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UCHICAGO ARTS SPRING 2018 EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS GUIDE

IN THIS ISSUE Dimensions of Citizenship Expanding Narratives at the Smart Museum Fire Escape Films: Tomorrow's Filmmakers A short look at UChicago Maya

arts.uchicago.edu


Antony Gormley, after an idea by Gabriel Mitchell, Infinite Cube, 2014. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Gift of Antony Gormley and W. J. T. Mitchell, 2014.63.

Through April 22, 2018


UCHICAGO ARTS SPRING 2018 EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS GUIDE

The University of Chicago is a destination where artists, scholars, students, and audiences converge and create. Explore our theaters, performance spaces, museums and galleries, academic programs, cultural initiatives, and more. For a full list of arts events at UChicago, visit arts.uchicago.edu.

ICON KEY UChicago student event

ON THE COVER Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2011, Twigs, wire, upholstery, basket, and metal armature. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Purchase, The Paul and Miriam Kirkley Fund for Acquisitions, 2011.44. Learn more on pg. 8.

PHOTO CREDITS arts.uchicago.edu | 3

Page 4: Fraser, James Earle. Equestrian Statue of Theodore Roosevelt. 1939. Bronze. American Museum of Natural History, New York.; Still from Boyfriends and Girlfriends, Eric Rohmer, 1987. 103 min, 35mm. Image courtesy of the Institut Français; Book jacket for Now that the Audience is Assembled by David Grubbs. Courtesy of the Seminary Co-op Bookstore; Logan Center Family Saturdays photo by Kelsey Akers; Page 5: Robert Arneson, Cherry Pie (detail), 1975, Seven-color lithograph on Arches Cover White Paper. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Gift of Allan Frumkin, 1978.166; Page 6: Tile Fragment with Figure in a Niche. Ilkanid dynasty, c.1270. Fritware, luster-painted overglaze decoration. The Art Institute of Chicago.; Richard Rezac, Quimby (painted steel, plate glass, enameled plate glass, and cherry wood), 2017, Chicago. Courtesy of the artist.; Page 7: Stuart, James and Nicholas Revett. "The external face of the capital, with the entablature, and half one of the tripods." The Antiquities of Athens measured and delineated by James Stuart F.R.S. and F.S.A. and Nicholas Revett Painters and Architects, vol. III (ed. Willey Reveley), London, John Nichols, 1794; Page 9: Still from Boyfriends and Girlfriends, Eric Rohmer, 1987. 103 min, 35mm. Image courtesy of the Institut Français; Still from La Collectionneuse (The Collector), 1967, Éric Rohme; Page 12: Design presentations from students in Arts + Public Life's Design Apprenticeship Program. Courtesy Arts + Public Life.; Page 17: Cecilia Vicuña. Photo: Daniela Aravena; Duane E. Powell. Photo: RJ Eldridge.; Page 20: University Chorus (November 2017). Photo courtesy of the UChicago Music Department; Gira Dahnee. Courtesy of artist.; Montrose Trio. Photo: Shayne Gray.; Page 21: Steve Coleman. Photo: Michael Weintrob; Page 22 Brian Blade and the Fellowship Band. Photo courtesy John Abbott; Page 24: The Originalist, image courtesy of Court Theatre; Page 28: Will Wiebe and John Santerre discuss their project "The View from Nowhere." Image courtesy of the Arts, Science + Culture Initiative; Page 30: Community Stewardship Day. Image courtesy of Arts + Public Life; Logan Center Family Saturdays photo by Kelsey Akers.


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EXHIBITIONS & VISUAL ARTS

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A N D N OW Y O U K N OW M O R E O F T H E STO RY

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FILM

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LIGHTS. CAMERA. CAREER.

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ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP

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L I T E R AT U R E & LECTURES

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MUSIC

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T H E AT E R , DA N C E & PERFORMANCE

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MORE THAN A N I L LU S I O N

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M U LT I D I S C I P L I N A R Y

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YO U T H & FA M I LY

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INFO

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MAP


EXHIBITIONS & VISUAL ARTS

THE FIRST 1000 YEARS: A N AT O L I A N S T U D I E S AT C H I C AG O

Ongoing  Oriental Institute Museum, lower level The Oriental Institute is one of the world’s main centers of Hittitology (the study of the ancient languages and cultures of Turkey). This exhibit looks at Chicago’s contribution to the field, including the early years of Hittitology, the careers of faculty members Hans G. Guterbock and Harry Hoffner, the creation and progress of The Chicago Hittite Dictionary, and the Oriental Institute’s expeditions to Turkey. Free; suggested donation: adults $10, children under 12 $5. Presented by the Oriental Institute.

Mar 27–Apr 10, 2018 Artist’s Reception: Wed, Apr 4, 7:30pm Rockefeller Chapel Rockefeller Chapel presents Columns of Thought by Audrius V. Plioplys—a series of light sculptures 65 inches tall, each incorporating multiple layers of assemblage and representing a writer or artist whose influence has shaped Plioplys’ life and work, including Hieronymus Bosch, Samuel Beckett, Franz Kafka, and Sigmund Freud. In pigmented inks on polycarbonate, with LED color-changing lights, on poplar wood. Free.

Presented by The Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society.

D E PA R T M E N T O F V I S UA L A R T S BA THESIS EXHIBITION Mar 29–Apr 22, 2018 Opening Reception: Thu, Mar 29, 6–8pm Logan Center Gallery The 2018 BA Thesis Exhibition features works by Sean Allen, Mary Grace Bilby, Simone Brandford-Altsher, Luke Clohisy, Amber Collins-Parnell, Claire DuCanto, Grace Hauck, Julia Huang, Aleksandra Majka, and Karen Xu. Free. Presented by Logan Center Exhibitions and the Department of Visual Arts (DoVA).

Presented by Rockefeller Chapel

CECILIA VICUÑA: PA L A B R A R M A S Mar 29–Jun 2, 2018 Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society New York-based Chilean artist and poet Cecilia Vicuña has been working across a wide range of ephemeral media since her debut as a painter in the highly politicized context of early 1970s Chile. This exhibition will be the first to focus solely on her “Palabrarmas,” visual anagrams made in exile in London and Bogotá after the 1973 Pinochet-led coup that are reminiscent of

PA I N T I N G W I T H P I E Thu, Mar 29, 5:30–7:30pm Smart Museum of Art Paint on paper with pie as the main ingredient. This evening features treats from Bang Bang Pie Shop and art activities for all ages is inspired by Robert Arneson’s Cherry Pie, on view in The History of Perception. Free. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

F R O M S PAC E S TO P L AC E S : P U B L I C A R T WA L K I N G TO U R

Thu, Apr 5 / May 4 / Jun 7, 5:30pm Tours begin at Black Sphere sculpture, across the street from Cobb Hall (5811 S Ellis Ave) Public art on campus is a fascinating, spontaneous experience, with some sculptures boldly claiming open spaces and others tucked unexpectedly between buildings. This one-hour tour led by Smart Museum docents covers a small sample of the stunning works that have helped shape UChicago's intellectual and cultural life for decades. Free; space is limited (register via smartmuseum.uchicago.edu). Presented by Smart Museum of Art and the Office of Civic Engagement.

TEEN ART EXHIBITION Apr 6–May 10, 2018 Opening reception: Fri, Apr 6, 6–8pm Closing reception: Thu, May 10, 6–8pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Curated by Arts + Public Life’s Teen Arts Council, this exhibition features art by teens all across Chicago. Works of various media explore the concepts of “teen experience” and “neighborhood,” and align with the City of Chicago’s celebration of 2018 as the “Year of the Creative Youth.” The opening reception will feature remarks and performances by teen curators, teen artists, and other community members. Free; for a schedule of related public events, visit arts.uchicago.edu/apl. Presented by Arts + Public Life and After School Matters.

UNTHOUGHT ENVIRONMENTS

Through Apr 8, 2018 The Renaissance Society Our elemental world is integral to our daily lives but it can be elusive, easily forgotten, or kept out of sight: sunlight, weather systems, rare earth minerals, and electromagnetic forces, for example. With new and recent artworks by artists including Marissa Lee Benedict, Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen, Peter

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C O LU M N S O F T H O U G H T

the concrete poetry idiom so popular at the time. The titular neologism is a contraction of palabras (words) and armas (weapons), a nod to the militant slant infusing so much progressive Latin American art in the era of juntas. Vicuña’s “palabrarmas,” however, are also eruptions of color and sensuous pleasure—words to live by. Free.


Fend, and Nicholas Mangan, Unthought Environments is informed by evolving discussions in various fields, including media studies, ecology, and philosophy. Free. Presented by the Renaissance Society.

G O O D M A N DAV I S L E C T U R E S E R I E S : H E L E N M O L E S WO R T H Mon, Apr 9, 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Helen Molesworth is the Chief Curator at The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Los Angeles, where she recently curated the first U.S. retrospective of the Brazilian artist Anna Maria Maiolino and the monographic survey Kerry James Marshall: Mastry. Free. Presented by the Department of Visual Arts Open Practice Committee.

LILIANA ANGULO: EXHIBITION A N D A R T I S T TA L K May 14–18, 2018 Artist Talk: Thu, May 17, 6pm Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture Liliana Angulo is a multi-media artist from Colombia whose work has been featured in individual and collective exhibits around the world. In her work, Angulo explores questions of the body and the image and their relationship to constructs of gender, ethnicity, language, history, and politics. Her work with communities of African descent illuminates issues of representation, racial discourse, performance, tradition, and the politics of reparation. Free.

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Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Theater and Performance Studies, Provost’s Office, and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.

C U LT U R A L D I S TO R T I O N S I N T H E S T U DY O F I R A N I A N A R T Thu, Apr 12, 5pm Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157 The historiography of Iranian art shows several phases of understanding, often subject to Western prejudices, and has been heavily ideologically instrumentalized. This talk, given by Yves Porter (Professor of Art History, Aix-Marseille University), examines the ways in which cultural notions of identity affect the viewer's perception of Iranian art, and explores the use of descriptive approaches in limiting the impact culturallyinformed "interpretive" models. In examining works of art on a micrographic scale, Porter hopes to reassess the impact of the "globaleffect" and the determinism framed by "onetrack thinking". Free. Presented by the Department of Art History.

FIGURE DRAWING: CHIAROSCURO Thu, Apr 12, 5:30–7:30pm Smart Museum of Art In-gallery figure drawing session with live models. This workshop focuses on chiaroscuro, the Italian term for drawing in extremes of dark and light, with models casting deep shadows under intense spotlights. Paper, chalks, and other materials provided. Open to all skill levels. Free.

Presented by the Smart Museum of Art and Outside the Lines.

SCIENCE AND CONSCIENCE: C H I C AG O ' S M E T L A B A N D T H E M A N H AT TA N P R O J E C T Through Apr 13, 2018 Special Collections Research Center, Regenstein Library Drawing on letters, documents, photographs, and artifacts, this exhibition traces the early career of Enrico Fermi and his immigration to America, the formation of the Manhattan Project, the building of CP-1 and organization of the Metallurgical Laboratory, and the impact of the Trinity Test, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the post-World War II atomic scientist's movement for civilian control of nuclear energy. Free. Presented by the University of Chicago Library.

D OW N W I T H M O N U M E N T S ? O N THE MAKING AND UNMAKING OF PUBLIC MONUMENTS Fri, Apr 20, 4:30pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Recent confrontations over monuments have highlighted the tensions in their nature as acts of power and works of art, as objects about the present as about the past. But, what is the best way to address these historical objects? And how have they been addressed in other historical contexts around the globe? Following a keynote lecture by art historian Michele Bogart (AM'75, PhD'79), panelists including Miguel Caballero-Vazquez, Wu Hung, Pamela Karimi, and Mechtild Widrich will present examples for how people have responded to the tension between a changing politic and an inanimate symbol. Free. Presented by the Department of Art History and School of the Art Institute in collaboration with UChicago Arts, Sawyer Seminar on Urban Art and Urban Form, and the Mansueto Institute, on the occasion of UChicago and SAIC’s commissioning of the American Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018.

by the Chicago-based artist Richard Rezac produced over the last two decades. Together, they demonstrate the artist's ongoing engagement with the sculptural logic of geometry and the elusive mechanisms of interpretation. While the artist cites a practice of improvisational drawing as the starting point for each sculpture, he also acknowledges the influence of architecture on his approach to composition and use of materials, techniques, and ornamentation. Free. Presented by the Renaissance Society

T H E H I S T O RY O F P E R C E P T I O N Through Apr 22, 2018 Smart Museum of Art This exhibition, based on a winter quarter UChicago History course, explores the historically contingent ways that human beings have understood their bodily sensations and made them intelligible from one body to another. It features works by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Josef Albers, Antony Gormley, Robert Irwin, Kenneth Noland, and others. Free. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

CURATOR TOUR: THE HISTORY OF PERCEPTION Sun, Apr 22, 2pm Smart Museum of Art Closing-day tour of The History of Perception led by Michael Rossi, Assistant Professor, Department of History and the College, and Berit Ness, Smart Museum Assistant Curator of Academic Initiatives. Free. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

EXPANDING NARRATIVES: THE FIGURE AND THE GROUND Apr 24–Dec 30, 2018 Smart Museum of Art The first iteration in a three-part exhibition series, Expanding Narratives uses the formal relationship between the figure and the ground in art history as a conceptual springboard into discussions around visual representation, the museum space, and the role of the Smart Museum’s collection in fostering the exchange of diverse perspectives. It combines works from the Smart’s collection with key loans from UChicago alumni and Chicago-area collectors. Free. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

WA R , T R AU M A , M E M O RY

R I C H A R D R E Z AC : A D D R E S S Apr 21–Jun 17 The Renaissance Society Address brings together twenty sculptures

Apr 30–Aug 31, 2018 Special Collections Research Center, Regenstein Library War is traumatic to those who experience it in any way. The pieces in this exhibition reflect their creators’ experiences in wars from the 16th century through the present day. However, rather than depicting battles or explosions, this exhibition captures the trauma of war through war’s very absence. Rare materials, photographs, and comics all explore the trauma of war and the difficulty of remembering. Free. Presented by the University of Chicago Library.


T H E WAY O F T H E V E S S E L : M A K I N G , CO L L E C T I N G , A N D CO P Y I N G A N C I E N T B R O N Z E S Thu–Sat, May 3–5 Art Institute of Chicago, Price Auditorium In ancient China elaborate bronze vessels were used for rituals involving cooking, drinking, and serving food. This conference aims to address certain issues in the study of ancient bronzes and not only examines the cultural practices surrounding these objects in their original context, but also the understanding of the tradition of collecting these bronzes in China. Experts of archaeology, art history, and classical literature will delve into the concerns of the specialized culture that developed around the vessels and the significant influence this culture, with its emphasis on how the concept of antiquity, reproduction, had on broader Chinese society. Free. Presented by the Department of Art History’s Center for the Art of East Asia and the Art Institute of Chicago, with additional support from Christie’s.

2018 MFA THESIS EXHIBITIONS: NO BURDEN FOR CONTINUIT Y Exhibition 1: May 4–20, 2018 Opening Reception: Fri, May 4, 6–8pm Exhibition 2: May 25–Jun 10 Opening Reception: Fri, May 25, 6–8pm Logan Center Gallery The 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibitions feature works by Derek Ernster, Chichan Kwong, Frances Lee, Frances Mendes Levitin, Adrienne Elyse Meyers, Elise Putnam, Takashi Shallow, and Zespo. Free. Presented by Logan Center Exhibitions and the Department of Visual Arts (DoVA).

THINKING SCULPTURE

of perception). This conference opens out some of the main lines of investigation in Snyder’s work, seeking to develop the unusually fertile perspectives it contains. Free.

Presented by the Department of Art History; co-sponsored by the Humanities Division, Franke Institute for the Humanities, Karla Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture, Nicholson Center for British Studies, France Chicago Center, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, Center for Latin American Studies, and Critical Inquiry.

practice question the travails of the public art complex. Free.

Presented by The Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society.

E M M A N U E L P R AT T: R A D I C A L [RE]CONSTRUC TIONS

T H E R E VO L U T I O N A RY I M AG I N AT I O N : C H I C AG O SURREALISM FROM OBJECT T O AC T I V I S M

Through Summer 2018 Smart Museum of Art Emmanuel Pratt’s interdisciplinary approach to regenerative placemaking on the South Side of Chicago mixes art, architecture, and community and economic development. His site-specific installation transforms the Smart Museum’s lobby and courtyard. Free.

Thu, Jun 7, 9am–5pm Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157, and the Smart Museum of Art Fri, Jun 8, 6pm and 8pm Arts Club of Chicago and TBA In conjunction with the Arts Club of Chicago’s summer exhibition A Home for Surrealism, this two-day program will explore the legacy of Surrealism in Chicago in all of its dimensions, from histories of collecting and display to surrealist artistic practices. In a series of lectures and discussions, a set of international scholars and historical practitioners of Surrealism will examine the movement’s story in Chicago from the standpoint of local art institutions and activist politics alike. This program is designed to expand awareness of Surrealism’s wideranging heritage in our city. Free.

2018 LOUISE SMITH BROSS L E C T U R E S : C L A S S I F I C AT I O N A N D T H E H I S TO RY O F G R E E K ART

Presented by the Department of Art History with support from the Arts Club of Chicago, the France Chicago Center, and the Smart Museum of Art.

W E L L E Q U I P P E D : L I B R A RY T E C H N O LO G Y F R O M DAY S PA S T

Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

Thu, May 24, 6pm Classics Building, Room 110 Travis Jeppesen, a critic, novelist, and artist, has developed innovative ways of addressing sculpture—including what he calls “object-oriented writing.” Artist Erin Shirreff works across a range of forms to consider the interactions of sculpture and photography and how they deal with concerns like scale and presence. Here, Jeppesen and Shirreff each respond to Richard Rezac’s work at the Renaissance Society, and then come together in discussion, drawing on their own practices to consider the various ways we experience sculpture. Free.

Through Jun 7 The John Crerar Library First Floor Over the years, Crerar Library has used the newest equipment and technologies to make books, journals and other information accessible to patrons. These tools have evolved over time, as online catalogs have replaced library card systems and digital scanning has replaced photocopying and microfilming. This exhibit features photos and examples of earlier technologies. See a related web exhibit at http://bit.ly/2DOSwN7. Free.

A N N A DAU C I KOVA & ASSAF EVRON

Mon, May 14, 5pm Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157

C R I T I Q U E / D E S I R E / P R AC T I C E : P H O T O G R A P H Y A N D B E YO N D , SELON JOEL SNYDER

Jun 8–Sep 16, 2018 Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society The immediate occasion for this coupling of Anna Daucikova (born in Czechoslovakia in 1950, currently living in Prague) and Assaf Evron (born in Israel in 1977, currently living in Chicago) is their shared interest in Soviettrained artists of little renown but substantial visual impact: Ukrainian native Valery Lamakh, known for his decorative tilework on Kiev’s many Stalin-era residential buildings, and Russian-born Shlomo Eliraz, whose name today primarily survives in a handful of public murals scattered around Tel Aviv. In revisiting the legacies of these forgotten heroes of a certain avant-garde’s last stand, Daucikova’s video works and Evron’s photo-based

T H E U N C L A S S I F I E D PA S T

Presented by the Renaissance Society.

Fri–Sat, Jun 1–2 9am–6pm Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157 This two-day symposium, organized to celebrate art history professor and photographer Joel Snyder, convenes Snyder’s former doctoral students and longtime collaborators to consider the history of pictures most broadly, the questions they pose about relations between concrete practices (in the darkroom, the laboratory, the museum, the studio), and the ways we think (about photographs, scientific knowledge, historical narratives, the nature

Presented by the University of Chicago Library.

H OW TO V I E W A D I O N YS I AC MONUMENT Fri, May 11, 6pm Art Institute of Chicago, Fullerton Hall

T H E L I M I T S O F TA XO N O M Y

Tue, May 15, 5pm Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157 Free.

Presented by the Department of Art History.

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Endowed in memory of Louise Smith Bross, PhD’94, every three years the lectures bring a distinguished scholar of pre-1800 European art and architecture to campus. In this year’s lectures Milette Gaifman, Associate Professor of Classics and History of Art at Yale University, explores the fundamental role of the classificatory act in our viewing of Greek art and architecture in the modern era. How do classifications inform our understanding of artworks from Classical antiquity? How did labels shape the formation of the history of Greek art?


And Now You Know More of the Story

Smart Museum expands their narrative

When Ali Gass was appointed as the Dana Feitler Director of the Smart Museum in May 2017, she was clear about her vision. As she explained to Chicago Magazine in an August 2017 interview, “I want to create exhibitions that look at trends across global communities.” The upcoming exhibition Expanding Narratives: The Figure and the Ground (Apr 24–Dec 30, 2018) seeks to do just that. This spring, the Smart will include alongside its already robust collection borrowed works from UChicago alumni and Chicagoarea collectors. The project will create a lens through which to examine the composition and role of the Smart’s diverse collection and how new works can shift and expand the nature and number of narratives the campus museum can create and share.

“We don’t have the space to tell an encyclopedic history all at once, but we can be flexible and build an exhibitions and collections program that positions us as a site of critical debate, reflective of the academic eminence and global impact of the University.” Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2011, Twigs, wire, upholstery, basket, and metal armature. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Purchase, The Paul and Miriam Kirkley Fund for Acquisitions, 2011.44.

—Ali Gass, Smart Museum

Casual visitors and art fanatics alike are sure to be entranced and delighted by the influx of works the Smart will host in Expanding Narratives. The Smart is currently in loan talks for works from such

luminaries as Kehinde Wiley, who recently completed the Presidential Portrait of Barack Obama, Kara Walker, and Cindy Sherman. Ultimately, Expanding Narratives will highlight the strength of the Smart’s collection while augmenting the stories the Museum can tell. Expanding Narratives is a three-year, three-part collections and exhibitions project. Each of the three exhibitions will have a distinct theme. The 2018 exhibition Expanding Narratives: The Figure and Ground sets the stage by dissecting representation through the formal dichotomy of figure and ground. In 2019, Expanding Narratives will focus on how museums, collectors, and scholars are “re-inscribing” African American artists and artists of the African Diaspora back into the “canon” of the history of art. In 2020, the final chapter of Expanding Narratives will break with traditional geographic divisions in museum display and tell an ambitious global history of art. This final phase of the exhibition will be installed chronologically with works from around the globe displayed together to allow examination of critical points of intersection among people and cultures. Expanding Narratives is an exhibition that, in the words of Gass, reflects what a university museum should be—a place where “all kinds of people should see themselves reflected.”


FILM

B E YO N D H O L LY WO O D N O R T H : CO N T E M P O R A RY C A N A D I A N VO I C E S A N D V I S I O N S

Presented by Doc Films.

T R E M O R S O F A N U N K N OW N PA S S I O N : T H E F I L M S O F MICHAEL HANEKE Tuesdays, Mar 27–May 22, 7pm (and 9pm for double-feature nights) Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall A retrospective on the work of Austrian auteur Michael Haneke, born of a generation of increasing discontentment with bourgeoisie values, Haneke’s work blends the raw inhumanity of mankind into a master-class of cerebral provocation and controversy. Highlights include The Piano Teacher, Funny Games, and Caché. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Doc Films.

ELIA K AZAN: A RETROSPECTIVE Wednesdays, Mar 28–May 30, 7pm and 9:30pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall Few directors have inspired as deafeningly loud a chorus of both acclaim and criticism

Presented by Doc Films.

L OV E I S A L L A M AT T E R OF TIMING ... Thursdays, Mar 29–May 31, 7pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall “...It’s no good meeting the right person too soon or too late. If I’d lived in another time or place...my story might have had a very different ending.” So goes the closing monologue of Wong Kar-wai’s 2046. Wong is far from the only director whose imagination this idea has captured, however, and many iterations of it have illuminated the big screen. Including such classics as The Graduate, Harold and Maude, and Three Colors: Red, this collection of movies focuses on and embraces these encounters whether they be too little or too long—or almost not at all. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Doc Films.

S H AT T E R E D V I S I O N S : L O S S O F IDENTIT Y IN CINEMA Thursdays, March 29–May 31, 9pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall Akin the inherent fear of physical and bodily transformation, the fear of change within an individual’s own identity is a prevalent theme in cinema. The loss of identity stands out as a visceral lament

that dissolves the very being of human nature into insignificance. Dealing with the collapse of personal identity, to broader themes of the anxiety of losing human identity, the films in this series struggle with the ability to retain or develop a personal stake within their beings. Highlights include Dead Ringers, Seconds, and Sisters. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Doc Films.

PROGRAMMERS PICKS Fridays, Mar 30–Jun 1, 7pm and 9:30pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall From underappreciated classics to well-known hits, these films are specially curated to exhibit a wide array of cinema that deserves the extra screening. Highlights include The Earrings of Madame De..., Dazed and Confused, and a 30th anniversary screening of Akira. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Doc Films.

T H E KO R E A N N E W WAV E Sundays, Apr 1–Jun 2, 7pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes HalL The turn of the millennium brought with it an explosively creative renaissance of the cinema of South Korea. The modus operandi of this "Korean New Wave" was to rework a wealth of diverse influences, synthesizing the styles of both international art cinema and commercial B-movies to fashion something completely fresh. The result was a genre-shattering “Korean New Wave,” whose formidable imaginative vision and stylistic inventiveness have scarcely been matched. Included in the series is Bong Joon-ho’s The Host, Park Chan-Wook’s Lady Vengeance, and Lee Chang-dong’s Poetry. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Doc Films.

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Mondays, Mar 26–May 21, 7pm Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall In 2017, the Toronto International Film Festival and its partners celebrated the country’s sesquicentennial by selecting and screening a roster of 150 “essential moving-image productions” from Canadian film history. Focusing more narrowly on works dating back to the 1990s, the decade during which Canadian film first achieved financial and critical success at home and abroad, this series serves as an introduction to a vibrant, heterogeneous, and all-toooften overshadowed contemporary national cinema, specifically bringing together films that foreground and illustrate distinct and diverse Canadian cultural identities, languages, geographies, and lives. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS).

as Elia Kazan. Despite a career polarized by his controversial testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee in1952, his brazen artistry thrust such great talents as Marlon Brando, James Dean, and Warren Beatty into the forefront of American cinema. Kazan’s work was a tapestry of interpretive compassion, serving as the medium for the stories of respected novelists and playwrights like Tennessee Williams, John Steinbeck, and William Inge. Called “without question, the best director we have in America” by Stanley Kubrick, Kazan is considered by many filmmakers and critics to have been one of the most prolific and influential directors of his time. General $5/film, quarterly pass $30 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS).


THE WHEEL OF LIFE

Fri, Apr 6, 7pm Logan Center, Screening Room Three actors play different characters in stories that trace the history of China and Taiwan across the ages, braided together by a mysterious ancient dagger and the irrevocable tragedies it causes. Their love triangle unfolds through King Hu's wuxia story of renegade swordsmen, Li Hsing's romantic melodrama of a wealthy man in love with an opera singer, and Pai Ching-Jui's story of the relationship between a dancer and a shaman. (Taiwan, 1983, 105 min., HDCam) Free. Presented by the Film Studies Center and the Taiwan Film Institute.

CHINESE- CANADIAN FILM RETROSPECTIVE Sat, Apr 7, 1pm International House Assembly Hall International House partners with the Canadian Consulate in Chicago and Asian Pop-Up Cinema, a Chicago-based Asian film festival, to premiere critically acclaimed films by Asian-Canadian filmmakers with strong references to their Chinese roots. Three films will be screened: The Magical Life of Long Tack Sam by Ann Marie Fleming, China Heavy Weight by Yung Chang, and Old Stone by Johnny Ma. A discussion with the filmmakers and film critic MC will follow. General $5, free for students with UCID. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program, The Consulate General of Canada in Chicago, and Asian Pop-Up Cinema.

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MIRIAM HANSEN MEMORIAL L E C T U R E BY A N D R E A S H U YS S E N

Thu, Apr 12, 4pm Logan Center, Screening Room The annual Miriam Hansen Memorial Lecture invites scholars who share Hansen’s passion for intertwining history and theory in the ongoing study of cinema and media. Joining us this year is Andreas Huyssen, emeritus professor of German and comparative literature at Columbia University and the author, most recently, of Miniature Metropolis: Literature in an Age of Photography and Film (2015). Free. Presented by the Department of Cinema and Media Studies and the Film Studies Center.

P R OT OT Y P E

Fri, Apr 13, 7pm Logan Center, Screening Room Texas-born, Toronto-based Blake Williams’s experimental 3D film immerses the viewer in remarkable and mysterious images of a world nearing destruction. Noted as the most significant 3D film since JeanLuc Godard’s Goodbye to Language, Prototype is a virtuosic visual delight that pushes the boundaries of cinematic language. Preceded by Red Capriccio, an earlier eye-shattering anaglyph 3D short. (2014–2017, 70 min., 3D DCP) Free. Presented by the Film Studies Center and Channels: A Quarterly Film Series.

S E N S I N G M E D I A : D E PA R T M E N T OF CINEMA AND MEDIA S T U D I E S 2 0 1 8 G R A D UAT E S T U D E N T CO N F E R E N C E Fri–Sat, Apr 20–21 Logan Center, Screening Room Graduate students from across the country and across disciplines will gather to engage in conversation on the ways in which contemporary media both expand our human senses and can also sense the world on their own. A day of panels on Saturday follows the Friday afternoon keynote address by Mark B. N. Hansen, the James B. Duke Professor of Literature at Duke University and author of Feed Forward: On the Future of 21st Century Media. For more information, visit sensingmedia.wordpress.com. Free.

Sponsored by the Departments of Cinema and Media Studies, Art History, English, & Music, the Committee on Theater and Performance Studies, the Adelyn Russell Bogert Fund of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, and the Film Studies Center.

L'A M I D E M O N A M I E [B OY F R I E N D S A N D G I R L F R I E N D S ] W I T H AC T R E S S SOPHIE RENOIR

Thu, Apr 26, 7pm Logan Center, Screening Room The sixth in Éric Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs series finds two friends navigating relationship foibles against the backdrop of Cergy-Pontoise, a planned suburb designed to meet residents' every need. Blanche and Léa meet, become friends, and switch boyfriends; meanwhile, Rohmer balances the utter banality of the characters' preoccupations with the banality of their surroundings. Sophie Renoir, who plays Léa, will speak after the film with Daniel Morgan, associate professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies. (France, 1987, 103 min., DCP) Free. Presented by the Film Studies Center with support from Alliance Française de Chicago.

A I W E I W E I : H U M A N F LOW SCREENING AND Q&A Sunday, Apr 29, 1:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Directed by internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, Human Flow is a sprawling and heartbreaking exploration of the global refugee crisis. Captured over the course of a year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent stories that stretches through Afghanistan, Greece, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey, and beyond. From teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders, Human Flow witnesses its subjects’ desperate search for safety, shelter, and justice. This event is a part of a nationwide simultaneous screening of Human Flow and the Q&A with Ai Weiwei will be livestreamed to institutions across the country. Free; reservations required (tickets. uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS).

Presented by UChicago Arts and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Additional support provided by the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights and the Chicago Humanities Festival.

L A COLLEC TIONNEUSE WITH AC T R E S S H AY D É E P O L I T O F F

Sat, May 5, 7pm Logan Center, Screening Room Actress Haydée Politoff joins professor Richard Neer in discussion of her role in Éric Rohmer's first color film. La Collectionneuse is a grand showcase for the clever and delectably ironic battleof-the-sexes repartee in a witty script. When a womanizing art dealer and his painter friend go to the Riviera for a relaxing summer getaway, their idyll is disturbed by the presence of the bohemian Politoff, accused of being a “collector” of men. (France, 1967, 87 min., DCP) Free. Presented by the Film Studies Center and the Department of Cinema and Media Studies.

C I N É -T R AC T S A N D SOULÈVEMENT DE LA JEUNESSE

Fri, May 18, 7pm Logan Center, Screening Room In the wake of the uprisings of May 1968, French filmmakers addressed the turmoil through short political and experimental works. Maurice Lemaître’s Soulèvement de la jeunesse juxtaposes footage of the uprisings with an abstract soundtrack of Lettrist spoken word and song. Meanwhile, filmmakers including Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, and Jean-Luc Godard anonymously created silent, political ciné-tracts using leftist and French modernist film techniques. (France, 16mm and digital, 85 minutes) Free. Presented by the Film Studies Center, the Center of the Study of Gender and Sexuality's Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project, and the France Chicago Center.


LIGHTS.CAMERA.CAREER. This year, Fire Escape Films is celebrating 21 years as a recognized student organization (RSO on UChicago’s campus. The student film group has produced several campus traditions since its formation in 1997 but is probably most well-known for its O-Week Screening series, held every year during new student orientation, and its annual 48 Hour Film Festival, which gives teams of student filmmakers just two days to write, shoot, and edit short films to screen at the festival. The rigor with which the members of Fire Escape Films approach the art of moving images often translates directly into careers in the film industry. While Cinema and Media Studies provides a strong theoretical foundation for students interested in the study of film, the student-led and student-operated Fire Escape Films serves as a resource for students of any major who are interested in the art of making movies. The RSO provides members with access to filmmaking equipment and screening opportunities, as well as workshops, seminars, master classes, and professional development. Grace MacLeod, Co-President of Fire Escape Films, notes that the RSO has seen a significant rise in membership in just the past few years, from about 45 students to a roster of 300 participating throughout the year. Members produce 6 to 8 student films per quarter, and run technical workshops and seminars on cinematography, sound design, directing, and screenwriting. MacLeod noted that Fire Escape Films was seeing an exponential growth in female membership, and the organization needed to develop programming that encouraged film diversity and participation. In 2016, Fire Escape Films won a $10,050 grant from The Women’s Board of UChicago to support the Women in Film Initiative (WIFI). The initiative supports programming for both the creative and professional development of filmmakers and provides funding for ambitious film projects. The WIFI application process is highly competitive, and eligible projects must “have non-male identifying students in all of the major crew positions.” Fire Escape Films wants to produce “a reliable group of contacts in the industry that can collaborate with students,” and WIFI is helping the organization to achieve this through diversifying its roster of filmmakers and the content produced by their members. Filmmaker and former Fire Escape Films member Mimi Wilcox, AB’ 2015, graduated before WIFI came into existence, but she is exactly the type of industry professional that MacLeod hopes the initiative will cultivate. Wilcox is the director of photography, co-producer, and editor of the documentary web series UNINSURABLE, which profiles individual stories about barriers to healthcare access in America. Through partnerships with Kindling Group and Upworthy, the series has reached over 600,000 viewers. We sat down with Wilcox to learn more about how her time with the RSO influenced her career path.

FIRE ESCAPE FILMS IS PRODUCING

TOMORROW’S FILMMAKERS HOW DID YOU COME TO JOIN FIRE ESCAPE FILMS WHILE YOU WERE AT UCHICAGO? WHAT WAS THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE?

I didn’t get seriously involved with Fire Escape until the end of my first year. I signed on right away. Fire Escape is really organized, and it was amazing to see how it evolved over the course of my time there.

WHAT WAS YOUR MAJOR? DID BEING A PART OF FIRE ESCAPE CHANGE YOUR FOCUS WHILE AT UCHICAGO?

My major wasn’t one bit film related — I double majored in Economics and Russian. Being a part of Fire Escape hugely changed my focus at UChicago. In my first year, I thought that maybe I wanted to go into nonprofit management or education policy, but by the end of my second year, Fire Escape had become such a signicant part of my life that I decided to start taking filmmaking more seriously. That said, my Econ and Russian studies at UChicago ultimately contributed to my film craft in subtle ways.

HOW DID BEING A FIRE ESCAPE MEMBER PREPARE YOU FOR A PROFESSIONAL CAREER IN FILMMAKING?

I thought that trying to break into filmmaking without any film classes or film school background would be a challenge, but Fire Escape filled that void in so many ways. From the start of my second year onward, I was always working on a film, whether I was directing, producing,

editing, running sound, or setting up lights. I felt so much room to flex creative muscles and learn what I loved to do.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY ABOUT YOUR CURRENT JOB AND WHAT ARE SOME PROJECTS YOU ARE WORKING ON?

I currently work as a freelance filmmaker, editing and shooting for documentary and commercial clients such as National Geographic, Nikon, and Sotheby’s. During my first year out of college, I worked as an in-house video editor and shooter for Shure Inc., creating advertisements and training videos. It was a scary move to jump from a salaried 9-to-5 position at Shure to being self-employed, and never having any idea what my next month of work would look like, but I haven’t regretted it once! The best part about being a freelancer is that I have the freedom to work on my own projects. For the past year I’ve been working with two other collaborators—one of whom I met at UChicago!—on UNINSURABLE. That kind of learn-as-you-go approach and ability to teach yourself what you need to know is absolutely something that I first experienced in Fire Escape Films, and I credit the passion I have now for creating my own projects entirely to the experiences I had as a member.

Find Fire Escape Films on Facebook facebook.com /FireEscapeFilms, learn more about Mimi Wilcox on her website mimiwilcox.com, and screen UNINSURABLE at uninsurabledoc.com.


DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE

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DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP May 26–Nov 25, 2018 U.S. Pavilion, Venice, Italy The University of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago are proudly serving as commissioners of the U.S. Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. The U.S. Pavilion exhibition, titled Dimensions of Citizenship, will grapple with the question of how architecture contributes to the meaning of citizenship as a cluster of rights and responsibilities at the intersection of legal, political, economic, and societal affiliations. Contemporary issues in the world today—from immigration to the impact of technology on individuals and nations—make it clear that now, and in the years to come, the stakes of citizenship are exceedingly high. See next page for more info.

URBAN ART AND THE N E T WO R K : DATA S Y M P O S I U M Fri, Apr 6, 2–6pm, reception to follow Neubauer Collegium How does data, which has shaped the urban environment and the ways we inhabit cities as individuals and as collectivities, advance intelligent urbanization? In an era when data analysis so thoroughly informs urban design, urban policy, and urban development, how can we understand the questions it raises and the questions it evades? And how can artistic or design practices defamiliarize the dynamics by which data forms and transforms the urban? This symposium foregrounds such questions in the effort to think across the digital, the material, and the spatial. This event is part of the 2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar on Urban Art and Urban Form. Free (more at urban.uchicago.edu). Presented by UChicago Urban and UChicagoArts.

B E R L I N FA M I LY L E C T U R E S : JEANNE GANG Tuesdays, Apr 10, 17, 24, 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall The Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures bring to the UChicago campus individuals who are making fundamental contributions to the arts, humanities, and humanistic social sciences. Jeanne Gang is an American architect and MacArthur Fellow, and founding principal of Studio Gang, an architecture and urban design practice with offices in Chicago, New York, and San Francisco. Gang’s practice advances the possibilities of architecture and design in the 21st century. Join the acclaimed architect and urban visionary for a three-lecture series. Free; RSVP strongly recommended (berlinfamilylectures.uchicago.edu/content/ rsvp). Presented by Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures Series and the Division of the Humanities.

URBAN ART AND THE N E T WO R K : I N F R A S T R U C T U R E SYMPOSIUM Fri, May 4, 1–4pm symposium (with lunch); 4–5pm presentation from Rahul Mehrotra; 5–6pm presentation from Studio CAMP. Reception to follow. Gray Center Lab at Midway Studios This symposium asks how art and design address not only the material, formal, and formalizing qualities of infrastructure, but also its often-impalpable implications. Permeating our existence by enabling daily life, infrastructure generally eludes scrutiny, rendered invisible through its material embeddedness or technological sophistication. From transportation to communication systems, from borders to electrical grids—infrastructure shapes not only the physical urban environment, but also the social, economic, and political structures within it. This event is part of the 2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar on Urban Art and Urban Form. Free (more at urban.uchicago.edu). Presented by UChicago Urban and UChicagoArts.

URBAN ART AND THE N E T WO R K : A TA L K BY K A S P E R KÖ N I G , F O U N D I N G DIREC TOR OF SKU LP TU R P R OJ E K T E M Ü N S T E R Thu, May 17, 5pm Logan Center, Screening Room Since the 1960s, Kasper König, one of the most important curators of contemporary art in the postwar era, has supported the practices of leading European and American artists. In addition to directing Frankfurt’s Städelschule and Cologne’s Museum Ludwig, König co-founded Skulptur Projekte, the decennial exhibition of commissioned public art held in Münster since 1977. König will present a lecture about this distinct exhibition, including his return to curating the latest instantiation in summer 2017. This event is part of the 2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar on Urban Art and Urban Form. Free (more at urban.uchicago.edu). Presented by UChicago Urban, UChicagoArts, the Department of Visual Arts (DoVA) Open Practice Committee, and the Department of Art History.

URBAN ART AND THE N E T WO R K : F E S T I VA L S SYMPOSIUM Fri, May 18, 9:30am–12pm; lunch to follow, 12-1pm Logan Center, Seminar Terrace Room Recurring art and architectural festivals have produced some of the world’s most memorable visual and built forms. This symposium explores the ways in which “festivals” have promoted new modes of experience and spectatorship, new relationships between exhibition and sites, and new networks of international exchange and institutional structures. This event is part of the 2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar on Urban Art and Urban Form. Free (more at urban.uchicago.edu). Presented by UChicago Urban and UChicagoArts.


DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP The University of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago are proudly serving as commissioners of the U.S. Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. The U.S. Pavilion exhibition is titled Dimensions of Citizenship. Dimensions of Citizenship grapples with the meaning of citizenship as a cluster of rights and responsibilities at the intersection of legal, political, economic, and societal affiliations. Contemporary issues in the world today—from immigration to the impact of technology on individuals and nations—make it clear that now, and in the years to come, the stakes of citizenship are exceedingly high.

ON VIEW

The Pavilion of the United States, Giardini della Biennale 26 May to 25 November 2018, 10am – 6pm The Giardini is closed Mondays Vernissage 24 and 25 May 2018, 10am – 6pm

COMMISSIONERS

On behalf of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs The School of the Art Institute of Chicago The University of Chicago

CURATORS

Niall Atkinson, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and the College, The University of Chicago Ann Lui, Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and co-founder of Future Firm Mimi Zeiger, Los Angeles-based critic, editor, and curator; faculty member in the Media Design Practices MFA program at Art Center College of Design

ASSOCIATE CURATOR

Iker Gil, Lecturer in the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, director of MAS Studio, and founder of MAS Context

FIND US ON SOCIAL

Facebook @Dimensions of Citizenship / Twitter @USPavilion18 / Instagram @uspavilion18 #DimensionsOfCitizenship


PARTICIPANTS

The exhibition’s curators have commissioned seven architecture practices to explore how citizenship may be defined, constructed, enacted, contested, or expressed in the built environment at seven different spatial scales. The installations raise questions about issues including belonging, sovereignty, and ecology. The spatial scales encompassed by Dimensions of Citizenship and the participants commissioned to consider them are:

SCALE: CITIZEN / AMANDA WILLIAMS + ANDRES L. HERNANDEZ, IN COLLABORATION WITH SHANI CROWE

Dimensions of Citizenship begins at the scale of the citizen with the project Thrival Geographies (In My Mind I See a Line), which will consider how race shapes notions of identity, shelter, and public space in historically AfricanAmerican communities. For their installation in the courtyard of the U.S. Pavilion, Williams and Hernandez will partner with Chicago-based artist Shani Crowe, whose intricate braided hair sculptures have been worn by celebrities such as Solange. While the specter of slavery and continued racial injustice will be at the core of the installation, the piece will ultimately strive for a possible architecture of freedom that might allow all citizens to thrive and participate in the democratic ideal. Image: Courtesy of Shani Crow.

SCALE: CIVITAS / STUDIO GANG

Led by 2011 MacArthur Fellow Jeanne Gang, Studio Gang uses design as a medium to help strengthen communities. Stone Stories builds on the Studio’s ongoing work in Memphis, TN, to investigate how redesigning cities’ public space can be an exercise of citizenship and empowerment. Inspired by Memphis’s recent removal of two Confederate statues, Stone Stories offers an inclusive urban vision for Cobblestone Landing, an overlooked yet historically important site along the Mississippi River. Hundreds of Memphis cobblestones will be shipped to Venice and used as a platform to share the stories of Memphians past and present, offering visitors a visceral and material interaction with a distant public space and the citizens who are actively building its shared urban future. Image: Courtesy of Studio Gang.

SCALE: REGION / SCAPE

SCAPE, under the leadership of 2017 MacArthur Fellow Kate Orff, will demonstrate that landscape architecture can be a critical tool for re-envisioning the response of citizens to climate change. SCAPE’s project, Ecological Citizens, understands the region as an area defined by the shifting relationships of ecology, infrastructure, and climate. It takes the Venetian Lagoon as a globally significant case study of a tidal region under ecological threat. Partnering with Università di Bologna and the Italian Institute of Marine Sciences, SCAPE will present possible solutions or interventions to aid the environmentally sensitive La Certosa island in the lagoon. Image: Courtesy of SCAPE. Photo by Andrea Barbanti.

SCALE: NATION / ESTUDIO TEDDY CRUZ + FONNA FORMAN

Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman challenges the way we think about national boundaries. Their project, MEXUS: A Geography of Interdependence, reveals a transnational zone comprised of eight watershed systems shared by Mexico and the United States. MEXUS provokes us to rethink citizenship beyond the limits of the nation, mobilizing a more inclusive, interdependent idea based on co-existence, shared assets, and cooperative opportunities between divided communities. Cruz is the winner of the 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture, which is presented to immigrants who are champions of the arts and sciences. Image: Courtesy of Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman.

SCALE: GLOBE / DILLER SCOFIDIO + RENFRO, LAURA KURGAN, ROBERT GERARD PIETRUSKO WITH COLUMBIA CENTER FOR SPATIAL RESEARCH When we zoom out to the scale of the globe, the primacy of the individual, the city, and even the nation drops away and is replaced by data: electricity, trade routes, migratory shifts, and the flow of capital, goods, and people. In Plain Sight-a collaboration among Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Laura Kurgan, and Robert Gerard Pietrusko with Columbia Center for Spatial Research-uses data drawn from images created by the Soumi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite to visualize where people live on earth. Two contrasting NASA images of the Earth taken at 1:30 pm and 1:30 am show us the gaps in the network: the places with many people and no lights, and those with bright lights and no people. This information maps out a political geography of belonging and exclusion. Image: Courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Black Marble, 2016.

SCALE: NETWORK / KELLER EASTERLING WITH MANY

Keller Easterling’s writings and projects regularly investigate the emergent territory where the state meets the digital network. With MANY, an online platform designed to facilitate migration through an exchange of needs, Easterling and team propose that we use the network to rethink possibly outdated notions of citizenship. With a nod to the pervasive and familiar share economies that define online life, MANY envisions a global form of matchmaking between the sidelined talents of migrating populations and the multitude of opportunities around the world. Favoring cosmopolitan mobility over national identity, MANY looks to short-term visas as a tool to foster an exchange of needs. Image: Courtesy of Keller Easterling with MANY.

SCALE: COSMOS / DESIGN EARTH

The space above Earth, as a site of existing human occupation and potential belonging, has become a territory that both captures the imagination and serves as a theater for existing conflicts or conditions. In looking to the cosmos, Design Earth’s speculative designs suggest possible off-world architectural responses. Design Earth’s El Hadi Jazairy and Rania Ghosn (recipient of the 2017 Boghossian Foundation Prize) present three “geo-stories,” which speculate on the legal geography of citizenship when extended to “the province of all mankind.” Together the stories in Cosmorama—Mining the Sky, Planetary Ark, and Pacific Cemetery—ask how we should reckon with the epic and frontier narratives that have fueled space exploration, at a time when prospects of instability and extinction have become normal on Earth. Image: Courtesy of Design Earth.

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LITERATURE & LECTURES

P O E T RY R E A D I N G : N I C K T W E M L OW W I T H J O S H E DWA R D S

Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores.

P O E T RY R E A D I N G BY C E C I L I A V I C U Ñ A

Thu, Apr 5, 6pm Logan Center, Terrace Seminar Room Cecilia Vicuña is a poet, artist, filmmaker, and activist. Her work addresses pressing concerns of the modern world, including ecological destruction, human rights, and cultural homogenization. Born and raised in Santiago de Chile, Vicuña has been in exile since the early 1970s, after the military coup against elected president Salvador Allende. The poet has published twenty-two art and poetry books, most recent including Kuntur Ko. Free.

Presented by the Pearl Andelson Sherry Memorial and the Program in Poetry & Poetics.

Fri, Apr 6, 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore (5751 S Woodlawn Ave) At age eighty-two, National Book Award winning poet and renowned Latin translator David Ferry embarked on a complete translation of one of the foundational works of Western culture: Virgil’s Aeneid. The result is a landmark, a gift to longtime lovers of Virgil and the perfect entry point for new readers. Join us to celebrate this achievement with a reading and conversation. Free. Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores

FICTION READING BY P E R C I VA L E V E R E T T

Mon, Apr 9, 6pm Midway Studios Percival Everett is the author of nearly thirty books, including Percival Everett by Virgil Russell, Assumption, Erasure, I Am Not Sidney Poitier, Glyph and, most recently, So Much Blue. He is the recipient of the Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, the Believer Book Award, and the 2006 PEN USA Center Award for Fiction. Free. Presented by the Kestnbaum Writer-in-Residence Program and the Program in Creative Writing.

G O O D M A N DAV I S L E C T U R E S E R I E S : H E L E N M O L E S WO R T H Mon, Apr 9, 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Helen Molesworth is the Chief Curator at The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Los Angeles, where she recently curated the first U.S. retrospective of the Brazilian artist Anna Maria Maiolino and the monographic survey Kerry James Marshall: Mastry. Free. Presented by the Department of Visual Arts Open Practice Committee.

REAR VIEW MIRROR SESSIONS

Thursdays, Apr 12–Jun 21, 6–9pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) The Rear View Mirror Listening Sessions, hosted by Duane E. Powell of Soundrotation, focus on influential unsung artists and legends and how their influence has lasted for generations. Through an exploration of musical eras and histories, the program provides fresh insight into the artists’ lives and music. Sessions are as follows – Apr 12: Leo Ware; May 10: Patti LaBelle; June 21: Maurice White. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life in conjunction with Soundrotation and Brain Trust Management.

2018 WEISSBOURD CO N F E R E N C E : I N H A B I T I N G OMEROS Thu, Apr 12, 5:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall The Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts invites you to a conversation on St. Lucian poet and Nobel laureate Derek Walcott a year after his death. Omeros, Walcott’s epic poem spanning seven books, is an intricate masterpiece that The New Yorker called “a hymn to the seductiveness of the ancient world.” The keynote discussion will feature publisher Jonathan Galassi, poet Ishion Hutchinson, and novelist Jamaica Kincaid in conversation with Rachel Galvin (Department of English Language and Literature, UChicago). Free (inhabitingomeros.com). Co-sponsored by the Bernard Weissbourd Memorial Fund, the Nicholson Center for British Studies, the Humanities Division, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Classics Department, and the English Department.

arts.uchicago.edu | 17

Fri, Mar 30, 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore (5751 S Woodlawn Ave) What does it mean to be a minor artist? What structures must be destroyed to clear the way for all the “minor” voices that litter the discourse of Western civilization? Poet Nick Twemlow explores these and many other questions of art and its discontents in Attributed to the Harrow Painter. Join us for a reading and conversation with the author. Josh Edwards, poet and co-editor of Canarium Books, will join him in conversation. Free.

READING AND DISCUSSION: DAV I D F E R RY O N T H E A E N E I D


READING AND PERFORMANCE: DAV I D G R U B B S O N N OW T H AT T H E AU D I E N C E I S A S S E M B L E D Fri, Apr 13, 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore (5751 S Woodlawn Ave) Musician and scholar David Grubbs blurs the line between literature and scholarship with Now that the audience is assembled, a book-length prose poem that describes a fictional musical performance with repeated interruptions in the form of in-depth discussions and musical demonstrations. Join us for a reading and conversation with the author, followed by a short live performance. Free. Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores

M A J E L CO N N E RY, YAO C H E N , AND JUDITH ZEITLIN

Thu, Apr 19, 6–8pm Gray Center Lab at Midway Studios Join us for a public conversation centered on creating an opera with Gray Center Mellon Fellows Judith Zeitlin (UChicago Department of East Asian Languages & Civilizations) and Yao Chen (Beijingbased composer), along with new opera vocalist, composer, scholar, and producer Majel Connery. Food served at 6pm, conversation starts 6:30pm. Free.

Presented by the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry.

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A R T S & I N N OVAT I O N S E R I E S P R E S E N T S : E CO N O M I E S O F T H E I N D I V I D UA L - S H I F T I N G T H E WAYS W E S U P P O R T T H E A R T S & C R E AT I V E S E C TO R Thu, Apr 19, 6pm Logan Center, Screening Room As President and CEO of the Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI), Angie Kim has a finger on the pulse of how support for arts and innovation is changing in America. Kim will talk about CCI’s prioritization of support for individual artists; current national trends and systems disruptions that hold promise for changing conditions of artists affected by job precarity, limited or no benefits, expensive debt, and lack of collateral for loans; and the tensions echoed throughout the creative and adjacent sectors as the nation shifts from full-time employment to gig economics. Kim will be joined by Tracie D. Hall, Director of the Joyce Foundation’s Culture Program and a CCI board member. Free. Presented by the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the Logan Center for the Arts.

READING WITH BEN PURKERT AND VU TRAN Fri, Apr 20, 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore (5751 S Woodlawn Ave) Authors Ben Purkert and Vu Tran read from and discuss their works, For the Love of Endings and Dragonfish, which address (through poetry and prose respectively) questions of meaning and belonging in a sometimes hostile world. Free. Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores

CURTIS WHITE ON L AC K I N G C H A R AC T E R Sat, Apr 21, 3pm 57th Street Books (1301 E 57th St) Postmodern master Curtis White reads from and discusses his first novel in 15 years, Lacking Character, a “wild satire he transforms the banal into magic” (Publishers Weekly). Free. Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores.

E D UA R D F R E U D M A N N WHITE ELEPHANT ARCHIVE Mon, Apr 23, 8pm Bond Chapel The White Elephant Archive, Setting No 3 explores the legacy of the Holocaust from the perspective of the third generation living in Austria today. In this intensely personal, documentary/object theatre production, Eduard Freudmann uses his family's archive—which includes poems written by his grandfather while imprisoned in concentration camps—to explore his family's silence about the Holocaust, and his own attempt to understand the burden of this legacy through art. Reflecting on the politics of Holocaust commemoration in Austria, and larger questions about how to speak of a horror once its witnesses are gone or silent, his production provides a rare and important glimpse into the experience of the third generation living in Europe, and the impact of trauma across generations. Free. Presented by the University of Chicago Greenberg Center for Jewish Studies, with support from the Austrian Cultural Forum NY.

P O E T RY R E A D I N G : S U S A N S T E WA R T Thu, Apr 26, 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore (5751 S Woodlawn Ave) Susan Stewart’s Cinder gathers poetry from across her thirty-five-year career, including many extraordinary new poems. Join us for a reading and conversation with this singular writer in contemporary poetry. Free. Presented by Seminary Co-op Bookstores.

P O E T RY R E A D I N G BY CO R A L B R AC H O & E L I O T W E I N B E R G E R Wed, May 2, 6pm Logan Center, Terrace Seminar Room Coral Bracho, winner of the 2000 Guggenheim Fellowship, was born in Mexico City and is the author of six books of poems including Tierra de entraña ardiente, in which she collaborated with the painter Irma Palacios. Eliot Weinberger’s work regularly appears in translation and has been published in more than thirty languages. Weinberger first gained recognition for his translations of the Nobel Prize-winning poet, Octavio Paz. Free. Presented by the Poem Present Series and the Program in Poetry & Poetics.

P O E T RY R E A D I N G F E AT U R I N G ROSA ALCAL Á Fri, May 4, 6–7:30 pm Regenstein Library, Room 122 Poet and translator Rosa Alcalá will read new work and poems from her acclaimed

third collection MyOTHER TONGUE (2017). Free. Presented by the University of Chicago Library and Chicago Review.

F I C T I O N R E A D I N G BY ALEXANDER CHEE

Mon, May 7, 6pm Logan Center, Terrace Seminar Room Alexander Chee is a novelist, essayist, and contributing editor at The New Republic, an editor-at-large at the Virginia Quarterly Review, and a critic-at-large at the Los Angeles Times. He is the author of the novels Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night. Free. Presented by the Fictions & Forms Series and the Program in Creative Writing.

A R T S , S C I E N C E + C U LT U R E I N I T I AT I V E G R A D UAT E CO L L A B O R AT I O N G R A N T P R E S E N TAT I O N S

Wed, May 9 5–6:15pm, Logan Center, Performance Penthouse 6:15–8pm, the Midway Studios Great Hall Please join us for the final presentations of the Arts, Science + Culture Initiative’s (ASCI) Graduate Collaboration Grant projects. The Collaboration Grants encourage independent trans-disciplinary research between students in the arts, social sciences, and the sciences. Formal presentations in the Logan Center will be followed by a reception and viewing of project installations and performances in the Midway Studios Great Hall. Free.

Presented by ASCI, in partnership with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), with support from the Office of the Provost and the Institute for Molecular Engineering.

NONFICTION READING BY MARY NORRIS

Thu, May 10, 6pm Logan Center, Terrace Seminar Room Mary Norris joined the editorial staff of The New Yorker in 1978 and has been a copy editor and proofreader at the magazine for more than thirty years. Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, she lives in New York and Rockaway. Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen is her first book. Free. Presented by the New Voices Series and the Program in Creative Writing

POETRY, POLITICS, AND PAINTING OF TANG CHANG Wed, May 16, 6–8 pm Smart Museum of Art Wed, May 23, 6–8 pm Poetry Foundation (61 W. Superior Street) This two-part program investigates the work of Thai painter and poet Tang Chang. Part I features a tour of his abstract paintings and poem-drawings at the Smart Museum as well as a hands-on painting workshop. Part II is a special Forms & Features poetry workshop and discussion dedicated to visual poetry. Free, but space is limited. Register: smartmuseum.uchicago.edu. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art and the Poetry Foundation.


University of Chicago Symphony Orchestra Barbara Schubert, Conductor

BERNSTEIN Symphony No. 2, “The Age of Anxiety” featuring soloist Daniel Pesca, piano

BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 in C minor

Saturday, May 26 8 PM | Mandel Hall 1131 E. 57th Street in Hyde Park Donations requested: $10 general/$5 students

Pre-concert lecture with professor Thomas Christensen 7:00 PM, McCormick Tribune Lounge music.uchicago.edu | 773.702.8069


MUSIC

F I R S T M O N DAY JA Z Z : G R E G O RY C A R M O U C H E

Monday, April 2, 7–9pm Currency Exchange Café (305 E Garfield Blvd) Greg Carmouche and the PA-TI AfroCaribbean Jazz Band plays arrangements of jazz flavored with Caribbean, funk, and traditional elements that have people dancing in the aisles. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life and the Currency Exchange Café.

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F I R S T M O N DAY JA Z Z : G I R A DA H N E E

Mon, Mar 5, 7–9pm Currency Exchange Café (305 E Garfield Blvd) Chicago-based artist Gira Dahnee believes that music is a passageway to the metaphysical realm. Conceptually rooted in Afrofuturism, Dahnee’s work seeks to use the past and present to create better futures for people of African descent. Dahnee’s music merges jazz, rock, and electro-experimental genres. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life and the Currency Exchange Café.

SECRET DRUM BAND: M U LT I M E D I A P R E S E N TAT I O N AND PERFORMANCE Thu, Mar 29, 5pm reception and ecology exhibits, 6pm lecture, 7pm performance International House Assembly Hall Lisa Schonberg will discuss her work in the intersection of art, music, and ecology. She uses writing, field recording, and music composition to document habitats and bring attention to issues such as habitat loss, the importance of insects, and endangered species. A percussion performance will follow. Free. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program and the Program on the Global Environment. Event is made possible in part by generous support from Bart Lazar, AB’82.

Fifth House Ensemble sheds new light on works by artists facing oppression under three different oppressive regimes: Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, and McCarthyism here in the United States where individuals, ideas, and art were deemed un-American. Discussion following performance. General $20, students free for first 50 tickets online, first 50 with ID at the door. Tickets at fifth-house.com.

Presented by Rockefeller Chapel, with the ACLU, Holocaust Community Services, the Spertus Institute, and Artists at Risk.

U LYS S E S OW E N S J R . ' S  SONGS OF FREEDOM

Fri, Apr 6, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall The 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln, and Nina Simone—all of whom have made an indelible mark in music. General $38, faculty and staff $30, under 35 $20, students $10. Presented by UChicago Presents.

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA AND CHORALE W I T H S H E R E Z A D E PA N T H A K I , SOPRANO

Sun, Apr 8, 2pm Logan Center, Performance Hall The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale, with soprano Sherezade Panthaki, offer a multimedia concert tour highlighting the music of Jewish composer Salamone Rossi and his contemporaries. General $38, faculty and staff $30, under 35 $20, students $10. Presented by UChicago Presents.

FIFTH HOUSE ENSEMBLE: D E G E N E R AT E A R T

Sun, Apr 15, 4pm Rockefeller Chapel Throughout history, art has maintained the power to threaten the social order. Delving into music that was censored, banned, and propagandized as “degenerate,”

MONTROSE TRIO

Fri, Apr 20, 7:30pm Mandel Hall  Former violinist Martin Beaver and cellist Clive Greensmith of the famed Tokyo Quartet join with long-time collaborator pianist Jon Kimura Parker to present music by Turina, Beethoven, and Mendelssohn. General $38, faculty and staff $30, under 35 $20, students $10. Presented by UChicago Presents.

T H E H I S TO RY O F R O C K A N D S O U L : PA R T 2

Fri, Apr 20, 8pm Logan Center, Performance Hall At this sequel to 2016’s sold-out concert, legendary Radio Hall of Famer Terri Hemmert returns to guide us from singersongwriters of the 1970s such as Elton John and Carole King, through renowned artists like David Bowie and Lady Gaga. With inventive new arrangements by Patrick Sinozich and Hemmert’s delightful


and inspiring on-stage narration, this will be an energetic musical trip! Preferred $43, general $35, students $5 with UCID. Presented by Chicago a cappella.

Warned for voice and piano, Britten’s Hymn to St. Cecilia, and music by George Crumb, Pauline Oliveros, Harrison Birtwistle, and others. General $20 at door, students free. Presented by Rockefeller Chapel.

D U K AT I A N D B I S E R I F O L K L O R E E N S E M B L E S P R I N G S H OWC A S E

S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS RESIDENCY Wed, Apr 11 - Sat, Apr 28, 7:30pm Logan Center Alto saxophonist and composer Steve Coleman and members of the Five Elements Band return to Chicago for their third two-week residency that will include multi-level workshops, performances, and South Side-focused outreach. Mentored by Chicago jazz greats, Coleman has been recognized for his technical virtuosity and engagement with diverse musical traditions. The residency will culminate in a Rosenberger Medal Lecture and Performance. For a full schedule of events, please visit arts.uchicago.edu. All events are free. Steve Coleman and Five Elements residency is presented by M-Base Concepts, Inc., the Logan Center for the Arts, Jazz Institute of Chicago, Rebuild Foundation, and Arts and Public Life.

S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS Fri, Apr 13, 7-9pm BING Books, 307 East Garfield Blvd

S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D FIVE ELEMENTS: OPEN REHEARSAL

S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS Fri, Apr 20, 7-9pm BING Books, 307 East Garfield Blvd

S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS Fri, Apr 27, 7-9pm BING Books, 307 East Garfield Blvd

T H I R D T U E S DAY JA Z Z : S T E V E CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS Tue, Apr 17, 7:30-10pm Logan Center, Café Logan

ROSENBERGER M E DA L L E C T U R E A N D PERFORMANCE: STEVE CO L E M A N A N D F I V E ELEMENTS Sun, Apr 29, 7pm Logan Center, Performance Hall

Presented by the International House Global Voices Series and Dukati and Biseri Folklore Ensemble.

UNIVERSIT Y SYMPHONY O R C H E S T R A : CO N C E R T O S H OWC A S E Sat, Apr 21, 8pm Mandel Hall Hear the two talented First Place Winners of the University of Chicago’s 2018 Concerto Competition in one concert! Violinist Stacy Wang, a second year student in the College, will perform the first movement of Jean Sibelius’ Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47. Flutist Julianna Han, an advanced graduate student in Microbiology, will perform Jacques Ibert’s Concerto pour Flûte et Orchestra with the University Symphony Orchestra. Free; donations requested at the door: general $10, students/children $5. Presented by the Department of Music.

CO N T E M P O W I T H I N T E R N AT I O N A L CO N T E M P O R A RY E N S E M B L E

Sun, Apr 22, 2pm Logan Center, Performance Hall New music champions International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) present pieces reflecting on or inspired by nature, including works by George Crumb, Krzystof Penderecki, and Harrison Birtwistle. General $25, faculty and staff $20, under 35 $20, students $10. Presented by Contempo.

C H I C AG O E N S E M B L E CO N C E R T: PROGRAM IV Sun, Apr 22, 3pm International House Assembly Hall Offering an innovative mix of familiar masterworks and lesser-known repertoire, The Chicago Ensemble has occupied a unique place in Chicago's cultural life for over 40 years. Featuring works by Scarlatti, Vivaldi, Handel, Fasch, Martinů, Piazzola, and Argento. General $30, students $10, free for UChicago students. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program and The Chicago Ensemble.

CO N T E M P O : T O M O R R OW ' S M U S I C T O DAY I

Fri, Apr 27, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Ensemble Dal Niente and Kontras Quartet showcase works by today’s most promising up-and-coming talent, University of Chicago doctoral candidates in composition, with works by Jack Hughes, Pierce Gradone, Tim Page, and Chicago Center for Contemporary Composition Postdoctoral Fellow, Aaron Helgeson. Reception to follow. Free. Presented by Contempo.

CHAMBER MUSIC SPRING CO N C E R T Thu, May 3, 7:30pm Fulton Recital Hall Some of the most dedicated chamber musicians on campus join forces with members of Spektral Quartet and pianist Daniel Pesca to present an evening of Romantic masterworks. The program includes music by Schumann, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Amy Beach. Free. Presented by the Department of Music.

CO N T E M P O : T O M O R R OW ' S M U S I C T O DAY I I

Fri, May 4, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Contempo's final concert of the season features works by today’s most promising up-and-coming talent, University of Chicago doctoral candidates Joungbum Lee, Alican Çamci, and Igor Santos, performed by Ensemble Dal Niente. Reception to follow. Free. Presented by Contempo.

CAMERON SHAFII Fri, May 4, 8pm Bond Chapel Based in San Francisco, Shafii is an Iranian composer practicing generative and electroacoustic music. Making use of a host of digital processes and attuned to how sound spectrums are perceived, his work often explores a range of sounds—from microscopic and minimal to macro and maximal—and features kinetic movement, tensions, and complex sonorities. Shafii runs the Ge-stell label, and he has remixed and produced works for other labels and experimental platforms such as Farmacia901 and Anòmia. Free. Presented by the Renaissance Society

MUSIC OF EXILE

SOUTH ASIAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE

Sun, Apr 22, 3pm Rockefeller Chapel A choral concert featuring the world première of Kala Pierson’s Mother of Exiles, written in honor of Dean Elizabeth Davenport, alongside Pierson’s She Was

Sat, May 5, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Explore raga and tala, the complex melodic and rhythmic frameworks that delineate the contours of improvisation and composition in Indian classical music. Focusing on the

arts.uchicago.edu | 21

Sat, Apr 14, 12-4pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse

Sat, Apr 21, 7pm International House Assembly Hall The Dukati and Biseri Folklore Ensemble present their annual concert showcasing Macedonian and Serbian folk dances and music. Dukati and Biseri presents authentic performances that reflect extensive research into the history and traditions of Serbia and Macedonia. General $15, free for students with UCID.


time-honored repertoire of the North Indian (Hindustani) and South Indian (Carnatic) traditions, the ensemble combines vocal and instrumental renderings with group-based and duet and trio performances, along with guest artists and specially choreographed dance pieces. Free. Presented by the Department of Music.

THE BRIDGE #11 — PRIDE OF LIONS Sun, May 6, 7pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse The Bridge is a network that promotes exchange between Chicago and French jazz communities by bringing various combinations of creative musicians from both countries together for two weeks at a time—twice a year in Chicago; twice a year in France—to play, record, and tour. "Bridge #11" is a Franco-Chicago ensemble comprising Joe McPhee (saxophone, brass), Daunik Lazro (saxophone), Joshua Abrams (bass, guimbri), Guillaume Séguron (bass), and Chad Taylor (drums/mbira). Free.

Presented by The Bridge; The France Chicago Center; The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; The Julie and Parker Hall Endowment for Jazz and American Music; The Department of Music; The Franke Institute for the Humanities; the Logan Center for the Arts; UChicago Careers in Journalism, Arts, and Media; and Experimental Sound Studio.

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F I R S T M O N DAY JA Z Z : M + N

Monday, May 7, 7–9pm Currency Exchange Café (305 E Garfield Blvd) M + N is a collaboration between Peabody Award winner Nikki Patin and Grammy winner Marta Cook, featuring Patin’s powerhouse vocals and poetic lyrics and Cook’s intricate harp arrangements. M + N has performed at the Black Artists Retreat, Uncommon Ground, Beastwomen, and the Chicago Art Department. Free.

T H I R D T U E S DAY JA Z Z : RYA N CO H A N , P I A N O Tue, May 15, 7:30-10pm Logan Center, Café Logan Jazz pianist and composer Ryan Cohan blends world rhythms, traditional jazz, and classical. His expansive body of work includes solo piano pieces, arrangements for symphony orchestra, and scores for independent films. Cohan has produced five critically-acclaimed albums of original compositions: Real World, Here and Now, One Sky, Another Look, and The River, which features Ryan’s sixty-minute suite inspired by his travels in Africa. Free. Presented by the Hyde Park Jazz Society and the Logan Center for the Arts, with additional support by WDCB.

BRIAN BLADE LISTENING SESSION

Wed, May 16, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Brian Blade invites listeners to hear some influential audio excerpts and talks about his musical life with moderator Dana Hall. Presented in partnership with Hyde Park Jazz Festival. Free. Presented by UChicago Presents.

C H I C AG O S TAG E : POSSIBILITIES Thu, May 17, 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Jazz at the Logan presents Chicago Stage at the Logan, showcasing local jazz artists in free pre-concert performances. Possibilities is composed of Tim Bennett (alto sax), Daniel Stien (bass), and Peter Manheim (drums). Free. Presented by the Logan Center for the Arts in partnership with the Jazz Institute of Chicago.

Presented by Arts + Public Life and the Currency Exchange Café.

IMANI WINDS, WEST POINT BAPTIST CHURCH CHOIR, AND CO RY S M Y T H E , P I A N O Fri, May 11, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Imani Winds offers a concert program to honor and inspire, with works by Frederic Rzewski, Vijay Iyer, and Henry Threadgill, to reflect on Chicago, civil rights, and the leaders who paved a way for justice and equality. General $38, faculty and staff $30, under 35 $20, students $10. Presented by UChicago Presents.

NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE WITH IMANI WINDS Sat, May 12, 8pm Rockefeller Memorial Chapel Four brand new works written for the Imani Winds by Department of Music Graduate composers. Along with these four world premieres, the Imani Winds will present Jeff Scott’s Sacred Women for Double Wind Quintet, performed by the Imani Winds and members of the University Symphony Orchestra. Free. Presented by the Department of Music.

T S U K A S A TA I KO/S H U B U K A I CO N C E R T

Sun, May 20, 1pm International House Assembly Hall Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month at International House with a performance of Japanese classical dance and traditional drumming. Tsukasa Taiko is one of Chicago’s largest community groups devoted to Japanese art and culture, and aims to pass on the traditional concepts of genuine Japanese art as a cultural legacy. Free. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program and Asian Improv aRts Midwest.

CAIC SPRING LIEDER LOUNGE

Sun, May 20, 3pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Collaborative Arts Institute of Chicago continues its Lieder Lounge series, showcasing rising stars performing programs of songs in intimate salon settings. The Spring installment features soprano Melody Moore with pianist Shannon McGinnis in a program of songs by Debussy, Richard Strauss and more. Praised by the Wall Street Journal as “passionate, full-voiced”, Moore regularly performs leading roles with the San Francisco Opera, English National Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Los Angeles Opera, and the Washington National Opera.  General $35, senior $30, student $5 (caicchicago.org). Presented by Collaborative Arts Institute of Chicago.

ROCKEFELLER CARILLON N E W M U S I C F E S T I VA L Fri, May 25, 5–8pm Sat, May 26, 10am–12:45pm, 2:30–5:15pm Rockefeller Chapel A two-day festival of new music for the carillon featuring twelve world premières, including works by Augusta Read Thomas, Laura Steenberge, and Emily Cooley. The Friday evening program includes a reception at 5:30pm with the artists, composers, and creators of the festival, with a showcase recital at 6:30pm. The Saturday program includes eight short recitals, interspersed with presentations in diverse formats about the music, the composers, and the world of new music for carillon. Free, light refreshments served. Presented by Rockefeller Chapel.

BRIAN BLADE AND THE F E L L OW S H I P B A N D

Thu, May 17, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Beloved by the jazz community and widely acknowledged as one of the world's greatest drummers, Brian Blade brings his long-standing, high-potency Fellowship Band to close the season.  General $38, faculty and staff $30, under 35 $20, Students $10. Presented by UChicago Presents.

E D D I E S H AW T R I B U T E : BR ASS IN THE BLUES Fri, May 25, 8pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Join Rodney Brown, Michael Peavy, Bill McFarland, and Hank Ford of the Chicago Horns in a tribute to the great Chicago blues saxophonist, Eddie Shaw, who passed away in January 2018. The tribute will include members of Howlin’ Wolf’s legendary Wolf Gang, of which Shaw was bandleader and a long-time member. Guitarist and Wolf Gang member Eddie “Vann” Shaw Jr. will also be in attendance to celebrate the life and legacy of his father. It will be a night of music and conversation in honor of Shaw’s unique style and illustrious career, and in recognition of the role brass played in the rich history of the Blues. Free. Presented by the Logan Center for the Arts.


UNIVERSIT Y SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: BERNSTEIN AND BRAHMS Sat, May 26, 8pm Mandel Hall Continuing its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein, the USO presents his compelling Symphony No. 2, The Age of Anxiety, which was inspired by W.H. Auden’s poem of the same name. Artist-in-Residence Daniel Pesca is the featured soloist in the work. The program also includes Johannes Brahms’ masterful Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Free. Presented by the Department of Music.

JA Z Z X-T E T Thur, May 31, 8pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Known for its boldness in showcasing cutting-edge works, the UChicago Jazz X-tet presents “Beyond Five Lines and Four Spaces,” a concert of new graphic works for jazz ensemble. Free. Presented by the Department of Music.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN Sat, Jun 2, 4pm Rockefeller Chapel A festive celebration of the Bernstein centennial, with excerpts from Chichester Psalms, Make Our Garden Grow, Choruses from The Lark, and other favorites. Featuring nearly 200 members of University Choirs with Thomas Weisflog on the organ, the

Friday, April 27, 2018

8pm Ruggles Hall Newberry Library

concert ends with a unique performance of Bernstein on the carillon and amplified instruments featuring university carillonneur Joey Brink. Free. Presented by Rockefeller Chapel in collaboration with the Music Department, for Alumni Weekend.

C H I C AG O M E N ’ S A C A P P E L L A : Q U O D E R AT DEMONSTRANDUM

Sat, Jun 2, 7pm Hyde Park Union Church (5600 S Woodlawn) UChicago's premier all-male a cappella group presents a breadth of repertoire, including choral works from Grieg, Orff, and Lauridsen, as well as jovial Chicago classics.  General $10, student $5. Presented by Chicago Men's A Cappella.

C H I C AG O E N S E M B L E CO N C E R T: PROGRAM V Sun, Jun 3, 3pm International House Assembly Hall Offering an innovative mix of familiar masterworks and lesser-known repertoire, The Chicago Ensemble has occupied a unique place in Chicago's cultural life for over 40 years. This program will feature piano trios by Beethoven and Brahms, and a special reception with the musicians as part of Alumni Weekend. General $30, students $10, free for UChicago students. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program and The Chicago Ensemble.

Saturday, April 28, 2018 8pm Logan Center for the Arts Hyde Park

A AC M : E CC E N T R I C CO I N C I D E N TA L CO N F I G U R AT I O N S Sat, Jun 16, 7pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse The always innovative AACM series, Eccentric Coincidental Configurations, takes improvisation and spontaneity to a new level by engaging the audience in identifying which aggregation of musicians will actually perform together at each concert, featuring guest artists Dee Alexander, Mike Reed and Ernest Dawkins. This experiment in creative interactivity builds on the AACM tradition of boundary-breaking innovation and gives the audience a chance to actually influence the music. It’s coincidence by design. Free. Presented by the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians in partnership with the Logan Center for the Arts.

T H I R D T U E S DAY JA Z Z : I S A I A H CO L L I E R , S A X Tue, Jun 19, 7:30-10pm Logan Center, Café Logan A 2nd year student at the Dave Brubeck Institute in Stockton, California, saxophonist Isaiah Collier began turning heads in Chicago from an early age. He is a recipient of the Kiewett-Wang award from the Jazz Institute of Chicago. Free. Presented by the Hyde Park Jazz Society and the Logan Center for the Arts, with additional support by WDCB.

Sunday, April 29, 2018

3pm Galvin Recital Hall Northwestern University


THEATER, DANCE & PERFORMANCE

GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER Mar 15–Apr 15, 2018 Student Night: Fri, Apr 13, 8pm Court Theatre Matt and Christina Drayton live a comfortable, white, upper-class lifestyle in 1960s San Francisco, but when their daughter returns home intending to marry black physician John Prentice, their longtime progressive values are challenged. General $38-$68, faculty and staff $25$30, students free with Wed/Thu Arts Pass or $20 advance (tickets.courttheatre.org, 773.753.4472).

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Presented by Court Theatre.

PRAIZE PRODUCTIONS P R E S E N T S R E V I VA L : THE ANSWER

Fri–Sat, Mar 23–24, 7pm VIP reception: Sat, Mar 24, 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Revive the dead places that need to live again and take flight into a new beginning with the 7th theatrical production from Praize Productions. Revival: The Answer taps into the highs and lows of the human experience, while waking the sleeping giants that lie within. Masterfully weaving dance, music, art, and spiritual undertones, Revival: The Answer is an affirming experience. General Admission $35, with VIP reception $60 (praizeprodutions.com). Presented by Praize Productions.

I & YO U

Thu–Fri, May 3–4, 7:30pm; Sat, May 5, 2pm & 7:30pm Logan Center, Theater West Anthony, the studious and enthusiastic basketball player, is paired with Caroline, the ambitious and artistic type for a school project on Walt Whitman. This heartfelt production showcases two strangers building a deep friendship through an understanding of one another’s fears and dreams. Circling themes of

poetry, empathy, and the power of connection, I & You is a warming work with surprise twists from playwright Lauren Gunderson. Directed by Maya Jain. Advance $6, door $8 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.

U C DA N C E R S : E M P OW E R E D Fri-–Sat, Apr 6–7, 7:30pm Logan Center, Theater West UC Dancers present the spring show, a collection of contemporary dance pieces centered around the theme of “empowerment,” specifically female empowerment. Student-choreographed and student-performed, Empowered gives individuals of all dance backgrounds the opportunity to showcase their talent and learn from the creative process. The evening wil also feature student musicians, singers, and poets, allowing the theme of to be interpreted and expressed to the audience in a variety of artistic forms. Empowered seeks to provide student artists and dancers with the chance to explore what it means to be a woman in today’s world, to bring their ideas to fruition, and to share their creations with the UChicago community. General $6. Presented by Rhythmic Bodies in Motion.

T H E AT E R [ 2 4]

Sat, Apr 7, 8pm Reynolds Club, FXK Theater Six teams of writers, actors, directors, and designers, led by four fearless curators, collaborate for a frenzied 24 hours to bring you an evening filled with brand-new plays. Never-before-seen and never-to-be-seenagain, this festival is not to be missed! General $4 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702. ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.

JA N A W I N D E R E N Sat, Apr 7, 8pm Reynolds Club, STAGE Lab on first floor

Winderen’s performances and immersive sound installations focus on audio environments and ecosystems that are difficult for humans to reach. Working in diverse locations, the artist searches for sounds from hidden sources or frequencies that aren’t usually possible for us to perceive. Here, Winderen presents Spring Bloom in the Marginal Ice Zone, a new, live eight-channel mix of underwater sounds recorded in the Barents Sea between Norwegian and Russian territorial waters. Free, RSVP required at renaissancesociety.org

Presented by the Renaissance Society and Lampo, in partnership with STAGE (Scientists, Technologists and Artists Generating Exploration)

BROKEN JUG Thu–Sat, Apr 12–14, 7:30pm Logan Center, Theater East Heinrich von Kleist's celebrated 1808 play about a corrupt village judge and the mysterious case of a broken jug is reimagined in a contemporary, experimental theater performance and a refreshing new translation from the German. Puppetry, sound installation, and choral performance bring out the allegorical resonances of Judge Adam's fall from grace with Eve, and his Oedipal fall from his seat of authority. Advance $6, door $8 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies.

N E W WO R K W E E K

Thu–Sat, Apr 12–14 Fri–Sun, Apr 19–21 Logan Center, Room 501 and Room 701 This festival features the premiere of original play readings, staged adaptations, and the final products of TAPS Bachelor’s theses, representing the culmination of four years of theatrical training in the College. All pieces are student-written and studentdirected. You can attend just one show, or purchase a Festival Pass to attend all events. General $5 per show/$12 Festival Pass (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.267.ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.


M A N DA L A S O U T H A S I A N PERFORMING ARTS PRESENTS A M I TA , W I T H O U T L I M I T S

RHYTHMIC BODIES IN MOTION : THE C AST

APSAR A INDIAN CL ASSICAL DA N C E G R O U P : PA N C H A B U TA

Presented by Mandala South Asian Performing Arts.

Fri–Sat, Apr 27–28, 7pm Mandel Hall RBIM's annual showcase is entirely run, choreographed, and performed by students. This year's show, The Cast, explores a range of character tropes from different cultures and different media. Dance styles will include Bollywood, ballet, hip-hop, belly dancing, ballroom, Latin fusion, modern, contemporary, and tap. General $5 advance, &8 door.

Fri, May 18, 7pm International House Assembly Hall Apsara's Spring Show, Panchabuta, will depict the five elements and their associated physical senses as defined by Hinduism's sacred texts, the Vedas. The show will feature a variety of Indian classical dance style—Bharatnatyam, Kathak, Kuchipudi, and Odissi—accompanied by Indian classical and Western music. General $6.

Presented by Rhythmic Bodies in Motion.

Presented by Apsara Indian Classical Dance Group.

E V E RY H O U S E H A S A D O O R

T H E S H A K E S P E A R E P R OJ E C T O F C H I C AG O P R E S E N T S SHAKESHAFTE

Sun, Apr 15, 3pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse Seeking peace through lasya, the divine dance of the feminine spirit. Sonali Mishra (Odissi) and Ashwaty Chennat (Bharatnatyam) explore the endless energy of the feminine, amita, by telling stories through classical Indian dance. General $25 (mandalaarts.org, 312.212.3422).

PUDDIN ‘N PETE Mon, Apr 16, 6:30pm AKArama Community Service Center (6220 S Ingleside Ave.) Puddin is an executive secretary with plans for a better future and a deep mistrust of men. Pete is a high school janitor with little education or guile but plenty of downhome, country wisdom. Each one has had failed marriages, but this middle-aged couple has put their bad experiences behind them, discovering what they have in common is their need for each other. Free (reserve seats at tickets.courttheatre.org). Presented by Court Theatre’s Spotlight Reading Series.

OFF- OFF CAMPUS: PRESENTS: FREUDIAN NIP SLIP

Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and The Dean's Men

C O P E N H AG E N Fri–Sat, Apr 20–21, 7:30pm; Fri–Sat, Apr 27–28, 7:30pm; Sundays, Apr 22 & 29, 2pm Reynolds Club, STAGE Lab on first floor During World War II, the friendship of two Nobel Prize-winning physicists is tested by the prospect of providing Nazi Germany with the atomic bomb. This Tony Award-winning play by Michael Frayn is based on historical characters and events and contemplates the various motivations behind Heisenberg’s enigmatic Copenhagen meeting with Bohr. Free; reservations recommended (etopia. northwestern.edu, 847.324.3296). Presented by Northwestern ETOPiA outreach and STAGE Lab of UChicago.

U C H I C AG O M AYA : H A I K U Sat, Apr 27, 7pm Logan Center, Performance Penthouse UChicago Maya is a fusion dance group dedicated to innovative and exploratory choreography and blends Western with Eastern dance styles. Join us for Haiku, a collection of short but striking studentchoreographed contemporary dance pieces. Free. Presented by UChicago Maya.

Presented by the Renaissance Society

THE ORIGINALIST May 10–Jun 10, 2018 Student Night: Fri, May 11, 8pm Court Theatre When a Harvard Law graduate takes on a clerkship with Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, one of America’s most brilliant and polarizing figures, she discovers in him an infuriating opponent and unexpected mentor. General $38-$68, faculty and staff $25$30, students free with Wed/Thu Arts Pass or $20 advance (tickets.courttheatre.org, 773.753.4472). Presented by Court Theatre.

U N I V E R S I T Y B A L L E T: D O N Q U I XOT E Sat, May 12 at 7pm, and Sun, May 13, 2pm Mandel Hall UBallet presents its spring full-length production of Don Quixote! This retelling of the classic story features dancers from various backgrounds, and everything from flair to fumbling knights. General $5. Presented by University Ballet of Chicago.

THE ALIENS Thu–Fri, May 17–18, 7:30pm; Sat, May 19, 2pm & 7:30pm Logan Center, Theater East Hidden behind a grungy coffee shop, KJ and Jasper are two lost souls spending their afternoons drafting song lyrics and sipping psychedelic tea. Peer into this secret urban hideaway where Evan, a shy teenage barista at the coffee shop, befriends the two deadbeat artists in an attempt to fit in. Annie Baker’s characters grapple with mental illness, drugs, and the unexplained nature of beauty. Advance $6, door $8 (tickets. uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.

Sat, May 19, 3pm International House Assembly Hall Join us at International House for a staged reading of Shakeshafte, a recent play written by poet, theologian, and former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. The play will be staged by the Shakespeare Project of Chicago under the direction of Peter Garino. Free. Presented by the International House Global Voices Program, The Lumen Christi Institute and The Shakespeare Project of Chicago.

THE DEAN’S MEN P R E S E N T: R I C H A R D I I I

Wed–Sat, 7:30pm Logan Center, Courtyard Richard, the Yorkist Duke of Gloucester, has not stopped plotting since the defeat of Henry VI. He conspires to pit his brothers, Edward (now King Edward IV) and George, Duke of Clarence, against each other in an attempt to gain the crown for himself. By William Shakespeare. Directed by Coriander Mayer. Free. Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.

A N I M A L S O U T O F PA P E R Thu–Fri, May 31–Jun 1, 7:30pm; Sat, Jun 2, 2pm & 7:30pm Logan Center, Theater West How do people stuck in the grieving process become un-stuck? This production of Pulitzer-nominated playwright Rajiv Joesph’s Animals Out of Paper explores themes of grief, loss, and hope. Through the interconnecting trio of Ilana, a depressed origami artist, Andy, a chipper high school teacher, and Suresh, a genius student, this production provides insight into how people both help and hurt each other. Directed by Jacob Spiegel. Advance $6, door $8 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented by Theater & Performance Studies and University Theater.

arts.uchicago.edu | 25

Fridays, Apr 20–May 18, 7:30pm The Revival (1160 E 55th St) Now in its 32nd generation, Off-Off Campus continues to serve up unique weekly shows featuring sketch and improv comedy. Alumni include playwrights David Auburn and Greg Kotis, as well as innumerable writers, performers, upstanding civilians, and others who also turned out fine. See them here first. General $5 (tickets.uchicago.edu, 773.702.ARTS).

Sun, May 6, 3pm Gray Center Lab at Midway Studios Since 2008, Chicago-based performance group Every house has a door has created dynamic, multi-faceted works that often draw out historically neglected subjects. Its founders Lin Hixson and Matthew Goulish frequently take on the respective roles of director and dramaturg, while working with a variable team of other artists. On the occasion of artist Richard Rezac’s Renaissance Society exhibition, Address, Hixson and Goulish present a new hybrid performance lecture, created in response to the substance and expression of Richard Rezac’s work. Free.


More Than an Illusion: A short look at UChicago Maya

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You might know UChicago Maya from their sold out performances in the Logan Center or their annual participation in the glamorous student-run MODA fashion show, or perhaps you’ve seen the group’s stunning and colorful photographs posted on their social media channels. However you might encounter them, once you’ve seen Maya, it’s impossible to look away. UChicago Maya, named for the Hindi word meaning illusion, is a recognized student organization (RSO) on campus. Formed in 2009 as an East meets West fusion dance group, Maya was conceived as company focused primarily on combining traditional South Asian styles, particularly Bharatanatyam, with Western contemporary dance. For its group of 30 student dancers, Maya is more than just a dance troupe—it’s a community. “UChicago Maya has been by far the most important and influential part of my experience at UChicago,” said Brianna Pinder, co-director of UChicago Maya. “I’ve been able to explore and discover who I am as a dancer, choreographer, artist, and as a person, through my time dancing and choreographing for the group. I’ve learned so much from other members of Maya.” Over its near decade since formation, Maya’s membership has evolved and, with it, Maya’s choreographic style. “Maya’s membership is now mostly composed of dancers trained in Western contemporary styles,” Pinder explained. Jocelyne Muñoz, who co-directs Maya with Pinder, acknowledged this development but noted that it hasn’t changed the company’s primary mission. “No matter what style,” said Muñoz.

“The goals of Maya are to simply give a space to individuals who love to perform and want to explore their creativity in new ways with others.” Maya’s members challenge both themselves and other dancers by creating exploratory and innovative work. Every year during the beginning of Winter Quarter, Maya presents an evening length themed showcase. This annual showcase is the company’s largest event, but Maya can be seen in performance year-round in support of other RSOs, hosting workshops and a showcase during the Spring Quarter, and competing in UChicago's annual dance competition “Where Fun Comes to Dance.” Maya, of course, is about more than dance. Reflecting on what she’s learned from her role in the company, Muñoz said: “Not only have I grown as a dancer and leader through choreographing and directing, but through this all, I have simply learned the meaning of a community.”

Join UChicago Maya for Haiku, a collection of short but striking student-choreographed contemporary dance pieces, on Sat, Apr 27, 7pm at the Logan Center (see p. 22 for more details). Images, top to bottom: UChicago Maya in Reflections. Photo: Kiran Misra; Hindsight, choreographed by Brianna Pinder. Photo: Kiran Misra; Isabella Lee. Photo: Daniel Chae


2O17/18 2O14/2O15 CONCERT CONCERT SERIES SERIES

74th

Imani Winds, May 11

Season

Montrose Trio, April 20

Be closer to the world’s greatest artists. Philharmonia Baroque • Montrose Trio • Imani Winds Visit chicagopresents.uchicago.edu or call 773.702.ARTS.

JAZZ AT THE LOGAN

2O14/2O15 CONCERT SERIES

Jazz at the Logan’s fifth anniversary season! 2O17/18 CONCERT SERIES

THURSDAY, MAY 17 / 7:30 PM

BRIAN BLADE & THE FELLOWSHIP BAND FRIDAY, APRIL 6 / 7:30 PM

SONGS OF FREEDOM Ulysses Owens Jr. featuring Theo Bleckmann, Alicia Olatuja, and Joanna Majoko, exploring music by Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln, and Nina Simone The Julie and Parker Hall Endowment for Jazz and American Popular Music

PLUS! Join Brian Blade for a free listening session Wednesday, May 16 / 7 PM / Logan Center Penthouse Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, 915 E. 60th St. Tickets $38 reserved / $30 UCID / $20 under 35 / $10 students 773.702.ARTS (2787) | chicagopresents.uchicago.edu


MULTIDISCIPLINARY

M O N DAY N I G H T YO G A

Mondays, 6:30–8pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Using the breath as the foremost guide through the body, this class explores the fundamental building blocks of advanced postures and movements. Designed to accommodate students of all levels and embrace body types of all kind, this class blends yoga with hints of acrobatic and Thai Massage, and a few other specialized movement techniques. Taught by Derrick Caldwell and Crissy Collins. No experience required. Free. Donations accepted.

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Presented by Arts + Public Life.

CO M M I T T E D K N I T T E R S

Wednesdays, 12–3pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Committed Knitters build a sense of community through knitting and crocheting. Learn the basics or use as a refresher course on how to knit or crochet and make a project. If you already know how to knit or crochet, join us, and share ideas. All supplies will be provided. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life.

CO M M U N I T Y YO G A W I T H YO G AC A R E

Fridays, 9:30–10:30am Saturdays, 10:30–11:30am Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Beginner Yoga is designed with the absolute yoga beginner in mind. The focus is an introduction to basic yoga poses and healthy alignment. Here you will practice standing asana (poses) as well as seated poses. Beginner yoga also incorporates yogic breathing, meditation, and relaxation techniques–great for stress relief and overall relaxation. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life.

W E AV I N G PAT T E R N S A N D P E R C E P T I O N S : A R T WO R K S H O P

Wed, Apr 4, 5:30–7:30pm Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, Room 103 (5733 S. University Ave) Join Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture Artist-inResidence Victoria Martinez for a workshop highlighting her current art practice based on African and Mexican textiles. Learn about patterns and explore color theory while participating in the creation of woven imagery inspired by text from the University of Chicago’s Art Libraries and collections. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture.

AFRICAN AND CARIBBEAN S T U D E N T A S S O C I AT I O N C U LT U R A L S H OW Fri, Apr 13, 7pm International House Assembly Hall This annual event welcomes members of the UChicago community to engage with various aspects of African and Caribbean culture. As an inclusive and diverse network, ACSA is a family of students from different backgrounds, ethnicities, and languages. This year’s show will include dance, comedy, singing, poetry, and fashion. General $15, students with UCID $10. Presented by the International House Global Voices Series and the University of Chicago African & Caribbean Students Association.

C U LT I VAT I N G S T U D E N T- D R I V E N LEARNING EXPERIENCES Sat, Apr 28, 10am–1pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Creating space for students to drive their own learning is a powerful way to help them discover their artistic voices, enable their agency, and motivate their continued growth. Led by teens in Arts + Public Life education programs, attendees will partake in discussion and creative engagement that highlights the teens’ experiences in participant-centered and student-led programming. Attendees will brainstorm

ways to apply knowledge learned in this workshop to cultivate student-driven learning as part of their respective practices. Free. Presented by the Amplify Collective: Arts + Public Life, Logan Center for the Arts, the Smart Museum of Art, Court Theatre, and the Oriental Institute.

A MUSICAL EVENING WITH H A R RY L E N N I X Wed, May 2, 6:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall A live program featuring singing, performance, and storytelling by native Chicagoan and actor Harry Lennix. Lennix, well-known for his roles in the 1991 film The Five Heartbeats and Joss Whedon’s TV series Dollhouse, currently stars on NBC’S criticallyacclaimed crime thriller The Blacklist. He and youth performers will present a selection of quotes and stories from The HistoryMakers Digital Archive. Free; RSVP recommended (tickets.uchicago. edu, 773.702.ARTS). Presented in partnership by The HistoryMakers and the Logan Center for the Arts.

C R E AT I V E M O R N I N G S : C H I C AG O W I T H H OWA R D T U L L M A N Fri, May 18, 8:30–10am Logan Center, Performance Hall CreativeMornings is a monthly creative breakfast lecture series for the creative community where invited speakers present on a given theme. This May, we welcome Howard Tullman, CEO of 1871—the hub for Chicago’s thriving technology and entrepreneurial ecosystem. Tullman is a celebrated entrepreneur, visionary, educator, and art collector, and will speak on the theme of “Commitment.” Free; RSVP required and begins Mon, May 14 at 11am (creativemornings.com/cities/chi). Presented by CreativeMornings and the Logan Center for the Arts.


CINEMA & MEDIA DANCE LITERATURE MUSIC PERFORMANCE THEATER VISUAL ART The Logan Center is a multidisciplinary home for the arts at the University of Chicago. Connect with the Logan Center for concerts, exhibitions, performances, programs, and more from world-class, emerging, local, and student artists.

logan.uchicago.edu Hypnotic Brass Ensemble Photo: Kelsey Akers


YOUTH & FAMILY

creativity and cultural awareness all through dance! Drawing from cultural traditions that have been evolving over centuries, students of all ages, backgrounds, and dance experience are welcome. Class $30 (mandalaarts.org, 312.212.3422). Presented by Mandala and the Logan Center for the Arts.

PAINTING WITH PIE

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LOGAN CENTER FA M I LY S AT U R DAYS

Logan Center Cultivate your child’s artistic curiosity with hands-on art workshops and interactive performances with engaging themes led by local artists, art organizations, and UChicago students. These interdisciplinary workshops are fun for the whole family, offering activities from music to arts and crafts for youth ages 2–12. Free. Presented by the Logan Center for the Arts.

Kidpreneurs: Children Making Creativity into Business Sat, Apr 7, 2-4:30pm

Sweet Home UChicago Sat, May 5, 2-4:30pm

Going Global: Exploring C r e a t i ve Tr a d i t i o n s Sat, Jun 2, 2–4:30pm

M A N DA L A S O U T H A S I A N PERFORMING ARTS DA N C E C L A S S E S

Saturdays, 9:30am–11:30am Logan Center, Room 802 Explore and indulge in Bharatanatyam, classical Indian dance. Learn gestures, postures, stories, and rhythmic movement. Embrace a tradition that you don't encounter everyday. Gain confidence,

Thu, Mar 29, 5:30–7:30pm Smart Museum of Art Paint on paper with pie as the main ingredient. This evening features treats from Bang Bang Pie Shop and art activities for all ages is inspired by Robert Arneson’s Cherry Pie, on view in The History of Perception. Free. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

T H I R D A N N UA L WA S H I N G T O N PA R K A R T S F E S T I VA L Sat, Apr 7, 12–3pm Chicago Youth Programs (5350 S. Prairie Ave.) Come celebrate the arts and talents of community groups in the Washington Park neighborhood and University of Chicago student groups! The festival features music and dance performances, delicious food from South Side vendors, art activities, and artwork to purchase from local entrepreneurs. Visitors will also have the opportunity to learn how to leverage collective assets and networks from local groups focused on community-building and resource-sharing. Free (registration recommended, http://bit.ly/2FH0u8A). Co-sponsored by Chicago Youth Programs (CYP), University Community Service Center (UCSC), UChicago Office of Civic Engagement, UChicago Student Government, Arts + Public Life, KLEO Center, Burke Elementary School, Coppin Community Center, and the Boys & Girls Club.

FAMILY DAY: BUILDING BLOCKS AND SUNFLOWER STALKS Sat, Apr 7, 1–4pm Smart Museum of Art Activities focused on building, construction,

and architecture. Learn how to use wooden peg carpentry techniques (inspired by the work of Emmanuel Pratt and Sweetwater Foundation), build a large structure out of sunflower stalks, and play and build with blocks of all sizes. Free. All materials provided. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

CO M M U N I T Y S T E WA R D S H I P DAY Sat, Apr 14, 10am–3pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Join Arts + Public Life for our annual Spring Community Stewardship Day. Youth, neighbors, UChicago students and staff, and community partners are invited to take part in actively stewarding our surrounding community through cleanup, beautification, and service projects. Participants will also have the opportunity to learn from each other in a facilitated community exchange, leading and taking short workshops from each other in areas of self-expertise. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life.

K-1 2 S U M M E R A R T S P R O G R A M FA I R Sun, Apr 29, 1–4pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Drop in to our free summer program fair to find high-quality arts programs for your child or teen. Representatives of arts programs in and/or serving residents of South Side neighborhoods will be present to answer questions about their opportunities. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life.

DESIGN APPRENTICESHIP P R O G R A M + S K YA R T: S P R I N G S H OW Thu, May 3, 6–8pm Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Arts + Public Life’s Design Apprenticeship Program (DAP) is a mentorship program that asks teenagers to craft their communities’ physical and social conditions through


design. Teens learn the fundamentals of carpentry and object design while exploring critical concepts in the built environment. At this culminating show and reception, beginning and intermediate DAP participants will display their work from the spring session. Participants from SkyART will show their own designed object projects and artwork alongside DAP in this joint showing. All community members are welcome to attend and celebrate these teen designers’ creative accomplishments. Free. Presented by Arts + Public Life, After School Matters, Field Foundation, UChicago Women’s Board, and SkyART.

FAMILY DAY: MAKING MONUMENTS Sat, May 5, 1–4pm Smart Museum of Art Guest artist Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford leads a monumental Family Day. What if you designed and built your own public sculpture or monument? What would it look like? What would it say? Who would it commemorate? Free. All materials provided. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

H Y D E PA R K YO U T H S Y M P H O N Y: S P R I N G CO N C E R T Thu, May 24, 7:30pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Join the Hyde Park Youth Symphony in the exciting season-ending Spring Concert that highlights the abilities of our talented young musicians drawn from music programs in

local schools across the South Shore. Admission is free; donations welcomed at door (thehpys.net, 847.902.0733). Presented by the Hyde Park Youth Symphony.

FAMILY DAY: FINGER PAINTING (AND HAND PAINTING AND ARM PAINTING…) Sat, Jun 2, 1–4pm Smart Museum of Art Use fingers, hands, huge brushes, and more to paint giant words and expressive marks on paper and canvas. Inspired by the work of Tang Chang. Free. All materials provided. Presented by the Smart Museum of Art.

B A R R E L O F M O N K E YS P R E S E N T S C E L E B R AT I O N O F AU T H O R S Tue, Jun 12, 7pm Logan Center, Performance Hall Barrel of Monkeys provides creative writing workshops in Chicago elementary schools, using theater to build youth confidence and storytelling skills. Join student-authors, their classmates, family, and educators for the annual Celebration of Authorsshowcase, featuring performances of student-written stories adapted into sketches and songs for the stage. It’s a night of hilarious and poignant storytelling that’s fun for all ages. Free; reservations encouraged (barrelofmonkeys.org/coa, 773.506.7140).

K E N WO O D S C H O O L O F B A L L E T + I T W I R L DA N C E P R O G R A M : S P R I N G R E C I TA L Sat, Jun 30, 1pm, 3pm, and 6pm Logan Center, Performance Hall The Kenwood School of Ballet and ITwirl Dance Program proudly present the 6thAnnual Ballet and Dance Recital. General $15; free under 4 years old (http://itwirldance.com/index.html)

Presented by Kenwood School of Ballet and ITWIRL Dance Program.

E M B O DY I N G D I A S P O R A

Second Tuesdays every month, 6:30–8pm Through July 10, 2018 Arts Incubator (301 E Garfield Blvd) Embodying Diaspora is a monthly dance workshop series that centers on Afrodiasporic movement traditions, led by Arts + Public Life/Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture Artist-inResidence Arif Smith and his guests. Smith’s residency prioritizes embodiment and co-presence as strategies for exploring linkages between various coordinates in the Black Atlantic. Workshop schedule – Apr 10: Orisha (all ages); May 8: Rueda de Casino (ages 16+); Jun 12: Bomba (all ages); Jul 10: Eskista (all ages). Free, all skill levels welcomed. Please wear comfortable clothes. Presented by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture.

Presented by Barrel of Monkeys.

A color is as strong as the impression it creates. Ivan Albright, SAIC Alum (1919–23, HON 1977)

Summer programs offered in art, design, and writing. Registration is now open for adults and children ages four and up. Register now at saic.edu/cs.


Logan Center Family Saturdays Sat, Apr 7, 2-4:30pm Kidpreneurs: Children Making Creativity into Business Sat, May 5, 2-4:30pm Sweet Home UChicago Sat, Jun 2, 2-4:30pm Going Global: Exploring Creative Traditions

Explore your child’s artistic curiosity with hands-on art workshops designed to stimulate creativity and play!

Appropriate for families with children ages 2-12. Registration is encouraged at tickets.uchicago.edu Workshop registration is first come, first served. FREE PARKING available all weekend + Mon–Fri after 4 pm. 915 East 60th St At Drexel Ave

04.22.18 SUN | 2:00 PM Chicago’s 71st Annual

57 TH STREET ART FAIR

JUNE 2+3, 2018 Between Kenwood and Woodlawn in Chicago’s historic Hyde Park

www.57thstreetartfair.org

Echoes of the Earth International Contemporary Ensemble

04.27.18 FRI | 7:30 PM 05.04.18 FRI | 7:30 PM Tomorrow’s Music Today I & II Works by University of Chicago doctoral candidates 773.702.ARTS (2787) | contempo.uchicago.edu


INFO INFO

This guide provides a list of highlights for the spring season, Mar 26–Jun 30, 2018. For a complete list of events and exhibitions, visit arts.uchicago.edu.

LOCATIONS

See the following pages for a map of over 20 arts locations on or near our South Side campus.

TICKETS

Learn about and buy tickets for arts events and performances at the University of Chicago through the UChicago Arts Box Office online, in person, and over the phone. To purchase tickets for Court Theatre, visit courttheatre.org or call 773.753.4472. BOX OFFICE URL tickets.uchicago.edu ADDRESS Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts 915 E 60th St Chicago, IL 60637

WALK-UP HOURS Tue–Sat, 12pm–6pm (later on show nights) Sun–Mon Closed PHONE 773.702.ARTS (2787)

TRANSPORTATION

Getting to the University of Chicago is just a quick car, bike, train, or bus ride away. For more detailed transportation information go to visit.uchicago.edu.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) The CTA is Chicago’s public transportation system, offering a large network of buses, elevated trains, and subways around the city. Take the 2, 4, 6, or X28 bus from downtown Chicago or take the Red or Green Line train toward the Garfield/55th stop and transfer to the 55 Garfield bus. » Download Transloc Transit Visualization, the real-time bus location and arrival app, at uchicago.transloc.com. Metra Train The Metra Electric District Line commuter rail runs from the downtown Millennium Station hub at Randolph & Michigan to University Park, IL. Exit at either the 55th-56th-57th or 59th/ University stops at UChicago. Visit metrarail. com for fares, timetables, and other details.

PARKING

Limited street parking is available around campus. Parking Garages The preferred visitor garage is located at 55th St and Ellis Ave. The Campus South Parking Garage is located at 6054 S Drexel Ave, near the Logan Center for the Arts, open to non-permit holders after 9am. Visitors may park at the Medical Campus parking garage, at 59th St and Maryland Ave. Parking Lot Wells Lot, located near the Logan Center at 60th St and Drexel Ave, is free after 4pm and all day on weekends.

ACCESSIBILITY

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in events should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Visit answers.uchicago.edu/19772 for information on Assistive Listening Devices.

BIKING

Bike racks can be found at various locations on campus. All CTA buses are equipped with bike racks, and Metra allows bikes on trains with some limitations. Chicago’s Divvy Bike system has many new and upcoming stations in and around Hyde Park. The 24-hour bike pass will provide you with unlimited rides for up to 30 minutes. Find more information and a full map of Chicago stations at divvybikes.com. Ancien Coffee & Cycles at 53rd St and Lake Park Ave offers bikes sales, repairs, bike parking, as well as coffee and brunch. You can find more information about bike tours and rentals at choosechicago.org.

ACCOMMODATIONS

The University of Chicago has certain relationships with hotels in Hyde Park and around the city of Chicago for visitors, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and hospital guests. Some of these hotels may offer discounted rates or special services for UChicago affiliates. Make sure to mention the University of Chicago when you make a reservation to learn more about these benefits. To find out more about preferred hotel program, go to visit.uchicago.edu/accommodations.shtml.

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CALENDAR


E. 53RD

E. 53RD

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E. 54TH

E. 53RD

DR PAYNE

VISITOR MAP

1 E. GARFIELD BLVD

3

21 RG

AN

DR

PAYNE DR

S. MARTIN LUTHER KING DR.

MO

S. PRAIRIE AVE

5

23

7 10

26

16

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WASHINGTON PARK 28 17

6 18

4 2 20 8

S. MARTIN LUTHER KING DR.

S. PRAIRIE AVE

12 9 19

The University of Chicago is a home to a variety of renowned arts destinations across campus. For complete information on academic, professional, and student arts programs and initiatives, visit arts.uchicago.edu/explore. Professional organizations such as Contempo and UChicago Presents, student groups, and department-based groups perform and exhibit across campus. Learn more by visiting arts.uchicago.edu. For a list of other arts and cultural organizations and venues on the Culture Coast visit culturecoast.org.

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For a list of dining options and details about transportation and parking see visit.uchicago.edu Museum Campus South partners visitmuseumcampussouth.com Public art location. Learn more about public art on campus at publicart.uchicago.edu

U C H I C AG O A R T S V E N U E S 1 Arts Block Arts Incubator Currency Exchange Café BING Reading Room The Muffler Shop 301–359 E Garfield Blvd arts.uchicago.edu/apl 2 Bond Chapel 1025 E. 58th St. 3 Court Theatre 5535 S. Ellis Ave. courttheatre.org 4

Charles M. Harper Center: Chicago Booth School of Business Art Collection 5807 S. Woodlawn Ave. art.chicagobooth.edu

5

Cochrane-Woods Art Center 5540 S. Greenwood Ave.


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DOWNTOWN CHICAGO 8 MILES NORTH

L A KE

LAKE MICHIGAN

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MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY

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JACKSON PARK

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NEAR CAMPUS 6

Film Studies Center Cobb Hall 5811 S. Ellis Ave., 3rd Floor filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu *See also #18

7

Francis X. Kinahan Theater Reynolds Club 5706 S. University Ave. 3rd Floor

8

Fulton Recital Hall 5845 S. Ellis Ave.

9 10

Gray Center Lab 929 E. 60th St. graycenter.uchicago.edu Hack Arts Lab (HAL) 5735 S. Ellis Ave., 2nd Floor hal.uchicago.edu

11

International House 1414 E. 59th St. ihouse.uchicago.edu

12 Lorado Taft House 935 E. 60th St.

13

Max Palevsky Cinema Ida Noyes Hall 1212 E. 59th St. docfilms.uchicago.edu

19

14 15

Mandel Hall 1131 E. 57th St. Midway Studios 929 E. 60th St.

20 Rockefeller Memorial Chapel 5850 S. Woodlawn Ave. rockefeller.uchicago.edu

16

Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society 5701 S. Woodlawn Ave. neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu

17 Oriental Institute Museum 1155 E. 58th St. oi.uchicago.edu 18

The Renaissance Society Cobb Hall 5811 S. Ellis Ave., 4th Floor renaissancesociety.org

Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts 915 E. 60th St. logan.uchicago.edu

21 Smart Museum of Art 5550 S. Greenwood Ave. smartmuseum.uchicago.edu 22

Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery The Joseph Regenstein Library 1100 E. 57th St. lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/exhibits

23 DuSable Museum of African American History 740 E. 56th Pl. dusablemuseum.org 24 Experimental Station 6100 S. Blackstone Ave. experimentalstation.org 25 Hyde Park Art Center 5020 S. Cornell Ave. hydeparkart.org 26 Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S Woodlawn Ave semcoop.com 27 Museum of Science and Industry 5700 S. Lake Shore Dr. msichicago.org 28

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave. flwright.org


ROCKEFELLER CHAPEL PRESENTS . . .

Original photo by Justin Kern

ROCKEFELLER CARILLON NEW MUSIC FESTIVAL FRIDAY MAY 25, 5 – 8 PM | SATURDAY MAY 26, 10 AM –12 :45 PM , 2 :30 –5:15 PM A two-day festival of new music for the carillon featuring twelve world premières, including music for carillon and other instruments. The Friday evening program includes a reception at 5:30 pm with the artists, composers, and creators of the festival, with a showcase recital at 6:30 pm. The Saturday program includes eight short recitals, interspersed with presentations in diverse formats about the music, the composers, and the world of new music for carillon. Free, with light refreshments throughout the event.

Commissioned by Rockefeller Chapel for the festival: — Augusta Read Thomas Ripple Effects — Laura Steenberge Red Shift — Emily Cooley Siciliana and works by Yvette Janine Jackson, Geert D’hollander, and Renske Vrolijk. Featuring the premières of music written by University of Chicago post-doctoral fellow Aaron Helgeson and current students Maria Kaoutzani, Allison Yun-Fei Jiang, Rodrigo Bussad, Kevin Kay, and Joshua Kaufman.

© Audrius V. Plioplys

Kala Pierson by Daniel McKleinfeld

JAMES KALLEMBACH AND THE CHAPEL CHOIR: MUSIC OF EXILE S U N DAY A P R I L 2 2 | 3 P M

A concert featuring the world première of Kala Pierson’s Mother of Exiles, written in honor of Dean Elizabeth Davenport, alongside Pierson’s She Was Warned for voice and piano, Britten’s Hymn to St. Cecilia, and music of Hildegard, Hindemith, Byrd, Brahms, and DeMonte. $20 at the door, free to students.

AUDRIUS V. PLIOPLYS: COLUMNS OF THOUGHT M A R C H 27 T H R O U G H A P R I L 1 0 A R TI S T ’ S R E C E P TI O N : W E D N E S DAY A P R I L 4 AT 7: 3 0 P M A series of light sculptures, each incorporating multiple layers of assemblage, representing writers and artists, including Hieronymus Bosch, Samuel Beckett, Franz Kafka, and Sigmund Freud. In pigmented inks on polycarbonate, with LED color-changing lights. Free.

rockefeller.uchicago.edu | Rockefeller Chapel, 5850 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637

2018 Spring Arts Guide  
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