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UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL MISSOURI MAGAZINE

THE GIRL WITH A LOUD

BARK

Since riding her first jet ski before the age of one, UCM student Anna Glennon has raced more than 70 times, captured national titles and earned international ranking.


CONTENTS Your UCM Magazine EDUCATIONA L ADVERTISIN G AWARDS has won a national honor, a silver in the 30th Annual Educational Advertising Awards, in competition against the largest universities in the United States. Stay in touch with us at ucmmagazine@ucmo.edu or 660-543-8000. 30 TH ANNUAL

SI

COVE R STORY

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THE GIRL WITH A LOUD BARK Since riding her first jet ski before the age of one, UCM student Anna Glennon has raced more than 70 times, captured national titles and earned international ranking. To succeed in this competitive men’s sport, she follows a simple philosophy: “Some succeed because they are destined to, but most succeed because they are determined to. Racing against the big tough guys is always fun, and beating them is even better.”

FE AT URE S

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CAMPUS CURRENTS

10 PHILANTHROPY 18 CENTRAL YESTERDAY 21 INTERACTIONS 22

CLASS NOTES

23 AWARDS & HONORS 24 IN MEMORIAM

A NEW KIND OF SUPERHERO In an age and place where technology plays a monumental role, Melissa Tebbenkamp may appear to have extraordinary powers to those who continually rely on her.

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S ECT I O N S

A STORY OF TRAVEL, HEROES & VILLAINS Living the dream for Paul Martin is hopping a daily train to the Library of Congress in search of narratives of people long past. He is, in fact, living most every writer’s dream.

FIND US ONLINE AT UCMO.EDU/UCMMAGAZINE

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ER A WARD


P R ES I D ENT ’S M ES S AG E

Progress Aimed at Student Success

MAGAZINE Vol . 14 , No. 3 EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Dalene Abner ’09 ASSISTANT EDITOR

Chelsey Buseck ‘13 DESIGNER

Julie Babcock PHOTOGRAPHERS

Bryan Tebbenkamp ’03 Andrew Mather ‘12

Published by the UCM Alumni Association and UCM Foundation. © 2015 by University of Central Missouri. All rights reserved. Find us online: ucmo.edu/ucmmagazine Contact the editor at ucmmagazine@ucmo.edu or 660-543-4545. Submit your address updates online to ucmo.edu/mynewaddress, by email to alumni@ucmo.edu or telephone, 660-543-8000 or toll-free, 1-866-752-7257. UCM Magazine (USPS 019-888) is published quarterly by the University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO 64093. Printed by Lane Press, 87 Meadowland Drive, South Burlington, VT 05403. Periodicals postage paid at Warrensburg, MO, and additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to UCM

Magazine, Smiser Alumni Center, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO 64093. To view the University of Central Missouri’s Nondiscrimination/Equal Opportunity Statement, visit ucmo.edu/nondiscrimination.

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he University of Central Missouri’s focused commitment on student success is exemplified in actions by the Board of Governors that promote the Learning to a Greater Degree strategic positioning platform. UCM’s dedication to engaged learning, futurefocused academics, a culture of service and a worldly perspective has led to record enrollments and significant progress, providing students with increased reasons to “Choose Red.” One example is the new student housing and retail project, The Crossing – South at Holden, which opens this fall, helping to fulfill UCM’s commitment to a round-the-clock learning and living environment that promotes student success. Student success is at the core of initiatives such as the Missouri Innovation Campus, which helps reduce students’ college debt and accelerates the time it takes to complete a degree. It is also vital to developing the Strategic Resource Allocation Initiative, which will provide new tools to help our institution better align financial resources with strategic goals aimed at helping students succeed. In this issue of “UCM Magazine,” you will see examples of students and alumni who are succeeding both in their education and life pursuits. On the cover, for example, is freshman Anna Glennon, fourth in the world of jet skiing. Also featured are Paul Martin, author and former executive editor of “National Geographic Traveler,” and Outstanding Recent Alumna Melissa Tebbenkamp, just to name a few. We hope these articles will not only inspire you but also provide more reasons to celebrate UCM and its long-standing commitment to students’ success. Joining you in service,

Chuck Ambrose PR ESI DE N T

University of Central Missouri Magazine

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C AM P US C UR R E NT S ER I KA K I NSEY

STUDENT FO CUS

Success Stories Emerge with TRIO Programs National TRIO Day, celebrating 50 years of federally funded programs that help students to succeed in college and life, was observed in February. Student Support Services is one of two TRIO programs at UCM and one of seven nationally providing direct services to disadvantaged students, according to Mary Alice Lyon, TRIO director and 1971 alumna. A member of the U.S. Marine Corps, John Morgan is a 2004 UCM graduate who said he initially struggled in college and was behind his peers academically. “I REALLY DON’T KNOW WHAT WOULD HAVE COME OF ME IF THIS PROGRAM NEVER EXISTED.”

He received help from the SSS program, graduated and became a military intelligence officer. He since has traveled the world, briefed generals and met several American dignitaries, including Hillary Clinton, John McCain and Donald Rumsfeld. Morgan was one of several students whose successes were featured in a 50th anniversary fact sheet created by the U.S. Department of Education. “These experiences contributed significantly to what the TRIO program provided me,” he said. “I really don’t know what would have come of me if this program never existed.”

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Jennies Crowned National Champions

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he Central Missouri Jennies track and field team is a national champion for the first time in its history. The Jennies were ranked No. 1 in the first regular season poll by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Association and for all seven weeks of the season fell no lower than second in the rankings. UCM justified those rankings as they had competitors in 11 different events. Ten were ranked in the top 10 of their events, tied for the most of any team, going into the national meet held recently in Birmingham, AL. Though they were in the top five for most of the meet, the Jennies didn’t take over the lead until one event remained. Trailing by five points with two events to go, Erika Kinsey and Madison Smith pushed them over the top as they leapfrogged two teams into first place. In the next to last event, Kinsey won her second individual championship of the day, the high jump, tying the school record and championship meet record at 6’ 2.75.” Smith took fourth in the event, tying her personal best 5’ 9.25.” The 15 points gave the Jennies a 10-point cushion heading into the final event, which proved to be more than enough to win the championship.   “It was a special day. Something I’ll remember for a long time,” said co-head coach Kip Janvrin. “It was crazy toward the end. I was hoping we’d have a chance to medal when all of a sudden Erika and Madison were jumping really well. Erika moved from fourth place up to first in the triple

jump on one of her final attempts. For Madison, to come back and place fourth in the high jump after finishing third in the pentathlon was really special. So in a matter of about five minutes, I went from hoping to finish with a medal to winning the whole thing.”

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The Jennies totaled 47 points, besting secondplace Hillsdale by 7 as well as 10 points over New Mexico Highlands and Ashland, tied for third. For Kinsey, it was a day she’ll never forget. When it was all said and done, she walked away with two individual championships and three All-American awards. Of the team’s 47 points, Kinsey scored 25 of them. In addition to her win in the high jump, Kinsey was also crowned a national champion in the triple jump. She again tied her personal best in the event, jumping 42’ 5.25.” Her championship weekend began with her first All-American honor in the long jump when she took fourth place jumping 19’ 10.25.” Kinsey wasn’t the only multiple-event AllAmerican. Smith won her first earlier in the day, taking third in the pentathlon. She scored 3,888 points, a new personal best and third best, all-time at UCM. The senior is now a three-time All-American in the event.   Coach Janvrin said it was more than just the performances of the athletes that led to the title. “We had a lot of fans there. We were making a lot of noise. We owned the building and the energy our fans provided helped push and motivate our athletes.”

Though they were in the top five for most of the meet, the Jennies didn’t take over the lead until one event remained.


CAM P US CUR R ENT S

“ The thousands of men and women who have gone out from this institution as teachers of Missouri, bear out this statement, that this institution has lived up to its high ideal and accomplished a work not accomplished by many.”

2:23:48

— PRESIDENT WILLIAM HAWKINS AFTER THE FIRE OF 1915. READ ABOUT IT IN CENTRAL YESTERDAY.

RA N K E D FOR A FFO RDABI LI TY

AN I CO N O F E D U CAT I O N

A CH E E R FO R L I BRA RI A N S

Two Honors for Accounting Program

Herman Credits Collaborative Work, Dedication

Antrim Recognized With Special Service Award

With honors for its master of arts degree and Professor Jo Lynne Koehn, the UCM accounting program added new awards to its portfolio this spring. First, Koehn, the BKD Distinguished Professor of Accounting, received the Impact Award from the Missouri Society of CPAs, naming her Missouri’s Accounting Educator of the Year. She was recognized as a frequent and nationally published accounting researcher who has sought additional training required to bridge online and classroom learning. The next honor came from the Accounting Degree Review, an online independent and objective resource for current and prospective accounting and finance students. It ranked UCM third on a list of 30 Most Affordable Residential Master’s Programs in Accounting for 2015. “UCM demonstrated a commitment to keeping education costs down by not increasing tuition and fees in the last two school years,” the review noted.

Richard Herman, chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance, has been named one of nine “Icons of Education” in Kansas and Missouri by “Ingram’s” magazine. “It’s certainly an honor to be included with other such outstanding educators,” Herman said, crediting his success to the work and dedication of a generation of students, faculty and administrators. Herman joined UCM in 1987, becoming department chair in 2001. He has received UCM’s Byler Award, the university’s highest faculty recognition, and the Kennedy Center Gold Medallion. During his tenure, UCM students have consistently earned recognition at regional and national levels in the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival.

Patricia Antrim, chair of the Department of Education Leadership and Human Development and coordinator of the Library Science and Information Services program, will receive the Special Service Award from the Missouri Association of School Librarians in April. Antrim joined the UCM faculty in 1995 as a librarian and began teaching graduate courses in librarianship in 2002. During her tenure at UCM, she co-wrote a 2011 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant for $843,000 to cover tuition and fees for two cohorts of school librarians pursuing a master’s degree in library and information services from UCM. Called the Preparing PRAXIS II Certified Librarians Program, the grant resulted in graduate degrees for 39 practicing school librarians.

MO’S NEW OUTFIT

MO CLASSIC WON! THANKS TO A NEW DESIGN AND CUSTOM-TAILORING BY UCM FASHION AND APPAREL MERCHANDISING STUDENTS, MO IS READY TO STEP OUT. SEE THE INSIDE BACK COVER TO TRAVEL WITH FLAT MO.

For a first marathon, Army Spec. Laban Sialo ’13 showed guts and speed, finishing second among the 30,000 registered runners in the 2014 Marine Corps Marathon and earning mention in “The Washington Post.”

177 ATTENDANCE AT THE

FALL CAREER EXPO SET A RECORD, WITH 177 EMPLOYERS EVALUATING THE TALENT AND KNOWLEDGE OF UCM’S CAREER-SEEKING STUDENTS.

If we want to be dreamers, we must encourage and empower each other.

We have to believe that all things are possible. My mom is a dreamer. I couldn’t have had a better coach in life than my mom.

Lucas Boyce ’03 FREEDOM SCHOLARSHIP DINNER KEYNOTE SPEAKER

University of Central Missouri Magazine

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THE GIRL WITH A LOUD

BARK

B ELOW:

Anna Glennon racing her women’s limited water ski, 777.

WEIGHING IN AROUND 90 POUNDS AND STANDING 5 FEET 2 INCHES WORLDRANKED ATHLETE AND UCM FRESHMAN ANNA GLENNON COMPENSATES FOR HER SIZE WITH FIERCE COMPETITION. 4

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he pain and temporary blindness of water hitting your face at 55 miles per hour can be as excruciating as multiple needles pricking you at once. For University of Central Missouri student, Anna Glennon, it’s just another day. Making her way to the starting line of the buoyed rigged course, her stand-up water ski pulls hard against the rogue ocean waves reiterating the mental and physical preparation it has taken her to get to this moment. As she mounts the ski, she relaxes briefly. The feeling of calmness before a storm settles her mind as she waits for a familiar surge of adrenaline. She thinks about the multiple injuries she could endure in the coming moments. Mind over matter, she reflects on the love and support waiting for her at the finish line as she cranks her machine forward at the sound of the starting gun. The only American to place in the top five at the 2014 Novice Women Ski Division of the World Finals, Glennon is redefining what it means to be a dedicated athlete in the competitive world of water sports.

PHOTO ABOVE BY JULIANNE WILSON

BY CHELSEY BUSECK


STATS NAM E:

Anna Glennon AG E:

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JERSEY NUMBER:

H EI G H T :

777

5 ft 2 in LOCAT I ON :

Overland Park, Kansas C OM PET I T I ON S:

Women’s Ski Limited Men’s Ski Open Vintage Ski

2013 US Pro Am Women’s Ski National Champion US Pro Am Women’s Ski National Tour Points Champion Midwest Region Novice Ski Stock Champion Midwest Region Vintage Ski Open Champion 9th in the World Novice Women’s Ski 7th in the World Vintage Ski Open

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Men’s Ski Open National Tour Points Vice Champion Women’s Ski Limited Vice Champion

IN THE WORLD: 2014 WOMEN’S SKI LIMITED

Ranked 4th in the World Women’s Ski Limited Ranked 7th in the World Vintage Ski Open Nominated for Women’s Ski Racer of the Year Inducted Rob Flores into the IJSBA Hall of Fame Helped get Vanilla Ice to the World Finals

SKIS:

800 SXR

Led seminar on Social Media and Sponsorship at JR Stars Ride With the Pros Day

FAVORI T E SON G S:

Robot • Trip Lee This Head I Hold • Electric Guest Monster • Skillet

University of Central Missouri Magazine

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spent most of her childhood at the Lake of the Ozarks, learning how to ride water skis – or as she calls them, boats, at a very young age. “Boats, skis, Jet Skis. More affectionately, I call them by their race number.” Her women’s limited water ski is 777 and Jessie, her younger sister’s, is 888. “When I was little I remember crying and dragging my life vest around until someone took me for a ride. I love the water

IN 2012 GLENNON STARTED JET GIRLS RACING, A FACEBOOK PAGE THAT HAS 3,100 FOLLOWERS. PROMOTING THE SPORT WITH PHOTOS AND VIDEOS, THE PAGE IS CONSIDERED A MAIN OUTLET FOR THOSE WHO ENJOY WATERCROSS RACING.

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that much,” said Glennon. The two sisters watched their first water craft competition at the Lake of the Ozarks in 2011. “Jessie and I loved watching the boats so we decided to give it a try the next year,” Glennon said. In 2012 Glennon competed in her first race on the Arkansas River in Wichita, KS, and continued the season, placing 13th in the World Finals at Lake Havasu, AZ. For more than 30 years the Jet Sports Boating Association World Finals has taken place at Lake Havasu, welcoming racers from more than 40 countries and inspiring a culture of love for water sports. “After I placed 13th in 2012, I analyzed my performance and thought about how I could improve. Now I do that after every race,” she explained. In 2013 she was in third place at the World Finals when she was hit by another racer and knocked off her water ski. “I didn’t even know what happened until I got hit. All of a sudden, I was in the water and couldn’t catch my breath,” she said. Glennon didn’t sustain any serious physical injuries, but she ended up placing ninth, taking a toll on her mind. “I told my dad ‘next year I am going to be going so fast no one is going to run over me.’ Fortunately we have such a great team that when things go wrong, people lift us up.” Glennon credits much of her positive attitude about the sport to her sponsors: The Rad Dudes, Commander Industries, Pro Watercraft Racing and Fly Racing. “My sponsors chose me because of my persona, the people I surround myself with and my passion. They don’t care how I place, and that’s the coolest thing about what we are doing.” She also mentioned her biggest sponsor and source of support – her mom and dad. “Ninety-five percent of my success is credited to them, and that’s the honest truth.

L E F T:

Anna Glennon competing in Charleston, WV.

PHOTO BY JULIANNE WILSON

“I like being small, you don’t have to be ripped to win,” Glennon said. “Power isn’t everything.” Glennon’s success and positive mentality resemble an experienced athlete with years of training. Yet, she has only been racing since 2012. “I built my first water ski with my dad when I was 12. Somehow we made a box of parts into a working machine.” A native of Overland Park, KS, Glennon


NEXT YEAR I AM GOING TO BE SO FAST NO ONE IS GOING TO RUN OVER ME

My dad is a master mechanic. When it comes down to it, he is the one who puts the boats together exactly the way they should be,” she said. “But, it’s my dad’s rule that if he is working on our stuff, my sister and I have to be with him.” Because of this, Glennon has a pretty good understanding of how the motors run. “I enjoy that part of racing as well. Being elbow deep in the grease, and learning is a real blast. One of the most important things about racing is understanding what the machine wants and needs. You have to feel that.” After placing ninth in the 2013 World Finals, Glennon went home, took two weeks off and got right back to training for the next year. “To be the best sometimes you have to make a commitment. I admire all of the pros that sustain from [doing] things that could damage their career. It’s not that they don’t want to; it’s that they choose not to. The amount of perseverance it takes to not eat pizza with my family is tough.” A dedicated athlete, Glennon prepares her body for races by eating healthy and exercising. “Riding a stand-up water ski, your knees and back are your suspension and they take most of the impact,” she said. “Strengthening your body and your endurance is important when racing. A large part of me winning is due to racing behind someone who is riding hard because once they get tired and slow down, I take it.” An accomplished athlete, Glennon says there is one thing no racer can prepare for. “Luck. You could be the best racer in the world but just have bad luck.” When asked about the most important part of the boat, Glennon responded, “A lot of people would say power, but that’s not it at all. How you handle your boat is most important. You can have the fastest boat in the world, but if you can’t ride it, then it’s not worth anything.” Before each race, Glennon follows a routine. She listens to rock music, stretches and drinks at least two cans of pineapple coconut water.

AB OV E:

Anna Glennon posing with younger sister, Jessie, at Panama City, FL. Anna won second place in Amateur Ski Open and Jessie won first place in Junior Ski. LEF T :

Anna Glennon posing with her dad, John, in the Technical Inspection tent at the World Finals.

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NOTEWORTHY Along with social media promotion, Glennon keeps busy being a full-time digital media production student at UCM and working for the “Watercraft Journal.” A writer and photographer, she has interviewed several noteworthy riders including the famous rapper, actor and television host, Vanilla Ice. “Interviewing Vanilla Ice was one of the coolest things I’ve gotten to do! I had about a two-hour long chat with him and now he calls my sister and I his ‘adopted nieces,’ which is about the coolest thing ever.”

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“I don’t really like to talk to anyone besides my dad before a race. I always tear up when I talk to my mom, so I try to avoid her.” According to Glennon, racing is a huge mental fight and once you give up, you’re done. To prepare, Glennon and her dad began a new trend on the starting line. “When I have pent up fire and frustration, I channel it toward the boat. For some reason, it will go faster, push harder and race more aggressively. That’s where the barking comes in.” While Glennon barks like a dog to get pumped, she claims her dad sounds more like a gorilla. “It makes the other girls uncomfortable, but for me, it’s better to be crazy than calm and slow.” Glennon and her dad also yell and slam their fists. “The best part is seeing other people’s faces watching me.” Before the World Finals, Glennon oozed confidence and determination on the track. She placed fourth in Novice Women Ski.

GROW, AND I WANT TO AS POSSIBLE SO PEOPLE AS MUCH AS I DO.

“Even though I didn’t win, I didn’t feel crushed. I worked my butt off to get there and prove that I was meant to be there. All of us were so thankful that the tension and velocity on the course were gone once the race was over. We all hugged and celebrated because we got to experience the World Finals.” Most athletes compete to win, but not Glennon. “As a racer, I feel like I am obligated to say my main goal is to win, but I think my biggest goal is continuing to be a good role model in the industry. I want this sport to grow, and I want to promote it as positively as possible so people will love it as much as I do. I want to empower ladies and see more of them get into the sport.” Glennon’s attitude continues to make her a role model in the water sports racing world. “There are a lot of haters and negative energy out there. I want to bring attention to the sport and the people who are working hard at it, and maybe not give the attention to the people who are being negative all of the time.” She also has goals as a UCM student, hoping to become a better writer and video producer so she can pursue a professional career in action sports racing. “Victories come on the side. No matter what happens on the track, people are going to remember your integrity and character.” n

WATER DROPS PHOTO BY ©ISTOCK.COM/SOMCHAIJ

I WANT THIS SPORT TO PROMOTE IT AS POSITIVELY WILL LOVE IT


FROM THE NANCE COLLECTION These rare industrial safety posters, produced in the 1960s and 1970s for Aramco in Saudi Arabia, are part of the only such known collection in existence. Housed in the Kirkpatrick Library’s McClure Archives and University Museum, the posters are part of the Nance Collection, the largest known collection of Middle Eastern artifacts in North America and a gift to UCM from its collector, the late Paul Nance. Read more about Mr. Nance in his obituary on page 27.

University University of of Central Central Missouri Missouri Magazine Magazine

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P HILANT H R O P Y

STUDENT FO CUS

Just Do Your Best

Doctors’ Legacy Ensures Future Athletes’ Health

T A random call brought Austin Mogg to the University of Central Missouri. The NAIA and NCAA III All-American wrestler had finished an undergraduate degree at Concordia University in Nebraska and was working for the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality when he received a call from Coach Justin Ensign. “He said he needed some extra help with the lower weight wrestlers,” said Mogg. When he applied for and got a graduate assistantship, was offered the Roger “IF I DIDN’T SUCCEED,

he legacies of two prominent Warrensburg physicians who built the foundation for healthy student athletes at the University of Central Missouri were recognized recently with the naming of the Maxson-Folkner Athletic Medicine Center at the university’s Audrey J. Walton Stadium. The late Dr. T. Reed Maxson served as team physician from 1946-1991. He recruited the late Dr. Al Folkner, first to assist him, then to succeed him. Folkner was team physician from 1991-94. At a special appreciation event, Virginia Maxson, wife of T. Reed Maxson, and Ann Folkner Angers, daughter of Al Folkner, along with family members and friends, were given a tour of the $6 million expansion of Walton Stadium, including the Maxson-Folkner Athletic Medicine Center. The group also toured the new lobby, game-day room, athletic training room, laundry facilities, and strength and conditioning area. Gifts from both families to the UCM Foundation helped fund the athletic medicine center and the stadium renovation. The Mules for Life Campaign also generated gifts from several former Mule football players, coaches, families, friends and fans for furnishing the locker room. The UCM Board of Governors approved the athletic medicine center’s naming earlier in 2014.

I WOULD KNOW I TRIED.”

Denker Scholarship, and received a green light from his boss to pursue a master’s degree, he took off for Warrensburg. After graduating high school, he notes his dad discouraged him from college. “That day is when I decided that was what I would do. I would give it my best and if I didn’t succeed, I would know I tried.” Several years later Mogg not only has an undergraduate degree but is close to completing his master’s. And when he’s done? The avid fisherman wants to work in renewable energy, developing sustainable sources that protect streams.

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VIRGINIA MAXSON, WIFE OF THE LATE DR. MAXSON, AND ANN ANGERS, DAUGHTER OF THE LATE DR. FOLKNER, RECENTLY TOURED THE MAXSON-FOLKNER ATHLETIC CENTER WITH PRESIDENT CHUCK AMBROSE, LEFT, AND ATHLETIC DIRECTOR JERRY HUGHES, RIGHT.

“We’re here to say thank you to the families of Dr. Maxson and Dr. Folkner,” said UCM President Charles Ambrose. “When something happens to one of our athletes, we know we can continue to provide the quality of care that honors the legacies of these two men.

Vol. 14, No. 3 | ucmo.edu/ucmmagazine

TEAM PHYSICIANS HONORED WERE REED MAXSON, LEFT, AND AL FOLKNER, ABOVE.

“There are many reasons for students to engage in a university community,” Ambrose added, “and among them is the knowledge that they are part of a caring community. The Board of Governors at UCM has made the commitment to put students first, and this gift is important to our ability to keep our students well and happy.” Maxson came to Warrensburg in 1946, volunteering his time and effort as UCM’s team physician. He seldom missed a game, both home and away, and for nearly 20 years he furnished all of the supplies for athletic injuries and treated athletes with sports injuries at no cost to the university. At the same time, he supported the university at large in a variety of ways. He was the first recipient of the UCM Distinguished Service Award, and in 1993 he was named to the UCM Athletic Hall of Fame, as well as the Sports Medicine Hall of Fame in Columbia. Folkner attended UCM on a football scholarship, majoring in physical education and biology. He continued his education at the University of Kansas School of Medicine and then joined Maxson, his mentor and lifelong friend, in practice in Warrensburg. In addition to serving as team physician and treating many of UCM’s football players at no cost, Folkner was appointed to the university’s Board of Governors in 1982, serving as president from 1986 to 1988. He was honored with the UCM Distinguished Alumni Award in 1991 and was inducted into the UCM Athletic Hall of Fame in 2008. “UCM’s athletes were near and dear to my father’s heart,” Angers said. “He loved attending games as a reprieve from the demands of his practice. This gift was in support of my father’s legacy here at UCM, which was so much a part of his personal and professional life.”


P HI LANT HR OP Y

“Our mother wanted to take the college courses necessary to teach. She had the brains but not the money so she took correspondence courses and some summer classes until she completed the two-year course. We established this scholarship in her name to make it easier for other aspiring teachers.”

Have You Made Plans for Your Future?

— CHILDREN OF HELEN MONROE BELL A GE N E ROUS L EGACY

A NEW RECORD

N E WS T H AT YO U CA N U S E

Estate Gift Creates Police Academy Scholarship

$1.18 Million Approved for Student Support

A Smart Move After Taxes and Before Vacation

The generosity of a University of Central Missouri alumnus will provide new opportunities for Missouri law enforcement personnel to attend the Central Missouri Police Academy located on campus. A bequest from the estate of the late Dama Cooper has established the Dama Cooper Police Academy Scholarship, providing a limited number of $500 to $1,000 scholarships for each academy class session. A native of Atchison, KS, Cooper served in the U.S. Army from 1960 to 1965 and attended UCM, studying criminal justice. He began his law enforcement career with the Warrensburg Police Department, later joining the Kansas City, MO, Police Department, where he served until his retirement.

Recognizing the financial commitment that a college degree requires, the UCM Foundation approved a historic amount of support for students and academic programs for fiscal year 2016. The Foundation Board of Directors authorized a payout of $1.185 million from its endowments, a 32 percent increase over FY15. The increased payout rate follows action by the UCM Board of Governors to keep tuition increases at a minimum. For the 2015-2016 academic year, they approved a 0.8 percent academic fee increase, lower than the Consumer Price Index and less than the 1.8 percent average increase in fees for the past five years.

You’ve filed your taxes and hopefully, received a refund that will finance a summer vacation. Before you take off for that trip, though, you may want to consider reviewing or creating a will. The time is perfect. Many people want to make a gift to UCM but are uncertain in today’s economy. A charitable bequest may be the answer. It’s a great way to hold on to assets, income or other property while knowing it will benefit UCM in the future. Visit our web site at ucmo. edu/plannedgiving for more information or contact Joy Mistele, our planned giving officer, about the many ways you could benefit UCM with your estate plans.

55%

IN FISCAL YEAR 2014, ALUMNI PROVIDED 55% OF OUR $5.3 MILLION IN TOTAL GIFTS. It’s easy to give; just go to ucmo.edu/giveonline

14 2% I NCREAS E

UCM Foundation Five-Year Payout History

If you are thinking about creating or updating a will or trust, we can help. If you are considering ways to save on taxes, we can help. If you are interested in a charitable bequest, we can help. There are many ways you can make a gift to further our important work and benefit UCM students.

Are You Looking for Secure, Future Income? When you make a gift of cash or appreciated property for a charitable gift annuity, we will pay you fixed payments for life (with rates based on your age). You will receive a charitable deduction for making the gift and a portion of your payments could be tax-free!

Thinking about Selling Your Business? Do you know you can minimize taxes, maximize a gift to UCM and take home more money from the sale of your business?

$1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0

FY 12 $490,595

FY 13 $831,614

FY 14 $886,249

FY 15 $898,762

FY 16 $1,185,000

This graph shows the five-year progression of the UCM Foundation’s endowment payout rate, representing an overall 142 percent increase in support of UCM’s academic programs, scholarships, awards and professorships.

Contact Joy Mistele, UCM Foundation, about any of these giving opportunities at 660-543-8000.

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F E ATUR E

“ UCM GAVE ME THE CONFIDENCE AND STRENGTH TO EXCEL AS ONE OF THE YOUNGEST FEMALE ADMINISTRATORS IN THE DEVELOPING FIELD OF EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY.”

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FEAT UR E

A NEW KIND OF

SUPERHERO BY JE FF MUR P H Y

I

n an age and place where technology death forced me to consider my priorities. I plays a monumental role, Melissa decided that I wanted to be close to home and Tebbenkamp may appear to have in a career that would allow me to continue extraordinary powers to those who to focus on what means most, family. Even continually rely on her. though I enjoyed debate and policy, education “You probably cannot tell from was where I belonged. I chose UCM.” looking at me, but I am a superhero,” While working at Raytown,Tebbenkamp said the University of Central Missouri’s says she has learned a lot about project Outstanding Recent Alumni Award management and leadership. Through her recipient at the fall 2014 undergraduate work, she also is building a national reputation commencement. “You cannot see my cape, as a leader in her field. She became one of and I’m not wearing a mask, but I have the first 46 individuals in the nation and super powers and so do you. one of only three in Missouri to become “My super power is that a certified education WHEN HER SISTER DIED I can work with technicians technology leader by the FROM A CAR ACCIDENT, to restore my district’s Consortium for School fiber network that was just Networking. With this TEBBENKAMP CHANGED shredded by a neighborhood HER COLLEGE PLANS elite designation, she lawnmower while also is regarded among FROM HARVARD TO THE facilitating technology training her peers as someone UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL for 100 of our district’s new who “demonstrates MISSOURI, CHOOSING teachers,” she added. “I am the knowledge and EDUCATION AS A CAREER skills needed to define often called upon to swoop to the rescue and make the vision for and OVER LAW. education miracles happen.” successfully build 21st Tebbenkamp has become accustomed to century learning environments.” saving the day as director of instructional Under Tebbenkamp’s leadership, technology at Raytown Quality Schools, Raytown Quality Schools is frequently where she has served since 2006. Having cited as a reference model district for many graduated from UCM with a bachelor’s technologies, practices and procedures. She degree in elementary education in 2001 and has become a key player and contributor a master’s degree in educational technology to state and national organizations and in 2003, she currently supervises two assistant publications focused on school technology. directors and 27 technicians, while serving 22 Most recently, she was elected to the facilities, 1,400 staff and 8,800 students. CoSN national board of directors, having Her decision to attend UCM came about already benefitted from experience as a through tragic circumstances. founding member and past chair of CoSN’s “My senior year of high school I had state chapter, the Missouri Education a decision to make, apply to Harvard Technology Leaders Board. She also served and become a lawyer or apply to the best as a moderator and creator of Missouri’s education college and become a teacher. A Educational Technology Professional tragic car accident resulting in my sister’s Learning Community.

Tebbenkamp praises her outstanding colleagues, noting, “I’m proud of my staff and how much they have grown. They are incredibly highly skilled, and they just wow me every day with the way they work together and solve problems.” Once considering a law career, Tebbenkamp says she is grateful for the direction her career has taken. In the everchanging world of technology, this includes preparing students for careers that do not exist today. “If you have found your passion, being a superhero is easy for you,” she said. “I found my passion in educational technology and have a sense of satisfaction when I see the impact of my work in the classroom.” n

HONORED DURING FALL COMMENCEMENT Two additional people were honored during fall commencement ceremonies: Air Force Veteran Raynetta Godfrey with the Mike Carter Award for Exceptional Service and Professor Emeritus of Psychology Joseph Ryan with the Distinguished Service Award.

RAY NETTA G O D F R EY

J OS EP H RYA N

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TAJ MAHAL PHOTO BY ©ISTOCK.COM/ADAMKAZ, PAPER CLIP ON PAPER ©ISTOCK.COM/PICSFIVE

artin has translated his love of research, writing and narrative into a 30-year career at various publications of the National Geographic Society. Since retiring in 2009, he writes books simply about people who interest him. He’s published one book about rather obscure but fascinating villains he met in his research. He also completed a book on heroes. Not the landing on the moon type of hero but the hero who helped change the path of history in a positive way, then quickly disappeared from the public consciousness. “I fell into a bed of roses,” Martin said of his career that began with a serendipitous trip from Columbia some 30 years ago to interview for a position at National Geographic in Washington. “I didn’t plan that far ahead. I just got interested in things and that moved me from one thing after another.” While so many stories must have a beginning, Martin’s probably began in Clinton, MO, where his family lived. His personal kindness, openness and heartfelt love of life reflect what could be considered

small-town conditioning. Yet in some ways, his story also seems to begin at Central Missouri State College, where he was inspired to blossom and grow by faculty who encouraged his writing. “So many of today’s youth are pushed into career decisions,” Martin said. “I had no idea what I wanted to do. I didn’t declare my major until my sophomore year. I just drifted

along. Then I took some literature classes and I was suddenly making As without any effort at all. I laughed so much. I was getting college credit for reading novels!” Once he committed to being an English major, Martin earned straight As. English faculty member Ronald McReynolds, who was also a poet and currently a long-time Warrensburg resident, inspired Martin to do some writing of his own. Martin wrote a few poems that were good enough to be published in CMSC’s publication, “Cemost ’66.” He won second runner-up for his poem titled “To Play Again.” Martin also decided to minor in journalism. “There were just a few courses in journalism that were offered in the English department,” he said. “The head of the journalism sequence was Evelyn Runyan, who had been a newspaper woman for a long time. She was the only instructor in journalism. I took her classes and really enjoyed them. I didn’t know what I would do with an English degree and I knew I would need a master’s to teach, so I thought journalism was a good addition.” Runyan, he said, was stern and a chain smoker. She was about five feet tall and gray haired. “She would have scared you,” he laughed. Yet he credits her with refining his writing and research. Within a few weeks after his graduation in 1967, Martin received his draft notice that, he said, helped him to decide what to do. He joined the U.S. Navy. With his background in journalism, he was tapped

For Paul Martin’s travels and books come images such as Kansas Senator James Lane, a villain whose vicious border war attacks unleashed the James-Younger gang; the Taj Mahal in India; and Inez Boissevain, whom Martin labeled “America’s Joan of Arc.” B OT TOM FR OM LEFT: Martin called Civil War doctor Jonathan Letterman “Father of Battlefield Medicine” and “Healer of the Fallen,” talked about counterfeiter Emerich Juettner who fooled the Secret Service for 20 years, and Hetty Green, a miserly multi-millionaire he named the “Witch of Wall Street.” Historic images are courtesy of the Library of Congress. TOP FROM LE FT:

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to write for the “Navy Times.” That work turned into contributions to the “All Hands” magazine, “Stars & Stripes” and the “Saigon Post.” He spent a year in Vietnam, returning

to Missouri in 1971. He enrolled in the University of Missouri’s graduate program in journalism. “That opened some doors for me,” he said. He wrote for a monthly boating magazine called “Outdoors,” then landed a position as a managing editor of a monthly medical journal in Kansas City titled “Continuing Education for the Family Physician.” After five and a half years, the journal was sold and its headquarters moved to New York. Martin began job hunting. He had a connection with a person at National Geographic and so made a call. He secured an interview and landed a job. “The biggest coincidence, or serendipity, was while I was at MU,” Martin said. “I came up one hour short of 36 hours to graduate. I went to a professor named Angus McDougal. I told him I needed one more hour. I signed up for a one-hour class over break and wrote a paper for him. He liked it and gave me an A and told me to try to sell it to a trade magazine.” The story got picked up by “Folio” magazine. A young man who wrote the caption for the story in “Folio” told Martin that if he was ever in Washington, D.C., to give him a call and stop by. So, Martin gave him a call and wound up with a job at National Geographic. While Martin said it was a big step to fly to the interview, he did

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it and the job at the children’s publication, “National Geographic World,” turned out to be a good decision. Signing on in 1979, Martin wrote and edited there for two years, also editing two books targeted at 8 to 13 year olds. “I really wanted to work on adult products, so after two years I asked to transfer,” he said. His boss said yes, and Martin began editing books. That stint lasted eight years until he transferred to “National Geographic Traveler.” “My boss, who was head of the children’s section and the book section and the ‘Traveler’ magazine told me that the ‘Traveler’ was struggling and needed someone to get the magazine planned and scheduled,” Martin said. “‘If you go down there and spend six to nine months, then you can come back to books,’ my boss said. So I went to the ‘Traveler’ and spent 20 years there. After eight years on books, I realized that I liked the magazine better. “It was the pace, constantly something new. I remembered that you spend so much time and intensity on books, that by the time they come out, I didn’t even want to look at them again. Books, I found, didn’t keep my interest as much as a magazine. Every issue

is new. Well, at the ‘Traveler,’ I got to write quite a bit and travel all over the world. I said to the boss, ‘Can I stay?’ And the boss said, ‘Stay if you want to.’” Ironically, books now hold Martin’s interest. A history buff, Martin said he’d always been interested in minor characters who have had some pivotal role in some great events. “So I started collecting those names,” Martin said. “I decided to write a book about these people who had done some amazing things, sort of secret heroes.” Martin said he created a list of 30 people who he thought deserved to be listed in a book of unsung heroes, then contacted faculty at several universities asking for their nominations of top unsung heroes. He received about 36 suggestions, which he culled down to those he included in the book, “Secret Heroes: Everyday Americans Who Shaped Our World.” One of his unsung heroes is Hercules Mulligan, an Irishman who became a New York tailor in the mid-1700s. With revolution percolating around the colonies, Mulligan became a member of the Sons of Liberty and later came to be friends with a young Alexander Hamilton, then a supporter of the Crown. During long discussions in the evenings, Hamilton came to see Mulligan’s position and joined the Sons of Liberty. Hamilton later became an aide to General George Washington and passed along information Mulligan culled from

Martin’s travel photo of Vietnam contrasts with two of his heroes: Carl Akeley, a museum taxidermist he called “The Intrepid Leopard Wrestler” and Grace Abbott, “Defender of the Defenseless” who pioneered work in immigrant protection and child labor laws. B ELOW:


©ISTOCK.COM/THE_LIGHT_PAINTER VIETNAM

In his book, “Secret Heroes,” Martin introduces a case of saints, visionaries and rogues. These 30 inspiring unsung Americans range from Hercules Mulligan, a tailor who twice saved George Washington’s life, to sisters whose notoriety began spiritualism, communicating with the dead. Read about all of Martin’s heroes.

his British clients. That information saved Washington’s life twice. Today, Mulligan is buried near Hamilton, the more famous founder and first secretary of the Treasury. In his search for heroes, Martin found villains as well. So he decided to do a similar book about some bad guys. “I found the experience writing about villains more fun,” Martin said. “With the heroes, you have to be more respectful because they deserve it. But the bad guys, I could really poke fun at these characters.” His favorite character in his book titled “Villains, Scoundrels, and Rogues” is Mister 880. Well, that’s the title of a film that was made about this fellow, Edward Mueller. His real name was Emerich Juettner. The film came out in 1950 starring Burt Lancaster and Dorothy McGuire. “Here’s this Austrian immigrant who came to the U.S. as a teen to New York City,” Martin said. “He worked in a picture frame shop and studied photo engraving. He ended up taking a picture of a onedollar bill and started counterfeiting these dollars. He operated for years passing these bills. They were so amateur. He misspelled George Washington’s name, for example

In his second book, “Villains, Scoundrels, and Rogues,” Martin profiles memorable American rogues, ranging from a rabid, homicidal judge who presided over the Salem Witch Trials to the most outrageous television and Internet huckster ever. Read about all of Martin’s villains.

[Wahsington]. He would go to a crowded business and buy a $.05 object and get $.95 back. Never visited the same place twice and never took advantage of people. He ‘cashed’ in just enough to keep himself and his dog from starving.” Juettner was finally caught when his apartment caught fire, and his documents were scooped out to the ground below. After 20 years, the Secret Service finally found their man. Over those 20 years, Juettner had cashed in almost $5,000. “He was just an old doddering man,” Martin said. “He spent only a month in jail. Just the quirkiness and oddity. You have to be respectful of the heroes, but the villains were different.” Martin returns to Warrensburg every couple of years to visit his sister in Clinton. Martin and his wife of 47 years (high school sweethearts) still live in the same house they bought in 1979. They have a son working toward a degree at Virginia Tech. Martin said the last time he visited Warrensburg, he was amazed that the campus looked so much as it had when he was there. Still clean, well maintained and a comfortable place to be. He said it brought back many memories. Yet he likes where he is these days. And there are more books in the waiting. “I’ve always felt that today we’re obsessed with celebrities and sports and Wall Street moguls,” he said. “I am just more interested in small-time heroes. Maybe it’s my smalltown upbringing. I love to ferret out what these people have done. “It’s a treasure hunt,” he said. “I go down to the Library of Congress, find this wonderful story about this character and find these wonderful tales. It’s like they come to life. That’s what is so much fun.” n

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CE N TRAL Y E S TE RDAY

100 YEARS AGO

BURNING OF THE NORMAL “ OUR BUILDINGS ARE SWEPT AWAY. NOTHING IS LEFT BUT BROKEN WALLS AND DEBRIS BUT WARRENSBURG #2 REMAINS!”

A

ccented by warmer temperatures, college basketball and approaching daylight savings, March 6, 2015, came and went. Unless you were inside James C. Kirkpatrick Library and saw the display put together by the McClure Archives and Museum, you may not have noticed that the day marked a more significant event. It was the 100th anniversary of the Great Fire, the worst natural disaster in UCM history. Most alumni have heard of the fire that burned down Old Main, the science annex and Training School, leaving only Dockery, then a gymnasium, and the powerhouse, since demolished. Forty-five years of official records, student transcripts, faculty research, textbooks, lab equipment, classroom furniture, the library’s 40,000 books, athletic and scholastic awards – all gone. There are other interesting facts. With six inches of snow on the ground, the cold, windy weather froze the nearest fire hydrants. The volunteer firemen taking a shortcut to campus, then on the edge of town, got stuck on the muddy dirt road. Underground tunnels connecting three of the buildings made the fire spread faster.

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Yet the spirit of the school was such, that before the fire was put out that day, then President William Hawkins called together a committee of faculty and community leaders to make sure spring semester would start as planned that Monday. And a basketball game was still played that evening, delayed only an hour to restore electricity. In a speech that day, Hawkins declared, “Our buildings are swept away. Nothing is left but broken walls and debris but Warrensburg No. 2 remains! The spirit of the old school will assert itself and will go on with the great work that it has been carrying so long. What have we to fear? We need but look bravely to the present and forward to the future. Institutions, like people, like men and women, have individuality. There are institutions that serve their purpose with honesty and live for the accomplishment of their ambition by serving the individuals that come to them. I believe that may be said of old Warrensburg No. 2… The thousands of men and women who have gone out from this institution as teachers of Missouri, bear out this statement, that this institution has lived up to its high ideal, and accomplished a work not accomplished by many.”

John Butler, who worked in the powerhouse, reported the fire, which he speculated was caused by faulty wiring. He had often seen the uninsulated electrical wires under Old Main’s beams and rafters arcing during high winds. Butler observed, “I didn’t think we could keep going but the school president, William Hawkins, was determined. He got all the students together downtown that afternoon and told them classes were starting Monday as usual. He also asked for their help and patience and the students pledged it to him. Somehow President Hawkins found a bunch of vacant houses and places like that for classrooms, and I’ll never know where he found desks and chalkboards. Right away, he telegraphed for textbooks to get them as soon as possible. When I came back to work Monday, I could hardly believe my eyes. Classes started right on time in places all over town. Dockery was like a fortress standing in the midst of the rubble.” The loss was estimated at $500,000. With insufficient insurance to rebuild, university leaders rallied immediately to approach the Missouri legislature for funds. They also fought off efforts by Sedalia and Kirksville

to relocate the school in their cities. Fear gripped the town and campus that students would leave and the school would fold. By the end of 1915, though, the campus was virtually all new, including a new president, Eldo Hendricks. Enrollment stood at 700 students strong. And Old Main? It never totally left campus. The cornerstone was salvaged and is part of the base of the right gatepost at what was the north entrance to campus. n


CENT R AL Y ES T ER D AY

1915 The unrelenting flames rolled high, Tumultuously and strong, Eliminating every hope Engendered by the throng… For we realize today, With eagerness profound, That we can lay a greater stone From educated ground. STANZAS FROM THE POEM, “BURNING OF THE NORMAL,” BY STUDENT JAMES H. BLAINE IN 1915

The campus looked like a war zone is how many people described the aftereffects of the worst natural disaster in university history. The Great Fire of 1915 destroyed all but one building, Dockery, but with a miraculous rallying effort over a weekend, classes scheduled to start that Monday did begin.

BEFORE

PRESIDENT WILLIAM HAWKINS

AFTER

The McClure Archives and University Museum provided these historic photos showing the fire’s devastation. The university’s first 45 years were gone, including student records, awards, furnishings, the library’s 40,000 volumes and students’ textbooks. Many of the archives’ photos were donated by family members

of graduates, including ones taken by Viola Agnes West ’24, a gift of her niece, Charlene Ritter, ’56 and by George Woods ’13, a gift of his daughter, Eleanor Drake. The cornerstone of Old Main remains on campus, part of this column north of the Ward Edwards building. University of Central Missouri Magazine

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YOU R UCM

HOW WILL YOU CHOOSE TO ENGAGE? A LUMN I T RAV E L P ROGRAM

If you want to travel the world, how about the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the Baltics or Cuba, coming soon. Mark your dream destinations off your bucket list by signing up for one of our cruises. A LUMN I A DV I S 0 R N E T WOR K

Following in the steps of world renowned institutions, we are making it easy for you to make a difference. In a few easy steps, you can create an online profile, set up your availabilities and connect with students. Be sure also to check out Mules4Hire, an account to post internships and job offers while having online access to students’ résumes. BE I N T HE K N OW

M U L E N AT I ON

Engage, develop and assist in alumni activities near your home and on campus through our Mule Nation network. To date we have launched clubs in Kansas City, St. Louis, Dallas and Houston. Watch for Mule Nation Mid-Mo in 2015.

CONTACT US!

Your news, thoughts and questions are important to us. Please write, telephone or send us an email. News of jobs, births, marriages, honors and more are always welcome. UCM Magazine Smiser Alumni Center Warrensburg, MO 64093 660-543-8000 or 1-866-752-7257

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ON THE WEB:

ucmo.edu/ucmmagazine ucmo.edu/alumni EDITOR:

ucmmagazine@ucmo.edu 660-543-4545 ADDRESS UPDATE:

ucmo.edu/mynewaddress or alumni@ucmo.edu

Keep up with recent news and upcoming events, as well as find all of our social media handles, by visiting the ucmo.edu/alumni “Stay Connected” section. M OST OF A L L , BE SU R E WE HAV E YOUR C UR R E N T EM AI L

Makre sure we have your email to receive event invitations, our monthly eNews and online UCMMagazine. Watch for new online services and our new web site in 2016. L E A R N MOR E A BOU T G E T T I N G I N VOLV E D

For links to all programs and benefits listed, go to ucmo.edu/alumni/benefits.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY DAVID BABCOCK

O

ur UCM alumni are 87,000 strong throughout the world. Empowered, inspired and wired, they have the potential to be a powerful force. Our goal is to make the world “red all over” from the amazing impact our alumni can make when they engage through any of these ways:


I NT ER ACT I ONS

We invite your thoughts and responses about our stories, photos, graphics or any other aspect of our magazine. Let us know about stories you would like to see in future issues. We want our magazine to be your favorite! Just email ucmmagazine@ucmo.edu. These responses came from emails. Beautifully done! Great content. Great layout. Easy to read and navigate on iPad. One issue, the two superb Foundation graphics don’t orient on the iPad. When you turn the device to read horizontally, they flip. - Gary Abram New magazine looks great! - Tom Altvater Could you please list the following class note in your next issue? Chad Blomberg ‘00 is now a partner in the law firm of Lathrop & Gage LLP in Kansas City. His practice focuses on tort litigation and appeals. - Chad Blomberg Interesting, very different from the previous design. Very upscale. Overall a great improvement. Congrats to the team. - Mark Schupp

The article in Vol. 14 No 2 was wonderful. I was fortunate to be a part of that great program, ICTEP, in 1966! The training we received was unmatched by any other. What I learned is with me today and I am grateful to all who conceptualized, planned and taught. Drs. Rietbrock, Marshall and Hudson are heroes in my book. (I am in the picture left on page 25. It was taken at Woodland School.) - Judy Cunningham I certainly can’t say much for your front page. - cawjm379@aol.ccom This is a terrific transformation. I love the story focus and quick, digestible bites of information. - Tim Doke New magazine looks really great! - Jonathan Cleveland

Having served three years in the military and several years in the business world, at the ripe old age of 28, I decided to fulfill my dream of becoming an educator. I started my freshman year at CMSU with a wife and two children and the desire to teach physical education.  I cannot remember who introduced me to the ICTEP program, but the first time I talked to Dr. Jim Hudson, I was sold on it. It was truly a blessing to get invited into this program. Not only was the campus experience rewarding but so was our weekly trip to K.C.  It gave me the opportunity to see and better understand a different way of life. I did my student teaching at Central Jr. High and three different elementary schools. Living part time in an apartment on the corner of Armour and The Paseo in 1968 gave me a chance to see the turmoil of the time first hand and yet get to experience the joy of teaching those young minds a new activity or repeating past learned activities. To this day, at the ripe old age of 76, I still volunteer in a program that attempts to keep truant students out of the juvenile justice system. Thank you, UCM, for teaching me the skills and the understanding I needed to have a very rewarding career.    - Ron Hoduski Please cover changes and innovations on campus. Include pictures. This is a great update to our college years on campus. - John Pierce I recently received an award from the Safety Council here in Kansas City. Please share in your class notes section of the magazine. - Tommy McAtee Editor’s note: Tom ’77 received the Thomas P. Cox Jr. Visionary Award from the Safety and Health

Council of Western Missouri and Kansas for inspiring others to strive to achieve optimum safety and health. More about his honor appears in the Awards section. Received the current issue of UCM Magazine. Loved the article about Annie Helmericks-Louder. My granddaughter, 18 months, loved the pictures. I passed this on to a friend of mine in Virginia who commented, “This is the most fabulous article I’ve read yet about nature and quilting and a meaningful philosophy of life.” She plans to share it with her quilting friends. Thank you for adding to the joy of our holidays! - Cammy Marble

I graduated from the University of Central Missouri in 1966. At the Second Annual Cultural Gala on Dec. 5, 2014, I was honored by the consulate of El Salvador in New York “for outstanding and tireless dedication, contributions and continuous support of Unaccompanied Refugee and Immigrant Children.” - Regis McDonald Editor’s note: read the full class note in the Awards section. In response to the headline, Have you made plans for your future?, she ponders “can you make plans for the past”? - S. Wogomon

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C L AS S NO T E S

1940-1949

1970–1979

Edward G. Schwerdt ’47 is a Navy V-12er who lived in Yeater Hall from 1944-1945 and graduated in 1947. He was 90 years old last May, and his wife, Loretta, celebrated her 89th birthday. They celebrated 66 years of marriage in June. Ed volunteers three times a week at St. Francis Medical Center in Topeka, KS.

John L. Craig ’72, ’75 completed an assignment as vice president and director of a $2-billion joint venture of Fluor Enterprises and HDR Engineering to repair or replace 365 bridges throughout Oregon. The on-time, underbudget project has won 54 awards. Craig previously was director of the Nebraska Department of Roads for more than 10 years and retired as a commissioned officer after 26 years in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with worldwide assignments. John’s wife, Kathleen ’72, is on the staff of Creighton University and splits her time between Oregon and their home in Nebraska. Two sons live in Nebraska; one is an attorney and the other a college student. A daughter is on the staff of the University of California San Francisco Medical Center. John has run 11 marathons and more than 25 half marathons, including Boston and Chicago but missed New York City because of Hurricane Sandy.

1960–1969 Sandy Cordes ’69 is stepping down after directing the Sedalia Missouri Choral for 25 years. She has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from UCM. Cordes has been retired for 35 years from teaching music in the public school system. Her many honors include receiving the Outstanding Educator for the Sedalia School District 200 and UCM’s Music Department Outstanding Music Alumni Award. She also was listed in “Who’s Who Among American Teachers.” Will Dryer ’68 retired from the Marine Corps as a lieutenant colonel in 1991. He has since retired from the Lee’s Summit Missouri School District where he taught science and coached cross country. He and his wife, Suzanne (Schrik), have moved to Florida to enjoy the warm weather. This spring they celebrated their 46th wedding anniversary in Italy. Elaine Frost Egbert ’66 took the Baltic Treasures Alumni Cruise and sent back a picture with Flat Mo from Picasa. Elaine Wallis ’67 has been living in Kansas City, MO, since graduation. She returned to the UCM campus in Lee’s Summit one night a week and got her master’s in social gerontology in 2001. She is now retired.

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Charlie Lane ’77 is senior vice president chief operating officer at the University of Florida with management responsibility for information technology, human resources, internal audit, business affairs and real estate. Previously he was associate senior vice president for administration at the University of Southern California. His career also includes stints at the University of Houston, Intermedics and Texas Instruments. Jerry Miller ’78 has retired to Branson, MO. He invites readers to visit and see a show. Denny Moore ’75 has retired to Punta Gorda, FL. He enjoys leaving the alarm in the off position and boating, fishing and golfing. Bruce Uhler ’77 has lived in Nybro, Sweden, for the past five

Vol. 14, No. 3 | ucmo.edu/ucmmagazine

years. He is the father of three children. One son, Sgt. Chris Uhler, recently returned from his third deployment with the U.S. Marine Corps. Julie Weissflog ’76 has been teaching Spanish part time in the Rockwood School District and substituting part time for the Francis School District since August 2012. She resides in St. Charles, MO, with spouse, Rick, and sons, Brett and Paul.

1980–1989 Alice (Stephens) Griffin ’85 was recently promoted to the director of curriculum review and program assessment at the University of Arkansas. She coordinates the review of each department, program, center and institute and administers the campus program and course change review process. In addition, she works with the Office of Retention and Graduation, Office of Institutional Research and Assessment and Enrollment Services to develop and analyze assessments associated with the activities proposed in the Quality Initiative Proposal to the Higher Learning Commission for the reaccreditation of the University of Arkansas and other campus assessments. Hope Lecchi ’87 is now a reporter for the “Sedalia Democrat.” She retired after 27 1/2 years of teaching in the Smithton School District. She covers education in Sedalia and Pettis County as well as reporting on other features and general news. Gary Machholz ’81 is managing a list of sponsored and VIP players with Volkl Tennis of Solana Beach, CA. According to Sean Frost, managing director of Volkl Tennis, “Gary has the industry contacts and experience as a USPTA, PTR and USRSA member

along with his years of service on the supply side to help us drive the Volkl brand. The past couple of years Volkl has grown and we want to hit the groups that drive brands – teaching professionals, junior players and key influencers across the country.” This announcement comes on the heels of the Volkl Organix V-1 Pro being named the Best All-Around Performer in the “Tennis Magazine” Racquet Guide 2014.  Machholz grew up in Chillicothe, MO, and served in the Air Force, then came to UCM in 1978 when he started playing tennis as a student. He completed his degree in public relations in 1981, then got his first job as a teaching professional in Hawaii. He’s coached teams in Hawaii, Arkansas, Missouri, North Carolina and Colorado. The USPTA- and PTR-certified professional says he’s strung 4,000-plus racquets. He went from teaching to promotions first for Adidas, then for Babolat and now for Vokl and Lotto, an Italian apparel and footwear company. His tennis family includes his wife, Robin; son, Drew and daughter-in-law, Alecia, both PTRcertified teaching professionals. Curt R. Roberts ’87 is employed by Delta Air Lines as a Minneapolis based MD88/MD90 captain. John N. Sands ’89 works for a company called Suture Express. He started as an endomechanical distribution tech and recently became manager of the returns department.

1990–1999 Tim Cooper ’98 has joined the Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County’s Board of Directors. He serves as divisional vice president of supply chain for the Walmart Pacific Division and is responsible for logistics


CLAS S NOT ES

Awards & Honors

G N I M O C Y T E R A M P HIT’SOOUR BIGGES4 T

and transportation support to Walmart stores in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Nevada and Washington. In his role at Walmart, Cooper has developed acumen for logistics operations, public speaking, project management and customer service. Of particular interest, Cooper has managed logistics to support communities after natural disasters helping those affected to recover. Prior to joining Walmart, Cooper was an Army officer and served as a MEDEVAC pilot performing search and rescue missions. He is a veteran of Desert Storm/Desert Shield. A native of Norfolk, VA, he now resides in San Juan Capistrano with his wife and two daughters. He enjoys spending time with his family, golfing, exercising and reading. Kathy Kay ’91 has been appointed by the Governor of Missouri to the State Independent Living Council. This council jointly develops and submits (in conjunction with the designated state agency) the state plan required by the Rehabilitation Act; monitor, review, and evaluate the implementation of the state planShe is also the director of West Central Independent Living Solutions, a nonprofit committed to helping individuals with disabilities stay or become

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independent. They serve more than six counties, have five offices and 45 staff members.

2000–2009 Doug Scotten ’07 is the regional family financial education specialist for the University of Missouri Extension in Vernon County, MO. The position is responsible for planning, implementing and evaluating educational programs in financial literacy, money management, estate planning, food resource management, debt management and consumer issues. The position serves Vernon, St. Clair, Cedar, Hickory and Polk counties. Izzy Balser, daughter of Tina Peak and Nick Balser, both 2007 graduates

2010–2019 Sarah Brinkley ’13 and her husband, Adam, announce the arrival of a son, Aaron Joseph. David Nicolaescu ’12 is a sheriff’s deputy with the Cole County Sheriff’s Department in Jefferson City, MO.

Regis McDonald ’66 was honored in December by the Consulate of El Salvador in New York “for outstanding and tireless dedication, contributions and continuous support of Unaccompanied Refugee and Immigrant Children.” Present at the gala were Consul General Sandra Cruz, consulate staff, Ambassador Rubin Zamora, permanent representative of El Salvador to the United Nations and other Salvadoran diplomats. On Oct. 25, 2014, Regis was elected chair of the 19-member Board of Trustees at Wentworth Military Academy & College in Lexington, MO. He has been on the board since 2010 and has served as its vice chair since 2011. Tom McAtee ’77 received the Thomas P. Cox Jr. Visionary Award from the Safety and Health Council of Western Missouri and Kansas on Sept. 19, 2014. This award recognizes an individual whose actions serve as an inspiration to others who strive to achieve optimum safety and health, and for those who have elevated expectations for safety results. This award bears the name of the council’s past executive director in his honor and memory. When McAtee was the president of the American Society of Safety Engineers, he was instrumental in starting a golf classic for the youth program “Safety For Kids.”  During the past 18 years, more than 2,000 families have learned how to properly install their car seats and over 3,000 car seats have been donated to deserving families through this charitable cause. Sally Kirchhoff ’84 & ’91 recently retired from her K-12 vocal music teaching position at the South Holt R-I School District in Oregon, MO. She spent her 30-year career in public education in that

district. Kirchhoff was also honored by the Missouri Choral Directors Association with an “Outstanding District Director Award” at its annual summer convention. She plans to move to Concordia, MO, and have a private piano studio as well as serve as a church pianist and accompanist for local schools. Mel Amick ’87 received certification as a federal aviation safety officer by the Interagency Committee for Aviation Policy and the Federal Aviation Administration. This certification recognizes his experience as an Army aviator, safety officer and registered nurse. Chief Warrant Officer 5 Amick served two combat tours as an Army aviator in Afghanistan and Iraq, piloting Apache and Blackhawk helicopters. He also served in the Air Force Reserves as a Nurse Corps Officer. Amick is the 35th Combat Aviation Brigade Safety Officer for the Missouri Army National Guard and is currently employed as an aviation safety manager for the Boeing Company. Stacy Williamson ’07 became president of the Missouri State Teachers Association Nov. 14 and will be in office for one year. She is a full-time teacher in the North Kansas City School District, teaching seventh grade social studies at Eastgate Middle School. Melissa Snell ’12 received the New Elementary Principal of the Year Award that is given annually by elementary principals in the 96-district west central Missouri region to recognize an outstanding peer who is in their first three years as an elementary administrator. Snell has 19 years’ experience as a classroom teacher. She received her education specialist degree from UCM in 2012, which is the same year she became principal of La Monte R-IV Elementary School.

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IN M E MO R I A M

1930-1939

1960-1969

1990-2000

Friends

Frances A. Swisher ’38

George W. Hodge ’61 Esther L. Duncan ’62 Norman L. James ’62 Kathryn A. Smith ’62 Norman F. Eckerle ’64 Alma R. Barb ’65 Ella L. Bitner ’67 Nellie S. Clemens ’67 Sara E. Field ’68 Tim D. McKinney ’68 Glen R. Anderson ’69

Sheldon S. Doyal ’94 Terrence A. Arnold ’97 Carlos Gonzalez ’98

Jerome S. Baird Wayne D. Bartley Duane A. Buchanan Rita H. Bunn Jerald A. Burton Robert N. Clark Richard C. Conley Carolee Cortner Harvey Alfred Craig Robert Rages Eldenburg Margie Marie Fahrni-Schneider Octavia R. Famuliner Lawrence W. Ferguson Ruth E. Frantz Everett Leo Funk Wanda R. Goucher Marian L. Gray Maryetta Louise Grayson Sue C. Horne Betty Sue Jones Ellen Kackley Elmo W. McClung Mary Sue Owings Robert Pierce Patrick Dorothy E. Roberson George T. Simmons Carleton B. Spotts Bob G. Vandiver Marilyn N. Vernon Hazel E. Ware

1940-1949 Robert G. Becker ’40 Lillian Rages Barrick ’43 Hattie Rose Farrelly ’45 Carleen H. Nolte ’46 LaVerne E. Rasing ’45 (CH), ’48 June S. Kohler ’43 (CH), ’49

1950-1959 Francis V. Bishop ’50 James Price Jr. ’50 Robert C. Norton ’51 David E. Cook ’52 Gerald P. Hesse ’52 Mary E. Nower ’52 Ruth Louise Echelmeier ’53 Harlan L. Saxton ’53 Robert E. Gunter, Jr. ’56 Mike S. Ford ’57 Bruce C. DeHart ’58 Donald E. Elliott ’58 Elaine M. Griffith ’58 Stan Hensley ’58 Walter A. Kennon ’59 M. Louise Russell Frye ’59

1970-1979 Kurt M. Neubauer ’70 Judith L. Fisher ’71 Linda H. Bretall ’72 Irma F. Nance ’72 Dennis H. Burtchell ’73 Ronald R. Mantle ’73 Richard D. Levin ’74 Thomas L. Meyer ’79 Ina L. Wray ’79

1980-1989 Michael E. Poke Sr. ’82 Debra A. Hesse ’84 Lynn R. Mosely-Love ’85

2000-2009 Chris L. Brandsberg ’06

College High Marie Evelyn Anderson ’33

Former Students Robert H. Atkins Charles L. Cormack Joshua N. England Lorraine I. Hemphill David E. Holt Ned Kain Beverly K. Miller James A. Neuner George Hudson Painter Mary Louise Phillips Jane S. Powell Jeryl D. Vaught Kent W. Whittaker

U N D A TI O N B E Q U E S T S UCM FO

e

Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way Voncile Huffman died in 2002 but her teaching legacy survives. Through a will bequest she made to the UCM Foundation, she found a way to continue her love of teaching through an endowed scholarship that has helped more than a hundred students follow in her footsteps. Now is an excellent time to create or review your will. Contact Joy Mistele at 660-543-8000 or mistele@ucmo.edu to discuss this and other estate giving options that can benefit both you and UCM.

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I N M EM OR I AM

Glen Anderson Glen Anderson, 88, professor emeritus of reading, died Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014, in Warrensburg. He served on the education faculty for 17 years, retiring in 1987. He was born in Bolivar, the son of Ezra Vivian and Mary Lucinda Neuhart Anderson. After graduating from Bolivar High School, he earned an A.A. degree from Southwest Baptist University in Bolivar, a B.S. in teacher education from Missouri State University in Springfield and an M.S. from Drury College in Springfield. After completing an education specialist degree from UCM, he joined the faculty. From 1987-2001, he served as a teacher, administrator and grant writer on a Navajo reservation in Many Farms, AZ. He wrote a number of published articles on reading education and was editor of the International Reading Association Journal, Missouri Council. Memorials are suggested to the Children’s Literature Festival, UCM Foundation, Smiser Alumni Center, Warrensburg, MO 64093 or online to ucmo.edu/giveonline, noting the gift designation.

Lillian Rages Barrick Lillian Rages Barrick, 92, retired registrar, died Thursday, Dec. 25, 2014, at Sylvia G. Thompson Residence Center. She was born Nov. 13, 1922, daughter of the late Charles Louis Rages, Sr. and Gertrude L. (Fischer) Rages. She graduated from Hughesville High School in 1940 and continued her education at UCM, earning a master’s degree in education in 1967. From 1943 to 1948, she was an education assistant and later the registrar at then CMSU. Her 30-year education career included 25 years with the Sedalia School District as counselor and director of guidance services.

Ruth Bond Ruth Edna Bond, 105, an alumna and generous donor of the university, died Wednesday, Oct. 15 in Warrensburg. She was born July 30, 1909, in Otterville, MO, the daughter of Samuel and Bettie (Wear) Henderson. She received a B.S. degree in 1941 from then Central Missouri State Teachers College and in 1966 completed a master’s degree from Central Missouri State College. She taught for 34 years in the Missouri public school system until her retirement in 1975.

HARMON COLLEGE NAMESAKE DIES AT AGE 95

ADRIAN HARMON, 95, one of Warrensburg’s most successful businessmen, civic leaders and philanthropists who helped to shape the city, county and university, died Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, in Largo, FL. An estate gift from he and his wife, Margaret, who preceded him in death, established the university’s Harmon College of Business and Professional Studies. He was born July 6, 1919, on a farm in Lafayette County, MO, to Walter Alonzo and Bonnie Wilson Harmon. After graduating from College High in 1938, he attended the university for three years, leaving during his senior year when his father died and he had to operate the family farm. After leaving the farm, the Harmons started their lives as entrepreneurs, starting with a livestock trucking company, then branching into a farm machinery and auto dealership in Odessa. They moved to Warrensburg in 1949 and bought the Ford dealership, selling it to purchase the controlling interest in Citizens Bank. From that stock purchase in 1953, they eventually acquired controlling interest in banks in Warrensburg, Lamar, Liberal, Stover and Kansas City, as well as a successful mortgage business in Springfield. The family formed Central Mortgage Bancshares, Inc. and continued to expand, acquiring the Citizens Bank of Nevada, MO. Through a public offering, they expanded into the Kansas City, MO, market. In 1995, the Harmons accepted an offer to merge with Mercantile Bancorp of St. Louis. Their business history also includes co-founding, owning and operating Bi-Lo Supermarket. Harmon’s life as a philanthropist was exemplary. He helped to build the UCM Foundation, joining its Board of

Directors in 1991 and staying active as an emeritus member. In 1995, he received the university’s Distinguished Service Award and in 2004, he and Margaret were inducted into the UCM Athletic Hall of Fame. Harmon attended his first Mules game in 1929 and in 1949, the couple became season ticket holders. They were charter members of the Mule Train Athletic Club. In the days before residence halls, they frequently opened their home, located near campus, to student athletes and loaned their personal airplane to coaches for recruitment trips. Their generosity established and supported many scholarships on campus, benefiting both undergraduate and graduate students, especially those in Harmon College. The Harmons believed in supporting the Warrensburg community where they raised their family and grew their business. Their generosity also extended to Powell Gardens where Adrian served on the Board of Directors, helped to provide the first trolley and supported the Island and Heartland Harvest gardens. They also supported the American Legion Missouri Boys State held annually on the UCM campus. In addition, Harmon was a 50-year member of the Corinthian Masonic Lodge #265, a life member of Elks Lodge #673, a Paul Harris Fellow of the Warrensburg Rotary Club and an active community volunteer. Survivors include his sons, Lynn Harmon and wife Jacqueline; Tommy D. Harmon and wife Muffet; and daughter, Deborah Harmon Rankin; eight grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Memorials are suggested to the Adrian and Margaret Harmon Business Graduate Scholarship, UCM Foundation, Smiser Alumni Center, Warrensburg, MO 64093.

University of Central Missouri Magazine

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IN M E MO R I A M

Mary Brinkley

Nadine Graham

Mary Theresa Brinkley, 37, died Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015, at her home in Centerview, MO. She was born Feb. 7, 1977, in St. Charles, MO, the daughter of James and Judith Ann (Siburt) Utterson. She was administrative secretary for the UCM Department of Nutrition and Kinesiology.

L. Nadine Graham, 84, of Warrensburg, died Monday, Dec. 15, 2014, at the Warrensburg Manor Care Center. She was the wife of Justyn Graham, professor emeritus of elementary education, former director of the University Lab School and later coordinator of the department’s field experiences. Lola Nadine Royston was born Sept. 5, 1930, in Jamesport, MO, the only child of Forest and Lula (Chaney) Royston. She graduated from Jameson High School in a class of eight and met her husband, Justyn, at Northwest Missouri State College. Nadine and Justyn were married in 1951 at the bride’s home on Thanksgiving Day. He survives. Nadine’s first teaching position was in Rockport. After marrying Justyn, she taught in Atchison, KS, and Independence. She and Justyn then moved to Savannah and Nadine taught in nearby St. Joseph. After living in University City, Nadine and Justyn settled in Warrensburg in 1967. Dr. Graham retired in 1996, after serving 46 years in the education field. Nadine was an avid reader and participated annually in the Children’s Literature Festival.

helmed the eight-hour miniseries, “Assignment Vienna,” with Robert Conrad. In 1974, he joined the South Australian Film Corporation. He was executive producer of its first major feature success, the critically acclaimed “Picnic at Hanging Rock” that launched Peter Weir’s career as an international director. He returned to the U.S. and had deals with Universal, Zev Braun Productions, EMI and L.A. House Productions before coming to Central Missouri in 1986. A highlight of his 10 years at UCM was hosting journalist and elite war correspondent, Eric Sevareid, brought to campus as an Oppenheimer Lecturer, as a guest for three days in his home. Throughout Graves’ varied career, he played several nights as a pianist, side man or band leader at private parties for such stars as Judy Garland, Groucho Marx, Danny Thomas and John Wayne. He was on the first Betty White show, was musical director for the Gloria Hart Show on KLAC-TV and accompanied such artists as George Burns, June Christy, Rosemary Clooney, Rudy Vallee, Redd Foxx, Arthur Duncan and Jimmy Durante. He is survived by his wife, Ann; daughter, Kerry; and son, Kim and his wife Sandi.

A. John Graves

Marian Gray

A. John Graves, 86, professor emeritus of mass communication, died Nov. 10, 2014, at his home in Pagosa Springs, CO. His life included dining with Bertrand Russell, playing piano for George Burns, dancing with Anita O’Day, producing TV shows and feature films, and touring in bands. He was born in Porterville, CA, in 1928. He started at age eight to write songs and play piano and during high school toured with a dance band. After graduating from the College of the Pacific, he went to Los Angeles to break into broadcasting, eventually landing at NBC as manager of film programs, supervising such shows as “Bonanza,” “I Dream of Jeannie,” “Ironside,” “The Man from Uncle,” “Then Came Bronson,” “The Debbie Reynolds Show” and “The Monkees.” In 1970, with a management change at MGM-TV, he became director of current programming. He became the executive in charge of the award-winning “Medical Center,” “Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” “GE Monogram Documentaries” and several syndicated talk shows. In 1972, he became a producer and

Marian Luvinnie Gray, 90, long-time university key-punch operator, died Monday, Dec. 29, 2014, at St. Mary’s Manor in Blue Springs. She was born Feb. 10, 1924, in rural Henry County, the daughter of Lester George and Maggie Eunice (Beckett) Hutchinson. She married John Robert Gray in 1945. He survives as well as three children, numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Dennis H. Burtchell Dennis H. Burtchell, 67, died Nov. 1, 2014, at his home in Middletown, RI. He was born Aug. 24, 1947, in Presque Isle, Maine, to Harold and Arlene Burtchell. He graduated from Guilford High School in Connecticut in 1966, served in the U.S. Air Force from 1966-70 and graduated in 1973 from CMSU with a bachelor’s degree in business management. He worked in the insurance field serving independent agents, taught a business class at CMSU and later became a real estate broker. He resided in Warrensburg for 30 years and then in Connecticut and Rhode Island for the past several years.

Jeanette Cunningham Jeanette I. Cunningham, 83, of Warrensburg, died Sunday, Nov. 2, at Lee’s Summit Medical Center. She was born April 8, 1931, in Rockford, MI, the daughter of George Irving and Sarah E. (Hoskins) Brantner. She worked in food service at UCM for 40 years.

Maxine Denton Margaret “Maxine” Blain Denton, a 1952 alumna, died Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014. She was born Aug. 22, 1930, in Blackburn, MO, the daughter of Samuel and Lula (Neer) Blain. After graduating from Sweet Springs High School, she came to Central Missouri State College, completing a B.S. in Business Administration in 1952. She then became a buyer for Stix, Baer and Fuller in St. Louis. After relocating to Kansas City, she worked at Vita Craft while obtaining a teaching certificate. She taught kindergarten for the Kansas City School District and retired in 1992. Maxine married Leslie Denton in 1957. After his death in 1994, she worked at Talbots for many years. She also was a volunteer at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art for 39 years.

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Maryetta Grayson Maryetta Louise Grayson, 86, formerly of Warrensburg, died Saturday, Nov. 14, 2014, at the Heartsworth Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Vinita, OK. She was born Jan. 26, 1928, in Coffeyville, KS, the daughter of Eugene and Mary Peters Watts. She married Daniel E. Grayson in 1947; he preceded her in death in 2006. She was retired from the university’s food service department where she worked several years as a dietitian.


I N M EM OR I AM

THE LEGACY OF PAUL NANCE AND HIS INCOMPARABLE COLLECTION

A B OV E: The Nance Collection, featuring centuries of Middle East art, artifacts and culture, is the only continous display of traditional Saudi Arabian culture outside the Kingdom.

PAUL NANCE, WHO GIFTED the university with his extensive collection of Middle Eastern artifacts, considered the largest of its kind outside the Saudi Arabia kingdom, died Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. In addition to the collection, he initiated the campus’ annual Saudi Arabia Day celebration and collaborated extensively with faculty and staff to use his vast collection to bridge cultural differences between Western and Eastern cultures and religions. Born in St. Joseph, MO, Nance grew up on a farm near Lawson, MO. He attended Northeast High School, then earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He later completed advanced management for senior executives at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He gained several years of personnel experience with the Corps of Engineers and United States Army before moving to Saudi Arabia in 1952 to work for the Arabian American Oil Company. In 1962, he became director of Aramco’s Build School and Scholarship programs for children of its Arab and Muslim employees. He held various personnel and industrial engineering positions, including his final two as manager of organization and industrial engineering and director of policy and planning. While working on a special project to expand the Oil Exhibition Center in Dhahran, Nance decided to develop his own museum when he retired from his 31-year career with Aramco in 1983. He got approval from Saudi Arabia Director of Antiquities Dr. Abdullah Masry to take a full traditional Bedouin tent and cultural items to start the Nance Museum in the United States. His son, James, photographed a complete collection of David Roberts, considered one of the best pictorial chroniclers of the Holy Land, for the museum, which Nance built in a modest building near his family farm in Lone Jack. The museum featured art and artifacts that Nance and his wife, Colleen, also now deceased, collected during their 30-plus years of travel throughout more than 50 countries. Considered the largest continuous display of its kind in the U.S., the collection traces the Middle East’s history, from the Stone Age period to the discovery of oil, and focuses on the lives of the Bedouin people of Arabia after 1938. In 1993, the Nances began sharing portions of their collection for exhibitions at UCM’s Archives and Museum, with titles ranging from “The Arab Woman,” “Hofuf Oasis” and “Desert Dwellers” to “The Chinese

Silk Road.” They eagerly shared their collection with outreach programs from schools, libraries and museums before donating all the items to UCM with a goal of creating “dialogues between Saudi Arabia and other countries and involve people in a deeper, richer understanding of cultures around the world.” Nance also authored a book about the collection, entitled “The Nance Museum: A Journey into Traditional Saudi Arabia.” More than 1.5 million people have seen a portion of the collection. Featuring an extensive research library of more than 1,000 books, journals and references, it has earned a national reputation garnered from hundreds of loaned exhibitions, programs and curricula. Pieces were most recently featured in the traveling exhibit, “Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,” which toured Europe and was on display at the NelsonAtkins Museum in Kansas City in 2014. Another prominent exhibit that featured its artifacts was “A Gift from the Desert: The Art, History and Culture of the Arabian Horse” at the International Museum of the Horse, a Smithsonian affiliate at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, in 2010. Pieces also are on permanent display at the Quincy House, the official American embassy in Riyadh. The Nance Collection has been described as “extremely rare.” International scholar Ismail Nawwab said the Nance Collection bears “the stamp of dedication to religious, cultural and ethnic tolerance, qualities needed more than ever in our contemporary world.” Housed within the Kirkpatrick Library McClure Archives and Museum, the Nance Collection is an integral component of the university’s undergraduate degree programs in history, anthropology, art and design, Arabic and teacher education. The university bestowed upon Nance an honorary degree of humane letters in 2003. He also received recognition from then President George H. Bush as one of his “Thousand Points of Light.” Read more about Nance’s life in the article, Middle East Meets Middle West. Survivors include two sons, Mark and wife Janey Depew, and James; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews. Memorials are suggested to the Paul J. and Colleen Nance Collection Endowment, UCM Foundation, Smiser Alumni Center, Warrensburg, MO 64093 or on the web at ucmo.edu/giveonline, specifying this gift designation.

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IN M E MO R I A M

Kelly Greer Kelly Allee Greer, alumna and former UCM women’s studies instructor, died Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Born Jan. 12, 1961, she was raised by her grandmother, Dorotha Brock, and was the daughter of Peggy June Brock and Dee Greer of Sedalia. She earned a bachelor’s degree in mythology and humanities from UCM in 1994 followed by a master’s degree in library information technology in 2004. She also received a master’s degree from Norwich University, then pursued a Ph.D. at Claremont University south of Los Angeles. Memorials are suggested to the UCM Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, UCM Foundation, Smiser Alumni Center, Warrensburg, MO 64093 or by going to ucmo.edu/giveonline and designating the area.

Bob Gunter Robert Ennis “Bob” Gunter, Jr., 80, of Prairie Village, KS, an emeriti member of the UCM Foundation Board of Directors, died Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, at St. Luke’s Hospice House in Kansas City. He was born Oct. 4, 1934, to Robert E. Gunter, Sr. and Mildred Helen (Morgan) Gunter. He was preceded in death by his parents and his wife of 40 years, Eva Carolyn (Kiehl) Gunter. Gunter graduated from Westport High School in 1952 where he played basketball and football. He graduated from then CMSC in 1956 with a B.S. in Education. He played basketball as a student and later joined the mathematics faculty. He worked for Business Men’s Assurance for 30 years, retiring as a senior vice president.

Pauline Ratnasingam Pauline Ratnasingam, associate professor of computer information systems, died Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015. She came to Warrensburg in 2003 having taught and lectured at the University of Vermont in Burlington, the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand and the University of Melbourne in Australia. She earned degrees from Monash University in Melbourne followed by a Ph.D. in information

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SP RI N GT I ME O U T DOOR SA F ETY AN D M A I N T EN AN C E TI P S

Before you can fully enjoy spring, you may need to clean up some of the damage caused by winter. Prepare for the upcoming season with these maintenance tips:

LAWN Spruce up your landscape by raking your grass and giving it a fresh coat of fertilizer.

FLOWERS If your flowerbed contains annuals, add mulch and fertilizer to encourage them back to life.

A MESSAGE FROM LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE*

TREES

I T ’ S S P R I N G , F I N A L LY ! Birds are singing, flowers blooming and yes, it’s time to handle all those spring chores, like flower beds, planting perennials or adding mulch and fertilizer to your annuals. Complete pre-spring maintenance, and your home will be as ready as you are for the beautiful weather ahead. As a UCM alumnus, you could save hundreds of dollars on quality comprehensive auto and home insurance through Liberty Mutual Auto and Home Insurance. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit www.libertymutual.com/ucmo.

Prune your trees of decayed branches to give them a boost of energy. Leave climbing trees and more extensive cuts to a certified arborist.

SIDING & ROOFING Check your siding and roofing for loose materials, chipped paint and rot.

S TA N D I N G W AT E R Drain areas of collected water, a breeding ground for mosquitos.

OUTDOOR HOME LIGHTING If you discover lighting that is not working despite changing light bulbs and checking the fuse box, you may have a short in the line caused by moisture, requiring the expertise of an electrician.

*Enjoy exclusive savings on your auto and home insurance thanks to the University of Central Missouri Alumni Association. Visit libertymututal.com/ucmo or call 800-524-9400 to get started!

systems from Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. She frequently consulted through the UCM Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies and Development. She was a prolific scholar with several books and chapters to her credit, mostly around the topics of internet security, trust, e-commerce and the web. She also served on several university committees, including the Faculty Senate University Assessment Council Committee, the Academic Technology Advisory Committee, the College Curriculum Committee and the President’s Commission on the Status of Women for which she also chaired a subcommittee analyzing gender inequity and hiring practices. She was a member of the graduate faculty and helped

design the CIS department newsletter. She would have become a full professor in August. She published more than 50 research papers in various peer-reviewed journals as well as international and national conferences. Her scholarship, rigor and innovation were evident from research grants and awards she received, including from the National Science Foundation. She served as an editorial board member of several international industry journals, including the Information Resources Management Journal, the Global Information and Management Journal and Journal of Internet Research. She was a member of the Association of International Systems, Academy of Management, Information Resources Management Association and Warrensburg Chamber of Commerce.


TAKE MO WHERE YOU GO Mo is ROCKING in his new outfit that you helped to pick and that our fashion design students created and then tailor-made. Use #FlatMo when you share your photos on our Facebook page at /UCMAlumniAssociation. See all the places where Mo traveled previously at ucmo.edu/flatmo.

University of Central Missouri Magazine

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UCM Magazine – Vol. 14. No. 3  

Cover Story: The Girl with a Loud Bark – Since riding her first jet ski before the age of one, UCM student Anna Glennon has raced more than...

UCM Magazine – Vol. 14. No. 3  

Cover Story: The Girl with a Loud Bark – Since riding her first jet ski before the age of one, UCM student Anna Glennon has raced more than...