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UCF FOUNDATION

2014 ANNUAL REPORT

Better Together

Partnering to Advance UCF


Our Highest

UCF Foundation CEO Robert J. Holmes (left) and UCF President John C. Hitt


and Best Futures In 1964, when today’s UCF was little more than a concept, 89 local leaders and their families took the extraordinary step of pledging nearly $1 million of their own resources to secure land for the campus. In doing so, they became the first of many invaluable partners, both public and private, to contribute to the university’s remarkable growth. The Founding Subscribers, as those 89 came to be known, watched as the new university brought growth and prosperity to their region, just as they had foreseen. And UCF parlayed their investment into what would become the nation’s second-largest university. Since those days, mutually beneficial partnerships have remained central to UCF. We have continued to find common cause with increasing numbers of individuals and institutions, and to combine resources to address and resolve the pressing problems confronting our state, our nation and the world. Among the most valuable and enduring of UCF’s partnerships is that between the university and the UCF Foundation, Inc., a distinct nonprofit organization with a mission to encourage, steward and celebrate charitable contributions from alumni and friends to UCF. Here, we celebrate that relationship, as well as the many key partnerships between individual and corporate donors and the foundation and university. We are honored to work together to drive UCF and Orlando forward, and we are honored by the generosity of our community. Through partnerships we discover our highest and best futures, and our best chance to move beyond conventional success to true significance. Thank you for your partnership and your contributions to UCF’s bright future.

John C. Hitt

Robert J. Holmes

President, UCF

CEO, UCF Foundation, Inc.

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INTRODUCTION


Model Speaking about Greg Welch, UCF’s recently appointed Florida Hospital Endowed Chair in Healthcare Simulation, Florida Hospital Chief Clinical Officer Sheryl Dodds says, “We feel his work will have a positive effect on both health care education and our clinical operations.”

As for the college, says interim Dean Mary Lou Sole, the new position advances its “commitment

In other words, Florida Hospital’s $1 million gift to the College of Nursing to establish the chair stands as a model partnership between higher education and health care — one that propels both partners toward new levels of excellence, that creates a whole greater than the sum of its parts.

And taken together, all of that ultimately

The prestigious title and endowment earnings help UCF recruit top scholars like Welch, who in turn help produce the well-prepared nurses and develop the new approaches to medical simulation that Florida Hospital needs. Welch, a computer scientist and engineer, “brings significant education and experience in simulation from a culture outside of health care, and we believe that will challenge our thinking about medical simulation in all the right ways,” says Dodds.

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to becoming a national leader in developing and testing innovative technologies to enhance nursing and health care education as well as patient care delivery.”

improves patient outcomes — the true measure of the partnership. The primacy of real-world applications and results certainly isn’t lost on Welch, whose current work focuses on improving the simulated patients that are used more and more effectively in training nurses and other health care professionals. “Computer scientists don’t exist to develop technology and conduct experiments in a vacuum,” he says. “We are tool smiths who support the work of others. Health care professionals help other people and so supporting them appeals to me personally.”


Partnership Established with a gift from Florida Hospital, an endowed chair in health care simulation propels both UCF and the hospital toward new frontiers. A computer scientist and engineer by training, Greg Welch, who holds the Florida Hospital Endowed Chair for Healthcare Simulation in UCF’s College of Nursing, works to improve the simulated patients that are now a mainstay of nursing education. Florida Hospital Chief Clinical Officer Sheryl Dodds says working with someone from outside health care “will challenge our thinking about medical simulation in all the right ways.”

A computer scientist and engineer by training, GREG WELCH, who holds the Florida Hospital Endowed Chair for Healthcare Simulation in UCF’s College of Nursing, works to improve the simulated patients that are now a mainstay of nursing education. Florida Hospital Chief Clinical Officer Sheryl Dodds says working with someone from outside health care “will challenge our thinking about medical simulation in all the right ways."


Making More


For years now — since at least since 2005, when a Business Roundtable report said that by 2015 America needed to double the number of STEM graduates produced each year — pundits have been debating whether or not we really face a shortage of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workers. Brian Crutcher, for one, isn’t especially concerned with what they have to say. That’s because, in the real world, the executive vice president of Business Operations for Texas Instruments is too busy with the company’s efforts to recruit highly sought-after engineering graduates, many of whom have job offers from TI and similar companies before they even walk across the commencement stage. So it only makes sense that a company like TI would seek to partner with key universities in order to help them attract more students to STEM fields and better prepare those students for the workforce — and, of course, get a leg up in recruiting them. All of those things, Crutcher says, factored into the company’s decision this year to help fund

Makers

an unconventional new complex of four labs (including the TI Innovation Lab) in the College of Engineering and Computer Science. This "maker space" is designed to encourage the kind of creativity and freewheeling collaboration that so often spawn the ideas that change our world. What attracted TI to UCF as a potential partner? Primarily the success of the approximately 60 UCF graduates working for the company — including Crutcher himself, who holds a degree in electrical engineering. Additionally, Crutcher says TI recruits so heavily from UCF because graduates know more than formulas. “They know how to put a values proposition together, and they can stand up and lead a team,” he says. In the coming years, Crutcher not only foresees a stronger engineering college, but also looks forward to additional partnership opportunities. “The labs look amazing,” Crutcher said after a grand opening ceremony last fall. “They’re going to attract talent. This is what gets you excited to be an engineer.”

Texas Instruments invests in an innovative new lab complex to help attract more students to STEM fields.

Texas Instruments Executive Vice President of Business Operations BRIAN CRUTCHER, ’95, (opposite) says TI partnered with UCF on an innovative new lab complex (inset) in part because the company needs the best engineers possible. TI gravitated to UCF because graduates know more than formulas. “They know how to put a values proposition together, and they can stand up and lead a team,” Crutcher says.

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With a pair of scholarships for single parents pursuing degrees at UCF, Ken Herndon,’87, offers a hand up that can resonate for generations. Family is a favorite topic during a conversation with Ken Herndon, ’87. The unmistakably devoted single parent of a daughter, Kendall, and son, Kenton, started his business, KC Curb, at age 28 with a loan from his mother. It was a good investment: The company has grown into the largest business of its kind in Central Florida, the loan was repaid, and Ken purchased the house next door for his mom. Helping others is a family tradition. “I remember at my grandfather’s funeral, I heard the story of my great-grandfather, who was a successful farmer during the Depression. He brought everybody eggs, butter and milk to carry them through,” he says. Like his great-grandfather, Herndon is carrying others through challenging times, except he’s chosen to help countless Knights reach their graduation day. When he was a UCF student, Herndon worked full time and attended school full time. If the responsibilities of single parenthood had been added, he says, a difficult situation would’ve been that much harder. That understanding motivated him to establish two endowed scholarships named for his children. The Kendall Shaye Herndon Endowed Scholarship, named for his 17-year-old daughter,

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Putting

helps single fathers, while single mothers who are full-time students are eligible for the Kenton Herndon Endowed Scholarship, named for his four-year-old son. The scholarships certainly meet a need. Nearly one-fourth of college students in the U.S. have dependent children. Of those who are single parents, nearly 80 percent are considered lowincome, with a majority spending at least 30 hours a week on child care. It’s unfortunate, but hardly surprising, that they are more likely to leave college before earning their degree. Yet when these students do reach their educational goals, the rewards are notable — both parent and child benefit through the parent’s higher earnings, greater access to resources, increased involvement in the child’s education, and the greater likelihood that the child will someday pursue higher education. “When you’re in that situation, your family comes first, of course, but if a single mother or father can get a little help, it can turn their paths and help their family in the long run,” Herndon says.


Family First

After working to balance a full time job and a full course load while he was a student at UCF, KEN HERNDON, ’87, (with children Kenton and Kendall), couldn’t imagine how other students had been able to do the same and raise children as single parents too. His concern was well-founded; with less money and time to spend on course work, single-parent students often struggle to graduate. The stakes are high; success can dramatically change the direction not just of their lives but their children’s too.


Building “We’ve worked to ... help these students understand there’s more to their college experience than Saturday afternoon,” says Athletic Director Todd Stansbury of UCF’s academically accomplished student-athletes. A recent gift from the Wayne M. Densch Charitable Trust will help construct a new $6.5 billion facility dedicated to that idea, with extensive space devoted to academic achievement, community service and career preparation.


Leaders

A $4 million gift, UCF Athletics’ largest ever, helps fund construction of the Wayne Densch Center for Student-Athlete Leadership.

Wayne Densch’s $1 million pledge for athletic scholarships in 1986 is widely considered to have saved UCF Athletics at a time when the program faced financial challenges so daunting the university’s Board of Trustees considered shuttering the program. It makes you wonder: What would UCF Athletics look like today if Densch hadn’t stepped forward? “It would be a very different culture,” says Todd Stansbury, UCF vice president and director of athletics. “That decision forever changed the direction of UCF’s athletics program.” After Densch's death in 1994, his business partner, Leonard Williams, assumed ownership of the company and directorship of the Wayne M. Densch Charitable Trust. “Leonard Williams and his family are very special people,” Stansbury says. “They’ve really been able to make an impact and allowed UCF Athletics to become what it is.” This summer, Williams and his wife, Marjorie, extended that impact even further, adding a $1 million gift of their own to a $4 million gift from the charitable trust — all directed to help construct the Wayne Densch Center for Student-Athlete Leadership. The $6.5 million facility, set to open next fall beside Bright House Networks Stadium, will support not just the academic achievement the Knights are known for (UCF graduates a higher percentage of student-athletes than any other public Division I school in the country), but also leadership, service and career readiness. Those ideas are already central to UCF Athletics. “Through intercollegiate athletics, we’re given an incredible opportunity to really influence young people,” Stansbury says. “We’ve worked to change the focus from graduation day being the end of their journey to realizing that it is the beginning. We have the opportunity to open up a whole new world for them.”

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Five-Star Friends from the start, HARRIS ROSEN (right) and Dean ABRAHAM PIZAM worked together to create a world-class hospitality management campus and program at UCF. “Abe and I went around town and had conversations with a number of people,” recalls Rosen. “I think everyone we met with made a contribution, and we were able to build this college debt-free.” Rosen himself gave some $18 million for the project.


During the early days of the UCF hospitality management program, the friendship between local hotelier Harris Rosen and Dean Abraham Pizam, then a tourism management professor, flourished. The program, unfortunately, did not.

Rosen’s contributions didn’t end there, though. “Abe and I went around town and had conversations with a number of people,” he says. “I think everyone we met with made a contribution, and we were able to build this college debt-free.”

In 1998, when UCF graduated about 100 hospitality students each year, the Orlando Sentinel called it a “less-than-stellar program” and posed the question: “Why doesn’t Orlando’s own University of Central Florida have a world-class program in hospitality management?”

That landmark gift to help create the Rosen College of Hospitality Management was the resounding fulfillment of an earlier promise, made during the first meeting between Pizam and Rosen back in 1983.“I went to his hotel,” Pizam recalls, “and explained my vision for the department and what we hoped to do. He was apparently impressed and wrote a check for $10,000. He promised that, God willing, he would give more.”

The gauntlet was thrown down. Rosen picked it up. “I made this presumptuous promise,” he recalls. “I can vividly remember my lunch with Abe, and I made the commitment that I probably never should have made, based on my financial situation at the time.” Over lunch, he pledged $10 million to help build a college of hospitality management. Rosen’s giving toward the new campus, eventually totaling $18 million, was matched by state funds and provided the means to build the college in the midst of Orlando’s tourist attractions.

Friendship

Now, with additional commitments of $10 million to expand the campus and $5 million to establish an endowed deanship within the college, Rosen reaffirms that promise and ensures that the college will always have leadership capable of maintaining its status as a world leader in hospitality management education. For Rosen, though, giving is about more than fulfilling promises. “Life is not complete,” he says, “unless you balance your enthusiasm to be successful with enthusiasm to give back to others.”

With another landmark gift, this time to endow a deanship, Harris Rosen continues a longstanding partnership with UCF and the college that bears his name.

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A Good Day Depressed and volatile after 15 months in Iraq, former Spc. BRUCE CHAMBERS was diagnosed with PTSD after an arrest and referred to UCF RESTORES, an on-campus clinic where psychology professor DEBORAH BEIDEL (inset) trains graduate students in a unique — and effective — type of exposure therapy. “I was out of control,” says Chambers, who is now back to work and living with his girlfriend.


to Live

With a federal grant set to run out next year, private donors step in to fund a promising PTSD treatment program at UCF.

A vet with clear blue eyes, a clipped haircut and a soldier’s bearing, former Spc. Bruce Chambers entered the U.S. Army to honor family tradition. He wanted to serve his country, as his father and grandfather did, and then build a civilian life with G.I. benefits. Instead, 15 months as a calvary scout in Iraq earned him years of trouble. He developed a drug habit, collected an other-than-honorable discharge and lost his benefits. War terrors surged on dark roads, with loud noises and in his dreams. One night, a police officer stopped him for an expired license plate and, seeing Chamber’s belligerence, pulled out a gun. Chambers took off and was arrested after a car chase. “I was out of control,” he says. “I didn’t care about anything.” A judge sent him to a first-time offenders program, and soon after a health counselor suggested UCF RESTORES for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. The program employs exposure therapy, using 3-D animation, motion, sounds and scents to recreate traumatic events and desensitize warriors to their memories. Again and again, Chambers experienced virtual recreations of the 2007 ambush of his Bradley Fighting Vehicle. He felt the bomb rock. He smelled kerosene and burning tires, heard shooting and then the explosion of another Bradley that had come to assist. Slowly, his anger, depression and paranoia eased. He could discuss his experiences in group sessions with other combat veterans. “I learned that if you talk about it, it loses power over you,” he says.

Today, Chambers and his girlfriend live in a tidy four-bedroom house filled with children. He holds down at least one job and thanks UCF RESTORES for his confidence in the future. That’s a common outcome for patients of the clinic, which has helped more than 150 vets put ghosts to rest and cope with PTSD. But clinic founder and director Deborah Beidel and her staff and students can treat only a tiny fraction of veterans who need help. So she dreams of training not just graduate students in her unique approach to exposure therapy, but also practicing clinicians. “We will never be able to treat everyone who needs our services,” she says, “but we could provide training to already established mental health professionals.” When the $5 million Defense Department grant that currently funds the clinic runs out in November 2015, though, Beidel may have to close the doors to both patients and clinicians. In response, private and corporate donors have stepped in to help with an endowment fund that will help fund future operations. “I know how to do the treatment,” Beidel says. “I know how to do the training. What we need is the funding.” For many of the thousands of soldiers and veterans like Chambers who still need help, that could make all the difference. “In Iraq,” Chambers says, “we said that every day was a good day to die. Well, how about every day is not a good day to die. How about, every day is a good day to live.”

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Thanks to private support, students gain life-changing experience abroad. 1

“We developed partnerships with the people there,” says industrial engineering major Daniel Washburn of a service-learning trip to Nicaragua with The Burnett Honors College. “We didn’t come to just give of ourselves; we came to learn too. It was great that we gave what we had, and they gave back so much.” Washburn and six other UCF students spent nearly a month last summer in the Central American country, building a rainwater collection system and cistern at a remote mountain rehabilitation center and devising an oxygenation system for a fish farm that will provide a sustainable source of protein. Although students paid a flat fee to participate, the bulk of costs were covered by private donors, including George MacKay, Paul Morgan and Mary Beth Morgan of The Social Enterprise Fund and UCF Foundation Board Chair Phyllis Klock.

Many

Philanthropy’s Wide-Ranging Impact The result of a unique partnership, a new research center uses horses to help veterans recover from post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Equine-assisted therapy shows great promise in helping veterans suffering from PTSD, but, because little formal research has been done, questions remain about why it works, how well it works and how to maximize its benefits. Now, thanks to the help of local benefactor Mark Miller, the UCF College of Medicine will partner with Heavenly Hooves — a therapeutic riding facility in Osceola County — to help answer those questions.

Miller, owner of the now-closed Arabian Nights entertainment complex, contributed funds to establish the McCormick Research Institute within Heavenly Hooves — soon to be designated as an international research center for equine therapy. UCF’s Dr. Mänette Monroe, who began a pilot program in 2012 called Horses and Heroes, will play a key role at the new institute.


Aided by scholarships at UCF, a gifted transfer student now pursues two Harvard graduate degrees. 2

“The teaching and mentoring [I received at UCF] have prepared me very well for Harvard,” says Cathy Gutierrez, ’14, who transferred to the university from Valencia College with the help of a DirectConnect to UCF scholarship and graduated magna cum laude with two bachelor’s degrees in microbiology from the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences. Now enrolled at Harvard Medical School, she intends to pursue both an M.D. and a master's degree in public health.

Forms, Many Faces

At UCF she helped underwrite her own research into neurological disorders in children in Pereira, Colombia, and discovered lead levels as high as eight times normal readings. The next step is to seek the source by testing for lead in the children’s environment. She hopes to gain funding for that work while at Harvard.

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I M PA C T


For a pair of UCF professors, dramatically different fields of study converge in a singular vision. 4

It might be said that UCF professors Kiminobu Sugaya and Ayako Yonetani have already given more than enough, just through their work. Yonetani, a professor of violin and viola and chair of the String Department at UCF, also wins international acclaim as a concert violinist, serves as music director for the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens in Winter Park, leads clinics in high schools throughout

Central Florida, and works to introduce contemporary Japanese composers to Western audiences. Sugaya, a professor in the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences at the College of Medicine, researches stem cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS, and holds dozens of patents, including one for a process that prompts a single gene to generate millions of stem cells.

A Constellation of Reasons, a Singular UCF Foundation Donors

Young and accomplished, Trevor Brewer, ’97, already knows the value of giving back. 5

Trevor Brewer, ’97, always thought he had gotten a good education at UCF, but it wasn’t until he found himself competing with Ivy League grads in law school at Emory University that he knew for sure. He not only held his own, he excelled. Brewer saw two sides of UCF: As an undergrad in The Burnett Honors College, he met great professors who challenged him, and as a student assistant in the Office of Sponsored Research, he learned what was happening at the research and discovery level. To give back, Brewer has made an estate gift that will focus on the needs of the college that prepared him so well. “I’m proud to be able to support my alma mater,” he says, “for the important and meaningful work it is doing in the community and the state.”

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But the pair still decided to make a planned gift through their estate that, once realized, will establish scholarships in their names in the Burnett School and in the College of Arts and Humanities, where Yonetani teaches. As an endowment, their gift will continue to grow in perpetuity, expanding an already remarkable legacy as it helps generations of deserving Knights pursue their own dreams in music and science.

Purpose

Boundlessly generous with her time and talent, Dianne Owen, ’93, believes alumni engagement is key to UCF’s future. 6

“Engage!” That’s the advice Dianne Owen, ’93, gives to her fellow Knights to help advance UCF. “It can be done in a multitude of ways and can be mutually beneficial,” she says. And she should know. In additional to her role as chair of the UCF Alumni Association Board of Directors, Owen has been involved in many other ways: as an adjunct professor in the College of Business Administration, a member of a UCF Foundation advisory committee, a student mentor, a volunteer on industry boards and more. Of course, Owen — who is executive vice president of marketing at FAIRWINDS Credit Union — also has a long and distinguished record of giving to UCF, starting while she was still a student. But it’s Owen’s unique vision for an engaged alumni population and her generosity with her time and talent that truly set her apart. “UCF alumni are a powerhouse group of individuals,” she says. “I want to leverage that group to build stronger students, a stronger university and a well-connected community.”


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Boots to Books The services and support UCF offers military veteran students earn the university a spot on a national list of military-friendly schools after G.I. Jobs magazine 9|13 ranks UCF among the top 15 percent of U.S. colleges and universities.

Record Athlete Graduation Rate UCF posts an 89 percent Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for student-athletes, the highest in school history. The Knights rank No. 1 in GSR among public institutions in Florida. 10|13 (They have since risen to No. 1 among all NCAA Division I public institutions in the nation.)

Business Incubation Impact A study reveals that more than 3,350 jobs and an estimated $620 million in economic output are the result of companies assisted directly and indirectly by the UCF Business Incubation Program, a 14-year economic development partnership between private enterprise and local government.

Year in Review Fire Rescue Simulation The Orange County Fire Rescue Department recognizes UCF’s Institute for Simulation and Training for providing key expertise in the development of the training curriculum at the OCFRD’s new Regional Command School and 1|14 Simulation Center.

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New Nanotech Degree The UCF Board of Trustees announces approval of a new interdisciplinary professional science master’s degree in 3|14 nanotechnology, one of today’s most active growth industries, with a worldwide market estimated at $1.2 trillion by 2020.

3|14 UCF at the White House Brandon Clark, a junior double-majoring in criminal justice and legal studies, and Caroline Engeman, a recent grad in event management, land internships at the White House.


Alex and Sierra The UCF couple are crowned winners of “The X Factor,” sealing the deal with a million-dollar recording contract. Alex Kinsey is a senior, and 12|13 Sierra Deaton recently graduated with a degree in advertising and public relations.

Sciences Medalist Peter Delfyett, 4|14 professor in optics, wins the Florida Academy of Sciences’ top annual award, the Medalist Award, for outstanding contributions toward the advancement of science. Delfyett, a Pegasus Professor who joined UCF in 1993, holds 36 patents.

Fiesta Bowl (and Academic) Champions In UCF’s first appearance in a BCS bowl, the underdog Knights, given little chance against No. 6 Baylor, beat the Bears 52-42, ending the season ranked No. 10 in the AP Poll. But if the top 10 AP teams were re-ranked by players’ graduation rates, UCF 1|14 would be No. 1.

Dancing for Dollars Knight-Thon, a 20-hour dance marathon, raises $400,000 to benefit the Greater Orlando Children’s Miracle 4|14 Network Hospitals.

"Best Value" University The Princeton Review's annual analysis of 2,000 institutions nationwide names 150 "best value" institutions—75 public 1|14 universities and 75 private colleges— and ranks UCF in the top 50.

Hack Champs UCF’s cyber defense team places first in the nation in the Raytheon National 4|14 Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. In August, the team gets an up-close look at cyber defense in the nation’s capital, including a visit to the White House to meet Vice President Joe Biden.


Congratulations, Graduates More than 7,700 students are awarded degrees over the course of three days. The total number awarded for the year is 15,508, most among all of Florida’s colleges and universities.

Top Station in the Nation The university’s Public Broadcasting Service radio station is the highest-rated, fulltime, noncommercial jazz station in the nation, according to recent Nielsen numbers. The 5|14 station, which went to an all-jazz music format in 1998, is celebrating its 35th anniversary.

New Home for American Tennis The U.S. Tennis Association announces that it is partnering with UCF to build a new, 100-plus-court tennis center at Lake Nona that will include a stateof-the-art, 12-court collegiate tennis venue to serve as home court for the Knights.

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Year in Review

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NIH Grant for Critical Care With a $2.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, interim nursing dean and Orlando Health Distinguished Professor Mary Lou Sole begins work to improve care of patients on ventilators, potentially saving billions in health care costs from pneumonia-related complications.

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Alex’s Bionic Arm A team of UCF students designs a low-cost, 3-D-printed prosthetic arm for 6-year-old Alex Pring, who promptly captures the hearts of the nation as his story is told by national media. Since children quickly outgrow prosthetics, insurance companies rarely pay for them, meaning the $350 UCF design could 7|14 have massive impact — especially because the students quickly posted their blueprints online for free use.


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8|14

Programming Success The UCF Programming Team places third among U.S. teams and 21st in the world at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest in Russia. UCF was one of 122 teams to advance to the world finals from a pool of 8,000 regional teams worldwide.

Best Freshmen Ever UCF’s freshman class includes 79 National Merit Scholars, more than any other university in Florida. The class’s average SAT is 1257, with an average high school GPA of 3.9.

Movers and Shakers Orlando magazine names five UCF leaders and several alumni among the region’s most powerful people. President John C. Hitt earns the No. 4 ranking. Alumni on the list include Alex Martins, ’01, CEO of the Orlando Magic; George A. Kalogridis, ’76, president of Walt Disney World Resort; Barbara Jenkins, ’96, Orange County 6|14 School Superintendent; Rasesh H. Thakkar, ’84, senior managing director of Tavistock Group; Dick J. Batchelor, ’71, business and political consultant; and Patty Sheehan, ’87, Orlando city commissioner.

Lifting Lives and Livelihoods A. Dale 8|14 Whittaker, a former Purdue University vice provost committed to student success, innovation and partnerships, becomes UCF’s provost and vice president for academic affairs, saying he is “deeply committed to lifting lives and livelihoods through knowledge.”

Embracing LGBT Students UCF is named one of the top 50 LGBTfriendly universities and colleges in the nation by Campus Pride, a national organization that works 8|14 to create safer campuses for LGBT students. UCF is the only Florida school on the annual list.

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REVIEW


UCF Foundation When I had the honor of speaking to an audience of UCF graduates at a recent commencement ceremony, I shared three pieces of advice: Learn all you can, serve all you can, and give all you can.

It’s not hard to see that you — our alumni, donors and corporate partners — already embody this advice. As our most dedicated volunteers, leaders and supporters, you are our partners in progress as we ignite the future for UCF. I am so proud to stand with you, as a member of a group that is helping UCF drive economic development, fuel research innovation, develop technology, foster entrepreneurship and grow the arts. Along with our partners, the university — which impacts well over 100,000 jobs and adds billions in value to the regional economy — is committed to a better, bolder and brighter future for Central Florida and beyond. UCF is changing lives, and the stories in this annual report are just a few examples of the impact of philanthropy. Donor support has helped America’s veterans receive the counseling they often need, through Deborah Beidel and the PTSD clinic in the College of Sciences. Funding has furthered research done by Greg Welch in the use of simulation in patient care in the College of Nursing. Visionary planning and transformational giving by Harris Rosen has made the Rosen College of Hospitality Management one of the top schools of its kind in the nation. On behalf of the UCF Foundation Board, thank you for your support. It ensures affordability, enhances academics and is crucial to the continued growth of UCF’s reputation as America’s Partnership University.

PHYLLIS KLOCK assumed the role of Chair of the UCF Foundation Board of Directors on July 1, 2014. She first served on the board in 1997 and was most recently vice-chair. She was a charter member of the UCF Board of Trustees, chosen by then-Governor Jeb Bush. She has a long and generous history of giving to UCF and has supported a wide range of programs and initiatives, including student scholarships, athletics and capital projects, to name just a few.

2013-14 OFFICERS

Judy Albertson James W. Ferrell, ’80 Phyllis Klock Michael Manglardi, Esq., ’84 Ronald C. Thow, ’93 Larry F. Tobin, ’83 2013-14 DIRECTORS

Phyllis Klock Chair, UCF Foundation Board of Directors

Rita Adler Jim Atchison, ’92 Richard O. Baldwin Jr., ’80 Scott Buescher Larry Chastang, ’80


Board of Directors Buddy Dyer A.J. “Bert” Francis II, ’77 John C. Hitt Robert J. Holmes Jr. Teresa Jacobs Ben McMahan Dianne Owen, ’93 Dominic Persampiere Rick Weddle EMERITI

Anthony J. Connelly, ’87 Carol M. Craig Melanie Fernandez, ’86 Keith J. Flannery, ’86 Hany M. Girgis, ’94 Bruce K. Gould Suresh Gupta James R. Hopes James A. Jahna Sr., ’81 Phillip L. Kean Rita A. Lowndes Marcos Marchena, ’82 Nelson J. Marchioli, ’72 Joseph A. Melbourne, Jr. Paul J. Mirabella, ’75

Tony Moreno, Jr., ’91 Anthony J. Nicholson Leila Jammal Nodarse, ’82 Margery Pabst-Steinmetz J. Oscar Rodriguez, ’86 Michael J. Sarpu, ’95 John R. Sprouls Rajesh S. Toleti, ’94 Richard J. Walsh, ’77

James T. Barnes Jr. R. Van Bogan Phoebe Carpenter Peter Dagostino Mary Jo Davis Alan G. Fickett, ’71 Manuel A. Garcia III J. Charles Gray Michael “Micky” Grindstaff, ’78 Gerald F. Hilbrich Deborah J. Komanski, ’79 John F. Lowndes Gerald R. McGratty, ’71 Richard A. Nunis Roger W. Pynn, ’73 Allen Trovillion Al R. Weiss, ’76 Nelson Ying Thomas Yochum HONORARY DIRECTORS

H. Trevor Colbourn Joan D. Ruffier

EX OFFICIO

David Albertson Randy E. Berridge Olga Calvet, ’71 Bob Dallari 23

B OA R D


GIVING BY GIFT TYPE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014

2014 Financial The University of Central Florida Foundation, Inc. — a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and

the university’s primary partner in securing philanthropic resources — encourages, stewards and celebrates charitable contributions from alumni and friends to support the University of Central Florida. Ways of Giving The UCF Foundation offers a wide range of giving options. You may make a direct

donation to the UCF Fund; plan one of several types of deferred or estate gifts; or establish a named endowment to benefit UCF in perpetuity. All gifts can be designated to support the college, program or initiative of your choice. Types of Gifts The foundation welcomes gifts made via cash, check or credit card; stocks; real estate;

goods or services such as lab equipment or transportation; and other means. Pledge gifts may be paid over up to five years. All gifts may be designated in honor or memory of a family member, friend or mentor. Next Steps To make a gift online or learn more about giving opportunities, visit UCFFoundation.org.

To make a gift by phone, call 407.882.1220. Check gifts, payable to UCF Foundation, Inc., may be mailed to the foundation with the intended area of support noted on the memo line.

FINANCIALS

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Amount

% of Giving

CASH

$ 8,453,052

22%

G I F T- I N - K I N D

$ 1,666,846

4.5%

OT H E R

$ 1,923,500

5%

PLANNED

$ 8,234,847

21%

PLEDGE

$ 18,313,724

47%

S TO C K / P R O P E R T Y

$

181,264

0.5%

T O TA L

$38,773,233

100%

Highlights

A complete set of statements, schedules and footnotes, including the auditor’s opinion, is available from the UCF Foundation, Inc.

ALUMNI

26%

C O R P O R AT I O N

18%

D O N O R A DV I S E D F U N D S

0.4%

E M P L OY E E

2%

E S TAT E O R T R U S T

11%

F O U N D AT I O N S

20%

FRIENDS

17%

O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

3.5%

PA R E N T S

1.5%

S TAT E O F F L O R I D A

0.5%

GIVING BY CONSTITUENCY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014

M AT C H I N G G I F T S STUDENTS

0.1%


E N D OW M E N T AC T I V I T Y Net cash flow includes contributions to endowments and spending distributions. Appreciation includes net investment activity and all fees. Ending market value includes internally endowed funds of $1,877,722 (FY2014).*

B E G I N N I N G M A R K E T VA L U E N E T C AS H F LOW A P P R E C I AT I O N E N D I N G M A R K E T VA L U E

E N D OW M E N T P O O L I N V E ST M E N T

2014 Financial D I ST R I B U T I O N O F E N D OW M E N T F U N DS

* The audited financial statements reflect the ending market value of true endowments (excluding quasi-endowments) and end-of-the-year fees, reflected by the pool in the following quarter.

FINANCIALS

26


Fiscal Year • 6/30/2014

RETURN

Three Years • 6/30/2014

Five Years • 6/30/2014

$ 138,560,878

$ 126,164,948

$ 92,690,767

$

$

$ (9,826,360)

(7,114,369)

(8,315,210)

$ 23,717,954

$ 37,314,725

$ 72,300,056

$ 155,164,463

$ 155,164,463

$ 155,164,463

17.88%

9.36%

12.55%

Highlights

For more information on the UCF Foundation’s endowment, visit UCFFoundation.org. Amount

% Asset

Accounts

AC A D E M I C S

$ 50,229,397

32%

72

A L U M N I R E L AT I O N S

$

118,799

1%

2

CHAIR

$ 49,718,386

32%

35

GENERAL

$

2,014,815

1%

16

PROFESSORSHIP

$

8,055,058

5%

29

RESEARCH

$

2,410,848

2%

6

SCHOLARSHIP

$

42,617,160

27%

345

T O TA L

$ 155,164,463

100%

505

UNIVERSITY SUPPORT


Impact,


The degree in biomedical sciences Kevin Choy earned in Spring 2014 marked one more milestone on his long path toward becoming a physician — something he has dreamed of since his childhood in Malaysia. But even though the hard work and natural ability were all his, Kevin did have a little help along the way, as do many other UCF students. That help came in the form of scholarships that made it easier for Kevin to afford tuition, books and living expenses, allowing him to get the most out of his courses and the university experience.

Personified Emblematic of the thousands of students helped by private giving, Kevin Choy, ’14, is on his way — thanks in part to alumni and friends like you.

Funded in part by donations from UCF’s valued alumni and friends, scholarships like the ones Kevin received can quite literally make the difference between graduating and giving up. Less than twothirds of Americans who start college go on to graduate, and many of those who drop out do so simply because they can’t afford to keep going. But the impact of scholarships extends well beyond the individual students who receive them. By helping increase the number of promising students who enter and finish college, you help make our region, our state, our country and our world better places, since higher college graduation rates translate to lower unemployment, a stronger economy, better health, and stronger families and communities. Now enrolled in medical school, Kevin personifies the powerful ripple effect giving can create. A firstgeneration college student, he served at UCF as a mentor and role model not only to his younger brother, but also to others facing the unique challenges of being the first in their family to attend college.

To learn more about how you can support UCF and its students, please visit UCFFoundation.org or contact us directly at: UCF Foundation, Inc. 12424 Research Parkway, Suite 250 Orlando, Florida 32826 407.882.1220 foundation@ucf.edu

To the thousands of donors who have chosen this year to step up and make a difference for this university and its students, we offer our deep and sincere gratitude. Whether with a gift of $5 or $5 million, your generosity has impacted lives in a real and important way. Thank you.


“Through partnerships, we can transform the impossible into the inevitable.” –UCF President John C. Hitt

The UCF Foundation encourages, stewards and celebrates charitable contributions from alumni and friends to support the University of Central Florida. U C F F O U N D AT I O N , I N C . 12424 Research Parkway, Suite 250 | Orlando, Florida 32826-3208 | 407.882.1220 | UCFFoundation.org UCF Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

UCF Foundation, Inc. Annual Report 2014  

The annual report of the UCF Foundation, Inc.

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