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london’s global university

public events at ucl

TALKS, EXHIBITIONS, WORKSHOPS & MORE January to April 2012 www.ucl.ac.uk/events


Welcome to Brain Food. In these pages you’ll find highlights from UCL’s wide range of public events. For a full listing and the most up to date information, please visit our public events web pages at: www.ucl.ac.uk/events As London’s leading multidisciplinary university, we’re passionate about bringing our research into the community and welcoming visitors into UCL to share in our activities. Everything from talks, workshops and seminars through to film screenings and exhibitions is featured here. UCL’s spring LUNCH HOUR LECTURE series kicks off on Tuesday 17 January by exploring the Arctic from space (see p.3) and is followed by a diverse range of lectures from the metaphysics of concrete (p.12-13) to the Great American Novel (p.19). The full list of Lunch Hour Lectures is on p.16-17. For those with a morbid curiosity, don’t miss the Buried on Campus exhibition, co-curated by UCL forensic anatomists and osteologists, showcasing the investigations undertaken when a mass of human bones was discovered in UCL during construction work in 2010 (see p.31). Sign up online to receive UCL’s events e-newsletter with regular updates about new events: www.ucl.ac.uk/events

The majority of UCL events are free, open to everyone and require no booking unless otherwise stated. The events listed in this leaflet are just a small selection of what’s on offer – for a full listing please visit: www.ucl.ac.uk/events If you would like to subscribe to our Brain Food email newsletter, or to receive future copies of the UCL events leaflet, please send your details to: events@ucl.ac.uk or call +44 (0)20 3108 3841.


public events at ucl

Contents 2 Events diary 15 Chamber Music Club concerts 16 Lunch Hour Lectures 30 Exhibitions 32 Venue locations 33 Getting to UCL 36 Visitor information

+44 (0)20 7679 2000 www.ucl.ac.uk/events University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT Cover image: Bright Club, Dr Joe Flatman (UCL Insitute of Archaeology) by Dr Hilary Jackson


events diary January to April 2012 Tuesday 10 January 6.30–8pm Inaugural Lecture Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre

Inspector Sangiorgi and the Sicilian mafia, 1875–1877 Professor John Dickie (UCL Italian Studies) +44 (0)20 7679 3988

Inspector Ermanno Sangiorgi was the courageous Italian policeman who, in late 1875, first discovered the most important piece of evidence in the history of the mafia: the ritual that must be undergone by anyone seeking to become a Man of Honour. In 2009 Professor Dickie unearthed a document in Sangiorgi’s own hand that explains how the mafia took revenge against him. Sangiorgi tells a story rich in intrigue that takes us deep into the world of the early mafia, and explains how it came to be that Italy ignored the crucial significance of the mafia initiation ritual, and thus continued to believe that the mafia did not exist. Final judicial confirmation of the mafia’s existence would only arrive in 1992. Please note that this lecture has been rescheduled from 25 October 2011.

1–2pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Jayne Parker presents

Exhibition

+44 (0)20 7679 2540; college.art@ucl.ac.uk

UCL Art Museum

In her own work, artist Jayne Parker, UCL Slade School of Fine Art, looks at the relationship between film and the performance of music. What will catch her interest among the prints and drawings in UCL’s art collections? Pop in to UCL Art Museum to find out.

Tuesday 17 January

2  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Exploring the Arctic from space Dr Katharine Giles (UCL Centre for Polar Observation & Modelling) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

See below.

Wednesday 18 January 6.30–8.30pm Film Screening JZ Young Lecture Theatre

Under the Caribbean (1954) on the big screen Dr Joe Cain (UCL Science & Technology Studies) +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

This Oscar-winning documentary/ camp shark-filled romp by Austrian wildlife filmaker Hans Hass displays stunning photography of the underwater world, including groundbreaking shots of whales around the Galapagos and insights into the life of scientists at sea. Part of the Humanimals Season at the Grant Museum of Zoology. Following the film join us for a free glass of wine and a private view of the museum.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Exploring the Arctic from Space Tuesday 17 January, 1.15–1.55pm With climate models predicting that the Polar Regions are the most sensitive to climate change, our need to understand them becomes increasingly important. This lecture focuses on how satellites can help us understand the changing Arctic, and back down on Earth how UCL scientists are stepping out onto the frozen ocean to validate the CryoSat-2 satellite, which is measuring changes in the ice cover with unprecedented accuracy. Marks the 100th anniversary of Scott reaching the South Pole. please see page 32 for venue locations  3

ESA/AOES Medialab

1.15–1.55pm

events diary

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 17 January


LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 19 January 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

What has Facebook done to us? Professor Daniel Miller (UCL Anthropology) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

See below.

Thursday 19 January

Psychical research and archaeology

6.30–7.30pm

Amara Thornton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Lecture/Talk Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Dr Amara Thornton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) explores the connections between sites and seances in early twentieth century archaeology. Concentrating on the archaeologists George Horsfield and Agnes Conway but with reference to Petrie’s assistant and lecturer at UCL, Margaret Murray, Dr Thornton considers how the use of mediums and psychical research was a larger phenomenon in archaeology than has generally been admitted.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE What has Facebook done to us? THURSday 19 JANUARY, 1.15–1.55pm Detailed research on the impact of Facebook on a population reveals very different consequences from those generally presented in newspapers. It also suggests the future of such social networking sites may be very different from their past. 4  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


6.30pm Inaugural Lecture Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre

The monologue in a crowdsourced world: Have digital resources rendered the inaugural lecture obsolete? Professor Claire Warwick (UCL Information Studies) +44 (0)20 7679 2548; c.warwick@ucl.ac.uk

Digital resources and social media have fundamentally changed the way that we create, share and disseminate information. Digital Humanities (DH) is a collaborative interdiscipline where most research is done in teams. Yet the traditional inaugural lecture emphases the work of an individual. Professor Warwick will question whether the inaugural lecture remains meaningful in a crowdsourced, DH world and compare its affordances with those of digital resources which allow users, both within and beyond academia, to contribute to and engage with the scholarly process. Followed by a drinks reception in the UCL Grant Museum of Zoology.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 24 January

Is complex life a freak accident?

1.15–1.55pm

Dr Nick Lane (UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Natural selection is a kind of search engine. Given enough time, and suitably vast populations, it should find the best solutions repeatedly. So why are bacteria still bacteria? And why did all complex life on our planet share an ancestor that only arose once in four billion years? Dr Lane will suggest that everything we see around us stemmed from a freak accident two billion years ago. We are far from inevitable, and may be alone in a universe of bacteria. Wednesday 25 January

Egypt revolution – one year on

6.30–8pm

+44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums

Film Screening and Discussion Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Film screenings and a discussion mark the first anniversary of the start of Egypt’s 2011 revolution. For more details check the Petrie Museum website nearer the time.

all events are free with no need to book unless otherwise stated  5

events diary

Tuesday 24 January


LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 26 January 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

The triumph of human rights: dream or nightmare? Colm O’Cinneide (UCL Laws) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Since 1945, the language of human rights has acquired great potency and resonance. Human rights law plays an ever-greater role in national legal systems, and states are now expected to respect an increasing range of basic rights. However, a growing backlash can now be detected against the apparently ever-expanding scope of human rights guarantees. Has the concept of human rights been stretched too far? Has it departed from its core mission? This lecture will address some of these questions, and make the case for an expansive conception of rights. Saturday 28 January

Humanimals family activity day

11.30am–4.30pm

+44 (0)20 3108 2052 zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Drop-in Family Activity Grant Museum of Zoology

How much of an animal are you? Through our hands-on specimen-based activities we will be investigating how humans and animals are linked. Come and build a skeleton from real bones and see just how similar we are. Discover how we have benefited from animals and how we threaten to destroy them.

Tuesday 31 January 1–2pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: After Michelangelo

Drop-in

+44 (0)20 7679 2540; college.art@ucl.ac.uk

Exhibition

Are prints the first ever examples of hacked content? In collaboration with Fabien Pinaroli and Claudio Galleri, UCL Mellon Fellow Antony Hudek explores this question by relating prints inspired by Michelangelo to appropriated imagery from the 1960s to today.

UCL Art Museum

6  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


LUNCH HOUR LECTURE The lure of the Kremlin: the court of Ivan the Terrible AND global networks in the 16th century Tuesday 31 January, 1.15–1.55pm In the 16th century, the rise of Muscovy was accompanied by military aggression and the growing influence of the Russian Orthodox Church. Westerners began to see Russia as a barbarian kingdom, locked away from the outside world. However, this lecture will demonstrate that the court of Ivan the Terrible (1530-1584) and other tsars was actually a focus for exchange with the East and the West, and that Muscovite regalia, court rituals and illuminated manuscripts were the result of intensive global interactions.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 31 January 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

The lure of the Kremlin: the court of Ivan the Terrible and global networks in the 16th century Dr Sergie Bogatyrev (UCL SSEES – School of Slavonic and East European Studies) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

See above. Tuesday 31 January

Mummifying Alan: Egypt’s last secret

6.30–8.30pm

+44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Lecture/Talk

Screening of a documentary originally broadcast on Channel 4. Mummifying Alan shows a team of scientists attempt to mummify a specially-donated body in order to understand Ancient Egyptian mummification techniques. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Dr Carol Reeves (UCL), Dr Stephen Buckley (University of York), lead pathologist in the documentary, and Gillian Moseley, Executive Producer.

Pre–booking essential JZ Young Lecture Theatre

please see page 32 for venue locations  7


ExhibItion BURIED ON CAMPUS Monday 19 March–Saturday 13 JULY, MON–FRI, 1pm–5pm Grant Museum of Zoology A huge mass of human bones was discovered in UCL during construction work in 2010. This installation displays the investigations undertaken to discover what they are and why they were buried. Remains of at least 84 individual people and many animals have been identified. Uncover where they came from and what we can learn from them in this unusual exhibition co-curated by UCL forensic anatomists and osteologists. (See p.31)

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 2 February 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Cutting to cure cancer and ‘the limits set by nature’ Professor Tom Treasure (UCL Clinical Operational Research Unit) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Selection of only the most favourable cases and the need to accompany operations with chemotherapy and radiotherapy must raise doubts about how effective surgery itself is in controlling cancer. In this lecture, Professor Treasure will describe research findings and changes in practice that indicate that the limits of cancer surgery may have already been overstepped. He poses the question: when our present day efforts become history, how will cancer surgery be judged by future generations?

8  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


6.30–8.30pm Workshop Pre–booking essential Grant Museum of Zoology

Get a Grip: A hands-on history of hands Jack Ashby & Mark Carnall (UCL Grant Museum) +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk http://historyofhands.eventbrite.com/

Join Grant Museum zoologists Jack Ashby and Mark Carnall in a light-hearted exploration of the history of the hand, paw, hoof, fin and flipper with the museum’s amazing specimens.

Thursday 2 February

Sappho in Sainsbury’s

6.30–7.30pm

+44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk http://sapphosainsburys.eventbrite.com

Performance Pre–booking essential Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

How the first female poet of the ancient world looks at love and loss in the 21st century. What would a lyric poet from Ancient Greece make of our modern romantic confusion? London’s ‘Sassy Sappho’ Sophia Blackwell explores the poet’s themes of love, loss, motherhood and women’s place in society and the arts. Part of LGBT History Month at UCL.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 7 February 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

The mystery of Master Humphrey: one of Dickens’s most enigmatic characters Dr Matthew Beaumont (UCL English) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

This lecture investigates one of Dickens’s most peculiar and enigmatic characters, Master Humphrey, the narrator of The Old Curiosity Shop (that is, until he is mysteriously dismissed from this role). It details some of Humphrey’s oddities, and speculates about his puzzling past, before discreetly following him into the streets of London at night. It identifies him as a far more disturbing individual than readers of this supposedly sentimental novel tend to assume, and locates his unsettling descendants in novels by Stevenson, Joyce and Nabokov, among others. This lecture marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens.

all events are free with no need to book unless otherwise stated  9

events diary

Thursday 2 February


1pm-2pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: sculptural colour

Exhibition

+44 (0)20 7679 2540; college.art@ucl.ac.uk

UCL Art Museum

Edward Allington, Professor of Fine Art, Slade School of Fine Art, looks at John Flaxman’s reliefs. Free, no booking required.

Tuesday 7 February

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 9 February 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

John Bull versus Stinkomalee: Tory opposition in the early days of the University of London (now UCL) Professor Rosemary Ashton (UCL English Language and Literature) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

In 1825 a group of liberal politicians, lawyers, dissenting ministers, Roman Catholics, and Jews came together to found a university in London aimed at those excluded from the two old-established English universities, where teachers and students were required to be subscribing Anglicans. To mark the anniversary of UCL’s foundation, this lecture will look at the opposition to the new university among Tory politicians and journalists, especially in the ultra-Tory paper John Bull, which nicknamed the new institution ‘Stinkomalee’ in honour of the swampy rubbish dump on which the building was constructed between 1826 and 1828. Thursday 9 February 6.30–7.30pm Lecture/Talk Pre–booking essential Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

A Boy and his Empire: Antinous, Last God of the Ancient World John J Johnston (UCL Institute of Archaeology) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk http://antinoopolis.eventbrite.com

When the beautiful youth Antinous, favourite of the Roman emperor Hadrian drowned in the Nile one autumn night in 130 AD, his legacy appeared slight. However, in the aftermath of his death, the city of Antinoopolis was founded for him, a stellar constellation was given his name, and, remarkably, Antinous was proclaimed a god with a cult, which went on to generate a vast and still instantly recognisable sculptural corpus.

10  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


Bright Club: Love

7.30–10pm

+44 (0)20 7388 8822 steve.cross@ucl.ac.uk boxoffice@thebloomsbury.com www.thebloomsbury.com

Performance Tickets £8 Bloomsbury Theatre

Monday 13 February – Friday 17 February 1–5pm Family Activities Grant Museum of Zoology

See below.

Nature’s best inventions – halfterm activities +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Get your hands on some of the museum’s most amazing specimens as we investigate the incredible structures that animals have evolved. Just as buildings are designed with every column and beam in the right place, a vast number of odd animal adaptations have evolved to fulfill a specific purpose. Discover trident-shaped teeth, hammer-shaped heads and needleshaped gnashers.

Bright Club: Love FRIday 10 February, 7.30–10pm Valentine’s Day is around the corner, so it’s time for Bright Club, UCL’s academic stand-up comedy night, to put the romance into your year. Join our line-up of comedians, musicians and researchers to find out about everything from duck sex to medieval seduction, and from internet dating to the pure love of a scientist for her apparatus (not that kind of apparatus). please see page 32 for venue locations  11

events diary

Friday 10 February


Tuesday 14 February 5.30–8pm £4 payable on the door. Includes a glass of wine or a soft drink. Drinks reception Grant Museum of Zoology

Animal magnetism – Valentine’s Day at the Grant Museum +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Whether you’re looking for love or heading out to a romantic dinner, join us for a glass of wine and discover how seduction is done in the animal world. Come and find just how big a heart can get, which animals play a role in romantic human superstitions and see how far creatures will go to get the girl in this one night only exhibition. A special evening drinks reception with unusual specimen labels for this amorous occasion.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE The Metaphysics of Concrete Tuesday 21 February, 1.15–1.55pm Almost three tons of concrete are produced every year for every person on the planet, second only to water in terms of human consumption. While it has transformed the lives of many people, in Western countries it has been widely blamed for making everywhere look the same, and for erasing nature. As well as architects and engineers; politicians, artists, writers, filmmakers and churchmen have made use of concrete for purposes of their own. The results are often contentious, and draw attention to the contradictions present in how we think about our physical surroundings.


7.30–10pm Performance Pre–booking advised Bloomsbury Theatre

Mahsuri UCLU Malaysian Society www.uclumsoc.co.uk +44 (0)20 7388 8822 boxoffice@thebloomsbury.com www.thebloomsbury.com

When Wan Darus goes off to war, his wife, the beautiful Mahsuri, is left behind to care for their child. An enigmatic travelling poet soon wanders into the village, and the two strike up a strong friendship. Mahsuri’s enemies, however, see this as opportunity to wreak havoc; their scheming eventually has consequences far more tragic than any of them could have imagined. A UCLU Malaysian Society production in collaboration with UCLU Stage Crew.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 21 February

The metaphysics of concrete

1.15–1.55pm

Professor Adrian Forty (UCL Bartlett School of Architecture) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

See opposite. Thursday 23 February 1–2pm Exhibition Grant Museum of Zoology

Strange creatures: UCL Art Museum pops-up at the Grant +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Huge volumes of art have been produced with representations of animals, but not all are particularly accurate. Historically, artists may have never seen the creature they depicted and mythological and religious themes allow for the creation of some truly strange creatures. Take this chance to see these intriguing works and more contemporary creations from UCL Art Museum amongst the strange, but real, creatures in the Grant Museum. Part of the Humanimals Season at the Grant Museum (see p.31), this event is running alongside the Art by Animals exhibition where you can see creations by animals as well as depictions of animals by humans.

all events are free with no need to book unless otherwise stated  13

events diary

STUDENT SEASON Wednesday 15 February


LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 23 February 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Prevention is better than cure: investing in your arteries Professor John Deanfield (UCL Institute of Child Health) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Although clinical complications of arterial disease usually occur from middle age, the underlying pathology begins many years earlier with signs of arterial wall thickening becoming detectable from childhood. Traditionally, guidelines for intervention have been based on 10 year risk, but this approach results in under-treatment, especially of young subjects and women. This lecture, to mark Heart Awareness Month, will discuss the assessment of ‘life time’ cardiovascular risk, how this is now being recommended as the basis for future prevention strategies, placing greater emphasis on healthy lifestyle from a young age, and advocating active earlier pharmacological treatment of high risk groups. Monday 27 February 6.45pm Lecture/Talk Chadwick Lecture Theatre

The synagogues of Britain and Ireland: An architectural and social history Dr Sharman Kadish (Director of Jewish Heritage UK) s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Kadish traces the architecture of the synagogue in Britain and Ireland from its discreet Georgian- and Regency-era beginnings to the golden age of the grand ‘cathedral synagogues’ of the High Victorian period. Shedding light on obscure and sometimes under-appreciated architects who designed synagogues for all types of worshipers – from Orthodox and Reform congregations to Yiddishspeaking immigrants in the 1900s. She also examines the relationship between architectural style and minority identity in British society and looks at design issues in the contemporary synagogue.

14  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


UCL CHAMBER MUSIC CLUB CONCERT SERIES Haldane Room, UCL Main Campus Check for up-to-date details at: www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music THURSDAY 12 JANUARY 5.30–6.30PM With fiddle and lute, voice, sackbut and curtal: an exploration of songs and dances from 15th century France. TUESDAY 31 JANUARY 5.30–6.30PM The programme will include works for clarinet, viola and piano trio, with opera arias from Verdi’s Don Carlo, Mozart’s Così fan tutte and Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin. FRIDAY 10 FEBRUARY 1.10–1.55PM Programme to include music for small wind ensembles. THURSDAY 23 FEBRUARY 5.30–6.30PM An evening of French music: performed by members of UCLU Music Society, to complement and promote UCOpera’s March production of Acante et Céphise by Rameau. TUESDAY 6 MARCH 5.30–6.30PM Programme based on recent compositions by Club members and friends.

Contact: Jill House j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4231

THURSDAY 15 MARCH 5.30PM–6.30PM Delius and his circle: a concert to mark the 150th anniversary of Frederick Delius (1862-1934). The programme will include songs by Delius and Grieg to Scandinavian texts, sung in the original languages, and Delius’s 3rd Violin Sonata.


Spring 2012 JANUARY

FEBRUARY

Tuesday 17 January Exploring the Arctic from space Dr Katharine Giles (UCL Centre for Polar Observation & Modelling) See page 3.

Thursday 2 February Cutting to cure cancer and ‘the limits set by nature’ Professor Tom Treasure (UCL Clinical Operational Research Unit) See page 8.

Thursday 19 January What has Facebook done to us? Professor Daniel Miller (UCL Anthropology) See page 4.

Tuesday 7 February The mystery of Master Humphrey: one of Dickens’s most enigmatic characters Dr Matthew Beaumont (UCL English) See page 9.

Tuesday 24 January Is complex life a freak accident? Dr Nick Lane (UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment) See page 5. Thursday 26 January The triumph of human rights: dream or nightmare? Colm O’Cinneide (UCL Laws) See page 6. Tuesday 31 January The lure of the Kremlin: the court of Ivan the Terrible and global networks in the 16th century Dr Sergie Bogatyrev (UCL SSEES – School of Slavonic & East European Studies) See page 7.

Thursday 9 February John Bull versus Stinkomalee: Tory opposition in the early days of the University of London (now UCL) Professor Rosemary Ashton (UCL English Language & Literature) See page 10. Tuesday 21 February The metaphysics of concrete Professor Adrian Forty (UCL Bartlett School of Architecture) See page 13. Thursday 23 February Prevention is better than cure; investing in your arteries Professor John Deanfield (UCL Institute of Child Health) See page 14. Tuesday 28 February From Euclid to modern geometry: Do the angles of a triangle really add up to 180˚? Professor Mark Ronan (UCL Mathematics) See page 18.

www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl


MARCH

Visitor Information

Thursday 1 March The Great American Novel: How and why Dr Kasia Boddy (UCL English Language & Literature) See page 19.

1.15–1.55pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Darwin Lecture Theatre (see page 32 for map) Free and open to all. No need to book. Places are on a first-come, first-served basis.

Tuesday 6 March Patents stop people doing things. So why are they a good thing? The Rt. Hon. Professor Sir Robin Jacob (UCL Laws) See page 21.

Contact

Thursday 8 March Having it all: dispelling the myths about work and motherhood Dr Anne McMunn (UCL Epidemiology & Public Health) See page 22. Tuesday 13 March The search for genius and Einstein’s brain Dr Mark Lythgoe (Director, UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging) See page 25. Thursday 15 March 3D imaging: nanotechnology and the quest for better medical sensors Professor Ian Robinson (UCL London Centre for Nanotechnology) See page 25.

Dan Martin +44 (0)20 3108 3840 dan.martin@ucl.ac.uk

ONLINE Watch lectures streamed live online at www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl/streamed or watch after the event at www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl or www.youtube.com/UCLLHL

READ REVIEWS ON OUR BLOG: http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events Lunch Hour Lectures are subtitled following the live event.

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Scan QRcode to link to www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

LUNCH HOUR LECTURES feed your mind at lunchtime


1–2pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Images of Rousseau

Exhibition

+44 (0)20 7679 2540; college.art@ucl.ac.uk

UCL Art Museum

See opposite.

Tuesday 28 February

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 28 February 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

From Euclid to modern geometry: Do the angles of a triangle really add up to 180˚? Professor Mark Ronan (UCL Mathematics) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

More than 2,000 years ago, Euclid of Alexandria wrote the most successful textbook of all time. Starting with a few simple assumptions (often called axioms), he proved one result after another – for example that the angles of a triangle add up to 180˚. Euclid’s work was later translated into Arabic, then from Arabic into Latin, and scholars wondered whether the last of his five axioms – which referred to parallel lines, and sounded more like a theorem than an assumption – wasn’t simply a necessary consequence of the other four. Many tried to prove this, and some false proofs were published. Professor Ronan will give a very convincing one before outlining the history of geometry up to the 19th century. That’s when three people independently discovered a perfectly consistent geometry in which Euclid’s fifth axiom is not true, and where the angles of a triangle no longer add up to 180˚. This new work inspired others and led eventually to the sort of geometry Einstein needed for his theory of gravity.

18  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


POP-UP EXHIBITION IMAGES OF ROUSSEAU Tuesday 28 February, 1–2pm Avi Lifschitz (UCL History) uses works from the Rousseau 300 exhibition to explore how the way we perceive Rousseau now is very different from his 18th century reputation. Pop in.

© Trustees of the British Museum

Image: Jean Jaques Rousseau by David Martin after Allan Ramsay, 1766, mezzotint

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 1 March 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

The Great American Novel: How and Why Dr Kasia Boddy (UCL English Language & Literature) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Parodied almost as soon as it was announced, and generally regarded as a topic beneath the remit of serious literary criticism, the Great American Novel enterprise has proved more durable and more various than almost any other in American literary culture. It remains the bench-mark for literary ambition, prestige, and sales. This lecture, to mark World Book Day, will consider some of the forms the Great American Novel has taken in its 150-year history and ask what social, political, moral, commercial and aesthetic needs it so persistently promises to serve.

please see page 32 for venue locations  19


The London Varsity Friday 2 March 5.30pm (Women’s) 7.30pm (Men’s) The London Varsity is the historic rugby event between University College London and King’s College London with both women’s and men’s rugby teams going head-to-head in the most eagerly anticipated event of the university sporting calendar. A rivalry spanning 180 years attracts a large number and variety of supporters from alumni and current students to members of local communities. With both sides training hard and dominating their current leagues the varsity match will be an intense and well fought battle to see who will be crowned the ultimate Varsity Champions.

Thursday 1 March 6pm Lecture/Talk JZ Young Lecture Theatre

Science fiction; science future: A conversation about what’s around the corner Jon Turney +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Everyone worries about the future. What’s going to happen? What can we do about it? In his Rough Guide to the Future, Jon Turney explores past, present, and future approaches to the ‘what’s next?’ His guide was shortlisted for the 2011 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books. Join us for an evening of conversation with the author and an expert panel of science historians and scientists who also study future-ology. Bring along your ideas about how we might best think about the future. Following the event join us for a free glass of wine in a private view of the UCL Grant Museum.

20  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


6.30–7.30pm Lecture/Talk Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Egypt and comics: Modern mythology and pop-art reflections Paul Harrison +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Asterix, Tintin, Thundercats, Dr Fate, Promethea and Hawkman comics have engaged with Egypt in a range of different ways. In this talk Paul Harrison analyses the manner in which Western conceptions of Egypt, heritage and legacy are portrayed in mainstream comics. Find out how modern comic books employ the themes and aesthetics of pharaonic culture to evoke mystery, magic and exoticism.

STUDENT SEASON Friday 2 March

The London Varsity

5.30pm (Women’s Kick Off) 7.30pm (Men’s Kick Off)

Alex Hingley (UCLU) +44 (0)20 7679 4163

Sporting Event

See opposite.

Pre–booking advised Twickenham Stoop, Langhorn Drive, Twickenham, TW2 7SX

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 6 March 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Patents stop people doing things. So why are they a good thing? The Rt. Hon. Professor Sir Robin Jacob (UCL Laws) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

The public debate about patents is old and perpetual. Here is what Jeremy Bentham said: “So long as men are governed by unexamined prejudices and led away by sounds, it is natural for them to regard Patents as unfavourable to the encrease of wealth. So soon as they obtain clear ideas to annex to these sounds, it is impossible for them to do otherwise than recognize them to be favourable to that encrease: and that in so essential a degree, that the security given to property can not be said to be compleat without it”. This lecture will put the debate in modern context and show why Bentham was right.

all events are free with no need to book unless otherwise stated  21

events diary

Thursday 1 March


Tuesday 6 March 6.30–8pm Lecture/Talk Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Getting to the root of Egyptian hair: African style and dressing Sandra Gittens +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Ancient and modern hair meet at the Petrie Museum in this workshop linked to research for the forthcoming exhibition ‘African Combs: 5,000 years of culture, politics and identity’ at Cambridge. Sandra Gittens, a specialist and author on African hair, will explore the types of North, West and East African hair types/braids worn today with a practical demo of braiding by a specialist.

Wednesday 7 March

Mice people: Cultures of science

6.30–7.30pm

Dr Gail Davies (UCL Geography) +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Lecture/Talk JZ Young Lecture Theatre

Join Dr Gail Davies (UCL Geography) as she explores the world inhabited by animal researchers with former geneticist Dr Steve Cross (Head of Public Engagement, UCL). What cultures have developed around scientists who work with laboratory mice? In this candid discussion discover how Davies’ ethnographic approach to the practice of modern science has uncovered some intriguing findings about the humans involved. A Grant Museum event. Following the event join us for a free glass of wine in a private view of the museum.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 8 March 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

Having it all: dispelling the myths about work and motherhood Dr Anne McMunn (UCL Epidemiology & Public Health) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

See opposite.

22  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


6.30–7.30pm Lecture/Talk Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Wandering wombs and wicked water: Women’s complaints and their treatment Dr Carol Reeves (UCL Wellcome Fellow History of Medicine) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

How did the Egyptians deal with period pains, contraception, cystitis, ‘terrors of the womb’, or determine a woman’s fertility? The Kahun Gynaecological Papyrus is the oldest known medical text dating from Egypt’s Middle Kingdom (2025–1700 BC). The fragments that survive offer an intriguing insight into ideas about women and their bodies in ancient Egypt and also suggest that ideas previously thought to have originated in Greek medicine are actually much older. A special talk for International Women’s Day.

LUNCH HOUR LECTure Having it all: dispelling the myths about work and motherhood Thursday 8 March, 1.15–1.55pm We hear a lot about the stresses of juggling motherhood with paid work, and the subsequent harm this might cause children. However, this lecture to mark International Women’s Day discusses evidence from UK cohort studies following generations of men and women which suggests that working mothers not only end up healthier in mid-life, but that their daughters may also end up happier too. please see page 32 for venue locations  23

events diary

Thursday 8 March


STUDENT SEASON Thursday 8 March – Saturday 10 March 7.30pm Performance Bloomsbury Theatre

Delirium UCLU Dance Society uclu-dance.society@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7388 8822 boxoffice@thebloomsbury.com www.thebloomsbury.com

Dr Dean Barratt (UCL Medical Physics & Engineering)

UCLU Dance Society’s 26th Annual Show in association with UCLU Stage Crew. An outbreak has occurred. Infection is reaching pandemic proportions – everybody around the world is dancing and it appears that no one is immune! From tap to hip-hop, classical ballet and breakdance – personal expression is being uncontrollably unleashed from the masses and little can be done to contain the virus. The question is… do they want to be cured?

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE The Search for Genius and Einstein’s Brain Thursday 15 March, 1.15–1.55pm To mark Brain Awareness Week, Dr Mark Lythgoe will take audiences on a journey in search of the greatest brain of the 20th century, a brain which was removed during the autopsy of Einstein in 1955. Through this journey, Dr Lythgoe will then discuss whether Einstein’s brain was extra special, and what this research can tell us about genius. Finally, this lecture will then take a playful look at whether we all have the potential to unlock our creative mind.


Drop in 11am-4pm Family Activities Grant Museum of Zoology

Fossil forage: National Science and Engineering Week activities +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Take this chance to visit the Grant Museum at the weekend with an amazing opportunity to sieve through our genuine fossil-rich sediment from a time when London was patrolled by sharks and rays. Find a 50 million year old shark’s tooth and take it home!

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Tuesday 13 March 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

The Search for Genius and Einstein’s Brain Dr Mark Lythgoe (Director, UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

See opposite.

LUNCH HOUR LECTURE Thursday 15 March 1.15–1.55pm Lunch Hour Lecture Darwin Lecture Theatre

3D imaging: nanotechnology and the quest for better medical sensors Professor Ian Robinson (UCL London Centre for Nanotechnology) +44 (0)20 3108 3840; www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

The smaller the scales we want to look at, the bigger the tools we need to use, and with complex equipment of this magnitude, it is becoming more and more common for research groups to share central user facilities. To mark National Science and Engineering Week, this lecture will focus on UCL’s use of central user synchrotron radiation facilities (sub-atomic particle accelerators), to highlight developments in the 3D imaging of nanomaterials in the ultimate quest for creating better medical sensors.

all events are free with no need to book unless otherwise stated  25

events diary

Saturday 10 March


Thursday 15 March

How scientific was Agora?

6.30–7.30pm

Dr Andrew Gregory (UCL Science & Technology Studies) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Lecture/Talk Institute of Archaeology Lecture Theatre, Gordon Square

A screening of clips from Agora where Hypatia explains astronomy and cosmology with analysis on what is accurate about what was known and believed about the universe at that time and what was not. With Andrew Gregory, expert on Greek cosmology and perceptions of astronomy, and Debbie Challis (UCL Petrie Museum) on Alexandria and perceptions of Hypatia.

Saturday 17 March

Printing objects: Lino-print workshop

1.30–4.30pm

Adele Wagstaff (UCL Slade School of Art) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Workshop Pre–booking essential Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Come and make your own lino cut prints inspired by Egypt and objects within the Petrie collection.

STUDENT SEASON Monday 19 March Wednesday 21 March Friday 23 March Saturday 24 March 7.30pm Performance Bloomsbury Theatre Pre-booking advised

University College Opera presents Acante et Céphise by Jean-Philippe Rameau UCLU Music Society universitycollegeopera@gmail.com +44 (0)20 7388 8822 boxoffice@thebloomsbury.com www.thebloomsbury.com

In the first British staging of this spectacular French baroque opera-ballet, UCOpera rediscovers the story of the lovers, Acante and Céphise. Tormented and separated by the jealous genie, Oroès, their only hope lies with the good fairy Zirphile. Will she be able to save them or will they die at the hands of Oroès and his minions? Originally written to celebrate the arrival of a new heir to the Bourbon dynasty, in this newly-conceived staging the piece becomes an entertaining journey through the trials and triumphs of that most universal of stories – the creation

26  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


FILM SCREENING The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) on the Big Screen Tuesday 20 March, 6.30–8.30pm This dinosaur classic follows a terrifying beast accidentally resurrected following nuclear testing as it rampages through America. It is said to be one of the inspirations for Godzilla. The trailers ask “Are we delving into mysteries we weren’t meant to know?”, “Who knows what waits for us in nature’s no-man’s land?” A Grant Museum event. Following the film join us for a free glass of wine in a private view of the museum.

of a new life. With a magnificent score by Jean-Philippe Rameau, one of France’s most famous and original composers, and fabulous dancing throughout, this is a unique chance to see this masterpiece. Tuesday 20 March 6.30–8.30pm Film Screening JZ Young Lecture Theatre

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) on the big screen Dr Joe Cain (UCL Science & Technology Studies) +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

See above.

please see page 32 for venue locations  27


WORKSHOP Easter Egg-Laying Animals Mon 2 April – WedS 4 April, WedS 12 April – Fri 13 April. Drop in 1–5pm For the Easter holidays the Grant Museum is exploring the wonderful world of eggy animals. From penguins to platypuses, sharks to snails and bullfrogs to butterflies, our fantastic specimen-based activities will investigate the best shells and spawn. Come and unscramble our games and whip up some eggcitement with our amazing animal specimens. Part of the Humanimals Season at the Grant Museum.

Wednesday 28 March

Unrolling Egypt’s ancient dead

6.30–7.30pm

John J Johnston (UCL Institute of Archaeology, Egypt Exploration Society) +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Lecture/Talk Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre

A frequent souvenir of wealthy travellers, the mummified cadavers of ancient Egyptians were not confined merely to museums but became an increasingly popular feature of salons and lecture theatres throughout the Western world during the mid-nineteenth century. The PR of ‘unrolling’ mummies has been viewed as both a ghoulish spectacle for sensation seekers and as an early scientific approach to the emerging discipline of Egyptology. This lecture by John J Johnston addresses this dichotomy by placing the practice within its social, cultural, and historical contexts.

28  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


Saturday 31 March

Comic book slam

2–4pm

Kel Winser +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Workshop Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Create your own comic panel and characters in two hours in this comic book slam at the Petrie Museum. Explore comics using Egypt as inspiration and objects from the museum for your own ideas.

Monday 2 April – Tuesday 4 April

Supergods comic book workshop

11am–3.30pm Workshop Pre–booking essential Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Monday 2 April – Wednesday 4 April Wednesday 12 April – Friday 13 April Drop in 1–5pm

Kel Winser +44 (0)20 7679 4138; events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

Create your own superheroes based on the Ancient Egyptian gods. Get advice from a comics writer on how tell your story. Take inspiration from the museum and other comics about Egypt to put your own comic strip together. Suitable for 12 years upwards.

Easter egg-laying animals +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

See opposite.

Workshop Grant Museum of Zoology

TUNE IN TO ucl podcasts mini-lectures films ON youtubE: www.youtube.com/ucltv Continuous line: figures in motion ON ITUNES U: SATURDAY 20 NOVEMBER http://itunes.ucl.ac.uk This practical drawing workshop will look at artists’ techniques for drawing the figure in motion, exploring weight of lines and speed of movement.


exhibitions Monday 9 January – Friday 27 April

Rousseau 300: Nature, self and state

Monday – Friday 1–5pm

This exhibition features rare items from UCL’s art and book collections to mark the 300th anniversary of the birth of one of the most controversial authors in the history of philosophy, Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778). Among the items on show are first editions of Rousseau’s works, including On the Social Contract (Du contract social, 1762), frontispieces and translations. The display highlights his unique and interdisciplinary characteristics as a philosopher who not only wrote on politics, economics and education, but also composed music and wrote best-selling novels. A significant part is dedicated to Rousseau’s engagement with the philosophical tradition (from Plato to Locke) and his posthumous reception by revolutionaries and conservatives alike.

Exhibition

© Trustees of the British Museum

UCL Art Museum

Wednesday 1 February – Friday 9 March 1–5pm Monday–Friday Exhibition Grant Museum of Zoology

+44 (0)20 7679 2540; college.art@ucl.ac.uk

Art by Animals +44 (0)20 3108 2052; zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/whats-on

Do animals make art? This exhibition includes paintings by apes and elephants and examines whether they are artistic works or just pointless lines on a page.

30  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING


Exhibition UCL North Lodge and North Cloister

Monday 19 March – Saturday 13 July Mon–Fri, 1pm–5pm Exhibition Grant Museum of Zoology

Reanimating cultural heritage in Sierra Leone paul.basu@ucl.ac.uk

An exhibition to celebrate the launch of the www.sierraleoneheritage.org digital heritage resource. Based on a three year AHRC-funded research project that has explored the role of culture and heritage in civil society strengthening in Sierra Leone, this multi-sited exhibition includes video installation, photography, and a rare opportunity to see some iconic Sierra Leonean artefacts from the British Museum and Sierra Leone National Museum.

Buried on campus +44 (0)20 3108 2052 zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk

A huge mass of human bones was discovered in UCL during construction work in 2010. This installation displays the investigations undertaken to discover what they are and why they were buried. Remains of at least 84 individual people and many animals have been identified. Uncover where they came from and what we can learn from them in this unusual exhibition co-curated by UCL forensic anatomists and osteologists.

please see page 32 for venue locations 31

exhibitions

Tuesday 10 January – Friday 24 February


Venue Locations

4 UCL Bloomsbury Theatre 15 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH +44 (0)20 7388 8822 www.thebloomsbury.com Check online for full event listings

1 UCL Main Campus Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2000 www.ucl.ac.uk

5 Chadwick Lecture Theatre UCL, Main Campus

2 UCL Art Museum South Cloisters, UCL Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT Monday–Friday, 1–5pm college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/uclart

6 Darwin Lecture Theatre UCL Darwin Building, Malet Place, London, WC1E 6BT 7 Grant Museum of Zoology UCL Rockefeller Building, 21 University Street, WC1E 6DE Monday–Friday, 1–5pm zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/zoology

3 UCL Institute of Archaeology Lecture Theatre UCL Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

8 JZ Young Lecture Theatre UCL Anatomy Building Gower The Street, WC1E 6BT Wellcome

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8

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6

9

MALET

MEWS

HUNTLEY

CHENIES

PLACE

Petrie Museum

Darwin

SHROPSHIRE PL

TORRINGTON Goodge Street

10 Gustave Tuck

Anatomy

CAPPER STREET

2

SQUARE

7

Grant Museum

Quadrangle

PLACE

Rockefeller MORTIMER MARKET

Bloomsbury Theatre

STREET N

UCL Art Museum

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5

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4

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UNIVERSITY

TOTTENHAM COU RT ROAD

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North Cloisters

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Entrance to Darwin Lecture Theatre 32  SEE WWW.UCL.AC.UK/EVENTS FOR AN UP-TO-DATE LISTING

TORRINGTON SQUARE


10 Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre Wilkins Building, UCL, Gower Street WC1E 6BT 11 Wilkins Haldane Room UCL, Main Campus 12 Cruciform Lecture Theatre 1 UCL Cruciform Building Gower Street WC1E 6BT

Getting to UCL By Tube Underground stations near to UCL’s main campus: Euston Square (Circle, Metropolitan, Hammersmith and City Lines) Goodge Street (Northern Line) Warren Street (Northern and Victoria Lines). By Rail Mainline train stations near to UCL’s main campus: Euston, King’s Cross and St Pancras International By Bus Buses serving Gower Street 134, 390, 10, 73, 24, 29, 14 By Car The Bloomsbury area has metered parking and visitors are strongly advised not to travel to UCL by car.

STREET

STREET

GORDON

ENDSLEIGH

TAVITON

STREET

ENDSLEIGH GA RDENS

3 ENDSLEIGH PL

GORDON SQUARE

SQUARE

BEDFORD WAY

Russell Square

WOBURN

SQUARE

Z

TAVISTOCK SQUARE

GORDON

GORDON SQUARE

venue locations / getting to UCL

9 UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Malet Place, UCL, WC1E 6BT Tuesday to Friday 1–5pm and Saturday 10–1pm petrie.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2884 www.petrie.ucl.ac.uk


VIsitor information ADMISSION All events are free and open to everyone with no need to book in advance – unless otherwise stated. WATCHING ONLINE If you are unable to attend any of our lectures, many are now being filmed and are available to download for free from our website, our YouTube site or on iTunes U. further information For further information please contact individual events or visit www.ucl.ac.uk/events term dates 9 January–23 March

ACCESSIBILITY UCL aims to provide accessibility to all its events. If you require any information about any accessibility requirements please contact UCL Disability Services on +44 (0)20 7679 0100 disability@ucl.ac.uk GENERAL ENQUIRIES Main Switchboard: +44 (0)20 7679 2000 Main address: University College London Gower Street London, WC1E 6BT For further information about any of our events please visit our website www.ucl.ac.uk/events

Keeping in Touch If you would like to receive future copies of Brain Food please email your contact details to events@ucl.ac.uk Subscribe to the fortnightly UCL e-newsletter at: www.ucl.ac.uk/events Please note: Listings correct at time of going to press. Please check event details online at www.ucl.ac.uk/events

UCL Brain Food 2012  

UCL's termly public events leaflet featuring talks, exhibitions, workshops and more.

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