel & Oates] kind of a Nixon reference, followed by Watergate, foljust unfolded. And once it did unfold, some lowed by Spiro Agnew, followed by Lyndon people thought we fell into it. Which is true ... Johnson?’” Lindhome said, remembering the But then after that we were like, ‘We’re really inspiration for one of the verses of “I Don’t Understand Job.” “And then you spend like three going to do this!’ and we really worked our asses off for this thing.” days on those lines.” Since then, Garfunkel & Oates has racked up But despite their current dedication, millions of views on YouTube for their bitterly Garfunkel & Oates was never in either of the

druthers

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sweet, ukulele-laced songs, caught the attention of CNN (for their pro-gay marriage video, “Sex With Ducks”), performed on “The Tonight Show” and landed monthly gigs at Upright Citizens Brigade — making them staples of the LA alternative comedy scene. Most notably, the duo signed a contract with HBO for a pilot show. They’re currently developing the script, but “things just take a lot longer than we thought,” Lindhome said. They’ve envisioned it as the female version of “Flight of the Conchords ” — or “Glee with dick jokes,” as Lindhome has taken to describing it. “I think it’s kind of like an extension of our stage show, where it’s two single girls in LA trying to make it,” she said. “But it’s us like five years ago, so we aren’t recognized yet or getting paid at all.” For now, they’ll continue turning the subjects of their girl talk into matter-of-fact songs like fan-favorites, “Pregnant Women Are Smug,” “Go Kart Racing (Accidentally Masturbating)” and “This Party Took a Turn for the Douche.” But not every subject can be made into a hilarious-ukelele jam. “People give us song ideas all the time, and we’ll consider them, but they don’t realize that it has to fill out three minutes,” Lindhome said. “Facebook, blind dates, parents, holidays — you name it and it has been brainstormed and rejected by us.”

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their Larry the Cable Guy, it’s just impossible. What makes us laugh is a reflection of ourselves — one that we loyally defend despite the criticism of unfazed naysayers. Case in point: “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!,” the surrealistic sketch show/prolonged nightmare and brainchild of creators Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim. Wrongfully dismissed as yet another ADHD stoner-gag exhibition in Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim lineup, “Awesome Show” is a landmark not only in cult television, but the dawn of a new kind of humor altogether — one that insists on doling laughter, confusion, anger and terror in equal measure. Call it stubbornness, but I was never one to turn fanboy for any one fad (except, I’ll admit, a three-year dedication to “Weird Al” Yankovic in middle school). And when I first experienced “Awesome Show” — the cast of off-thestreet weirdos, John C. Reilly as disturbed anchorman Dr. Steve Brule — I was entertained but hardly addicted. Yet, the more Tim and Eric I casually consumed, the more difficult it became to resist. Their bizarre musical numbers, invented holidays and public access commercials all shone with a brilliant new set of comedic standards that television had been somehow missing altogether. But, as is the bitter pill of any cult follower, the glaring judgment poured in from all sides. “Random” and “disgusting” became dirty words, spat from the ignorant mouth of the non-convert. And while a couple of lawless teens sticking it to the man by eating their own boogers in a musical PSA may not be an attractive image, the latter accusation is particularly aggravating when you consider the shit that actually passes for entertainment. Take for example the episode of “Two and a Half Men” when the lovably perverted Charlie, after considering sleeping with a pregnant woman, proclaims, “Just because there’s a bun in the oven doesn’t mean I want to butter it.” The hasty laugh track is answered by the Pavlovian guffaws of some 14 million home viewers who all seem to ignore that the notion of ejaculating onto an unborn fetus is far more disturbing and morally reprehensible than digging for that proverbial gold. Granted, “Awesome Show” is designated for its target audience. But its sheer creativity is hard to dismiss while much of mainstream comedy television is beginning to resemble one long, Officeinspired mumblecore-like sitcom.   If our tastes mature but never really change (of course “Weird Al” became an “Awesome Show” regular), Tim and Eric’s upcoming feature film, though propped upon a cast of big comedy names like Will Ferrell and Zach Galafianakis, will likely do nothing to change the face of mainstream comedy. But the devout will continue to celebrate the duo’s demented creations in the face of our unamused and therefore inferior peers, keeping alive what is so intrinsically our own.


THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

photo courtesy of P atrik R agnarsson

CONCERT PREVIEW

check in and trip out France’s Chateau Marmont talks cosmic-pop and marbles in space. By Ren Ebel Predicting the future is difficult. But Parisian space-dance quartet Chateau Marmont appreciates the attempt. “I think it’s a mix between two periods,” founder/keyboardist Guillaume de Maria said about Chateau Marmont’s retro-futuristic sound. “We are big collectors of analog synths. The way they are built, the way they look, the way they sound — it reminds us of old sci-fi movies.” The music video for the band’s motorik, vocoder-doused “One Hundred Realities” stunningly captures this fondness of the new as told by the old. Japanese director Shinya Sato’s hazy, black and white scenes of animated marbles against kaleidoscopic astral back-

drops resemble some lost “Twilight of remixes,” de Maria said. “More than original songs. We kept the Zone” experiment. main voice of the song and we “Shinya is in a band called managed to compose and build Crystal, and they released an EP around that voice. At the time we on our label,” de Maria said. “We were not very good loved them, they singers, so we had were really nice and chateau marmont a real voice from a we knew that Shinya with revolver real song. We started was making a lot of When: oct. 3, 8:30 p.m. using our drum videos. He told us machines more, and the concept and we Where: the casbah at the same time we were really excited, Tickets: $12, 21+ signed our first EP so we gave him carte to a very famous blanche. When we Phone: (619) 232-4355 electronic French watched it we were Online: casbahmusic.com label, Institubes.” like, ‘Wow, this is After recordreally how we imaging a new LP and making their ined the music.’” U.S. debut at South by Southwest But Chateau Marmont’s this summer, the band plans on electronic tendencies mark a remaining in the States. fairly recent venture for the band, “In Paris, people are not very spurred by an interest in remixopen-minded,” said de Maria. “In ing mainstream pop songs. Their the U.S. you can play for young downplayed, spaced-out remixes people or old people and they all of La Roux’s “Quicksand” and have a good time. We’re really Ladyhawke’s “My Delirium” managed to breach France’s competitive looking forward to coming to California.” electronic scene. “In 2009 we were making a lot

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THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

ALBUM REVIEW Girls Father, Son, Holy Ghost true panther sounds

8 10

Looking for a great pharmacy school?

SF Heartbreakers Return With Soul on Sophomore Effort

A

followup to the fantastic debut Album and the equally impressive Broken Dreams Club EP, Girls’ Father, Son, Holy Ghost offers up the same ’60s rock sound — only now with incorporated string orchestrations and a gospel choir — with a confident, well-produced finish. “Honey Bunny,” the upbeat surf-rock opening track, is most reminiscent of Girls’ previous releases. The sunny guitar and rumbling drums, highlighted with backing gospel harmonies, works as a great transition before Father, Son, Holy Ghost begins to explore its country, gospel and soul undertones more deeply. “Die” borrows elements of ’80s metal, using a distorted guitar intro to lead straight into an aggressive headbobbing riff reminiscent of Black Sabbath — a completely new stylistic venture for the band. Meanwhile, Christopher Owens’ fragile and pained lyrics assure that “no, nothing’s gonna be okay” and “we’re all gonna die.” The sentiment marks a transition from Owens’ yearning for love to his acceptance of failed dreams.

But Father also has its share of Girls’ expected tenderheartedness. On the dreamy gospel “My Ma,” shimmering electric guitars float in a chorus of angelic backing vocals. Easily the most powerful track on the album, “My Ma” reveals Owens’ strive for happiness and love, as his honest, half-whispering voice weaves through the four-minute track.   Following suit with the nostalgic styles and forlorn themes, “Forgiveness” presents the peak of Father’s passion. The track’s country-ballad style, full of spacious guitar and slow, acoustic strums, details Owens’ most straightforward thoughts of forgiveness from his own family. The eight-minute epic strives to bring positive out of life’s struggles while conceding that bad news is something tough to ignore and forget. A more frustrated, technically mature story of love and heartbreak, Father, Son, Holy Ghost’s hook-filled gems create a flawless soundtrack to the first crushes and lost loves of a summer long forgotten. — Tanner Cook

Meet some alumni of California universities who recently enrolled as University of Michigan PharmD students.

E

Look no further than the University of Michigan. very year, UCSD graduates choose the PharmD Program at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. In fact, nearly 20 percent of our

PharmD enrollment is comprised of alumni from California universities. What accounts for Michigan’s popularity among Golden Staters? First, we are consistently ranked among America’s top pharmacy schools. Secondly, we consider a lot more than GPA and PCAT scores when evaluating your application. Earn your bachelor’s degree at UCSD, and then earn your PharmD at U-M. That’s what many UCSD students do every year. To learn more about the PharmD Program at Michigan, visit our Web site at www.umich.edu/~pharmacy.

Or contact the College of Pharmacy at 734-764-7312 (mich.pharm.admissions@umich.edu).

Staff Writer

1. Financial support unequalled by any other U.S. pharmacy school. 2. Outstanding pay. 3. Job security in economically uncertain times. 4. Unlimited opportunities to improve people’s lives. 5. Unparalleled career choices. 6. Continuous growth potential. 7. Life and career mobility. 8. The prestige of owning a degree from one of America’s top-ranked pharmacy schools. 9. Membership in an influential alumni network spanning the globe. 10. The power to apply medical knowledge at the forefront of technological innovation. 11. Small class size to maximize individualized educational experiences. 12. One-to-one learning with world-renowned faculty.

Your future never looked brighter.

CHOOSE HOUSTON LAW

©2011 Twentieth Century Fox.

THEY TOOK IT TO THE SUPREME COURT AND WON!

Our students shepherded a case through the lower courts and on to the nation’s highest, stunning the immigration world with a unanimous decision. Hands-on training is a large part of what we do at the University of Houston Law Center. But it’s just part of what we offer. The Law Center combines the best of all worlds: • Excellence in education with multiple “Top Ten” specialty programs • Reasonable tuition and fees • A campus recognized as one of the most diverse in the United States

Still looking for a reason to make Michigan your pharmacy school? Consider these:

We are a Tier One law school in a Tier One university. In addition, our home is Houston: the nation’s fourth largest city with a robust legal employment market and an affordable cost of living to make the most of your budget. There’s a lot to like about our school. Find out more at www.law.uh.edu.

The University of Houston is an EEO/AA institution.

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tricity shared equally ($3040/month). Visit ucsdguardian.org/classifieds and reply online to Listing ID: 12271083

Level: 1 2 3 4

master bedroom can fit two people with plenty of extra room and also includes a walk $500 - Single bedroom for in closet as well as a his/her rent in Mira Mesa (Mira Mesa). vanity with attached bathUp for rent is a single bedSingle bedroom with own room. The whole apartment room in 2 bed/2 bath Casas bath, females only. 14’ x 10’ (on the 8th floor) includes Apartments in Mira Mesa. unfurnished bedroom with three bedrooms and two full Rent will be $500/month + Guardian Classifieds are placed online and are FREEbathroom for UCSD. Low placements for our your own in cost a classified baths. Please feel free toprint conUtilities ($50) 500 todollar edition are alsowith available the UCSD campus and the public at ucsdguardian.campusave.com 2bd/2ba 950-sq ft condo in tact us if you have any quesdeposit. 7 month lease. The the gated Pines of La Jolla tions! Visit ucsdguardian.org/ room is 12x11 in size with a complex. Can easily fit a classifieds and reply online to big closet, unfurnished. Full queen bed, dresser, and two Listing ID: 11976685 access to kitchen, laundry on desks. Looking for someone to site.You will be living in the take over my lease as soon as apartment with two other possible. Available for moveguys. Both are recent UCSD in starting on September 2007 - Toyota Yaris - $13491. grads working full-time. Visit 20th. Lease will end in July Front Wheel Drive,Tires - Front ucsdguardian.org/classifieds 2012. Visit ucsdguardian.org/ All-Season,Tires - Rear Alland reply online to Listing ID: classifieds and reply online to Season,Wheel Covers,Steel 12271168 Listing ID: 12271036 Wheels,Compact Spare Tire,Power Steering,Front Disc/ Roommate needed for 1st Female roommate needed to Rear Drum Brakes,Intermittent November. A room in 2 bed share master bedroom at Costa Wipers,Cloth Seats,2nd room/2 bath apartment Verde Towers! We are three Row Bench Seat,Adjustable is available to share with a fun and hardworking UCSD Steering Wheel,A/C,Driver Professional post doc at La females looking for another Vanity Mirror,Passenger Vanity Scala apartments in UTC area friendly female roommate to Mirror. Visit ucsdguardian.org/ from 1st November as the curshare a large master bedroom classifieds and reply online to rent room mate is moving out. at Costa Verde Towers and Listing ID: 12279384 Rent is $823 per month (all complete our apartment. The included). Internet and elec‘01 Audi A4 1.8T Quattro. 5-speed with low mileage $6750. Low mileage & lots of fun to drive! 2001 Audi A4 1.8L 4-cyl. Turbo with quattro allwheel drive & 5-speed manual transmission. 93k miles.Good/ excellent condition. Well maintained & reliable. email: audilj@gmail.com

Student Housing

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Guardian Classifieds are placed online and are FREE for UCSD. Low cost classified placements for our print edition are also available to the UCSD campus and the public at ucsdguardian.campusave.com

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12

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Sanche bill Studen the univers to is a colrider UC A will pay back ional program Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that aims legislation between ing used by a Feb. 25 inci-By by â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preside will remodel the with acts like Angela students in professco Superior Court â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a group the 10-cam- the effort overshadowed B.o.B, Relient K, students canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bring themselv lendto describe care reform the laborative News Editor Chen a San Francis a noose was . Sanchez rk health- by cutting out private es â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so represent Michelle Branch 10 that the workwhich a good balance after is in groups landma finding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; federal dent two ity on March UC in Geisel and By Jake Boisson illegally loan system billions more in pus univers UCSD Black the idea before of found hanging judge ruled Drake â&#x20AC;&#x201D; attracted headliner Bramwell said. between those two isstudent raised fees ault aside brought the Contribu ting Hundreds university had â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had the same erstough,â&#x20AC;? ing with the and setting al aid. s a packed last to pass during a series Writer of studen Library. provide would 2007. house on May 14. Union to officials on MAIn StAGe DAnce tent t number UCSA financi ment out year. n 2003 ts walked for e presentIt just turned Studen s as of an admini govern from betwee For the dollars â&#x20AC;&#x153;The legislati time in Sun God arrange the U.S. the meetings stration ing to evidenc â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Andrea teach-in tions which history, all 16,500 second popular of an event; out this year to be more Office of Currently, a Wiz Khalifa JfK of mstrKrft â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fiercely indepen yesterdayAccord-planne d case, wristbands and and the UC discuss potenhout the page 7 attend interest at more students money to banks or corpora of the student mornin BILL throug collect dentâ&#x20AC;? See ed Regents 3,500 come. to the g a then wanted v. student counte â&#x20AC;? radio station KSDT to students, Crystal Castles et. alto President improving the ing to In 2008, the first guest tickets sold out. by the Black r teach-i LuquetntaorganizCalifor nia â&#x20AC;&#x201D; official loans for has given up on profit. Accord Budge t At the 2008 Sun of ed Student Union. tial ways of plans to obtain ng an al didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell out until time this happened, tickets University Jimmy eat World The Feb. 24 ents, includi God Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Congr ession ing private students ity docum stated that fees Price the day before. Station manage an FM frequency. when Center univers began with loan Office, bypass all tickets sold protest This year, entire wristbands were distribut guide, rs miKe Posner additional pending a press confere fee out for continu ed for$ the BILLION lenders and giving online nce s build a radio towerare now looking to week leading increased to student held which time studentsby 2:30 p.m. on Friday, at not be throughout by would Best Coast announcement OPINION WEB POLL the BSU, ran out on Thursda up to the event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; tickets t added funds directly federal govwere frequency instead. to pursue an AM at any point sthe the y, leading students Amoun ent. According to Associatturned away. ingt student studen Guest NO will save billion over the organiz of enrollm these matechase all the leftover to to Pell Grants periodaKSDT station e Vice Presiden commentary tion their Concerts and Events DO YOU AGREE ernment $1 guest tickets for purthat declare ruled that t of selves that and $62 bilco-manager t, which WITH 63 % The courtd Meredith Wong Alex Bramwell calls for themFriday. campus climate next year alone, A.S. PRESIDEN organized this ted a contrac â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who next 10 years. said that the constitu $ T campus to then violated. yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sun God In 2009, students tower would lion over the majority of be in rials AM UTSAV GUPTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ity Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the a plainsell-out was due â&#x20AC;&#x153;state the vast univers waited cost approximately n underst of be The in line for up to maximum DECISION TO anding. emergethe four hours on to the popularity $100,000 and that FREEZE contract betwee ncyâ&#x20AC;? billion will New university â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thelast the morning of Page 4 leading acts. of the eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s , YES that $62 she hoped it could STUDENT-MEDIA Friday. The studen ts and the tment not the festival to receive their wristban be located in a Pell Grant award reinvested in Pell Grants tiff BSU be commi will â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get complain central area of ds. FUNDING? fees Despite d a binding of which â&#x20AC;&#x153;toxicâ&#x20AC;? environ has address however, over campus I 32 % ts and yelled at includethe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; although she ional degree $13 billion increasing stur 1,000 of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the crowds, dents canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bring ment with ed the profess was unsure where DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T and a list raise their guests, but when stu- went unclaimed. wristbands rally ing students,â&#x20AC;? Superio devoted to that would be. avoiding a of 32 deman to a continu in and ity OUT time, we get yelled said KNOW at the same OF Chair David for BSU ds. Munter dent eligibil money students 133 VOTES at and complain New age limit Judge John â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really for the UCSD Ritcherson Court ts when the a cap on the called nt. Black Student Union member serious about 5% for children on nearly . chancellor stateme but we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it, to respond By Angela applies to in UCs held a counter teach-in can receive See SUN GODpa cabinet ruling nal funds started much parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health The cationwho on Feb. 24 News EditorChen ge 3 enrolled The additio maximum of the research,â&#x20AC;? Wong demands by to the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to discuss the s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with â&#x20AC;&#x153;thoroung insurance the student March 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; said. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Compton Cookout timeline for â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a includi gh, written 2010 J OHN H ANACEK day as a system will push schools immed the 3,000 year from same â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2009 ic Preside and before ional /G â&#x20AC;&#x201D; institutional UARDIA N ne iate nt Utsav Gupta profess is 1 academ Student media racism at UCSD. limited accessi wide protest against and medici 2008 conference action.â&#x20AC;? WRISTBANDS sPressthe 2010-1 federal government for his recent decision to heads are bility to higher law, busines include action against award for See TOWERpage speakers 2007 freeze SOLD OUT 1,000 The threatening g for more such 25, 2003.d history A.S. Preside edustudent media funding for all 33 meeting all the BSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to $5,500. allowin 12 profess schools August and EXTRA Widen $5,350 aid. e Fridayfrom or GUEST TICKETS nt Utsav Guptaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal demands. er,s who of Law and Daniel asked increas afterno organiz additional SOLD OUT* â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will not Four student for his SOLD OUT SOLD covering this with $36 billion in government administrators ations, then sions student publicaon decision to freeze School applauded allow any E RIK J EPSEN 7,500 EXTRA ed in all funding discusof the budget /G UARDIAN to OUT tions. as the UCLAof Medicine contact in A.S. the current like it by 2010 g the to ing $13 billion *[\]LMV\[NWZK SOLD OUT budget crisis disregard Gupta announ crisis to affect Of the remain will go toward reducin ML\WJ]a\PMZMUIQ UCSF School Berzon LLP the in favor of ced Friday SOLD OUT wished to pull will go to Altshuler billion VQVO O]M[\\QKS against law firm See PROTE funding from morning that he savings, $10 and about $2.55 billion M\[IN\MZ_ZQ[\JIVL[ up their case newspaper STpage 2 controversial [WTLW]\ the 2007 to take federal deficit serve minorities. affects stuhumor Price Cente a racial slur Koala, whose editor that ity. bill also d, who works in on institutions râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vacant retail univers health-care allows all Americans fee le Leonar before in referenStudent-Run Televis chief made Daniel space The larger Quarte that while that until HIE //G UARDIAN s on R said r were ce s 2003. to policy HILIP P firm, Black Studen ion the night a provisi Onlyry,five bers protest student for the â&#x20AC;&#x2122; health-care beenmay dents with vendor t Union meming the designated tooriginally be necessa lity s have their parents es installe d in thepossibi typical 19. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried, Feb. 15 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Compton to stay on spaceinto openin house a bank increas ed of the Cookout.â&#x20AC;? of the more since its g, leaving throughout inform go coffee be P hoto B y J ohn h AnAcek /G uardian instead media they 26, three , must this year, to shop and hairHING age guidelines], in at es before vacant â&#x20AC;&#x153;The slots. redo [the increas studen and essentia s were not Bisceglia-Mart ANYT salon. of such Koala],â&#x20AC;? he ts wanted student bothInworlds said at an improm lly not fund [the the best of contact Hayley this case, ,â&#x20AC;? By Ayelet effect. know if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Readers can .edu. BUT ptu meetin of Studen Assistant Vice the llor get Chance Associate Bitton t Life Garyed that we can defund rid of them, but on the g. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hbiscegl@ucsd News Editor â&#x20AC;&#x153;They court conclud CLOTHES a notified contrac â&#x20AC;&#x153;The wanted f tssaid. d itsRatclif them, and I them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we absolutely part of A.S., an expans had breache going to price ion that ity be believe we must can Students took univers for the Two years was large tsenough Gupta said defund them.â&#x20AC;?defund studen after the e the studen lion from health-c from ďŹ nals to serve t body becaus of Price grand break with the ion, when freeze media- he had the executi Center East,participopenin thethe educat ate g state weedreached to keepsteady ve enrollm impact low-inc are services that accomm to Univer of their Centers official ent,promis ly allocation of org funding because power to and they ome families odate growing degree quartersity s said they fee ional as lowityashad in theare wanted univers final stages depend on state who in the enrollment the the profess lates Section money for media organizthe current the is amoun t ofpossibl e. period run,inwhich of their UC and CSU systems welfare program there needed that II of the A.S. ations viostore spaces of filling undie the remainat theWhat meant for t that tion s.  to The suggested Constit . ing be place states with other violated revenu In order to absorb took fee constan ution. The the role of sources of and hair salon, a bank, e to ent, allocations to coffee on and then pay to secthe council execute program the University Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as midnight shop, andenrollm is â&#x20AC;&#x153;to create $19.1 billion retail was the operate d said.the buildin of California Price Center they promis and years, g, budget deficit, ests of the undergs which serve the collecti answer Marched.18. promise,â&#x20AC;? Leonar nearly identica are services Price last .â&#x20AC;?several fees for 2008, funded East opened ve interof raduate popula the East Center l would suffer major other indsMay to Gupta, the Hundre By Regina Ip raised by the Price numberOver tion.â&#x20AC;? Accord Schwarzenegger to the ones from includin current system ity hasalready Expansion cuts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; clad has a te of ing univers food Center the Koala since and gradua g a proposed â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Associat e News Referendum scantily â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which has retailers, raduate ran Tapiocthe t for quarterly studen a Expres such as al, including the January propos- from 1982â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is Editor funded underg â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a alls therefore not both to accoun s andwide $39 in health care, $3.7 billion t fee enactedstressb restoration of Burger serving the hurting students, and CLICS King. $305 million that in Spring the cut the past students system collecti Free speech a cuts. cut will Medi-Cal program would Gov. Arnold P hoto B y A ndrew oh /G uardian organizationsve interest. Library, where state Seebudget Foundation additional $51.3 last year and an poor, PRICEpage by the case Schwarzenegge t :762,5 ited such as for presented his along with state for the 2 Those affected an amounThree empty spaces â&#x20AC;&#x201D; two million in finanr cial few overexc the and Americ Individual Rights to $8,000, ed during floor by the on either side in-home aid toward the Makeshift carts in Education support for the an Civil Loft â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will participants of the Sunshine J OHN H ANACEK /G receive up state budget last revised 2010-11 raced in the seventh increas GAS PER GALLON iNSIDE Liberti 5,121 soon UARDIA disabled ani be a sharply Market, eligible tion, filled with new es Union students in the N annual Junkyard has *(:; E smashed the that-69, student services. and one on the second have the budget takes . 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five nurses from the Over 11,000 including l centers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; UC medica l centers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will strike UCSD medica protest unsafe nurseto Nurses on June 10 the National to-patient ratios,ced last Friday. United announ things weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been askratio â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the ient] [nurse-to-pat times,â&#x20AC;? ing is that the at all maintained st regshould be l Center - Hillcre â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re said. UCSD Medica Janice Webb . Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a istered nurse relief nurses asking for break- in and watches your nurse that comes break.â&#x20AC;? on youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re patient while , slated to be the largest The protest , will also in U.S. history nurse strike 14,000 nursadditional Minnesota, N include an /G UARDIA nia and BY ARIELLE SALLAI J OHN H ANACEK es from Califorparticipants. ls SENIOR STAFF WRITER totaling 25,000law requires hospita nia for Califor one nurse fter fivein months of planning, A.S. Concerts and Events well as one more act for the main stage â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will be revealed once at least depend maintaLiaison to Media Oliver Zhangs,sat down with patient five . the Guardian the artist contracts are completed. to three receive â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not all contracts are fully executed,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we Sunday afternoon to patient leak thes lineup for the annual Sun every RS the care the mandate on Festival. release something we want to make sure that the contracts are ingGod BY THE NUMBE TOTAL DEBT it wants toever had, GROVE CAFEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me,union itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thesaid best lineup weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve â&#x20AC;? Zhang said of the fully valid, just in case they back out at the last minute.â&#x20AC;? TO BREAK EVEN The of these laws $925 $177,920.78 GROVE NEEDS Associate Vice President of Concerts and Events Brian Wong May 13 festival. GROVE EARNED r enforcement at all times. DAILY PROFIT stronge REOPENING, $925 safe l DAYS, SINCE said he is proud of the lineup. Rapper establi Wiz Khalifa willratios be headlining the main stage, while sh OF DAILY NUMBER the medica and to Webb,music â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew coming into this year that it would be hard to top Jesse F. Keeler (JFK) of electronic duo MSTRKRFT will be 2 GROVE MAKES to According tent.enough nurses to AVERAGE PROFIT il voted 17-2 the success of 2010,â&#x20AC;? he said in an email. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To make this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the main act at the dance $525 do not have A.S. Counc that Bestcenters Coast, Mike Posner,s.Jimmy Eat World and last night, the ending a 24-year saga gsCrystal Castles patient the two hours meetin will alsoattend play the main stage. The support for the dance tent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as See sun god, page 7 ing eatery. effectively having n less than â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been say they already the Grove Cafe, ts to revitalize the struggl last June shut down ls that s council voted ous attemp at with hospita nurses, but realisticalincluded numer a year after the previou was $140,000 in debt on charge comes ratio hyped n which the have The decisio coffee shop, and a much- over maintain operating the ongoing renovations ly they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t of times when ed its debt to continue said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot er, despite ss has increas nurses who breaks,â&#x20AC;? she r, the busine the time. Howev nurses [or more ces Winter Quarte the charge By Jonathan Kaslow there are still $180,000. e and Resour reopening this Staff Writer a total of nearly President of Financ rise Operations supervise] watch,â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just someone to $35,000, to to both ViceVice President of Enterpprofit of $925 to nurses needed According ate Students from 50 states and 90 countries congregated on ent, and Associ to make a daily January, help out.â&#x20AC;? an online statem Andrew Ang the Grove would need er, since reopening in campus for the Clinton Global Initiative University this weekHowever, in the President conn, of end, held April 1 to 3. The conference is devoted to developing Brian McEue ng costs alone. Howev is without the UC Office operati strike its a and implementing projects (called â&#x20AC;&#x153;commitmentsâ&#x20AC;?) to global 7 By Regina Ip cover E,page that such See GROV News Editor tended issues, such as poverty, pollution, LGBT rights and college aflegitimate cause. sity considers this fordability. univer Carlsbad resident Angel Garcia-Puente, 50, â&#x20AC;&#x153;TheJulio About 1,200 students entered the conference with individn of gooda violatio will go to trialaction for murder andul, arson charges following and a ual commitments, 200 of which were from UCSD. Students unlawf requireofments ing a hearing held March 30. He is suspected killing his faith bargain n of the partiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; con- were required to apply to be participate. estranged wife â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 38-year-old Lorena Gonzalez, whoseent. The Clinton Global Initiative is part of the Clinton Founstatem clearin violatio in their was found a burning vehicle in the P701t to dation, founded by former U.S. president Bill Clinton in 2005. UCOP said A crowd of body tract,â&#x20AC;? also attemp parking lot next to the UCSD baseball strike will field. ent benefits Now hosting its fourth conference, the CGIU has been to uniThehearing students gave At the preliminary to determine if probable versities in New Orleans, Texas and Miami. nursesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; retirem ans nor cause exists to indictthe Garcia-Puente, politici secure ďŹ&#x201A;owers to Mary, Clinton was on hand for the weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event, and other neither San Diego at the rescind guests included Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs, actor Sean Penn Court Judgecan Fraser make sure toSuperior easily an employeein y Jeffrey industr concluded that the prosecutors and singer Mandy Moore. Jacobs participated in the opening health King the Burger provided sufficient evidence for the ned session, while Moore spoke at the first workshop on global East, concer them. Price Center thing caseâ&#x20AC;&#x153;The to stand theweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re San Diegohealthhealth and Penn appeared at the closing session. Students were othertrial, our n and Union-Tribune reported on March get-also able to attend a variety of panels and workshops to prepare yesterday. The is the pensio about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things are 30. event began post s,â&#x20AC;? Webb said. testified tryingthem to fulfill their commitment to face issues such as populabenefit San Diegoivefirefighters now, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;stion growth, the environment and global health. because of a JuliomAngel that expens costs. tingthey arrived in the parking lot â&#x20AC;&#x153;You believe you can make a difference, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to cut Garcia-Puente at approximately at ways on UCSDFML.co we wantto help you,â&#x20AC;? Clinton said at the April 1 opening session. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The look 8:30 p.m., when they to and , t affect people broughfound to According the vehicle going in flames. to the Union-

State California a bill d 11, the e passe On Jan. funds to Committe Assembly allocating more affirmaat with five . Bill aimed education negative votes an higher and two Assemblymwill tive votes authored by remont), comAB 656, Torrico (Dâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F on oil Alberto an excise tax and natural oil se ct water impo that extra land and panies the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State gas from rnia sources. d by the Califo d create If passe the bill woul Education , Legislatureornia Higher n. The corthe Calif nt Corporatio by represenEndowmewould be run s from the tative State poration California system, K ersity Univ TAX TAL ersity of stude has group . has cine, ageto7 when stude hopes to beginraised last Sprin the Univ and ic medi See AVP,p As no formding of the two CSS currently with ate Liz Costa accepted ornia fees were SSC with an additrators the rstan coland classm he had been quit his job projactivity % Calif an unde r, however, only e student â&#x20AC;&#x201D; providing the per-quarter for r the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once community would ams, he t unde student-fe ged SED the cente s the space. the progr Quarter PROPO ing the leges and nsible ed per-studen arran bers were one of NCE TAX SEVERA full acces months follow center were respo the 9 SSC mem ts would be hous tional $2.34 be S page University staff â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In the , plans for the ting See KLOO and staff. ects and n their new effor. for alloca year. and students each referendum y impressio borative spaceuniversity staff $ BILL. mone between this role of verbally page 3 Earli er by the colla however, reed on the See SRC withTOTAL RAISED the bill Since then,rs have disag g the SSC a to month, BY 2011 leavin ded leade on student in the center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was amen e the SRC 12.5-perty to utiliz students incur a opportuni $ MILL. sever ance out the cent basis. sed to consistent TO UC SYSTEM tax, as oppo ercent osed 9.9-p by the sis ously prop nue the previ rding to an analy on Reve be cil distax. Acco Committee the coun will now meeting, ndum â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one Assembly ion, the tax n in 2010 of refere yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s During models of the Vice President and Taxatto raise $1.8 billio . ted two ts, 2011 Associate of the University expec cussed dmen by A.S. billion in and one chair t amen and $2 sponsored Affairs and Jordan Taylor, to recen sent 60 pera. Prior have Chen Academic sory Board CSU sysUtsav Guptthe two would Angela ers Advi een President N the bill revenue to the UC system By Edito r e, the A.S. O H /G UARDIA News of debat night to Cent sored by A.S. difference betw A.S. Council cent of percent to the community B Y A NDREW six hours spon of ary esday P HOTOS than sity ter to prim 30 Wedn nt IAN The tem, the inten After more 20-7-1 late the Spring Quar , g of the 10 perce W U /G UARDleast Council on K EVIN at osals was voted nt body and just After the urginCalifornia the A.S. rnance tees that Council Loft referendum by the stude of per prop ight. osal, ts. the dum guaran Gove prop ved $3.82 colleges. Asso ciation y Loft -69,*(:; appro fees by toward overs tion. place the Loft referen for UCSD studen Guptaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s however, canâ&#x20AC;? ballot. If student Under a student-majorit budget alloca of t body, the Faculty ity Colleges, now directs as you7633 ,5 election sal would raise would go be â&#x20AC;&#x153;pay by the studen :762 venueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s d create >,) members money Communrewritten and to the CSU If passed of Loft events will the propo quarter. The ing at the Loft. 29 per- woul d to regulate the de various t sysper bill was nt of its revenue 80 percen +,THE A.S. Boar amm at least would inclu student 05:0LD the UC D FRIDAY music progr requires that that at least 80 CLOSE 50 perce 25 percent to community  365 SHOU CIL  This board THURSDAY 3 HAVE  H 72 L 62 art and .(3 aid, ndum  to page canâ&#x20AC;? m, COUN nt cial H 70 L 60 syste PJZ E CAFE? as you See LOFT The refere go to finan  .(:7,9 *VTGROV 25 perce be â&#x20AC;&#x153;pay uates repLZZ  THE anies tem and of the fees s at the Loft 5L^)\ZPU  LOW ; ed oil comp our cent nt of all event and that undergrad g staff. Y[ colleges.  769 hirin allow â&#x2C6;&#x161; Yes â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from 9LWV  :\YM students nt of the venue â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to extract oil to charge perce :<9-9, SUNDAY l City OL,KP[VY  FRIDAY ft. â&#x2C6;&#x161; No Nationa perce for UCSD ornia SATURDAY 3L[[LY[V[  (;*/ 2-5 H 73 L 62 least 60 Qwik Korner, Ave 91950 have failed in Calif knowYL]PL^ Height:  H 74 L 63 donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tLY[7 mph 50./;> â&#x2C6;&#x161; I *VUJ THURSDAYft. resent at and we 3009 Highland  2-5 RG ground Wind: 9-13 59 F RDIAN.O Height: :; HIGH PMPLKZ Temp: mph  page 3 *SHZZCSDGUA WWW.U -69,*( Wind: 8-19 59 F Water  See OIL :\KVR\ Water Temp: Ave AY

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most important question is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how do you propose to do it [commitment]â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and college students are more prone for that question.â&#x20AC;? CGI U Campus Representative Melissa Etehad, who attended CGI U in Miami last year, expressed her excitement

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14

THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

Nationally Ranked Tritons Remain Undefeated in Their First Six Matches

E rik J epsen /G uardian file

With a 4-0-2 record, the Tritons are looking to continue their undefeated run as they face off against CSU Dominguez Hills at the Home Depot Center on Sept. 23.

▶ W. Soccer, from page 16 way. Coming off a tremendous postseason run that saw the Tritons come just short of a NCAA Division II National Championship last year, Armstrong said the team is eager for the new season. “I’m excited by what I’ve seen so far this year,” Armstrong said. “Our passing and creativity is outstanding, and we’re not a secondhalf team anymore. We’re starting and finishing our games, and we’re a lot stronger on the ball. We have a lot of talent coming in this

year, we have an incredibly deep bench and the subs coming off are always raising the level of play.” UCSD is showing no signs of fatigue: Six games into the new season and the No. 4 Tritons remain undefeated. Kicking off their campaign with a trip up north, UCSD played Western Washington to a 0-0 draw and then beat perennial powerhouses No. 10 Seattle Pacific 2-0. The Tritons then headed back down to Southern California to open conference play, facing off against the only two other nationally ranked squads in the CCAA, No. 10 Cal

State Los Angeles and No. 19 Cal State San Bernardino. UCSD took a scrappy 1-0 win against CSULA on Sept. 3. The only goal came in the third minute when McTigue headed in a corner kick from Johnson, UCSD’s deadball specialist. On Sept. 9, the Tritons drew 1-1 against CSUSB with an unassisted goal from Callahan. The following week, UCSD took down CCAA South Division newcomers San Francisco State 2-1 in a hard fought overtime win, and in the same weekend blew out Cal Poly Pomona 4-0.

“Right now, we’re taking each game one game at a time,” Armstrong said. “Our past success doesn’t matter this season. But I think if we continue to keep improving, we’ll go far.” The Tritons’ next match is slated for Friday, Sept. 23 at the Home Depot Center against Southern California rivals CSU Dominguez Hills. UCSD will then head back home for the first home game of the season on Sunday, Sept. 25 against CSU San Bernardino. Readers can contact Rachel Uda at ruda@ucsd. edu.


15

THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

MEN’S SOCCER PREVIEW

M ichelle J aconette /G uardian file

The men’s soccer team will look to improve on its 3-3 overall record this week with an away game against CSU Dominguez Hills.

By Rachel Uda Sports Editor MEN’S SOCCER — The core of the men’s soccer team has returned to the pitch for the 2011-2012 campaign. Head coach Jon Pascale’s squad is looking to improve their 8-3-6 overall record from last season, a campaign which proved to be as exhilarating as it was frustrating. Going without a win for their first six matches, the Tritons then went on an inspired eight-game undefeated streak, during which they drew against nationally -ranked CSU San Bernardino and upset No. 14 Chico State in a stunning double overtime victory. However, the deficit the Tritons found themselves in after their rocky start to the season proved insurmountable, and they narrowly missed a post-season berth. This season, Pascale has made a few adjustments to his starting eleven. Stalwart junior defender Harris Rabin is filling in the gap left by graduating hard-nosed fullback Jared Kukura — captain and AllAmerican second team selection. He is accompanied in the back line by sophomores Cory Wolfrom, Alec Arsht and Gavin Lamming. They sit in front of sophomore goalkeeper Josh Cohen, who saw limited playing time last season as a freshman, but has played every minute of every game so far. Junior Alex Portela continues to control the play in the midfield

with sophomore Andrew Keimach sitting in behind. Pacey juniors Kian Malek and Adam Zernik have returned to run the widths, while up top, the Tritons will look to sophomore Andrew Ball and junior Evan Walker for offense. So far the Tritons are 3-3 overall, splitting their only two nonconference games, beating Cal Baptist 2-1 and then dropping a game 0-1 to Saint Martin’s. UCSD opened league play on Sept. 9, losing 0-1 to CSU Los Angeles. In their next match, the Tritons came from behind, scoring two goals within the span of three minutes to beat CSU San Bernardino 2-1. The Tritons then traveled to San Francisco, taking a 1-0 win from SFSU. In a back-and-forth contest, UCSD broke the draw after Portela scored off a penalty granted in the 88th minute. Two days later the Tritons fell 3-0 to Cal Poly Pomona. “At this point in the season the most important thing for our team is that we keep improving every day,” assistant coach Eric Bucchere said. “We have a diligent and motivated group, and if we stay focused and humble the sky is the limit.” The Tritons will face CSU Dominguez Hills in their next match on Friday, Sept. 23 at the Home Depot Center. UCSD is scheduled to play its first home game on Sunday, Sept. 25 against CSU San Bernardino. Readers can contact Rachel Uda at ruda@ucsd.edu.

MEN’S SOCCER 2011-12 2010 Record: 8-4-6 overall (8-3-5 in CCAA) Starting 11: Josh Cohen, Harris Rabin, Gavin Lamming, Cory Wulfrum, Alec Arsht, Andrew Keimach, Alex Portela, Kian Malek, Adam Zernik, Evan Walker, Sam Ball. Bottom Line: Already four games into conference play, the Tritons seem hampered by changes in personnel. They will need to work the kinks out quick in order to remain competitive for a playoff berth.

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16

THE UCSD GUARDIAN | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | www.Ucsdguardian.org

UDA CONTACT THE EDITOR RACHEL sports@ucsdguardian.org

SPORTS WOMEN’S SOCCER

UPCOMING UCSD GAMES MEN’S WATER POLO MEN’S/WOMEN’S SOCCER WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

9/22 9/23 9/25 9/23 9/24

VS LOYOLA MARYMOUNT AT CSU DOMINGUEZ HILLS VS CSU SAN BERNARDINO VS CAL STATE STANISLAUS VS CHICO STATE

MEN’S SOCCER

FALL SEASON PREVIEW

The nationally ranked UCSD Women’s Soccer team remains undefeated in its first six matches and is looking to continue an unbeaten streak into conference play.

By RACHEL UDA • Sports Editor Photo By Kevin Wu • Guardian File

Gabi Hernandez Forward

Sarah McTigue Forward

Anne Wethe Center Midfielder

Cassie Callahan Center Midfielder Jessica Wi Winger

Shelby Wong Winger

Danielle Dixon Center Midfielder

Hayley Johnson Defender

Ellen Wilson Defender

Kristin Armstrong Goal Keeper

Sara Spaventa Defender

W

ith a 4-0-2 record, the No. 4 ranked women’s soccer team is off to their best start since 2007, and with 10 out of their 11 starters back from last season, the Tritons look as dangerous as ever.      All-American senior Kristin Armstrong has returned to tend the net for the Tritons. In her third year as the keeper of choice for head coach Brian McManus, Armstrong will look to anchor the Triton defense. She is joined in the back by veteran defenders, senior Sara Spaventa and juniors Ellen Wilson and Hayley Johnson.    Junior midfielder Jessica Wi and senior midfielder Shelby Wong are continuing to run the widths for the Tritons, while junior Danielle Dixon and senior captain Annie Wethe — 2011 All-CCAA first team selection — are also continuing their tenures in the middle. They will be joined in the midfield by freshman midfielder Cassie Callahan. As the only underclassman to crack the starting eleven, Callahan serves as the replacement for graduate Lisa Bradley, who earned All-American honors in her junior and senior seasons. Callahan — recently named CCAA player of the week — is making a seamless transition and has already notched three goals for the Tritons in her past three matches. Junior Gabi Hernandez and senior captain Sarah McTigue are sitting up top for UCSD. The duo has proved lethal for the Tritons thus far. 5’10” junior Hernandez is a constant threat in the air, while McTigue — who was named to the AllWest Region Second Team last season — has already netted two goals. Rostering 25 out of a maximum 26 players, the depth of the squad provides a number of choices for McManus and insurance for a team that has not had much trouble in the way of injuries anySee W. Soccer, page 15


09.22.11 | UCSD Guardian