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A NURSE DOCTOR CONSULTANT AN ENGINEER

I AM A PHILANTHROPIST

UCF FOUNDATION Annual Report 2015

ADVANCING

through

Philanthropy


THANK

YOU

To the many thousands of donors whose combined gifts have made today’s UCF possible, thank you. Your generosity makes all the difference.


If you asked the donors who appear in these pages whether or not they are philanthropists, the majority of them would say no. Many of us associate philanthropy with wealth, and yet at its core it is a matter not of means but of motivation — the inexplicable but lovely impulse to make life better not just for our loved ones but for people we’ll never meet. As such, it takes almost as many forms as there are people in the world, ranging from spending a few hours volunteering to donating significant personal resources. The fact that some of those forms may be more visible than others doesn’t make them matter more. What truly matters is the simple act of giving for giving’s sake. Here, we celebrate the philanthropist in all of us.

Michael J. Morsberger, CFRE Vice President for Alumni Relations and Development, UCF Chief Executive Officer, UCF Foundation, Inc.


CONNECTING

HIS FIELD’S BEST THINKERS

Years ago, when Raj Mittra was a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, one of his Ph.D. students needed a computer. “It wasn’t budgeted in the contract that he was working on, so I went to the dean and asked if the college had some money to get the computer so the student could do his work,” he recalls. Money wasn’t available, so Mittra made a donation to the college to buy the computer. “That’s how it got started,” he says. “Then I got hooked — first at the University of Illinois, then at Penn State, and now at UCF.” Mittra, a renowned electromagnetic communications scholar, is a courtesy professor at UCF. Throughout his career, he has balanced distinguished academic positions with a worldwide consultancy serving the aerospace, communications and computer industries.

Through four new endowed funds, Raj Mittra makes a major impact on engineering at UCF

I AM AN ENGINEER In 2015, he created the Raj Mittra Endowed Funds to benefit four areas in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UCF’s College of Engineering and Computer Science: a professorship, a graduate fellowship, an academic journal and a distinguished lecture series. While the majority of the funding for these endowments will come from a planned gift in his estate, he has already begun giving to them.

2 | DONORS

Through these endowed funds, Mittra’s goal of connecting the best thinkers in his field will continue forever at UCF. “Universities never have enough money. To have that guarantee come from an endowment, I think, is important,” Mittra says thoughtfully.


I AM A PHILANTHROPIST


I AM AN ACCOUNTANT


SHE CAN

An accountant in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, Prejido has been giving what she’s able to every year since joining UCF in 2004, donating to scholarships in both her college and the College of Nursing.

ANY WAY

HELPING

“Without help, these students — especially the ones who struggle to make ends meet — might not be able to achieve their goals,” says Filomena “Mena” Prejido. “I don’t have a lot of money, but it’s important to me to help them in any way I can.”

When it comes to philanthropy, she knows firsthand that a little goes a long way. With the help of scholarships just like the ones Prejido supports, her daughter Alexandria, now a cardiac nurse at Orlando Regional Medical Center, graduated from UCF in 2012 with just $3,000 in student debt. A ministroke in 2012 further underscored for Prejido the importance of doing what good we can every day, not saving our kindness up for some indefinite future.

I AM A PHILANTHROPIST

Donating to support student scholarships, Filomena Prejido knows her dollars make a difference

After a week in the hospital, she returned to her office with a grateful heart and an even deeper commitment to philanthropy. “If I can temporarily make things easier for a student, I will,” she says.

5 | DONORS

Now, in the wake of Prejido’s ministroke and two more that have since followed, her son Nickolaus, ’16, has decided to become an emergency room nurse. “You never expect these bad things to happen in life,” Prejido says, “but out of something negative has come something good. And I want to keep the good going.”


I AM A DOCTOR


GIVING A NEW perspective

Anatomy lab is a rite of passage for first-year medical students. It’s the place where they practice dissection skills and see actual organs, muscles and pathologies through the help of “silent teachers” — people who have willed their bodies to science.

Thanks to a generous donation from a Central Florida radiology group, students at the UCF College of Medicine get even more out of anatomy lab — a chance to study and use 3-D medical imaging. Each year, Dr. Rick Ramnath and his partners at NeuroSkeletal Imaging take full-body CT scans of the anatomy lab’s cadavers and donate the images. The scans allow students to get a detailed look inside the body before they start dissecting — a look that often reveals conditions like clogged arteries, surgically implanted joints and cancerous tumors.

I AM A PHILANTHROPIST

With donated services, NeuroSkeletal Imaging teaches UCF med students about more than anatomy

Such experience is not only valuable, but also expensive. “We simply couldn’t afford to pay for full-body scans of each cadaver,” says Professor Andrew Payer, who runs the lab. “We are the only medical school in the country where every student has a full CT scan of their first patient thanks to a community physician.” Describing radiology as “more than just X-rays,” Ramnath says the specialty is the most closely tied to the science of anatomy because it allows the physician to understand the interconnectedness of the human body. As he pointed out to students in an anatomy lab session, the scans tell the story of their patients’ health, lifestyle and, often, death.

7 | DONORS

“Our team is so thankful to be part of teaching medical students,” Ramnath says. “Being part of something bigger than yourself and giving back to the community is a feeling you can’t beat.”


TRADITIONS

UCF FIND ITS

HELPING

Parents of three graduates and ardent football fans, the Coreys are all-in for student-athletes

Loretta and Mike Corey are about as closely tied to UCF as you can get without being a graduate yourself. Their two sons, hospitality management major Matthew, ’08, and political science major J.B., ’11, not only graduated from UCF, but also both married alumnae — psychology major Melissa Stypul Corey, ’09, and hospitality major Jenna Tepe Corey, ’11, respectively. Their daughter, Jamie, ’15, earned her bachelor’s degree in education in December and started her UCF master’s program in January.

WE ARE PARENTS WE And then there’s Loretta’s recent appointment to the UCF Foundation Board of Directors, where she’ll serve until 2018. But the Coreys’ dedication to UCF runs even deeper. In addition to annual donations to maintain a box at Bright House Networks Stadium (“We love it,” Loretta says. “It’s the way we all get together and spend family time.”), they have made a major gift commitment to the Everyday Champions program, which provides valuable scholarships for student-athletes. Loretta, a first-generation college graduate, believes deeply in the transformative power of higher education and says that the academic success of UCF’s student-athletes drew them to support athletic scholarships. In fact, thanks in part to support from donors like the Coreys, UCF student-athletes graduate at a rate higher than any other NCAA Division I public institution in the nation.

8 | DONORS

Of course, the Coreys like to see the Knights win on the field and the court too, which also has a meaningful impact by drawing the UCF community closer together. “It’s such a young school,” says Loretta. “We want to see more alumni involved. We want to help UCF find its traditions.” Left to right: Kristian Lloret; Jamie Corey, ’15; J.B. Corey, ’11; Jenna Tepe Corey, ’11; Michael Corey; Loretta Corey; Melissa Stypul Corey, ’09; and Matthew Corey, ’08.


ARE PHILANTHROPISTS


I AM A TEACHER


FOR MORE

OPENING THE DOOR

In light of his stellar career as a student at UCF, it’s not especially surprising that Will Furiosi, ’13, continues to distinguish himself. An active member of the President’s Leadership Council, the biomedical sciences major was named in 2013 to the Order of Pegasus, UCF’s most prestigious student recognition, and graduated at the top of his class in the College of Medicine. Then, instead of continuing on to medical school as he had first intended, he took a teaching position at Oviedo High School while earning his master’s degree in science education at UCF. Now in his third year at OHS, Furiosi (“Fury” to the students on the Ultimate Frisbee team he coaches) teaches AP Biology and Chemistry and is planning his wedding to Jessica Ortega, ’13, who also teaches there.

I AM A PHILANTHROPIST

On a teacher’s salary, Will Furiosi,’13, donates what he can — but gives more than dollars

The fact that someone who could have chosen — and almost certainly excelled in — any one of a variety of more lucrative careers decided instead to teach high school is its own kind of philanthropy. But Furiosi, with his teacher’s salary and a wedding to pay for, manages to give back to UCF too. “I’d like to save up a lot of money and give it later, but I only make so much,” he says. “I give when I can.”

11 | DONORS

While that may not get his name on a building, Furiosi knows that as an alumnus his participation at any level directly impacts UCF’s national rankings and serves as a powerful example to his peers. And, he says, “It opens the door to me being able to give more in the future.”


SHOWING THEIR appreciation Alexander Mertens believes it’s important to give to UCF, no matter how small the gift, even though he’s still a student. “Giving as a student shows your appreciation for the university,” he says. “I believe I have an obligation to help support the opportunities and resources that are created through philanthropy.” Fellow Knight Vittoria Calello agrees. “I believe it is important to give back to communities that give me so much — in this case, UCF. I don’t believe my status as a student should affect that. Whenever I am able to, I try to give back to UCF.” Student philanthropists raise awareness about private support while giving back themselves

WE ARE STUDENTS Alexander, a first-generation student enrolled in The Burnett Honors College, is pursuing degrees in finance and economics. Vittoria, also a Burnett Honors student, is majoring in interdisciplinary studies — women’s studies track. Both are members of the Student Philanthropy Council (SPC), which promotes the spirit of philanthropy on campus as it creates awareness about the impact private support makes at UCF. Begun in 2013 with 13 students, the SPC currently numbers 38 Knights who meet monthly to learn about the impact of philanthropy. Members volunteer their time to the university in a variety of ways, such as organizing opportunities for students to write messages of thanks to university donors or increasing awareness about UCF fundraising efforts. As a result, many SPC members have been inspired to make modest gifts of their own.

12 | DONORS

“Obviously, raising money is fantastic, but I’ve learned a lot since joining,” Vittoria says. “I hope that my work will contribute to greater student awareness.” Student Philanthropy Council members (clockwise from top left): Ashlynn Hughes, Gulreen Kassoo, Tali Trenkamp, Alexandra Bueno, Alexander Mertens and Vittoria Calello


WE ARE PHILANTHROPISTS


ADVANCING through Philanthropy

14 | D O N O R S

WE ARE EDUCATORS


LEVELING THE PLAYING

FIELD

Mary and Dale Whittaker met on the campus of Texas A&M, where she was preparing for a career teaching special needs students and he was studying engineering. In the years since, they have shared their lives and a unique lens on America’s classrooms. Mary’s lens gave her a view of the enormous challenges faced by special needs students, especially those with limited means. Dale has concentrated on leveling the playing field in higher education as a professor, an administrator and a change agent at some of America’s best-known public universities.

WE ARE PHILANTHROPISTS

With generous support of several initiatives, Mary and Dale Whittaker seek to open UCF’s doors still wider

For both of the Whittakers, the fact that family income, independent of ability, remains a predictor of college graduation is simply unacceptable. So UCF — an institution that seeks to be defined more by who it includes than who it excludes — was a perfect fit when Dale assumed the role of provost and executive vice president in 2014. The Whittakers’ professional commitments are bolstered by their philanthropic ones. They are generous donors to the DirectConnect to UCF program, which guarantees admission to students who earn two-year degrees from UCF’s partner colleges, and to first-generation student scholarships. Recently, the Whittakers made an additional commitment to UCF’s future downtown campus, a place that will further level the playing field when it opens its doors to thousands of students.

15 | DONORS

Although the Whittakers understand the power of their giving to help individual students, they also hope it will help others to see the America they see — one where motivation and opportunity are all you should need to pursue the American dream.


LEGACY

PERPETUATING A SPECIAL

Toni Wisne, ’91, was in her prime when she passed away at age 48 in 2013, but her legacy of achievement belied her age. A graduate of the UCF Rosen College of Hospitality Management, she created some of the most renowned restaurants in her native state of Michigan. To honor her memory and to inspire others to give, Steve Sabina, her widower, has established the Toni A. Wisne Endowed Scholarship for students of the Rosen College.

With a scholarship in her memory, Steve Sabina helps students following the steps of his wife

I AM A HUSBAND I AM

Wisne was president and founder of the Epoch Restaurant Group, which started with Chez Raphael, a fine-dining restaurant in Detroit. She went on to open multiple establishments by 2000, including their flagship Tribute Restaurant; Forté Restaurant; Latitude Restaurant; and Knot, Just a Bar. Named one of Crain’s Detroit Business’ Most Influential Women of 2002, Wisne was also active in such organizations as the Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan and the Michigan Humane Society. Sabina, a mechanical engineer who worked for the Ford Motor Company, wants his wife’s legacy to live on through the successes of future Rosen students. He initially resisted speaking publicly about the endowed scholarship, but wants to inspire other alumni to make commitments to the Rosen College. Wisne never forgot that her success started at UCF, he says, and would be happy to know that she was helping others get a hospitality education there.

16 | DONORS

“Toni found her deepest satisfaction from the appreciation her employees displayed during their growth and advancement in their careers,” he said. “She always felt that education was the foundation for opportunity.”


9| DONORS

A PHILANTHROPIST


CURING sometimes CARING

ALWAYS

Their once-in-a-lifetime friendship started when they found themselves in the same orientation group freshman year, wearing the same green spotted tank top from Target. Samantha Brown, ’11, had already decided to major in nursing and by the middle of that year, ReAnna Greene, ’11, had too. “From that point on we were inseparable; we became roommates and went through the entire nursing program together,” says Brown. Their common clothes became not only their Target tank top, but also UCF T-shirts and nursing scrubs.

Giving in her honor, Sami Brown, ’11, carries forward the memory of her friend, ReAnna Greene, ’11

I AM A NURSE

Graduation eventually took the two out of Florida to opposite ends of the country, but an opportunity to volunteer for a medical mission team in a rural Honduras hospital allowed them to work side by side again, in 2013. The trip was life-changing for Greene and helped define her career path. Shortly after, she landed her dream job at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore and was working on her doctorate of nursing practice at the University of Maryland when she tragically lost her life in April 2015. Brown, along with Greene’s parents, wanted to honor the woman the family calls “a comet whose zest and passion for life affected everyone around her.” Together they’ve created an endowed scholarship in Greene’s honor to assist College of Nursing students who share her drive, with Brown being one of the first to donate.

18 | DONORS

“ReAnna had a ‘no-excuses, give it 100 percent’ attitude and cared so deeply for others,” Brown remembers. The academic scholarship will support those who share the personal nursing philosophy Greene penned in her first semester at UCF: “We cure sometimes, we care always.”


I AM A PHILANTHROPIST


I AM A CONSULTANT


he walked

THE PATH

WIDENING

Bob Danna, ’79, was not on an automatic path to college while growing up on Long Island, New York. His parents — both children of Italian immigrants — were making a life without high school diplomas, and college seemed a distant, unaffordable dream. Danna nonetheless found a path to higher education. It first went through Hunter College of the City University of New York, a public school with enough government support to make his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in physics attainable. Later he earned a master’s in engineering from UCF. That degree was paid for by the Navy because Danna was a naval officer and instructor at the Naval Nuclear Power School in Orlando. Now living in Las Vegas as a director and management consultant with Deloitte Consulting LLP, Danna is returning the investments made in him through his generous support of his alma maters — with both time and money.

I AM A PHILANTHROPIST

With gifts of both time and money, Bob Danna, ’79, improves college access and supports entrepreneurship

He makes annual contributions to the UCF Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. He also serves on the dean’s advisory board for the College of Business Administration. He believes the center promotes innovative thinking that is particularly needed today, while appealing to the strong entrepreneurial drive of members of the millennial generation. In addition, he has bequeathed UCF $500,000 to be split between the College of Business Administration and the College of Engineering and Computer Science.

21 | DONORS

“I am the product of public investment in education, from kindergarten through two master’s degrees,” he says. “I believe we must rededicate ourselves to investing in the education of our young people.”


7 |14

Limbitless Solutions Makes First 3-D Printed Arm

9 |14

Eleven Schools for University Innovation Alliance

Having learned of a Central Florida child missing an arm and without access to a prosthesis, doctoral engineering student Albert Manero and a group of classmates design and build a functioning 3-D printed arm that they give to seven-year-old Alex Pring. Over the ensuing months, the team, known as Limbitless Solutions, presents similar bionic arms to several other children, including Wyatt Falardeau, 10, who received a Blue Man Group-themed arm; Annika Emmert, 10, who received her arm while visiting the dolphin who inspired the “Dolphin Tale” movies; and Paolo Boa Nova, 6, a soccer enthusiast who is the first international recipient of a bionic arm.

Eleven of the nation’s top public research universities, including UCF, form a new alliance focused on helping more lowincome and first-generation students earn college degrees. The goal is to develop a “national playbook” for higher education. Joining UCF as alliance members are Iowa State, Michigan State, Oregon State, Ohio State, Arizona State, Georgia State, Purdue, University of California at Riverside, University of Kansas and University of Texas at Austin.

11 |14 Hacking for Good UCF’s hardware security team – one that specializes in keeping computer hardware safe from malicious attacks – is among the two best in the nation, according to a cyber security awareness conference. They join UCF’s cyber defense team, who placed first in the nation earlier in the year in a contest sponsored by Raytheon.


8 |14

The

YEAR in review

Attracting the Brightest Students The Fall 2014 class has an average high school grade-point average of 3.9, and an average SAT score of 1,255. There are 79 National Merit Scholars in the class – a record for the university.

10 |14 Critical Needs Met

The Rosen College of Hospitality Management claims the top spot in the UCF Live United Campaign Team’s Annual Critical Needs Drive with a donation of 1,186 pounds of food to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank of Orlando. In total, UCF donates 1,664 pounds of food. More than 180,000 individuals in Central Florida struggle with hunger.

12 |14 Top Ranked Student-Athletes The UCF football team’s graduation rate is 90 percent, one of the highest rates among the 76 teams competing in 2014’s postseason bowl games. Counting all student-athletes, UCF has a 95-percent graduation rate, the highest of any NCAA Division I public institution in the nation.


1 |15

UCF’s Second President, Trevor Colbourn, Passes Away Colbourn renamed the former Florida Technological University as UCF, established the honors program and the football program, and helped create Central Florida Research Park. Known as the “scholar president,” Colbourn held multiple degrees and taught for many years before moving into academic administration.

3 |15

Employee Giving Hits All-Time High A record number of faculty and staff members participate in the annual employee giving campaign, Believe. The focus of 2015’s campaign is increased participation: 1,544 donors give to the campaign – a 12% increase over 2014. The total dollars given is also high, with $1,036,248 raised.

5 |15

New Leadership Michael J. Morsberger is named the vice president for alumni relations and development and chief executive officer of the UCF Foundation, replacing Robert Holmes, who served in that role for 17 years. Among his first priorities is identifying a new executive director of the UCF Alumni Association. Julie C. Stroh (middle right) accepts the position in September.

The

YEAR in review


1 |15

3 |15

High school grads from the Parramore community who wish to become doctors will be able to attend the UCF College of Medicine on full scholarships after graduating from Jones High School and then UCF. UCF’s College of Medicine has a longstanding commitment to the students of Jones High School and has launched several health-focused programs there.

UCF continues to receive notice for its innovative programs and high-quality education. U.S. News & World Report lists 20 UCF programs among the top 100 in their fields in its Best Graduate Schools 2016 guidebook and ranks UCF’s online nursing programs among the top 25.

Scholarships for Parramore Grads

UCF Ranks High

4 |15

Celebrating Partnerships

The President’s Partnership Reception recognizes key donors to the university. FAIRWINDS Credit Union is spotlighted for their years of philanthropy, service and commitment, receiving the UCF Partnership Award. For more than 20 years, they have supported co-curricular programs, events, scholarships and academic positions, giving a total of more than $1 million.

5 |15

#EdOnCampus: Singing and Scholarships

The UCF Department of Music receives scholarship support from textbook rental company Chegg and a performance from popular musician Ed Sheeran after winning the #EdOnCampus social media contest. The award of $10,000 award assists a minimum of ten students who have financial need, with scholarships of $500 to $1,000 each.


ss

A complete set of statements, schedules and footnotes, including the auditor’s opinion, is available from the UCF Foundation, Inc.

P E R C E N TA G E O F T O TA L GIVING BY CONSTITUENCY, FISCAL YEAR 2015

ALUMNI

26%

C O R P O R AT I O N S

23%

F O U N D AT I O N S

18%

FRIENDS

28%

O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

5%

T O TA L

$57 million


2015

FINANCIAL

Highlights P E R C E N TA G E O F T O TA L GIVING BY GIFT TYPE, FISCAL YEAR 2015

CASH

22%

GIFT-IN-KIND

6%

OTHER

6%

PLANNED

26%

PLEDGE

40%

T O TA L

$57 million


Highlights

FINANCIAL

2015

Net cash flow includes contributions to endowments and spending

distributions. Appreciation includes net investment activity and all fees.

ENDOWMENT ACTIVITY

Ending market value includes internally endowed funds of $1,787,742 (FY2015). The audited financial statements reflect the ending

market value of true endowments (excluding quasi-endowments) and end-of-year fees, reflected by the pool in the following quarter.

Fiscal Year • 6/30/2015

Three Years • 6/30/2015

Five Years • 6/30/2015

B E G I N N I N G M A R K E T VA LU E

$ 155,099,306

$ 123,478,186

$ 104,326,224

NET CASH FLOW

$ (6,352,830)

$ (13,467,199)

$ (16,179,190)

A P P R E C I AT I O N

$

1,729,678

$ 40,465,167

$ 62,329,120

E N D I N G M A R K E T VA LU E

$ 150,476,154

$ 150,476,154

$ 150,476,154

ENDOWMENT POOL INVESTMENT RETURN

1.0%

10.1%

10.1%


For more information on the UCF Foundation’s endowment, visit UCFFoundation.org.

DISTRIBUTION OF ENDOWMENT FUNDS

Amount

% Asset

Accounts

ACADEMICS

$ 47,919,200

31%

77

A L U M N I R E L AT I O N S

$

1%

2

CHAIRS

$ 48,098,652

32%

35

GENERAL

$

1,910,019

1%

15

PROFESSORSHIPS

$

7,668,239

5%

29

RESEARCH

$

2,313,795

2%

7

SCHOLARSHIPS

$ 42,450,274

28%

380

T O TA L

$ 150,476,154

100%

545

115,975

UNIVERSITY SUPPORT

* The audited financial statements reflect the ending market value of true endowments (excluding quasi-endowments) and end-of-year fees, reflected by the pool in the following quarter.


UCF BOARD OF TRUSTEES

James Atchison, ’92 Clarence H. Brown III, MD Olga Calvet, ’71 Richard Crotty, ’72 Alan Florez, ’88 Robert A. Garvy Ray Gilley Keith Koons Marcos R. Marchena, ’82 Alex Martins, ’01 Beverly J. Seay John Sprouls Cait Zona (student) UCF FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OFFICERS Judy Albertson Melanie Fernandez, ’86 James W. Ferrell, ’80 Phyllis Klock Nelson J. Marchioli, ’72 Ronald C. Thow, ’93

30 | BOARD

DIRECTORS

Rita Adler Richard O. Baldwin Jr., ’80 David W. Boone, ’75 Scott Buescher Larry Chastang, ’80 Anthony J. Connelly, ’87 Loretta Corey John D. Euliano Keith J. Flannery, ’86 Hany M. Girgis, ’94 Bruce K. Gould Suresh Gupta James A. Jahna Sr., ’81 Phillip L. Kean Rita A. Lowndes Diane Mahony, ’96 Joseph A. Melbourne Jr. Paul J. Mirabella, ’75 Tony Moreno, Jr. ’91

The STRENGTH OF

UCF LEADERSHIP continues


UCF FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James Atchison, ’92 Clarence H. Brown III, MD Olga Calvet, ’71 Richard Crotty, ’72 Alan Florez, ’88 Robert A. Garvy Ray Gilley Keith Koons Marcos R. Marchena, ’82 Alex Martins, ’01 Beverly J. Seay John Sprouls Cait Zona (student)

OFFICERS Judy Albertson Melanie Fernandez, ’86 James W. Ferrell, ’80 Phyllis Klock Nelson J. Marchioli, ’72 Ronald C. Thow, ’93 DIRECTORS

Rita Adler Richard O. Baldwin Jr., ’80 David W. Boone, ’75 Scott Buescher Larry Chastang, ’80 Anthony J. Connelly, ’87 Loretta Corey John D. Euliano Keith J. Flannery, ’86 Hany M. Girgis, ’94 Bruce K. Gould Suresh Gupta James A. Jahna Sr., ’81 Phillip L. Kean Rita A. Lowndes Diane Mahony, ’96 Joseph A. Melbourne Jr. Paul J. Mirabella, ’75 Tony Moreno, Jr. ’91 Mary Beth Morgan Anthony J. Nicholson Leila Jammal Nodarse, ’82 Margery Pabst-Steinmetz J. Oscar Rodriguez, ’86 Paul E. Ryan, ’83 Michael J. Sarpu, ’95 John R. Sprouls Rajesh S. Toleti, ’94 Joyce Virga, ’98 Richard J. Walsh, ’77

EX OFFICIO David Albertson Randy E. Berridge Brenda Carey Olga Calvet, ’71 Peter F. Cranis, ’84 Buddy Dyer A.J. “Bert” Francis II, ’77 John C. Hitt Teresa Jacobs Ben McMahan Michael J. Morsberger Dominic Persampiere Rick Weddle EMERITI

James T. Barnes Jr. R. Van Bogan Phoebe Carpenter Peter Dagostino Mary Jo Davis Alan G. Fickett, ’71 Manuel A. Garcia III J. Charles Gray Michael J. Grindstaff, ’78 Gerald F. Hilbrich Deborah J. Komanski, ’79 John F. Lowndes Michael Manglardi, ’84 Gerald R. McGratty, ’71 Richard A. Nunis Roger W. Pynn, ’73 Allen Trovillion Al R. Weiss, ’76 Nelson Ying Thomas Yochum HONORARY DIRECTOR

Joan D. Ruffier

31 | BOARD

UCF BOARD OF TRUSTEES


FOR MORE INFORMATION cut out this card and return it to the UCF Foundation in an envelope. Name_________________________________________________________________ Address________________________________________________________________ City________________________State_____ZIP________________________________ Phone_________________________________________________________________ Email_________________________________________________________________

I AM A: o Graduate, class of_____________

o Faculty or staff member

o Parent of a graduate

o Friend

o Parent of a current student P L E A S E S E N D M E I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T :

o Including UCF in my will o Making a gift of securities o Making a gift to UCF that provides me with income now o Enclosed is my gift of $____________ (please make checks payable to UCF Foundation, Inc.) o Please charge a one-time gift of $___________ o Please charge a recurring monthly gift of $__________ the first business day of each month D E S I G N AT E A G I F T F O R : o UCF’s area of greatest need o First Generation Scholarship Program o Other________________________________________________________________________ o My employer will match a gift to UCF. The appropriate form is enclosed. PA Y M E N T I N F O R M AT I O N : o Visa o MasterCard o American Express o Discover Card Number_______________________________________ Expiration Date_______/_______ S I G N AT U R E __________________________________________________________________

CMAR16


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UCF Foundation, Inc. Annual Report 2015  

The annual report of the University of Central Florida Foundation

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