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 Issue 19,233 Summer 2013

4   

    plastic "   Fighting cancer   with biodegradable      UCD researchers led1 ! by Conway Fellow, %  have  created     Dr Kevin O’Connor an 

    5agent  6

using  small improved anti-cancer    a biodegradable    molecules derived from (67-!   !

 plastic, PHA. Their findings are published in   !  8! the April issue of Biomaterials.

 5            $ ' is a PHA  or polyhydoxyalkanoate !   

  7 biodegradable plastic produced by 1

   9   particular bacteria, such as Pseudomonas 4

  : (94:-   putida commonly found in Irish soil. PHA is % !   5    intensively studied as a substitute for non6

     $

degradable plastic packaging. However, this

  

   is thefirst example globally of   a  

 plastic    being used  biodegradable monomer    therapeutic.     ! "   as a cancer          #   $ 

 of "   broken  %down The structure PHA can be &   component    "     or into simpler building blocks   $ called (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic        monomers  "  % acid  one of which is called (R)-3-hydroxyde-

canoic acid for short. ' (")  or R10 "            *+      , The research team  created a new molecular  

    -    structure in the laboratory by chemically .

"     $   linking R10 hybrid.  of two naturally

"" " to a % 

   peptides      "    occurring with anti-cancer activity           named P18.   % They then investigated the impact of this

/"       #      new synthetic molecule (R10P18) on a "  -+         variety of cancer types. ‘We found + %  cell

 "   that these new synthetic molecules were able to     +%     " 

drive cancer cells to self-destruction or apoptosis much more effectively than the P18 peptide would do if acting alone’, explained Dr Kevin O’Connor from UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science.

 "  bycancer  cells 

"  molecules with

     " beginning   within  programmed cell  death    entry       two hours of to   

the cell’. In the design      "    of new  molecules, the precise location of 

    % every component part is critical as this will

dictate how the   structure ultimately .  " "will "    behave.         "           In the.  case     of the R10P18 molecule,

 %   the enhanced activity displayed *01., anti-cancer

       is due % to the'  presence and position of the   "  hydroxyl (OH) The structure  component.     promises flexibility for   "   further

  chemical   or biological in the future.   " manipulation         "             01.% laboratory A crucial  "  part of translating

research on potential drug candidates is to

-   23        investigate the behaviour of these novel     "  "  compounds with other commercially           available chemotherapeutics.    "    Clinicians

"  often favour treatment regimen that uses  $% 4a     "  a combination of drugs rather single       than " a  compound. Acting  together,    "  drugs can be more effective and the desired  " 

response is      "   achieved with a lower dosage.    

  

      % 0   "  

    The new  R10P18 molecules act 

 " " "with  chemotherapeutics "      synergistically      $       "  such as cisplatin to allow biological activity           in the nanomolar concentration range.

               According to Dr O’Connor, “The next step  " "        in our research is to test this putative           therapeutic in   " an in-vivo setting so that        we

can establish drug toxicity levels and anti-tumour efficacy�.

  ) / The collaborative project also involved

  detected better      We uptake 

of the new

 1    

8     8  

    ;

Conway Fellows, Professor William Gallagher (UCD School of Biomolecular & 4 "  C  and   

 Byrne Biomedical Science) Dr Annette

   "           <                          /      " "  "   "four  new "  I am delighted to welcome

 Fellows;  Dr   Philips,      Conway Andrew Dr     "   " Le  Fiona

McGillicuddy, Professor Carel % Roux and Professor Ron Pinhasi. I have

Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Message    "                  "  Welcome! $            Congratulations to Professors Mark     " ("        Crowe, Pat  Guiry and Cormac Taylor who "     

  $ have been  announced as newly elected

        % .  members of the Royal Irish Academy.  "  B     '     Each has made significant contributions    '       =3 to scholarly research as demonstrated ;  23 ;-research.   public "  A by their published This " % recognition of their academic excellence is

the highest academic honour in Ireland.

no doubt that they will forge successful

4     Institute      collaborations with other   and   

    members contribute fully to-+ the     $  

  continued success of the Institute. "                  "  The Institute will " celebrate a decade   of

discovery and innovation in September

 $    " 

    (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and           % UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science), as well as researchers in Trinity    ' ("         College Dublin, Royal College of Surgeons   "       in Ireland and the Synthesis & "  

 Centre   for  "  Chemical It was funded   Biology.       " through  UCD Ad5" Astra scholarship, the Higher /   ' '    Education Authority  PRTLI4 and     

 programme,  Science Foundation Ireland. UCD Conway       " imaging and"  flow  cytometry core "          technologies were used during the course of  % the research. &  6.        

     ("    " Reference:

" "!"       

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor S, et al. The anti-cancer activity of     derived    a cationic anti-microbial peptide from  "  

         monomers of polyhydroxyalkanoate. Biomaterials (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.20 5  "  %7 12.12.032

  "    "             8      +      % +   & 9 :   0 :  : .  . 11  + +  :   . :  : ' (" ;%  + ' % 233 /  22< ==*>,?@A>@

Uptake and localisation of biotinylated peptides  

     in HeLa cells. Cells were cultured in the presence of biotinylated-P18L. Cells are treated with two dyes separately: Streptavidin Texas Red binds to the Biotinylated peptide and MitoTrackerÂŽ Green stains mitochondria. Regions of yellow indicate where the red stained peptide co-locates with the green stained mitochondria in overlaid images.

      "     /  0        233% 0    "         "         " 2013 as we mark the anniversary of the      "     building opening to +  researchers     its doors "   from across  the UCD and affiliate      campus       hospitals. We   hope to welcome back many   "      of the alumni to a special commemorative    "        event as part of the 2013 UCD Conway "

%

Festival of Research & Innovation (11-12 September 2013). B 4  : 

   -+ +  Professor Walter Kolch0 " Director

  <2:4 <7''' 1 '0/D;+-D E '0/;0+D ;;+&


+       0  .  0    

Welcoming new Conway Fellows

  5    5   5! 7  9   

5 Dr Fiona McGillicuddy is interested in        4   the impact of obesity and inflammation      '  : on HDL function and cardiovascular    :$ 'this  health. A key goal of research 7A! is to 

   5     !  establish the effects of the obesigenic 

!    of

  environment on  the capacity  1 !to9   '  macrophages mediate   cholesterol     7 1

  efflux to HDL particles. The effects of   55  obesity  on reverse cholesterol transport  willB00"$ be assessed in vivo by monitoring 3H-

cholesterol from macrophages . 0  . movement           onto HDL particles and        measuring    B   uptake into liver, bile and elimination             % in the faeces. The obese phenotype will .

       " or subsequently be  manipulated by diet    D;N   B N    anti-inflammatory regimens to improve    health  "    equivalent      metabolic but maintain  " and "         obesity the  effects  on macrophage          " 

will faeces reverse cholesterol transport

% be monitored. .    B  .       Dr Andrew Phillips focuses on            researching the development of  "         sustainable catalytic processes utilising   energy    related *0', catalysis,   

natural  products;   in    storage  especially the area   of hydrogen . 

"  boranes;     from ammonia pioneering new  (" ! "  "

    multifunctional anticancer compounds D;O     and   B  % with enhanced selectivity inhibitor

delivery; development of silver antibiotic

+     B . and drugs  

with biofilm inhibitor behaviour   64against     +"    activity MRSAbacteria.         "   %      "

" Professor Ron Pinhasi envisages   

 233 Fellows     " synergies   with Conway      "   specificallyin  the area of research

concerned with the health of past populations and the evolution of

"    ""               "  pathogens and disease using ancient       "    %7

DNA studies of pathogens. He is also interested areas such as human  +   in  . 

    evolution, demographic history +"  variation, 6.        .  and microeveoluion; the Middle-Upper   

        Palaeolithic transition in the Caucasus;        "   " palaeogenetics: population history,      

  % .    selection, phylogeography; variability in              human growth and development in past

         "   populations.               % .         "  Professor Carel le Roux is interested 10    "      in the mechanisms by which Roux    bypass     "

    en-Y gastric reverses diabetic   disease.   

   %7 kidney His research is primarily

concerned with the   increased mortality . )        B    and morbidity associated

   "

"  with  obesity     and its related diseases. A better   " "         mechanistic understanding of how the      

  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gut talks to  

the brainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will #"  allow safer  more 5    B  

and effective treatments to be  G      To  this     role   used in future. end, the of  gut

   bile       hormones, acids and changes"  in food          #% preference are areas of interest to him. /   A333   0                  0'  % +"  "

                    "         % .    "  "    00    " " ("        " "  "

"     %

                "        % 0  0'            

   "   "  "" 

 % .      -+ +  "   0'         "    $                      % 64    "   " 0' Dr   Andrew Phillips, Stokes Lecturer,  

"   of   &      UCD School Chemistry Chemical Science    

   $ % .             "             

     7 $  B . % 6"             $      B  "       7% 0      "     "    00    "     B      D;N   "    Professor    Ron Pinhasi, Associate  $  Professor, UCD School of    "  $    */5,   Archaeology               " %

-     

    Dr Fiona McGillicuddy, Wellcome

Professor Carel le Roux, Professor of Experimental Pathology, UCD Conway Institute & UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science

Trust Research Career Development Fellow, UCD Conway Institute

'    signal    &0F    "  A new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for  inflammation Inflammation an important A is  response   in the body but chronic or uncontrolled  1 ! 9    7  inflammation can also cause trouble         in conditions including rheumatoid  5    %   arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease  @>,         and sepsis. 5  5       5  $ A new study involving UCD researchers

has discovered a signal that appears to &0F     

 

    trigger inflammation when the       "      threat    of a bacterial infection looms, and the      0%      experiments have also been able to block     +C systems,  pointing

"  the signal in model  

     0     to possible new approaches to treating   3   diseases.   % inflammatory     " "      

The published*D.GB, in Nature and  led by  study,       Trinity Dublin, found   that in the   College 0% .     presence of a potential bacterial threat,            macrophages change how they burn        $   energy. This " switch in burning eventually     build-up     % leads to the of succinate in cells, turn triggers chain   " and  this in     a  of biochemical events that encourage        "   inflammation. "  "       

One link in"that hypoxia-induced "  chain   is    factor 1a (HIF-1a), best known for its role           in helping the body adapt to conditions of      % low oxygen. & 

"          

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When go  to high this  factor    you   altitude,    

 gets expressed in cells and that "       " helps  to increase number.  of red cells    the  "  % blood     in    your blood, so you can adapt   B"  "tothe lower explains Conway  oxygen,â&#x20AC;?   "       Fellow,   Professor Cormac Taylor from UCD School      $      of Medicine & Medical Science.       "               %

But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the only place that HIF-1a has a job   to do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At time of$           stress including inflammation you also D.GB            experience an activation HIF ("  

  of this  % pathway,â&#x20AC;? says("  Prof Taylor. our 4      â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   previous work has looked at this in models       "   "     of inflammatory bowel disease.â&#x20AC;?

         "    

   "       In the new study, led by TCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prof Luke   $    Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, Prof Taylor and    Research   % Fellow

Dr Cummins helped  to work out that .Eoin   

 "

"   in  macrophages sensing bacterial " threat,       a  " 

the build-up succinate seems â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  &0F  of

       to   HIF-1a to switch on an inflammatory       % B   gene.

                    "   "   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this case, HIF drives a gene called      % 6   "   interleukin-1, a potent pro-inflammatory     ("          gene, and that willcontribute to the  

  #"  process.â&#x20AC;?    " 

inflammatory     "     "    new      

"  7  The study makes an important link %

between energy processes in the .      burning " "     immune system and an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; signal for 1"   0   -   +  inflammation. The research also showed " % that a drug usually used for epilepsy was able to tone down this succinate/HIf1a pathway in a model of sepsis, and this could point to new approaches to intervening when inflammation is  ? running outof /     control.      &0F                 %   B"  /   ("   +%  % "   F    233 >CC>A

Reference Succinate is an inflammatory signal that induces IL-1β through HIF-1Îą. G. M. Tannahill et al.Nature 496,238â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 242(11 April 2013)doi:10.1038/nature11986


Identifying key regulators of kidney injury Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of RNA molecules that regulate how genes are expressed. UCD researchers led by Conway Fellow, Professor Catherine Godson are studying the role of miRNAs in diabetic kidney disease.

"

  ;- 1BK      $ '

AA    9   A  how  They have described for the first time the miRNA family, miRNA, a key     let-7 â&#x201A;Ź"E+!+00  plays    role kidney injury by targeting 5 in

 regulating     7  key fibrosis pathways human kidney      <  in   F epithelial cells.  '  (7F          5   19. The team investigated the miRNA 5  $

responses in human kidney tubule epithelial cells cultured under fibrotic conditionsthat   *%: %",      mimic kidney disease and   in the " diabetic " "  

 

presence of anti-inflammatory mediator lipoxin A4 to suppress fibrosis.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Promoting the resolution of inflammation makes for an interesting therapeutic approach that could reduce the risk of developing diabetic kidney disease. We believe that the lipoxins involved in regulating this process may be acting through miRNA mechanismsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, said Dr    *+:,          Eoin Brennan, first author of the published article in the Journal of +: the American     "   "      Society Nephrology.  of   % . "           "

  2A

The extent let-7c miRNA expression   *>of"    @ "  , seems impact on  Ato "  the integrity #  of "  " epithelial cells as the study found less let    % 7c miRNA expression in injured epithelial cells than+  in healthy . -+  cells.   "        % +    % G  

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The next for  us now is to /    step "  

"" determine   if let-7 miRNAs can actually play a role as biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease and

we will do this by measuring expression in both urine and kidney biopsies of patients,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; said Professor Catherine Godson from UCD School of Medicine & Medical Science. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We will also investigate the therapeutic potential of let-7c delivery to the kidney   models         in  experimental of disease. +:        our These studies will  further enhance       

of 

understanding of the role miRNA in        % "    diabetic kidney disease as . both biomarkers and potential  novel therapeutic    

     targets.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  

"     " "    Reference      Emma Borgeson,    Eoin P Brennan, Karen A Nolan, Oisin S 

Gough, Caitriona M Mc Evoy, G Docherty, Debra     Neil      F  Higgins, Madeline Murphy,% Denise Sadlier, Syed +:   ; M  Tasadaque Ali-Shah, Patrick J Guiry, David A Savage,   % I" %      B Alexander P. Maxwell, Finian Martin, the GENIE    "  % Consortium, Catherine Godson. Lipoxins attenuate renal fibrosis by induction of let-7c and suppression of TGFβR1. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2013 (24(4):627-637)

5 ;$          "   Setting standards for protein localisation G    55    8 In order to understand how cells work,

 =!     where  scientists first need to establish =  

$in !  everysingle protein the cell  resides.

 8   of ! In   the largest study its kind to date,  5   the two most  widely used microscopy  !  based methods that can    be applied to 5  compared. =  this task5    have been

   5  $

The international collaboration led

    G       by Conway Fellow, Professor Jeremy /  +    G    0 " Simpson, UCD School of Biology &  '    Science   and E .  

*G0'., Environmental Professor   +  1 B B "  " Emma Lundberg, KTH-Stockholm     500

   looked at more than proteins         $   (" 

using antibody-based localisation and fluorescent tagging methods.     protein &BD+    

     " "  %

Their findings show that by following a

5     

 antibody-based   defined set of  rules, both " "         and fluorescent-tagging methods are       % /  other,   and  highly complementary to each

      for the show"  a high degree of correlation

  % 4    

   determination of protein localisation in cells.

                      The study provides  a significant    also " "     and experimentally validated data set "            of

protein localisation in mammalian cells,

  " which in itself  is " % a valuable resource for the scientific community. +        " &BD+

"        $   

According to Professor    ("       % 0Simpson,      â&#x20AC;&#x153;The debate of   whether antibodies or      " " fluorescent protein is the  most

  #  tagging G0'.  reliable method to determine protein          localisation has been going on for more    4        than 15 years.

       "   $     "    the  "(" In addition to determining localisation   % . 500 "     "  of more than proteins, half  of  which no     localisation  "  annotation,     had previous study   has     % this allowed us to address a key

;-+ '     " "   " "   ;- > 1  B  % B   " 

  5 ;$    ?!!   % % ?=3=3! 5 ;$

! B %   5 ;$ ?         " "     &BD+5    G   F%   /  B% +   B "  /% " "   B     233 @ *C,  23KP23C

experimental issue.â&#x20AC;? . G0'.          5 ;$     ;-+ '

This work is expected to set the standard           methodology for ultimately determining " " &BD+of   the localisation the    entire   human          $   proteome.

  % .      $           "  Reference     "      Immunofluorescence and fluorescent-protein        

         tagging show high correlation for protein localization        C, Rexhepaj      in mammalian cells. Stadler E, Singan

VR, Murphy RF, Pepperkok R, UhlĂŠn M, Simpson JC, .          "  Lundberg E. Nature Methods (2013) Feb 24 doi: 10.1038/ nmeth.2377. [Epub ahead of print].

Experimentally-determined subcellular localisation of almost 500 human proteins. The localisations of proteins were determined using both immunofluorescence and GFP-tagging, with each protein being assigned to a localisation class (CY, cytoplasm; CSK, cytoskeleton; ER, endoplasmic reticulum; GO, Golgi apparatus; MI, mitochondria; NU, nucleus; PM, plasma membrane; VE, vesicle). Each node represents a protein, with dark green nodes indicating identical localisations recorded between the two methods, light green nodes indicating similar G0'.     /  +  and  red  G   localisations between the two methods, nodes  conflicting    5 ;$  indicating localisations between the two methods.

Primitive complex human processes identified Q   forms  of

     

  The evolution of multicellularity marks one of themost profound <   1   evolutionary developments H F     contributing to the

 appearance

    

8  of human and on theplanet. 5  animal   life 5     

 However, relatively known    with     C  little   about this seminal event, a number 

      5$ of international genome research efforts have focused identifying G  2%A    on      a" timeline for  % the emergence of key   

.     genome features that   contributed to

         multicellularity.                     The findings  of  new research now adds  " "     " to a growing body of data that the  %

development of multicellular animals was,  in many key respects, -     "    enabled

    through a re-purposing of existing   " 

"   facilities present unicellular   already     in    "  organisms.

The Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded study led by Conway Fellow,       "     Professor Brendan Loftus, UCD School of

"       % Medicine & Medical Science sequenced  :  "amoeba     the genome  of a unicellular    " 

     

(Acanthamoeba castellanii).          

% 0   found      genome

 The researchers within the   " (tyrosine     an intact signalling facility kinase long associated

" signalling)    "    with  multicelluar and % thought    organisms   "  to have arisen much later in evolution. .     signalling    Tyrosine kinase is    a core "  of   8   communication     means intercellular     Its      

and coordination. appearance in unicellular indicates the    organisms  " % 0   $  

necessity for a sophisticated of      "  level   interaction with oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbours even as " $          a unicellular     organism.       %

The study also demonstrated that + pathogen   recognition    receptors,  : a  key 6' element of the innate    

"immune     system humans used to recognise and   of    

    " engulf were already in use as  pathogens,  "      part of a primitive form of self-defence             

inamoebae.

 "      "

"   7%

As human evolve .many      pathogens " "     their virulence outside of &  human   1"   0    hosts through interactions in their ' % environments, these findings inform how certain pathogens have evolved to evade or manipulate the innate immune  ? system. B      "   

Reference           

Genome of Acanthamoeba castellanii extensive   % 9   8 highlights +   lateral geneG transfer and early evolution of tyrosine kinase  4  % )+ '   signalling. Lohan E A et al. Genome Biology 2013, :% Clarke   M,/ /     *233, 14:R11 doi: 10.1186/gb-2013-14-2-r11


Reducing experimental inflammatory arthritis

+  ;$         identified the inflammatory receptor reporting 10% of men and 18% of

UCD researchers led by Conway Fellow, Professor David Brayden in UCD School of Veterinary :    5

 =!  Medicine have  successfully reduced inflammation in the swollen arthritic 5        7 >? knees of a@ 5 murine model using a novel        nanoparticle.      8 5  A

B/  B. B0,0$ 75      The team used an anti-inflammatory 9 ! 95  8 5  molecule complexed in a nanoparticle of         hyaluronic acid to overcome the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   5  :   55   

normal clearing processes.     5     In addition toreducing inflammation  (:7 >?$

after a localised injection of this new nanoparticle preparation, the team

target for the components of the particle and demonstrated its reduction. . B     

  " 

â&#x20AC;&#x153;By using these molecules a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;        in    format, we were   able to   successfully

    " 

  

target site of and "  retain  the

  "inflammation  

  them there to reduce The "       swelling.    effect compared treatment with   % 0favourably     to  "  +  steroidsâ&#x20AC;?, said Prof Brayden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This may 1 B   1 85   provide a new type of long-acting, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; "   F          therapy for human or animals suffering "inflammatory    "   in"   with arthritis the futureâ&#x20AC;?.              % This condition has a huge social impact

women aged over 60 have symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA). The WHO estimates that 80% ofthose have limitations  

   

" /in/  movement 25% cannot perform "   and  G" 

 /% :  major daily activities. +        G"    ' E   -  $       $     "       References   F  ) "       An intra-articular salmon calcitonin-based nanocomplex    "    arthritis.

  reduces experimental inflammatory Ryan SM,       A,   Kornerup   KN,    McMorrow J, Umerska Patel HB, Tajber  L, Murphy EP, Perretti M, Corrigan OI, Brayden DJ. Journal of     

" % Controlled Release (2013) 167: 120-129 Feb 4.

for the aging Western population with the World Health Organisation (WHO)

1   " "    #"    MMI medal for UCD Student Trudy McGarry won the 2013 Molecular :       55     Medicine Ireland (MMI) medal for    8        her presentation rheumatoid oral     of        arthritis research. :5 B0,0      C

!      5 : (:-D Currently student on the MMI Clinical 9  a9  $

& Translational Research Scholars B       Trudy    

Programme (CTRSP), carriedout  research     in  "    her project conjunction with   Fellow,        "" Veale, Conway Professor Douglas   % .    "  St. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University Hospital and UCD  of  Medicine   %&.    School Medical Science.       $   



       Her studyfocuses on the signalling  "  "          pathways involved in joint destruction

 in % seen rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) isa chronic, +  1 +   progressive &     autoimmune disease, characterised    "  "    by  J.K       " L5C:MJ.K 

synovial proliferation and destruction of    "     "   cartilage and bone.

" "               %

through β1-integrin-induced cytoskeletal pathways.

When integrin receptors are engaged, they cell migration/invasion .  induce   "  J.K       through attachment to the extracellular     "         matrix and downstream "       activation  of   RhoGTPases.        +    % &         

Toll-like TLR2 has    receptor,     been    

implicated in the pathogenesis of joint  % destruction in RA but the mechanisms    have  yet to be  " "   involved elucidated. J.K         "  

In  presenting the results of her        "study,  "  Trudy McGarry how . TLR2    

 explained   %    induced cell" "  migrational and invasive   *      mechanisms are specifically  ,    " mediated       "  

"   %

(L-R) Dr Mark Watson, Programme Manager (Education & Training); Trudy McGarry, MMI CTRSP scholar; Dr Graham Love, CEO Molecular Medicine Ireland +     233     '    '    *'',< B  E B %

Experiencing life at the bench

D "   +     E  "  "

As part of the 2013 UCD School of Veterinary Medicine transition year programme organised by Conway     "  +   "  Fellow, Professor David Brayden            "  during the week of February 18th,  /  233% .           seven pupils visited UCD Conway       "     " Institute hear   first-hand    to "

  about  the  working lives of Conway researchers.          H +   "

  

They met PhD students Paul Lavin (McGee group), Sharon Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill (Knaus group) and Aoibheann McMorrow (Roche group) who each explained the type of research projects that they are involved with as well as their

  4

 1  

educational route to this role.

The pupils got a little closer to       "      experiencing life â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;at with a       " the $ benchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;    tour of the Institute that took in the            nuclear magnetic (NMR)    B resonance    

 facility PhDstudent  where      Jennifer   Cleary about  (Malthouse % 1"  group)  spoke   B working up. close to  8 the large Bruker " / magnets. They heard about E. coli plasmids from Dr David Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell in the protein expression laboratory and Dr Gordon Cooke (Donnelly group) gave some insight to lung fibrosis research.

* %  8I" %  ,           5 8 * %  8I" % ,   +   *  % I" %  ,   "

    "  "%

(L-R)(Front row) Tadhg Lonergan, Alyce Grant, Kate Doherty, Anna Duggan, Nicola Armstrong, Isobel Digby, Prof David Brayden, Jayne Baird; (Back row) Sharon Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, Paul Lavin, Dr David Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell

                          !   "  # $% & $ '# ()*+*,- .,/ /.0/ 1# ()*+*,- .,/ /.0, 2# $ $3 

Conway Focus Issue 19 Summer 2013  

Highlighting the research and innovation successes of UCD Conway scientists in the last three months.

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