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Wednesday, October 3, 2012 • 306 Royce Hall • 4 PM

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 • 314 Royce Hall • 6:30 PM

JEWISH STUDIES OPEN HOUSE

HASIDIC COURTS: A Talk with Photographer Gil Cohen-Magen

For everyone interested in learning about the Center and meeting affiliated faculty. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

SEPHARDIC PHILANTHROPY AND THE ORIGINS OF A MODERN JEWISH NATION Matthias B. Lehmann (UC Irvine) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Sephardic Jews have been noticeably absent from one of the central chapters of modern Jewish history, the rise of Jewish nationalism in the late 19th and early 20th century. It is certainly the case that Zionism as a political movement and a secular, nationalist ideology was largely a product of the European, Ashkenazi experience. This paper argues, however, that in the 18th century, the traditional Sephardic elites of the Eastern Mediterranean established a new type of relationship linking the Jewish communities of the Diaspora to the Holy Land that was crucial for the subsequent success of modern Zionism. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies UCLA Department of History UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies

Thursday, October 11, 2012 • 10383 Bunche Hall • 12 PM

FROM ENEMY TO BROTHER: The Revolution in Catholic Teaching on the Jews, 1933-1965 John Connelly (UC Berkeley)

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for European and Eurasian Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more info, please contact CEES at 310-825-4060 or cees2@international.ucla.edu

Wednesday, October 17, 2012 • 348 Humanities • 3:30 PM

AFTER SECULARIZATION: Configurations of the Post-Secular in Goethe, Heine, and Spinoza Willi Goetschel (University of Toronto) Sponsored by the UCLA Department of Comparative Literature Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information, please contact Michelle Anderson at 310-825-7650 or manderson@humnet.ucla.edu

Gil Cohen-Magen (Photographer)

Gil Cohen-Magen’s photographs are part of the current exhibition on Hasidic life at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. His recent book, Hasidic Courts, is a photographic exposé of moments, surprises and impressions from the lives of Israel’s ultra-Orthodox, mostly anti-Zionist communities such as the Satmar Hassidic sect. It provides a no-holds barred look at ceremonies and gatherings which have never before been photographed by outsiders. Sponsored by the UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information, please contact Maura Kleeman Resnick at 310-825-9646 or mkresnick@international.ucla.edu

Thursday, October 25, 2012 • UCLA Hillel • 7 PM

WHERE THE PAST MEETS THE FUTURE: The Art of Fay Grajower Fay Grajower (Artist) An Exhibit Opening

Fay Grajower’s paintings provide insight about the second generation of Holocaust survivors. The artist uses her acquired memories of her mother’s and siblings’ experiences to work through issues of the past. The installation is made up of 140 vivid mixed-media works on wood (9.5” each). Arranged to form mosaic walls, the pieces suggest the scope of Jewish experience over the centuries, and up to the past 50 years. Sponsored by the Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please contact Perla Karney at 310-208-3081 or perla@uclahillel.org

Thursday, October 25, 2012 • UCLA Hillel • 7 PM

WHAT REMAINS: The Iranian Jewish Experience in LA

Soraya Nazarian • Shelley Gazin • Jessica Shokrian Krista Nassi • Tess Halavy A satellite show of the Fowler Museum exhibition Light and Shadows presenting Jewish Iranian artists Sponsored by the Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Iranian Jewish Women’s Organization Janis and Avi Rojany For additional information, please contact Perla Karney at 310-208-3081 or perla@uclahillel.org

Sunday, October 21, 2012 • Fowler Museum • 12 PM

LIGHT AND SHADOWS: The Story of Iranian Jews Exhibition Opening Celebration

Sponsored by the UCLA Fowler Museum Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information, please contact The Fowler at 310-825-4361

Monday, October 22, 2012 • 306 Royce Hall • 9 AM

AUTHORITATIVE TRADITIONS AND RITUAL POWER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD A Colloquium

The aim of this colloquium is to explore how authoritative texts, culture heroes, and authors were invoked ritually for cursing, protection, and divination in the ancient and late antique Near Eastern and Mediterranean world. The speakers represent a wide range of specializations in ancient ritual practice, including Egyptian, Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Christian materials. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures UCLA Department of History UCLA Department of Classics For more information, please contact CSR at 310-825-8472 or csr@humnet.ucla.edu

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 • 6275 Bunche Hall • 12 PM

KISHINEV’S POGROM IN MYTHOLOGY AND HISTORY: The Transmutation of the 1903 Riot in Hebrew Poetry, Jewish Politics, and the Protocols of the Elders in Zion

Thursday, November 8, 2012 • UCLA Hillel • 4 PM

BULGARIA AND THE HOLOCAUST: The Fragility of Goodness

Keynote: Steven Sage (US Holocaust Museum) Film Screening: The Optimists A Symposium, Exhibition, and Cultural Event

This exhibition tells the story of how the Bulgarian Jews survived the Holocaust. In February 1943, Bulgaria and Germany signed an agreement to deport Bulgarian Jewry to camps in Poland. First Bulgarian police detained over 11,000 Jews of Thrace and Macedonia, then under Bulgarian occupation, and sent them to death camps. Then they proceeded to round up 9,000 Jews within Bulgaria itself. An intense public reaction ensued. Significant and public protest involving key political leaders and the Bulgarian Orthodox Church moved King Boris III to cancel the deportation on the very day of its planned execution. While expelled from their homes and persecuted, Bulgaria’s 48,000 Jews nonetheless escaped total destruction with the help of civic society. The exhibit will run from Sept. 10 to Nov. 30 at UCLA Hillel. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies The “1939” Club Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the Bulgarian Jewish Heritage Alliance of America UCLA Center for European and Eurasian Studies UCLA Department of History UCLA Mickey Katz Chair in Jewish Music

Wednesday, November 14, 2012 • UCLA Faculty Center • 4 PM

JEWISH STUDIES IN CHINA: The New Frontier

Jewish Studies is a small but growing field in China. The Glazer Institute of Jewish Studies at Nanjing University, founded in 1992 and renamed in 2007 for Los Angeles philanthropists Diane and Guilford Glazer, offers regular courses on Judaism, Jewish history and culture, and Holocaust studies. What kinds of issues may Chinese scholars in Judaic Studies encounter in a land which is neither Christian nor Muslim, and where Judaism and the animus against it are not deep-seated? The talk will address the current situation and future prospects of Jewish studies in China.

Lihong Song (Nanjing University) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Thursday, November 15, 2012 • 314 Royce Hall • 12 PM

CHINESE AND WESTERN PERSPECTIVES ON THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF KAIFENG: Towards a Fusion of Horizons

The Jewish past in Kaifeng, China stretches back more than a thousand years. Most scholars agree that a Jewish community existed in Kaifeng, once an important stop on the Silk Road, since the Northern Song Dynasty (960–1127). Some experts date the arrival of Jews to the Tang Dynasty (618-907) or even earlier. Since the discovery of the community by the Jesuits in the 17th century, it has triggered legions of scholarly activity. Working on the same historical evidence, however, Chinese and western scholars usually drew drastically different conclusions. Reflections on the differences will not only lay bare the orientations of Jewish studies in China, but also shed light on the worlds in which we live.

Steven Zipperstein (Stanford)

Lihong Song (Nanjing University)

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Kishinev’s 1903 pogrom was the first instance when an event in Russian Jewish life received wide hearing. The riot, leaving 49 dead in an obscure border town, dominated headlines of much of the western press for weeks; it intruded upon US-Russian relations, and made an imprint on an astonishing array of institutions: the nascent Jewish army in Palestine, the NAACP and, most likely, the first version of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. How was it that this particular incident – devastating, to be sure – came to define so much, and for so long?

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History UCLA Confucius Institute UCLA Department of Asian Languages & Cultures UCLA East Asian Library UCLA Center for Chinese Studies

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History UCLA Center for European and Eurasian Studies UCLA Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

CJS Events are free and open to the public. ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To RSVP: call (310) 267-5327 or email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu

For maps and parking information please visit www.transportation.ucla.edu. Please note that events are subject to change without notice. For an up-to-date schedule, please visit www.cjs.ucla.edu

CJS Event

Center for Jewish Studies

CJS Cosponsored Event

Annual Calendar of Events 2012 - 2013

Thursday, November 29, 2012 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

Thursday, January 24, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall • 12 PM

FROM THE SHAHS TO LOS ANGELES: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women

BIRTHRIGHT VEGAS: Wandering the Desert in Search of Jewishness

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Daniel Itzkovitz (Stonehill College)

Saba Soomekh (Loyola Marymount University)

Prof. Saba Soomekh will present an ethnographic portrait of life for three generations of Iranian Jewish women who lived in Iran and now live in America, exploring the political and social changes that have affected these women in regards to From the Shahs to Los Angeles their rituals, religious observances, sexuality and their self-concept as Iranian Jewish women in Iran and now in Los Angeles. THREE GENERATIONS OF IRANIAN JEWISH WOMEN BETWEEN RELIGION AND CULTURE

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures UCLA Department of Sociology

SABA SOOMEKH

Tuesday, January 29, 2013 • UCLA Faculty Center • 4 PM

MAPPING JEWISH LA

WHY THIS NEW FASCINATION? Islam in the Modern Jewish Imagination

Wonder what Jewish LA was like more than a century ago? Go back in time with Dr. Karen Wilson, head curator for Mapping Jewish LA, the Center’s five-year initiative to create a multimedia digital archive. She will share the first exhibits for this intriguing project. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Library With Support from the Sady and Ludwig Kahn Endowment in German Jewish Studies

Thursday, December 6, 2012 • 314 Royce Hall • 4 PM

THE JEWISH ORIGINS OF CULTURAL PLURALISM Daniel Green (Newberry Library, Chicago) Naftulin Family Lecture on Studies in Jewish Identity

The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism (Indiana UP, 2011) traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to a group of Jewish college students and public intellectuals, including the philosopher Horace M. Kallen. At Harvard, they founded an influential student organization known as the Menorah Association in 1906 and later the Menorah Journal, which became a leading voice of Jewish public opinion in the 1920s. In response to the idea that the American melting pot would erase all cultural differences, the Menorah Association advocated a pluralist America that would accommodate a thriving Jewish culture while bringing Jewishness into mainstream American life. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Library UCLA Department of History

FORBIDDEN ART: A Symposium and Exhibition on Camp Art from the Collections of the Auschwitz Memorial

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Exhibit will run from December - January at UCLA Hillel

This paper looks particularly at Hettie Jones’ memoir of her marriage to the poet LeRoi Jones/ Amiri Baraka, How I Became Hettie Jones (1990), Lore Segal’s novel Her First American (1985), and Gary Shteyngart’s recent Super Sad True Love Story (2010) to show the conjoined histories of gender and race in Jewish American culture during the period. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion UCLA Department of English

Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth College)

Sady and Ludwig Kahn Lecture in German Jewish Studies

Why have so many Jewish scholars been drawn to the study of Islam? From the 1830s to the 1930s, Jewish scholars came to dominate the field of Islamic Studies in Europe, particularly in Germany, Hungary, and France, concentrating primarily on the Qur’an and the life of Muhammad, but also painting a broad canvas describing the nature of Islam as a religion. They presented Islam as derived from Judaism, and under whose aegis, especially in medieval Muslim Spain, Jews enjoyed not only religious tolerance, but cultural and economic flourishing. This talk will discuss the contributions of these Jewish scholars to the nascent field of Islamic Studies; the very different kind of “Orientalism” their work promoted; and what their studies of Islam contributed to modern Jewish self-understanding. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures UCLA Department of History

Thursday, January 31, 2013 • 365 Humanities • 12 PM

WOMEN IN THE BIBLE: Now That We Are Out of the Garden, Where Do We Go? Tammi J. Schneider

(Claremont Graduate University) Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Thursday, January 17, 2013 • UCLA Hillel • 4 PM

Jennifer Glaser (U of Cincinnati)

THE COLOR OF MARRIAGE: Jews, Race, and Intermarriage in America

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

Wednesday, December 5, 2012 • Young Research Library • 4 PM

This exhibition from the Auschwitz Memorial features twenty works of art made illegally and under the threat of death by prisoners in Nazi concentration camps. At once a unique historical document and testament to the fight for one’s own humanity, the art is also a record of each prisoner-artist’s inner life. The photographs are accompanied by historical commentary and excerpts from archival accounts, and include drawings depicting the plight of inmates, scenes from camp life and portraits. They also include excerpts from fairy tales that inmates wrote for their children left at home, and in some cases, information about the artists themselves.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012 • 314 Royce Hall • 12 PM

Since World War II there has been a growing sense among many that anti-Semitism would not destroy the Jews after all; rather, it would be through assimilation, intermarriage and general indifference. By the 1990s, when the Jewish population survey noted an alarming drop in the number of American Jews, a full-scale panic set in among those concerned with the future of the Jews. Birthright Vegas will look at one moment in this panic and its aftermath: a moment in which the Jewish relation to Israel, to religion, and to Las Vegas is wildly in flux.

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies The “1939” Club Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Poland German Consulate General in Los Angeles UCLA Department of Germanic Languages UCLA Department of History Exhibition was made possible through the partnership of The Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and the Polish Mission

Monday, February 4, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

VIENNA’S JEWISH GEOGRAPHY: Beyond the Leopoldstadt

Lisa Silverman (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) Inaugural Seminar on Vienna in Los Angeles

“Jewish space” immediately conjures up images of urban sites bearing visible evidence of Jews or Jewish culture, such as Vienna’s traditionally Jewish Leopoldstadt district. But other spaces can also be implicitly perceived as Jewish, for a variety of reasons. Through historical analysis of Vienna’s built environment and its depiction in the testimony of Austrian Jews forced to leave after 1938, this talk will explore how a complex coding of Jewish difference translated onto space affected how all Vienna’s residents navigated – and imagined – their city. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Germanic Languages UCLA Department of History


Monday, February 11, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

Tuesday, March 5, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

CONVERSION AND CONVERGENCE: Transcontinental Latina/o Sephardic/Muslim Narratives

J. Edward Wright (University of Arizona)

Dalia Kandiyoti (College of Staten Island) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

This comparative talk will examine tropes and themes in cultural discourses and fictions about the legacies of conversion from the Americas to Europe and Turkey. In the contemporary imagination, conversion and “returns” are characterized by both sharply differentiated and convergent identities in highly imbricated Catholic, Sephardic, and Muslim cultural worlds. At the center of these representations are changing contemporary perceptions of Sephardic cultures and histories as well as global ideas about religion and ethnicity. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies UCLA Department of History

Wednesday, February 13, 2013 • 6275 Bunche Hall • 4 PM

RE-VISITING “THE RINGWORM AFFAIR”: X-Rays and the Jewish Question in Early Israel Michael Berkowitz (University College London)

Prof. Berkowitz will address the “Ringworm Affair” in modern Israel (an effort by the State of Israel in the 1950s to combat the scourge of ringworm especially among children who arrived in the massive migration of Jews from North Africa and the Middle East). When it was realized later that many of these children died from (apparently) excessive exposure to radiation, their treatment became a scandal and the subject of an award-wining documentary film, The Ringworm Children. Sponsored by the UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies UCLA Department of History For more info, please contact Maura Resnick at 310-825-9646 or mkresnick@international.ucla.edu

Thursday, February 21, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall • 12 PM

THINK YIDDISH, DRESS BRITISH: Jews, AntiSemitism, and the Ivy League Style at Yale in the 1950s Dan Horowitz (Author)

TITLE TBA

Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Thursday, March 7, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall • 7:30 PM

FUTURITY: Contemporary Hebrew Literature and the Quest for the Past Amir Eshel (Stanford)

The Arnold Band Distinguished Lecture in Jewish Studies

When looking at how trauma is represented in literature and the arts, we tend to focus on the weight of the past. Prof. Eshel suggests that this retrospective gaze has trapped us in a search for reason in the madness of the twentieth century’s catastrophes at the expense of literature’s prospective vision. Considering several key literary works, Eshel argues that by grappling with watershed events of modernity, these works display a future-centric engagement with the past that opens up the present to new political, cultural, and ethical possibilities—what he calls futurity. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies With the Generous Support of Milt & Sheila Hyman

Monday-Tuesday, March 18-19, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall

JACOB AND SUSAN TAUBES AND THEIR CIRCLES An International Conference Organized by

Kenneth Reinhard (UCLA) This conference looks at the lives and brilliant careers of Jacob and Susan Taubes. They were strikingly original, and often controversial Jewish intellectuals in New York after World War II, and key figures in some of the most important philosophical, political, theological, and artistic discussions of their times. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory Zentrum für Literatur-und Kulturforschung (Berlin)

Faculty/Student Seminar Series

This talk will illuminate major changes in the relationships between social class, sartorial style, and entrepreneurship, as well as the relationships between Jews and others in the opening up of American society. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

TITLE TBA

Joel Baden (Yale) Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Thursday, April 4, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall • 4 PM

SIMONE WEIL’S ANTI-SEMITISM

Mary Gordon (Barnard College)

The life, character, behavior, and ideas of Simone Weil shed light on the painful contradictions lived out by a kind of Jewish intellectual. Ordinary, or garden variety self hatred was sometimes masked by a assertions of cultural, rather than ethnic, tribal, religious self identification. Simone Weil, whose life was devoted to witnessing oppression and injustice, and was almost silent about the persecution of Jews by Nazis — chose to instead focus on the fate of France at the hands of the Germans. In a woman of such high intellectual and ethical standards, such blindnesses are shocking and deeply distressing. Her supporters want to pretend the problem wasn’t there; her detractors want to deny her brilliant contributions to the intellectual history of the 20th century. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 • 6275 Bunche Hall • 4 PM

Tuesday, June 4, 2013 • Venue TBA • 4 PM

CHINESE ATTITUDES TOWARDS JEWS AND JUDAISM

Jewlia Eisenberg & Charming Hostess (An Ensemble)

Xu Xin (Nanjing University)

An analysis of Chinese knowledge and attitudes toward the Jews in the 20th century. Many Chinese people are fascinated by the Jews and how they survived, were revived, and have achieved so much in modern times despite the fact that they have been persecuted throughout the ages. The image of the Jews in the Chinese mind serves as an “other”, which remains a mirror for the Chinese to judge or construct themselves and a model for them to learn about the path to modernization without losing their traditions. Sponsored by the UCLA Department of History Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

Thursday, April 25, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

THE GINZBURG GEOGRAPHY PROJECT The Natalie Limonick Program on Jewish Civilization A Performance

This performance features music from The Ginzburg Geography, an upcoming installation exploring the lives of Italian anti-fascist intellectuals Natalia and Leone Ginzburg through sound and cartography. The texts are drawn from the Ginzburgs’ writings, the music draws from Italian regional traditions, Italian Jewish liturgy, and anti-fascist song from work chants to resistance anthems. Performance by Charming Hostess, an ensemble working at the intersection of voice, text, and diaspora consciousness. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Mickey Katz Chair in Jewish Music at UCLA Funding Provided by the Natalie Limonick Fund in Memory of Miriam Nisell Rose

LOOKING IN THE MIRROR: The Ethnographic Sensibility in Yiddish Literature Samuel Spinner (UCLA) Ross Seminar in Yiddish Studies

Yiddish literature, largely written by Jews and for Jews, nevertheless contains an ethnographic element, seemingly more appropriate for the description of unfamiliar peoples and cultures. This talk describes the influence of ethnography on the formation and expression of European Jewish identity in the first half of the twentieth century, and analyzes the ways in which the idiom of describing the foreign came to be used in Yiddish to describe the familiar. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies UCLA Mickey Ross Program in Yiddish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

Sunday, May 19, 2013 • Autry National Center • Time TBA

JEWS IN THE LOS ANGELES MOSAIC Exhibition Opening

Committed to presenting the evolving story of the American West as an interwoven tapestry of cultures and peoples, the Autry will break new ground in exploring the diversity of Los Angeles and the second-largest Jewish community in North America. Through approximately 150 artifacts, countless images, and original media, visitors will learn how the place and myth called Los Angeles has shaped Jewish identities, and will have an opportunity to reflect on their own notions of self, community, and society in the twenty-first century.

at the

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CJS Event CJS Cosponsored Event CJS Events are free and open to the public. ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To RSVP: call (310) 267-5327 or email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu

For maps and parking information please visit www.transportation.ucla.edu. Please note that events are subject to change without notice.

302 Royce Hall, Box 951485 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485

Phone: 310.825.5387 RSVP line: 310.267.5327 cjs@humnet.ucla.edu

For an up-to-date schedule, please visit www.cjs.ucla.edu

Sponsored by the Autry National Center UCLA Center for Jewish Studies The Historical Society of Southern California

Thursday, May 23, 2013 • 314 Royce Hall • 4 PM

THE SHOAH EXPERIENCE FROM THE ANDREA DEVOTO ORAL ARCHIVE Giovanni Contini Bonacossi (Scholar) Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies UCLA Department of Italian

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 • 306 Royce Hall • 12 PM

Eleanor Kaufman (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

The French philosopher Gilles Deleuze is known as a contemporary thinker engaged with Scholastic thought, above all with Duns Scotus’s notion of univocity, which Deleuze famously links to Spinoza. By contrast, Prof. Kaufman’s Deleuze, the Dark Precursor suggests that Deleuze should be thought more directly alongside Aquinas, his avowed enemy, and Aquinas’s notion of analogy. This presentation will link Deleuze’s thought not only to Christian philosophy but also to a strain of “apostate” Jewish thought arguably represented by Spinoza. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory

Tuesday, April 9, 2013 • 6275 Bunche Hall • 12 PM

NEW BABYLONIANS: The Farhud and Iraqi Jewry

Thursday, May 30, 2013 • UCLA Faculty Center • 4 PM

Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Ben Shephard (Oxford)

Orit Bashkin (University of Chicago)

The talk will explore the Farhud, a series of urban riots against Iraqi Jews during which nearly 180 Jews were killed (June 1-2, 1941). The Farhud brought to the fore both the worst and the noblest aspects of Jewish-Iraqi relations. Essentially the first pogrom in a modern Arab state, it was a direct result of rampant nationalism, the violence of which reached epidemic proportions. At this time Iraqi Jews were attacked by their fellow citizens. The Farhud was also a moment when Muslim neighbors risked their lives in order to protect their Jewish friends, neighbors, and business partners and when friendship, loyalty, and religious and tribal notions concerning protection of the peoples of the book overcame nationalist xenophobia. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies UCLA Department of History

FROM THE CAMP TO THE CHAIR: The Holocaust and Psychiatry The “1939” Club Lecture in Holocaust Studies

It has taken psychiatry many decades to come to terms with the Holocaust. On the one hand, doctors have tried to help survivors to rebuild their lives; on the other, they have been profoundly influenced by the Holocaust in formulating modern concepts of trauma. This lecture will weigh the effectiveness of the medical response and assess the legacy of the Holocaust in modern psychiatry. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies The “1939” Club Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

COVER: Image of the downtown campus of Nanjing University. Photo: Vladimir Menkov. Student: Yasaman Yaghoubian is a Neuroscience major with a minor in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and a member of the Center’s Student Leadership Council. Photo: David Wu.

ANNUAL CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2012 - 2013

Center for Jewish Studies

Business hours: M-TH 9am-12 pm, 1-5pm

(Picture: Emma Dodge Hanson)

DELEUZE, SPINOZA, AND SCHOLASTIC THOUGHT

‫במרכז‬

UCLA CJS Annual Calendar 2012 - 2013  

The UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Annual Calendar of Events 2012 - 2013