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20TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

REIMAGINING JEWISH STUDIES

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2013-14 NEWSLETTER VOLUME 21 Flash version: cjs.ucla.edu


FROM THE DIRECTOR:

REFLECTIONS ON THE CENTER'S 20TH ANNIVERSARY Teaching at UCLA, we have a chance to see many of our students turn twenty. For undergraduates, it’s a big deal because twenty represents a significant rite of passage from the teenage years to young adulthood. It’s a time of transition for the students, who have now chosen a major and begun to seriously embark upon a career path. For many, this is the end of their foundational education and the beginning of their professional training. As the Center for Jewish Studies turns twenty, I began to think that we, too, are reaching a stage of maturity. Jewish Studies—as an academic field—is widely accepted as a field of study, with a rich tradition of knowledge, experiences, cultures, and languages, which have contributed vitally to world civilization. And yet, it’s quite striking that these profound contributions have only recently been recognized institutionally with the creation of the Center. In this regard, we are still quite young.

While the first Jewish Studies courses were taught here in the 1950s, today UCLA offers more than 70 such courses—from general education undergraduate courses to advanced graduate seminars—and we reach over 2,000 students every year. That’s a remarkable achievement and a signal that Jewish Studies is flourishing at UCLA. We are truly fortunate to be in Los Angeles, at a major public university, where diversity and intellectual freedom are coupled deeply with democratic values and cosmopolitan perspectives. We are fortunate to have had visionary leaders—engaged faculty directors, magnanimous patrons, and committed board members—who have created the opportunities that our students have today. Jewish studies at UCLA has become many things: it is globally-oriented, historically informed, comparative, and deeply integrated into the study of world history and world civilization. It is, in many ways, part and parcel of the human condition. And it is also more than academic study: it is engaged, applied, public, and community-enriching. As we turn twenty, the Center is a testament to the bridging of academic knowledge and civic engagement. It represents the deep linkage between UCLA’s public mission as a research and teaching university and the vital necessity of preserving democratic values, pursuing social justice, and fostering ethical responsibility. This is work that is never finished and, in many ways, represents our critical charge for the next twenty years.

When the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies was founded in 1994, Professor Arnold Band, the first director, sought to integrate Jewish Studies more generally into the academic enterprise at UCLA. Rather than establish a separate department, the concept was broad, interdisciplinary integration. The idea blossomed, and today we have 28 affiliated faculty from ten departments: comparative literature, history, political science, near eastern languages and cultures, Germanic languages, French and Francophone studies, law, sociology, ethnomusicology, and theater. As a global, transnational, and trans-media field of inquiry, Jewish Studies at UCLA stretches from the Middle East, North Africa, and the Mediterranean basin to Europe and Eurasia, the Americas, and even China; our faculty and students not only study textual sources but also art, film, music, performance, and digital media.

COVER: Past CJS Directors Arnold Band, David N. Myers, Kenneth Reinhard, Carol Bakhos, and Todd S. Presner. The professors reflect on the Center's Anniversary and the field of Jewish Studies on pages 9-12.

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We are excited to celebrate our 20th anniversary with you, our community. Indeed, this would not have been possible without your generous and steadfast support. The Center staff and I look forward to seeing you at many of our programs this year, and we hope that we can count on you to commit to investing in the next twenty years of the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies.

Box 951485 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485

Todd Samuel Presner Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director, UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Professor, Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature Chair, Digital Humanities Program

editors

www.cjs.ucla.edu

Mary Enid Pinkerson Vivian Holenbeck

cjs@humnet.ucla.edu

design

David Wu

at the

‫במרכז‬

center

Center for Jewish Studies


Q&A WITH FIVE CJS LEADERS OVER TWO DECADES Twenty years ago, Arnold Band established UCLA’s Center for Jewish Studies. Since that time, it has grown into one of the largest, most vibrant and diverse centers of its kind in the world. Sady & Ludwig Kahn Director Todd Presner recently asked Professor Band and the other past directors to reflect on the development of CJS and the field of Jewish Studies during the past two decades and to imagine what lies ahead.

ARNOLD J. BAND DIRECTOR (1994-1996)

PROFESSOR EMERITUS, COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND NELC

What was your original vision for the Center for Jewish Studies and what part of that vision has come true? Our original vision for Jewish Studies at UCLA was modest in comparison to what has developed over the years. Though we are now celebrating 20 years of our Center for Jewish Studies, individual courses in this area were taught at UCLA some 70 years ago. In fact, Hebrew was recognized as an undergraduate major as early as 1959 and individual doctoral programs were conducted in the 1960’s. Nevertheless, when I first arrived on this campus, the presence of Jewish Studies was barely visible—and I really did not expect it to be much more. We had few books on this area in our library. Fortunately, funds were available to purchase significant library holdings and we did this in the 1960’s. However, these academic activities were hardly noticeable on campus. We often had to explain to colleagues that Jewish Studies was a rich academic field. Any proper evaluation of the accomplishments of Jewish Studies in the American academy, including UCLA, really has to take into account the relatively late introduction of this subject into the curriculum of the American academy. When universities first started to consider Jewish Studies as a discrete area, one spoke of Bible and the recent emergence of Israel. Anything in between, including Maimonides, or Spinoza, or the Holocaust, was unknown. It is not coincidental that my requests as early as 1974 to create a Center for Jewish Studies generated little interest even among our closest colleagues. We had few specialists in this field and often relied on visiting professors from Israel from 1965 through 1985 to staff advanced courses. This traffic with Israeli academic institutions helped put UCLA on the international academic map.

The nexus with Israeli institutions was enhanced by the creation of the UC Study Abroad Center in Jerusalem in 1967. Pioneering the academic study of the Holocaust, we were granted our first endowed chair, the 1939 Club Chair in Holocaust Studies, in 1979. And yet, we still did not have a Center to concentrate and enhance our activities. The creation of the Center in 1994 was thus a belated recognition that the historical experience of the Jewish people was indeed a subject of interest in the academy, an integral part of Western Civilization. Thus the recognition of the Jewish experience was confirmed by the very creation of a center and, of course, has been significantly enhanced by the dynamic programs mounted by successive dedicated and imaginative directors over the past 20 years. I cannot imagine that one has to explain today what Jewish Studies are, or why they are important in the university. The list of doctoral dissertations in Jewish Studies prepared by David Hirsch (UCLA Library's Jewish and Middle Eastern Studies bibliographer) includes over 200 items going back to the 1960’s and covering a wide array of topics. One finds on that list the names of more than a few major scholars of Jewish Studies who teach both in America and in Israel. For those interested in the true accomplishments of academic work in Jewish Studies, this is the most forceful proof of what has been done here.

Where do you see the next 20 years? What challenges and opportunities lie ahead? In the best of all possible worlds, I would like to see greater cooperation among the various professors of the diverse areas of Jewish Studies on this campus. I would also appreciate more visiting professors bringing new perspectives, including young post-docs from Israel. In a period of budgetary retrenchment in universities, it is crucial to protect the advances we have made and forcefully demonstrate the centrality of Jewish Studies to the Humanities curriculum in any respectable university. (Continued on page 9-12)

POST A MAZEL TOV What does CJS mean to you? Share your memories and good wishes on the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies’ Facebook page. www.facebook.com/UCLACJS

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JEWS IN THE LOS ANGELES MOSAIC:

A UCLA / AUTRY COLLABORATION “UCLA allowed us to think ambitiously and expand our scope, and that’s a wonderful place to be,” said Carolyn Brucken, the Autry National Center’s chief curator, at opening festivities for “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic,” on view at the Autry through Jan. 5. The exhibition examines local Jewish history by documenting the numerous ways that Jews have always been connected to the city’s other residents and a vital part of the growth of the city of LA itself. The region’s oldest charitable organization, Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles, started as the Hebrew Benevolent Society in 1854, nonsectarian in its assistance then and now. The recent election of three Jews to city-wide offices (mayor Eric Garcetti, city attorney Mike Feuer, and city controller Ron Galperin) are the latest instances of Jewish civic leadership that dates back to the nineteenth century and includes service on the County Board of Supervisors, Los Angeles City School Board and City Council, California State Assembly and Senate, and U.S. House of Representatives. “From the very beginning, Jewish Los Angelenos have been committed to putting aside differences and connecting with other people,” Exhibit Curator Karen Wilson said. Their experience is “evidence of a confidence in the collective. The attitude has been, ‘We’re all here in this together.’” Wilson, the Sady and Ludwig Kahn Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at CJS and curator of the Center’s digital history initiative, Mapping Jewish Los Angeles, had assistance from UCLA students, staff, faculty, alumni and the library’s holdings in assembling over 150 artifacts and media pieces in the show, which traces the Jewish community’s growth from eight European immigrants in 1850 to more than 600,000 today. The exhibition highlights the diversity of the Jewish community and the mark that Jews have made on multiple facets of the cultural and social fabric of the city. In addition to curating the exhibition, Wilson also edited an accompanying book, which includes a chapter by CJS Research Associate Caroline Luce, who unearthed the unlikely story of a politically influential bagel-bakers union in Boyle Heights. Luce, a recent Ph.D. in history at UCLA, also identified and categorized all the library archival resources that deal with Jewish Angelenos. The product of her work, the “UCLA Research Guide to Jewish Los Angeles”—a one-of-a-kind resource for scholars, students, and the greater community—is now available at www.mappingjewishla.org, the online project that links the history of Jewish neighborhoods and communities throughout Los Angeles with historical maps, cultural artifacts, and archival materials.

CORPORATE AND MEDiA SPONSORS:

The most visible contribution by CJS to the exhibition is a projected digital map that documents the decade-by-decade growth of Jewish institutions in the realms of philanthropy, education, and social services. Elliot Yamamoto, who just finished his B.A. at UCLA in architectural studies and who worked at CJS as a research intern, built the map, with information from Mapping Jewish LA. Wilson, who received her Ph.D. in history from UCLA in 2011, was a graduate student in 2005 when Professors David Myers and Steven Aron offered a seminar on the history of the Jews in LA. Aron also serves as executive director of the Autry’s Institute for the Study of the American West, and the idea for the Autry exhibit grew out of that seminar. The digital companion, “Mapping Jewish LA,” is an extension of Professor Todd Presner’s online mapping platform, HyperCities, created in 2007. In addition to providing access to the "UCLA Research Guide to Jewish Los Angeles," the website’s initial exhibitions elaborate on the development of Boyle Heights, once the center of Jewish life in Los Angeles and home to the largest concentration of Jewish residents in the western United States, as well as the impact of Jewish architects and builders on shaping the urban landscape of LA. Coming exhibits focus on the TB epidemic behind the creation of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and City of Hope, and the history of the location of many Jewish institutions in the Sepulveda Pass, among other topics. Speaking of the Autry exhibition, Presner noted that the Center is especially proud of the collaborative vision in realizing an exhibition of this scale and historical significance. “The partnerships with the Autry, the UCLA Library and Special Collections, the department of History, and numerous community organizations are reflected in the diversity of perspectives presented." Visit www.TheAutry.org for more information on the exhibit.

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MOBILE TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE AUTRY EXHIBITION During the fall, visitors to the “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic” exhibition at the Autry National Center will be able to dive into local Jewish history in a brand new way: using web-enabled mobile phones to “augment” the physical exhibition. The mobile experience was spearheaded by a partnership between the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, the Autry National Center, and a mobile start-up company called On-Location Experience (OLE), which develops blue tooth and WiFi beacons for “curating” physical environments with digital content. For the last three months of the exhibition, the Autry will be testing an enhanced visitor experience using a mobile app that will allow guests to connect to web-based content developed by UCLA’s Mapping Jewish LA team. For example,

“while standing in the Autry gallery, visitors will be able to compare pencil sketches drawn by artist Hugo Ballin to the corresponding realized panels of the Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s Warner Memorial Murals encircling its newly restored sanctuary or zoom in and out of historical maps that allow users a much more interactive and personalized experience of the exhibition,” Exhibit Curator Karen Wilson explained. The innovative app is being developed by OLE Technology and will be available to the general public on select days at the Autry. To learn more about this innovative initiative, please visit www.mappingjewishla.org

Featuring

Tali Tadmor

In Concert

as "ELLA FITZGERALDBERG"

SPACE IS LIMITED TICKETS: $50 by 10/31 $75 after 10/31 INCLUDES GUIDED TOUR, CONCERT & DINNER PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. RSVP: (310) 825-5387

Los Angeles was once a center of Yiddish culture, trailing New York in size but not in quality. As part of the Center’s 20th Anniversary celebration, you are invited to enter this world for one day, Sunday, Dec. 8th. Come see the places where the "stars" of Yiddish culture lived and worked, from Boyle Heights to Hollywood on a narrated bus tour. Tour leaders Professor Samuel Spinner and Yiddishkayt Director Dr. Robert Adler Peckerar will bring to life the poets, novelists, journalists, and industry insiders who developed the local Yiddish scene and contributed to the flourishing of American and global Yiddish literature. Additional tour guides will include Yiddish expert Miriam Koral, and historians Dr. Caroline Luce, and Dr. Karen Wilson.

The Yiddish Star Tour will originate at UCLA Hillel and wrap up there for dinner and a musical performance by Six Points Fellow Tali Tadmor. The program will include a mix of both old and new Yiddish music such as 20th-century art songs by Lazar Weiner, traditional, newly arranged folksongs, and original Yiddish music taken from Tadmor’s most recent project, Ella Fitzgeraldberg, a Yiddish Swing cabaret.

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 1

ALMA HECKMAN

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ANAMARIA BUZATU

BRYAN KIRSCHEN

■ GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS BLUMA APPEL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP ■ Alma Heckman1 [History]

BETHANY BEYER

MAURICE AMADO PROGRAM SUMMER RESEARCH AWARDS ■ Nadav Molchadsky [History] "The Yemenite Children Affair"

Heckman’s dissertation, “Radical Nationalists: Moroccan Jewish Communists 1945-1975,” uses newspapers, oral histories, literature and archival documents in French, Arabic, and Hebrew to conjure the unique social and political universe of radical Moroccan Jews, connected to transnational currents.

■ Bryan Kirschen [Spanish & Portuguese]

JACK H. SKIRBALL FELLOWSHIP IN MODERN JEWISH CULTURE

CHASKEL AND SARA ROTER SUMMER RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

■ Bryan Kirschen [Spanish & Portuguese] Kirschen’s interest is Judeo-Spanish, the language of the Sephardim dating back to the Iberian Peninsula. His research reveals how political, economic, and social processes are grounded in communicative practices and linguistic forms. Last summer, with the support of a Roter research fellowship, Kirschen began work on a documentary on the Judeo-Spanish speaking community in Sarajevo, Bosnia, and the role of the language in helping one man survive the Holocaust. The Jack H. Skirball Fellowship includes the opportunity to teach an adult education class at the Skirball Cultural Center. Taly Ravid, the Skirball fellow for 2012-13, taught “Anne Frank Redux” in the spring. This fall, Ravid will teach a new Skirball class: “The New Guard: 21st Century Jewish American Fiction,” from 7:30-9 pm on Sept. 25, Oct. 23, Nov. 20, and Dec. 18. Sign up at www.skirball.org.

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For Hebrew study at Middlebury College Summer Language Institute

■ Rachel Deblinger [History] "Memories/Motifs" for Mapping Jewish Los Angeles

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Ceren Abi [History] Michael Casper [History] Lisa Cleath [NELC] Rachel Deblinger [History] Rosanna Lu [NELC] Anat Mooreville [History]

MICHAEL & IRENE ROSS SUMMER RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Dylan Connor [Geography] Lindsay King [History] Sina Rahmani [Comparative Literature] Chris Silver [History] Andrea Wang [World Arts & Cultures] Jody Washburn [NELC]


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YARON SPIWAK

at Holocaust Memorial in Minsk, Belarus

YARON SPIWAK

JOSHUA MILSTEIN

MICHAEL CASPER

ucLADINO GRADUATE STUDENT SYMPOSIUM2

■ UNDERGRADUATE KUDOS

Judeo-Spanish: Survival in the Diaspora, the 2nd Annual Graduate Student Judeo-Spanish Symposium, took place March 5-6, 2013, in front of an audience of about 100 students and community members.

HERMINE AND SIGMUND FREY SCHOLARSHIP

Eight students presented on topics ranging from Rediscovering our Sephardic Roots: A Turkish Jewish Tale to A Diachronic Dilemma of the Possessive Constructions in Judeo-Spanish, and three keynote speakers described their personal efforts to preserve the Judeo-Spanish language and culture. These included Liliana Benveniste, a world renown Sephardic singer from Argentina and co-founder of e-sefarad, who presented in Ladino; and her husband Marcelo Benveniste, who presented in English. Solly Levy, a Sephardic Jew from Morocco, presented in Spanish/Haketia/English. Haketia, the Moroccan version of Ladino, borrows from Arabic, as well. In addition, three hands-on workshops, Beginner’s Rashi and Beginner’s Solitreo, were given by Benni Aguado, from New York; and Bringing Rashi and Solitreo into the 21st Century was presented by Brian Berman, from Los Angeles, the creator of the LadinoType program. Bryan Kirschen and Anamaria Buzatu, both Spanish and Portuguese graduate students, are co-directors of ucLADINO. Bethany Beyer helped organize the event. Besides CJS, symposium cosponsors included the Campus Programs Committee of the Program Activities Board, the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese, The Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies, The UCLA Graduate Student Association, and the G.E. Von Grunebaum Center for Near Eastern Studies.

■ Moshe Lapin, history major, spent the summer as a Fellow at the Steiner Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA engaged in an intensive study program in Yiddish language, literature, culture, and history.

HELIX PROJECT VISITS EASTERN EUROPE4 The overwhelming success of Holocaust education during the past two decades has amplified a serious absence— students know about the loss, but not what was lost. Yiddishkayt’s Helix project actively fights against this erasure by allowing young Jews to explore the landscapes Jews once called home and the cultural treasures they produced there. Undergraduate students Joshua Milstein and Yaron Spiwak participated in a preparatory week of workshops and a two-week visit to historic Jewish sites in Lithuania, Poland, and Russia. Graduate student Michael Casper (History) accompanied the group. The students received partial scholarships from the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies.

SARAH & EUGENE ZINN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FOR HOLOCAUST STUDIES Over the summer, Jewish studies major Yaron Spiwak3, created four videos and interactive lesson plans to introduce the Holocaust to children ages 10-16 at local religious schools, and teach about the Jewish culture that flourished in Eastern Europe for a thousand years.

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ALEXX SHILLING'S ABSENCE: A HISTORY

PHOTO: OLIVIA HEMRATANATORN

STUDENT'S PHOTOS FOCUS ON HOLOCAUST HISTORY5 For a 20-year-old, Holocaust history may seem quite distant both in time and space. Not so for Andrew Rosenstein, a photographer starting his third year at UCLA. Rosenstein’s exhibit, “Light out of Darkness,” consists of 36 intimate portraits of Holocaust survivors living in Los Angeles and telling their life stories to UCLA undergraduates. Rosenstein’s photographs were on display at Hillel last spring and at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust during the summer. Rosenstein began working with survivors in 2012 through Professor Todd Presner’s course, German 118SL, Between Memory and History: Interviewing Holocaust Survivors in the Digital Age. He returned in 2013 to photograph the Service Learning class, in which students recorded the survivors’ stories as audio guides for the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust.

Presner’s class, along with students from UCLA Hillel’s Bearing Witness program, developed strong bonds with the survivors over multiple meetings. The partnership between CJS, Hillel, and the Jewish Family Service’s Café Europa, provides a unique opportunity for university-age students to recognize the value of eyewitness testimony of the Holocaust.

STUDENTS LEAD PROGRAMS ON DIASPORA, HOLOCAUST RESEARCH & YIDDISH THEATER The CJS Student Leadership Council plans events for students interested in Jewish Studies. Tessa Nath, a participant in the 2012 Helix Project, organized a roundtable on the history of diaspora Judaism featuring Professor David N. Myers and Yiddishkayt Executive Director Robert Peckerar. Velena Hernandez and Helen Wu, invited four graduate students to discuss their Holocaust related research: Rachel Deblinger (History), Kevin Moore (English), Taly Ravid (English), and Alexx Shilling6 (World Arts & Cultures). Miriam Pinski arranged a screening of the film Yiddish Theater: A Love Story.

INFLUENTIAL JEWISH STUDIES ALUMNI

UCLA has graduated 215 Ph.D.s with dissertations related to Jewish Studies. Our illustrious alumni have gone on to become leaders in the field, including: DAVID BIALE (Ph.D. 1977) Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History, UC Davis JEFF BLUTINGER (Ph.D. 2003) Assistant Professor of History and Co-Director of Jewish Studies, CSULB WILLIAM CUTTER (Ph.D. 1971) Steinberg Emeritus Professor of Human Relations, HUC-JIR in LA MARC DOLLINGER (Ph.D. 1993) Richard & Rhoda Goldman Chair in Jewish Studies and Social Responsibility, SFSU

SHARON GILLERMAN (Ph.D. 1996) Associate Professor of Jewish History, HUC-JIR in LA LIORA HALPERIN (Ph.D. 2011) Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies, University of Colorado Boulder JASON MOKHTARIAN (Ph.D. 2011) Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies and Religious Studies, Indiana University JODY MYERS (Ph.D. 1985) Professor of Religious Studies, Coordinator of the Jewish Studies Interdisciplinary Program, CSUN

SHALOM SABAR (Ph.D. 1987) Professor of Jewish Art and Folklore, Hebrew University of Jerusalem STEVEN ZIPPERSTEIN (Ph.D. 1980) Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History, Stanford IDDO TAVORY (Ph.D. 2010) Assistant Professor of Sociology, New School for Social Research MIR YARFITZ (Ph.D. 2012) Assistant Professor of Latin American History, Wake Forest University 8


20TH ANNIVERSARY:

HIGHTLIGHTS OF JEWISH STUDIES AT UCLA

1963 BAMBERGER-WAHRMANN LIBRARY ACQUISITION

Appointment of Judaica bibliographer S. Brisman led to the rapid build up of UCLA's Judaica library collection, including the purchase of the Bamberger-Wahrmann Antiquarian bookstore in Jerusalem, and other collections in the 1960s.

1954 JEWISH STUDIES COURSES FIRST OFFERED AT UCLA

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19

JEWI UNDE ESTAB


1979

1992

THE "1939" CLUB CHAIR IN HOLOCAUST STUDIES ESTABLISHED

ISH STUDIES ERGRADUATE MAJOR BLISHED

THE UCLA ISRAEL S PROGRAM IS ESTAB

Becomes the UCLA Nazarian C Studies in 2010

1994

1991

972

2005

UCLA CONFERENCE: "PROBING THE LIMITS OF REPRESENTATION" ON HOLOCAUST STUDIES

THE MAURICE AMADO CHAIR IN SEPHARDIC STUDIES ESTABLISHED

THE UCLA CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES IS ESTABLISHED WITH PROF. ARNOLD BAND AS FOUNDING DIRECTOR

DAVID N. MYERS

DIRECTOR (1996-2000, 2004-2010) CHAIR AND PROFESSOR OF HISTORY

What was your vision and what part of that vision has come true? I was lucky enough to be present, as a junior faculty member, when Arnie Band became the founding director of CJS. We felt a tremendous sense of opportunity, but also of challenge. Arnie established the foundation for what has become a model center throughout the country. When I took over as director in 1996, I had two main goals. I imagined a center for Jewish studies at UCLA as a place where no subject in the field of Jewish studies would be foreign, to paraphrase Franz Rosenzweig’s famous statement. I believed then, and continue to believe today, that such a sweeping ambition suits a center such as ours in a global city such as LA. The second goal was to achieve a degree of financial stability for the Center, for, as Pirkei Avot famously says, “If there is no material sustenance, there is no Torah.” 10

How does the center foster UCLA’s public education mission? The fact that there is a CJS at UCLA means, first and foremost, that Jewish studies has arrived. Once upon a time, Jewish studies found a home in rabbinical seminaries and small colleges intended only for Jewish students. Today Jewish studies is found at every major college campus in America; those who take Jewish studies classes are Jews and non-Jews alike. They are drawn to the example of a small minority group that manages to balance skillfully group preservation and immersion in the surrounding society. In this regard, Jews are a model that helps us understand the challenges and benefits of integration into a host society. As a more general matter, I would say that studying groups like the Jews induces a degree of respect and tolerance for diversity that can only add to the betterment of society at large.


2008

2007 MELLON DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT The Myth of Silence? AWARD: U.S. Mail First Class PAID

October 25 - 26, 2009

UCLA

STUDIES BLISHED

The UCLA/Mellon Program on the Holocaust in American and World Culture and The UCLA Center for Jewish Studies present

Who Spoke about the

Holocaust and When

The Role of the Holocaust in American Culture awarded to Professor Eric Sundquist / UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

October 25 - 26, 2009

Myth of Silence?

Who Spoke about the

Holocaust and When

Who Spoke about the

Holocaust and When

Sponsored by

Myth of Silence?

Photos of Nuremberg Trials credit: USHMM, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration, College Park.

The

S D C J E

Exploring Debates Over The Post-War “Silence” about the Holocaus t

The

Images: Cover 1. (top) Nazi leader Hermann Göring stands in the prisoner's box during his trial for war crimes in Nuremberg, Germany (1945). 2. (bottom left) Actor Montgomery Clift as Rudoph Peterson in the film Judgment at Nuremberg (1961). Photographer: Allan Grant (April, 1961). 3. (bottom right) American military police admit a father and daughter, both displaced persons, to the refugee shelter at Fort Ontario. Oswego, New York, after August 4, 1944. (National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Md.). This page (top to bottom) 1. Nazi Physician and head of the Nazi euthanasia program, Karl Brandt, during his trial for war crimes in Nuremberg, Germany. 2. Mr. and Mrs. Michele Mikhailoff, artists from Russia and Jewish refugees rescued from wartime Nazi-occupied Europe at Fort Ontario in Oswego, NY. (Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1944. LIFE Photo Archive) 3. Actor Spencer Tracy as Chief Judge Dan Hayward in the film Judgment at Nuremberg (1961).

October 25 - 26, 2009

Center for Israel

302 Royce Hall, Box 951485 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485 MDF2

T

his conference hopes to explore the idea, frequently expressed but now increasingly called into question, that before the early 1960s (with the publication of Raul Hilberg’s Destruction of the European Jews and the trial of Adolf Eichmann) there was a general “silence” in American circles about the events coming to be known as the Holocaust. The conference will probe this assumption and test the evidence for and against it. What kinds of inquiry and discussion—in survivor testimony, in historiography, literature and the arts, or elsewhere—wein re taking place before the 1960s? What role was played by scholarship and commentary in Yiddish?

VITERBI FAMILY FOUNDATION ENDOWS THE VISITING PROFESSOR AND PROGRAM IN MEDITERRANEAN JEWISH STUDIES

the UCLA/Mellon Program on the

Holocaust in American & World Culture, the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, and the “1939” Club

2008

2008 2006 CENTER ESTABLISHES COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD

R.B. KITAJ: PASSION AND MEMORY

The Center partners with the UCLA Library Special Collections to present "R.B. Kitaj: Passion and Memory-Jewish Works from his Personal Collection"

THE CENTER THE STUDEN COUNCIL TO UNDERGRAD

KENNETH REINHARD DIRECTOR (2000-2004)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND ENGLISH DIRECTOR, PROGRAM IN EXPERIMENTAL CRITICAL THEORY

What about Jewish Studies most engages you personally? Jewish Studies continues to link the various aspects of my work in critical theory, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and opera. The “Jewish angle” is not a way of narrowing a particular intellectual field, but of opening it up to other ideas, in other fields. Jewish Studies is intrinsically interdisciplinary, and continues to lead me into new fields of research and teaching. Jewish Studies for me has always been a way to think not just about the history, culture, and religion of the Jews in particular, but about how Jewish issues have always had profound implication for questions of universal importance. Rather than simply focusing on its own problems, and despite the terrible history of its persecution, the Jewish people have always taken responsibility for other people, too.

CAROL BAKHOS DIRECTOR (2008-2010)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, NELC DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF RELIGION

Why is it important for the Center for Jewish Studies to continue to exist? The Center is an essential resource for bringing together colleagues from all over the world to participate in conferences that contribute to a range of discussions taking place across the Humanities. It’s a hub of exciting intellectual activity that reflects the vitality of current scholarship in the subfields of Jewish Studies, and in this way it celebrates the very richness of Jewish tradition, history and culture.

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Center for Jewish Studies

302 Royce Hall, Box 951485 Los Angeles, CA 90095-148 5 MD79

2010

FirSt ClaSS Mail U.S. POStaGE

PAID UCla

2012

SADY & LUDWIG KAHN DIRECTORSHIP OF THE UCLA CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES ESTABLISHED

CENTER HOSTS "HISTORY UNLIMITED: PROBING THE ETHICS OF HOLOCAUST CULTURE" CONFERENCE

Sunday - Monday April 22 - 23, 2012 UCLA Faculty Center

Sponsored by

The UCLA Center for Jewish Studies The UC Humanities Research Institute The “1939” Club

Cosponsored by

The UCLA Department of History

R ESTABLISHES NT LEADERSHIP ENGAGE DUATE STUDENTS

2010 "RECOVERED VOICES: STAGING SUPPRESSED OPERA OF THE 20TH CENTURY"

2012 CENTER INITIATES "MAPPING JEWISH LOS ANGELES" DIGITAL PROJECT

Presented with the Orel Foundation

What is exciting or compelling about your research and teaching in Jewish Studies? My current research project on the intersections between Jewish, Christian, and Islamic scriptural interpretation stems from my longstanding interest in trying to understand what makes Judaism like and unlike other religious and cultural traditions. It’s rewarding to introduce students to the early literary texts of the tradition, and to the ways in which Judaism developed over time, as well as to challenge assumptions of Jews and non-Jews alike about what it means to be Jewish. I’m thrilled when students discover that they know so little about their own tradition and set off to learn more about it, when they walk away with a deeper appreciation for its variety and complexity.

UCLA LIBRARY DAVID HIRSCH JEWISH AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHER ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, NELC

How do UCLA’s collections compare to those of other US universities? UCLA began rather late in collecting Judaica. We started in 1956 as contrasted with major universities on the east coast that have been collecting for hundreds of years. The nucleus of Judaica was acquired in 1963 with the purchase of the Bambeger Wahrmann Antiquarian Book Store in Jerusalem. This purchase was funded through the generosity of Theodore and Suzanne Cummings. Several collections of Hebrew and other Judaica manuscripts were also acquired later that decade: The Cummings Collection, The Feldman Collection, and The Rosenberg-Lewin Collection. An important Sephardic studies collection was acquired through the generosity of Lawrence and Barbie Weinberg in the 1970s. Today, UCLA's Judaica holdings are probably the largest of any public university and definitely among the top 10 of any university in the US. However, in order to maintain and expand our collections to meet the needs of UCLA students, faculty and other researchers, we really need to expand the funding available for regular Judaica acquisitions as well as print and electronic journals and audio-visual resources. Many people are surprised to learn that there is no kind of special fund to acquire such collections of special materials for the library or the Center.

12


NEW PUBLICATIONS AGAINST AUTOBIOGRAPHY: ALBERT MEMMI AND THE PRODUCTION OF THEORY

FRANZ KAFKA: THE POET OF SHAME AND GUILT (JEWISH LIVES)

Nebraska Press, 2013

Yale University Press, 2013 Jewish Lives Series

Lia Nicole Brozgal

The work of Tunisian Jewish intellectual Albert Memmi, like that of many Francophone Maghrebian writers, is often read as thinly veiled autobiography. Questioning the prevailing body of criticism, which continues this interpretation of most fiction produced by Francophone North African writers, Lia Nicole Brozgal shows how such interpretations of Memmi’s texts obscure their not inconsiderable theoretical possibilities. Calling attention to the ambiguous status of autobiographical discursive and textual elements in Memmi’s work, Brozgal shifts the focus from the author to theoretical questions. Against Autobiography places Memmi’s writing and thought in dialogue with several major critical shifts in the late twentieth-century literary and cultural landscape. These shifts include the crisis of the authorial subject, the interrogation of the form of the novel, the resistance to the hegemony of vision, and the critique of colonialism. Showing how Memmi’s novels and essays produce theories that resonate both within and beyond their original contexts, Brozgal argues for allowing works of Francophone Maghrebi literature to be read as complex literary objects, that is, not simply as ethnographic curios but as generating elements of literary theory on their own terms.

Saul Friedländer

Franz Kafka was the poet of his own disorder. Throughout his life he struggled with a pervasive sense of shame and guilt that left traces in his daily existence—in his many letters, in his extensive diaries, and especially in his fiction. This stimulating book investigates some of the sources of Kafka’s personal anguish and its complex reflections in his imaginary world. Distinguished historian Saul Friedländer probes major aspects of Kafka’s life (family, Judaism, love and sex, writing, illness, and despair) that until now have been skewed by posthumous censorship. Contrary to Kafka’s dying request that all his papers be burned, Max Brod, Kafka’s closest friend and literary executor, edited and published the author’s novels and other works soon after his death in 1924. Friedländer shows that, when reinserted in Kafka’s letters and diaries, deleted segments lift the mask of “sainthood” frequently attached to the writer and thus restore previously hidden aspects of his individuality.

AFFILIATED JEWISH STUDIES FACULTY CAROL BAKHOS*

JEWS IN THE LOS ANGELES MOSAIC Karen S. Wilson, editor

U. of California Press 2013 An S. Mark Taper Foundation book in Jewish Studies

Influenced by popular notions that the West is a place of vanishing Jews and disappearing Judaism, most people draw a blank at the words "Los Angeles Jew." Yet, the region is home to the second largest number of Jews in North America, and boasts the fourth largest Jewish population in the world, behind only Tel Aviv, New York City, and Jerusalem. This book, and its companion exhibition at the Autry National Center, reveals how Los Angeles has shaped Jewish identities and how Jewish Angelenos have shaped the metropolis. Six incisive essays look at the mutual influence of people and place as they examine Jewish engagement with frontier society, Yiddish culture and union activism, ethnic identity and Hollywood movies, Jewish women and local politics, and Jews making music in Los Angeles. The book is illustrated with a wealth of images that illustrate how Jews, operating both at the center and the margins of power, have contributed to the place and myth called Los Angeles. 13

Associate Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures.

ARNOLD J. BAND Professor Emeritus of Hebrew and Comparative Literature.

LIA BROZGAL* Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies.

AARON BURKE Associate Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology.

ELLEN DUBOIS Professor of History.

NANCY EZER Lecturer in Hebrew.

SAUL FRIEDLÄNDER “1939” Club Chair of Holocaust Studies and Distinguished Emeritus Professor of History.

JESSICA GOLDBERG Associate Professor of History.

LEV HAKAK Professor of Hebrew Literature.


POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS AND VISITING SCHOLARS NETTA AVINERI

GURI SCHWARZ

Netta recently began a 3-year TESOL/ TFL Visiting Professor position in the Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation, & Language Education at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. While working on her doctorate in Applied Linguistics, she assisted Dr. Mary Pinkerson, Community Affairs Coordinator, in establishing the Center’s Service Learning program. In 2012-13 Avineri was a Post-Doctoral Research Associate and taught a new course, Applied Jewish Studies and Social Ethics, designed as a foundational course for Jewish studies service learning, with support from the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles and Repair the World. Students learned about the history of Jewish ethics and had the chance to apply this knowledge by working with five community partners in Los Angeles: Bend the Arc, Koreh LA , New Ground: A Muslim-Jewish Partnership for Change, Workman’s Circle, and Yiddishkayt.

Guri Schwarz is the Viterbi Visiting Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Jewish Studies. His research focuses on memory politics in post WWII Europe, the transition from fascism to democracy, and the history of the Jews in modern Europe. He is the author of four books, most recently, After Mussolini: Jewish Life and Jewish Memories in PostFascist Italy, (Vallentine Mitchelle, 2012). Schwarz earned a Ph.D. summa cum laude in History at the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa in 2002, and has been a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Bologna, a fellow of the Luigi Einaudi Foundation (Turin), a research fellow at the University of Pisa, a research fellow at the Deutsches Historiches Institute in Rome, and a visiting lecturer at NYU. He is a member of the Interdepartmental Center for Jewish Studies of the University of Pisa as well as coordinator of the academic board of the Fondazione Centro di Documentazione Ebraica Contemporanea (Milan).

*Faculty Advisory Committee member

DAVID HIRSCH

TIMOTHY RICE*

STEVEN SPIEGEL

Jewish and Middle Eastern Studies Biographer, Charles Young Research Library and Adjunct Assistant Professor, NELC.

Professor of Ethnomusicology

Professor of Political Science.

TEOFILO F. RUIZ

ROGER WALDINGER

Professor of History.

Professor of Sociology.

YONA SABAR

JONATHAN M. ZASLOFF

Professor of Hebrew and Aramaic.

Professor of Law.

GIL HOCHBERG Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Gender Studies.

ELEANOR KAUFMAN*

SHELLEY SALAMENSKY*

Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and French and Francophone Studies.

Associate Professor of Theater and Performance Arts.

MIRIAM KORAL

Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Chair in Israel Studies and Associate Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures.

Lecturer in Yiddish.

EFRAIN KRISTAL Professor of Comparative Literature.

DAVID N. MYERS* Professor and Chair of History.

TODD S. PRESNER* Professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature, Chair of the Digital Humanities Program, Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director of CJS.

KENNETH REINHARD Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and English, Director of UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory. 14

ARIEH SAPOSNIK

WILLIAM SCHNIEDEWIND* Kershaw Chair of Ancient Eastern Mediterranean Studies, Chair of the Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and Professor of Biblical Studies and Northwest Semitic Languages.

VISITING FACULTY 2013-2014 FABRIZIO LELLI—Senior Scholar (University of Leece, Italy) NAHID PIRNAZAR—Lecturer in Iranian Studies SAM SPINNER—Michael and Irene Ross Visiting Assistant Professor of Yiddish and Jewish Studies SABA SOOMEKH—Lecturer in Sociology

JEREMY SMOAK

CJS FELLOWS 2013-2014

Lecturer in Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near East.

JOANNA CHEN—Civic Engagement Fellow

SARAH ABREVAYA STEIN*

CAROLINE LUCE— Michael & Irene Ross Research Fellow, “Mapping Jewish LA”

Maurice Amado Chair in Sephardic Studies and Professor of History.

KAREN WILSON—Sady & Ludwig Kahn Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Curator of "Mapping Jewish LA"


FACULTY HONORS SAMUEL SPINNER Samuel Spinner, the Ross Visiting Assistant Professor of Yiddish and Jewish Studies in the Department of Germanic Languages, teaches courses on, among other things, American Yiddish literature and the literary representation of the Holocaust. He received his Ph.D. in German-Jewish and Yiddish literature from Columbia University. Spinner’s current book project is provisionally entitled The Museum of the Jews: The Ethnographic Impulse in German-Jewish and Yiddish Literature, 1900-45, and examines the conjunction of ethnographic and museological practices with the literary strategies of German and Yiddish texts about Jews in the modern period. In addition to his work on modern and contemporary literature, he maintains an interest in early modern Jewish culture, and has translated the oldest Yiddish book written by a woman—Meneket Rivkah (Rivkah's Nurse), published by JPS in 2008.

David Hirsch, a worldrenowned librarian, linguist and scholar, received the UCLA Librarian of the Year Award in April. Hirsch is known for his dedication to collection building in the areas of Armenian Studies, Central Asian Studies, Egyptology, Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern and North African Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Culture, and South Asian Studies; and in his acceptance speech he playfully donned some of the many hats he has collected on his travels. Hirsch was honored specifically for efforts to enhance the Library's Middle East collection, through his recent trip to Iraq, and for providing invaluable assistance in finding a permanent home for the Tahrir Square Collection in the Department of Special Collections. Special mention was made of the bravery Hirsch exemplified “in his recent lecture at the University in Basra and his unrelenting efforts to assist in the development of Iraq's libraries, in spite of the obvious danger posed to an American traveling in that country.”

VISITING FELLOW SPRING 2013 (US Holocaust Museum, Washington, DC) Arnold J. Band, Professor Emeritus of Hebrew and Comparative Literature

2013 LIBRARIAN OF THE YEAR

KAREN WILSON Karen Wilson is the Center’s Kahn Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and head curator for “Mapping Jewish Los Angeles, ” an innovative digital initiative of the Center for Jewish Studies. Last year, she taught an undergraduate seminar on the history of Jews in LA, and during the current year, she will teach in the Digital Humanities program. In addition, Dr. Wilson served as guest curator for the exhibition, “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic,” showing at the Autry National Center through January 5, 2014. She received her Ph.D. in U.S. History from the UCLA. Her dissertation, entitled “On the Cosmopolitan Frontier: Jews, Social Networks, and Nineteenth-Century Los Angeles,” examined the ways in which diverse social networks shaped the emergent American city and the incorporation and identities of Jewish settlers in post-Gold Rush society.

(Librarians Association of UCLA) David Hirsch, Jewish & Middle East Studies Librarian and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern Studies

DOROTHY SCHROEDER AWARD (Association of Jewish Libraries of Southern California) David Hirsch, Jewish & Middle East Studies Librarian and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern Studies Hirsch was recognized for his “tireless and outstanding dedication to Judaica Librarianship and the education of Judaica Librarians."

YIDDISH VOICE OF LA (Dos Forverts Kol in NY) Miriam Koral, Lecturer in Yiddish, provides a bi-weekly podcast in Yiddish on local cultural activities for the Yiddish Forverts website. (http://yiddish.forward.com/sections/los-angeles-us/)

GOLD MEDAL (2013 Independent Publisher Book Awards, Religion Category) Saba Soomekh, Visiting Lecturer in Sociology, author of From Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture

15


PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS EXHIBITION AND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE:

THE SHANGHAI MIRACLE SET IN ITS COSMOPOLITAN CONTEXT From 1933 to 1941, Shanghai became a modern-day “Noah’s Ark” accepting some 23,000 Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Most were from Germany and Austria, but the refugees also included students of the famed Mir Yeshiva. In the “Designated Area for Stateless Refugees” in Tilanqiao area of Shanghai, 18,000 Jewish refugees lived harmoniously with local citizens, overcoming numerous difficulties together. Though the living conditions were not comfortable, most of the Jewish refugees survived and many went on to have remarkable lives. Holocaust historian David Kranzler, called it the “Miracle of Shanghai.” "Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (19331941)," an exhibition bringing together for the first time photos, personal stories, and artifacts from Shanghai's Jewish Refugee Museum, located in the former Ohel Moshe Synagogue in the Tilanqiao Historic Area, is on display from October 27 through December 14 at UCLA Hillel. Former “Shanghailanders” now living in Southern California, loaned their own memorabilia, as well. A satellite exhibit at UCLA’s Young Research Library features related items from the library’s collection.

The exhibition is sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, UCLA Confucius Institute and UCLA Hillel. Cosponsors include the UCLA Confucius Institute, the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies, the UCLA Department of History, the UCLA Department of Germanic Languages, the UCLA Department of Ethnomusicology, the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum, and the Shanghai Foreign Affairs Office of Hongkou District.

16

“Cosmopolitan Shanghai,” an international conference on Shanghai culture on Oct. 27, will help to put this extraordinary exhibition in context. Speakers will explore models for promoting cross-cultural understanding and transnational exchanges, using the Shanghai experience prior to 1949 as a critical foundation. Panelists will focus on the music, literature, visual arts and urbanism in the 1920s, 30s and 40s and the interchange between Chinese and Western culture.

The conference will include two panels: “The Many Musical Worlds of Pre-1949 Shanghai” at 11 am with talks by Tang Yating and Luo Qin, both of the Shangahi Conservatory of Music, and UCLA Ethnomusicology Professor Li Chi; and “Transnational Shanghai, Modern Metropolis” at 2 pm with talks by Yomi Braester (U. of Washington), Bryna Goodman (University of Oregon), and Wen-hsin Yeh (UC Berkeley). An Opening Celebration will follow at 4:30 pm with remarks by Steven Hochstadt (Illinois College) and Peter Loewenberg (UCLA). The international educational and professional development organization, Facing History and Ourselves, will use the exhibition as a tool for teaching L.A. middle and high school students about history, compassion, and creativity. A workshop for educators by Facing History and Ourselves on Sunday Nov. 1 at 1 pm will explore the personal narratives of rescuers and survivor testimonies, classroom strategies for engaging students, and a visit to the exhibit itself. For more info, contact: leslie_caroline@facing.org


FABRIZIO LELLI IS VITERBI SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE 2014 Fabrizio Lelli, Associate Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature at the University of Salento (Lecce, Italy), was the first Viterbi Visiting Professor in Mediterranean Jewish Studies at UCLA in 2007. He will be returning as a scholar-in-residence to present his current research on the Sephardic and Romaniote (Jewish Byzantine) legacy of Italian Renaissance Judaism in a series of three public seminars on May 13, 20, and 21, 2014. In the spirit of our 20th Anniversary Issue, we asked Professor Lelli to reflect on what his involvement with CJS has meant to him. How did the time you spent at UCLA contribute to your scholarly work? What was most valuable about the experience? It may seem strange that a scholar dealing with the literature and history of the Jews in the Italian Renaissance may be looking for new ways to interpret the material of his own research far from Italy. However, seeing things from different perspectives is very important to better understand our own history and all its repercussions. My 2007 visit to UCLA helped me better focus on some aspects of Italian Jewish history from such a "renovated" perspective. This was made possible especially thanks to the classes I had the opportunity to teach during the term I spent at UCLA. I found that both the undergraduate and graduate students had a very different perception of Jewish Italian literature than the one I had, and talking with them deepened my understanding of the topics I was presenting. At the same time, working at the UCLA Young Research Library enabled me to discover a rich collection of documents pertaining to the Jewish community of Ancona, which had never been studied at that time.

LISTENING TO THE OTHER Mideast Musical Dialogues

December 2-8, 2013 ucla IN RESIDENCE:

Taiseer Elias Mohammed Fairouz David Krakauer David S. Lefkowitz Betty Olivero

Moreover, I could talk to colleagues at UCLA and share with them my insights on the relationships between Italian and Jewish literature throughout time, as well as between American and Israeli contemporary literature, which is one of the subjects I teach in Italy. Thanks to a good friend and colleague at UCLA, Professor Brian Copenhaver, I was able to improve the English translation of a late 15th century Hebrew philosophical and mystical treatise, which should be published shortly in the US. Last but undoubtedly not least, I had the opportunity to discuss with friends now living in LA (all of them former UCLA students)—and who had experienced the tragedy of the Shoah—about the periods they spent in the area of Lecce after WWII in local transit camps, which were administered by the United Nations agency for Refugees. From many vantage points, my relatively brief stay in L.A. contributed to deepen my knowledge of the major research topics I am working on.

COMPOSERS-IN-RESIDENCE TO DIALOGUE THROUGH MUSIC While Arab-Israeli “fusion” music is not new, it has largely focused on the traditional music practices of diverse Middle East communities. “Listening to the Other: Mideast Musical Dialogues,” a groundbreaking week of public performances, master classes and panel discussions at UCLA beginning on Dec. 2nd, will examine these kinds of collaborations in an art-music context, culminating in a major orchestral and choral concert Sunday evening, Dec. 8th at Royce Hall. With diverse cosponsorship and hundreds of students participating, the project will highlight the important role music can play in promoting cross-cultural understanding and transnational reconciliation.

Project managers are Neal Brostoff and Professor Neal Stulberg. Find more details and ticket information at www.listeningtotheother.org

17


MAJOR GIFTS FOR JEWISH STUDIES 1979

1999

2002

"1939" CLUB CHAIR IN HOLOCAUST STUDIES

ARNOLD BAND DISTINGUISHED LECTURE

NATALIE LIMONICK SYMPOSIUM

Supports research, teaching, and programming in Holocaust Studies

Established by Milt & Sheila Hyman to support an annual lecture on Jewish literature in comparative perspectives

Supports programming related to Jewish culture and civilization

2005 VITERBI FAMILY PROGRAM IN MEDITERRANEAN JEWISH STUDIES Supports research, teaching, and programming in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

Antonia Babb gift to the "1939" Club Endowment in 1995

1989 MAURICE AMADO CHAIR IN SEPHARDIC STUDIES Supports research, teaching, and programming in Sephardic Studies

2001 NAFTULIN FAMILY LECTURE ON STUDIES IN JEWISH IDENTITY Supports an annual lecture on Jewish Identity

Honor Roll 2012–2013 Through the generosity and visionary support of our donors, the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies has become one of the most active and distinguished centers of its kind in the world. We are extremely grateful for your support, which has built a solid foundation for research, teaching, and outreach in all facets of Jewish Studies.

2007

2003 JOY & JERRY MONKARSH FAMILY ENDOWMENT Supports programming in Jewish Studies

SARA & CHASKEL ROTE RESEARCH FUND

Established by Dr. Ellen R. Dirksen in honor of her paren to support graduate student research

 MANHIGIM (Leaders)

 BONIM (Builders)

Maurice Amado Foundation

Phyllis & Sanford Beim

Dr. Ellen R. Dirksen

Phyllis & Philip N. Colman

Sady Kahn Trust

Dr.Marie-Luise Dirksen

Stephen O. Lesser

Bernard Friedman

Resnick Family Foundation

Myra & Bruce Newman Smotrich Family Foundation

 AMUDIM (Pillars)

Elaine Meyers & Daniel B. Spitzer

Rose & Al Finci

Sidney Stern Memorial Trust

Benita & Bertrand Ginsberg Sheila & Milton Hyman

Marilouise Melczer Zager & Dr. Albert Zager

Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles

 CHAVERIM (Friends)

Lee & Luis Lainer

Nancy & Dr. Emanuel M. Abrams

Dr. Elaine & Richard D. Lindheim

Sara & James N. Adler

Pamela & Randol Schoenberg

Sara & Dr. David Aftergood

Shirley & Ralph Shapiro

Basil Anderman

Lucille Ellis Simon Foundation

Eva Ballo

Dr. Kerri & Howard Steinberg

Iris & Sydney H. Bash Sadelle Brussell Birnbaum Anne M. Bodenheimer Barbara T.H. Brandon

18


ER

nts t

2009

2007

2012

THE BLUMA APPEL RESEARCH INNOVATION FUND

SIMHA & SARA LAINER YIDDISH FUND To advance the curriculum and enrich the education experience of students engaged in Yiddish Studies

LESSER FUND FOR JEWISH STUDIES IN CHINA

Supports graduate students and faculty in the field of Jewish studies

Supports programming and faculty/student exchanges between UCLA and China

CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES ADVISORY BOARD Al Finci, Chair Milt Hyman Luis Lainer Stephen O. Lesser Elaine Lindheim

2008 MICHAEL & IRENE ROSS ENDOWMENT AND CHAIR IN YIDDISH & JEWISH STUDIES Supports research, teaching, and programming in Yiddish and Jewish Studies

E. Randol Shoenberg

2010 SADY & LUDWIG KAHN DIRECTORSHIP OF THE UCLA CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES Supports the Directorship of the Center and other initiatives, including programming in German-Jewish Studies

Andrew Viterbi Elaine Wolfe* Rabbi David Wolpe* Zev Yaroslavsky* *Honorary Member

Esther Lerner Brenner

Raquel & Bertram Lewitt

 AMITIM (Fellows)

Gail & Alan Mangurten

Dr. Gregory L. Charlop

Bea Mandel

Dr. Lilla & Edgar Aftergood

Ruth & Daniel Merritt

Rita L. Chotiner

Estelle P. Markowitz

Eve Asner

Arlene Michales Miller

Howard D. Cohen

Gail Aspinwall

Dr. Albert Mizrahi

Rachel R. Finegood

Dr. Steven Moszkowski & Esther Kleitman

Susan & Dr. David S. Boyer

Dr. Mary & William Pinkerson

Susan & Thomas J. Fineman

Howard K. Myers & Walter Arlen

Barbara Braunstein

Jerry A. Rabow

Nancy D. Gilbert

The Hon. Vicki & Murray Pepper

Karen & Dr. Vincent Brook

Sylvia & Herbert J. Rose

Manuel Glaser

Sandra R. Radoff-Bernstein

Adele Clark

Marlene Rotblatt

David A. Gorlick

Fradya & Rabbi Joel Rembaum

Joan Forman

Rachel Rubin-Green &

Esther & Dr. Herbert Hecht

Harriet Rice

Lori & Shelly Garelik

Helen & Andrew W. Hyman

Priscilla & Ronald Rosenfeld

Bernard Gechter

Renee & Dr. Albert Sattin

Sharon D. Jacobson

Carol & The Hon. Marvin D. Rowen

Theodore A. Goldman

Leah & Norman Schweitzer

Haskel E. Joseph

Dorothy & Avram Salkin

Norman H. Green

Esther Shelden

Rita L. Kahane & Serena Rubin

Dr. Mary J. & Dr. Ernest M. Scheuer

Hanna Grinberg

Dr. Rose & Andrew Steinberg

Sally & Robert M. Shafton

Rachel P. & Alan Grossman

Jacklyn & Michael Waterman

Natalie & Pat Kater

Shirley Shore Williamson

Chanel Katiraie

Alice & Maurice J. Wisel

Margot Katz

Molly Zachariash

Paul & Dr. Myron Kayton Dr. Snira & Earl Klein Shirley Kotler Hannah & Marshall F. Kramer

Drs. Merilee & Zanwil Sperber Dr. Michael I. Stern

Dr. Alicia Rufman-Levine & Dr. Allan Levine

Lillian & Dr. Charles Trillin

Nadine & Israel Levy

Mary R. Weissmann

Marsha Lewin & Forrest Latiner

Marcie & Howard Zelikow

Lillian Apodaca Weiner

Norman Green

Tobi & Gregory Kaufman Laraine & Allan Kokin Heni & Richard Krammer Bertha & Dov B. Malkin 19


JOIN US FOR OUR

20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 • 306 ROYCE HALL • 4 PM

JEWISH Refugees IN

SHANGHAI

(1933 - 1941)

OCT 27 | UCLA Hillel SYMPOSIUM, COSMOPOLITAN SHANGHAI

11am - 4pm

OPENING CELEBRATION

4:30 - 6pm

EXHIBITION RUNS:

OCT 27 - Dec 14, 2013

THE AUTRY IN GRIFFITH PARK

VISIT THE ENHANCED & AUGMENTED EXHIBITION COMING OCTOBER 2014* AUTRY EXHIBIT INFO: WWW.THEAUTRY.ORG CJS MAPPING PROJECT: WWW.MAPPINGJEWISHLA.ORG

Yiddish

Featuring

StarTour CORPORATE AND MEDiA SPONSORS:

Sunday, Dec. 8 1pm meet at ucla hillel at the

‫במרכז‬

center

Center for Jewish Studies

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED FOR ALL CJS EVENTS. TO RESERVE: CJSRSVP@HUMNET.UCLA.EDU OR (310) 267-5327

* see page 5 for more details

Tali Tadmor

In Concert

as "ELLA FITZGERALDBERG"

SPACE IS LIMITED TICKETS: $50 by 10/31, $75 after 10/31 INCLUDES GUIDED TOUR, CONCERT & DINNER

At the Center 302 Royce Hall, Box 951485 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485

Phone: 310.825.5387 cjs@humnet.ucla.edu Business hours: M-TH 9am-12 pm, 1-5pm Facebook: www.facebook.com/UCLACJS

Prof. Todd S. Presner Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director

David Wu Digital Projects & Program Coordinator

Vivian Holenbeck Assistant Director

Chelsea White Program Coordinator

Mary Enid Pinkerson, PhD Community Affairs Coordinator

Hali Mason Financial & Administrative Coordinator

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies 2013-2014 Newsletter  

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies 2013-2014 Newsletter

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