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ANNUAL REPORT Academic Year 2016/17


Cover image Š Ben Curtis/AP


Contents

Note from the Frankopan Director

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Introduction

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Centre’s Governance

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1 MPhil in Multi-Disciplinary Gender Studies

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2 Scholarships

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3 The Distinguished Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship

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4 Public Engagement Series

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5 PhD Programme in Multi-Disciplinary Gender Studies

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6 Gender Studies Profiles

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Appendix 1

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The University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies Alison Richard Building 7 West Road  Cambridge CB3 9DP  www.gender.cam.ac.uk


Note from the Director The University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies (UCCGS); an international pioneer in multi-disciplinary gender research, teaching and public engagement

I

t has been a stellar year for the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies. I want to start by welcoming our new temporary lecturer Dr Bogdan Popa whose teaching and research interests include LGBTQ+ studies, critical race studies, feminist theory and activism. Bogdan’s award winning historical research on Shame and Queer Practices in the 19th Century is detailed on p28. We very much look forward to working with Bogdan who will also be a member of Lucy Cavendish College. Our mission in the Centre is to engage and study gender in its broadest sense - across identities, sexualities, categorizations, geographies, cultures and disciplines. Our 2016-17 MPhil students for example, are an outstanding group of young scholars from all over the world whose wide-raging research topics include ‘Early Modern Venetian Women Writers’, LGBT+ Rights Advocacy in Hong Kong’s Democratic Movement, ‘Clinical Management of Gender Dysphoria, ‘Gender and Cyborg-security’ and ‘Feminist Political Party Politics in the UK’ (see p9 for details). Both Dr Lauren Wilcox (Deputy Director of

the Centre) and I have thoroughly enjoyed working with this year’s cohort in developing their research projects and helping the students craft their final dissertations. I have no doubt there will be some excellent dissertations at the end of the year. Our PhD programme is also continuing to thrive. We will have 11 PhD students in October, again from a diverse range of backgrounds and with some very prestigious funding bodies behind them. You can read the range of fascinating doctoral projects on p24–25 ranging from ‘Gender, Citizenship and Peacekeeping in Somalia’ to a study of ‘Trans and Post-humanism in the US Military’.

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David Bell

© Bill Knight

© Bill Knight

Jessica and Peter Frankopan

In terms of our visitors and public events this academic year, we have welcomed four iconic gender scholars: Professor Judith Butler (The Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature at Berkeley), was the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor at the Centre in Michaelmas 2016. The University’s largest hall wasn’t nearly large enough to accommodate the huge crowd that came to hear Professor Butler speak on her latest research project ‘Gender in Translation: on the limits of monolingualism’. It was an extraordinary public event, later followed by several fascinating in-house sessions with our students and colleagues. In Lent came Professor Seyla Benhabib (The Eugene Meyer

Primrose Bell

Above left: Professor Judith Butler, Dr Jude Browne, Dr Lauren Wilcox and Multidisciplinary Gender Studies MPhil and PhD Students. Above right: The Centre’s home - The Alison Richard Building. Carl Djerassi and Diane Middlebrook


Introduction The University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies is a multi-disciplinary centre for research, teaching and public engagement. Working together with over 20 departments within the University and an international network of gender scholars beyond, the Centre conducts outstanding research and teaching on a broad spectrum of approaches to understanding gender and sexuality in relation to the human subject. Uniquely, the Centre has evolved from intellectual engagement with front-line research topics rather than developing from any particular discipline or methodology and its network of world-class experts enables it to facilitate outstanding teaching, research and public engagement.

Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Yale University) as the second Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor of this academic year. She too gave a brilliant lecture entitled ‘From the Right to have Rights to the Critique of Humanitarian Reason. Migrants and Refugees in Political Theory’ and became a really active member of the Centre during her time her with us (see p16–18). Also in Lent term we hosted two of the world’s most famous legal and feminist scholars, Professors Catharine MacKinnon and Carol Sanger both of whom came to talk to us about their new books ‘Butterfly Politics’ (MacKinnon 2017, Harvard University Press) and ‘About Abortion’ (Sanger 2017, Harvard University Press) in two highly engaging public events (see p22–23). This has been bumper year for prizes in the Centre. Dr Lauren Wilcox was awarded the best book prize from the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies Section of the International Studies Association; and I was awarded the University’s Pilkington Teaching Prize (see p26–27).

Before signing off, I want to say a special thank you to Ms Su-Mei Thompson who is stepping down as the CEO of the Hong-Kong based NGO, The Women’s Foundation (TWF). Ms Thompson has been an extremely active supporter of the Centre and has enabled the TWF scholarships to bring excellent students to the Centre to study (see p12–13). We wish her the very best in her new role of Chief Executive of the Media Trust in London. As ever, enormous thanks to the wider Department of POLIS, our Centre Administrator Joanna Bush, our students, academic visitors, and in particular to our donors - Jessica and Peter Frankopan, David and Primrose Bell and the late Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi - who together have helped craft the Centre into such a dynamic space within the University of Cambridge.

Dr Jude Browne The Jessica and Peter Frankopan Director University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

The aim of the Centre is to increase our capacity for rigorous gender analysis and to promote awareness of its relevance in historic, economic, political, artistic, social, and scientific contexts. As such, we welcome inquiry from multiple and overlapping perspectives including various forms of feminist theory, lesbian and gay studies, queer theory, transgender/trans* theory, and critical sexuality studies. We aim to push across the boundaries of disciplines and identities to promote ambitious and groundbreaking work that is able to build on the strengths of research across the University of Cambridge and to deeply engage with the complexities of studying gender in our world.

Women’s March, USA, © Edward Kimmel

ANNUAL REPORT Academic Year 2016/17

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Centre’s Governance Management Committee

Academic Committee

The membership of the Management Committee for the academic year 2016–17 was as follows:

The membership of the Academic Committee for the academic year 2016–17 was as follows:

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

Chair: Professor Robin Osborne, FBA (School of Arts and Humanities, Faculty of Classics, King’s College) Dr Jude Browne (Frankopan Director of UCCGS, King’s College) Professor Simon Deakin, FBA (School of Technology, Judge Business School (and the Faculty of Law), Peterhouse College) Professor Susan Golombok (School of Biological Sciences, Centre for Family Research, Newnham College) Dr Alex Jeffrey, (School of Physical Sciences, Department of Geography, Emmanuel College) Professor Dame Theresa Marteau FMedSci (School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge Institute of Public Health, Christ’s College) Professor David Runciman (Head of Department of Politics and International Studies, Trinity Hall College) Professor Jim Secord (School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Christ’s College) Dr Lauren Wilcox (Deputy Director of UCCGS, Selwyn College) External: Professor Kimberly (Department of Politics, Queen Mary University of London)

Our Founding Director, Juliet Mitchell (left), is Emeritus Professor of Psychoanalysis and Gender Studies at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Jesus College. Her seminal works include The Women’s Estate, Psychoanalysis and Feminism, Women: the Longest Revolution, Mad Men and Medusas, and Siblings: Sex and Violence all of which have shaped generations of feminist and psychoanalytic scholars. Professor Mitchell’s vision and passion for politically engaged, rigorous scholarship continues to inspire our Centre of which she remains an integral part.

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• • • • • • •

Chair: Dr Jude Browne (Frankopan Director, UCCGS) Dr Duncan Bell (Department of Politics and International Studies) Ms Joanna Bush (Centre Administrator, UCCGS) Dr Clare Chambers (Faculty of Philosophy) Dr Tabitha Freeman (Centre for Family Research) Professor Tony Lawson (Department of Economics) Dr Sian Lazar (Division of Social Anthropology) Professor Juliet Mitchell FBA (Founder of the Centre for Gender Studies) Dr Eleanor O’Gorman (Senior Associate Centre for International Studies and UCCGS) Dr John David Rhodes FBA (Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages) Professor Ulinka Rublack (Faculty of History) Ms Sigal Spigel (Senior Associate of UCCGS and Chair of the MGS Research Seminar Series, UCCGS) Dr Sharath Srinivasan (The Centre of Governance and Human Rights) Dr Brigitte Steger (Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies) Dr Lauren Wilcox (Deputy Director, UCCGS) Dr Ayse Zarakol (Department of Politics and International Studies)

"I am so impressed. Under the superb directorship of Jude Browne, Gender Studies is achieving what we aimed for. When Alison Richards asked us to establish a Centre and a programme we had nearly ten years of informal experimental experience of providing Gender lectures, seminars and conferences behind us. First and foremost we knew that in a university context,the politics must be intellectual not programmatic. This was, and is, our framework: to make 'gender' a category of analysis. Gender is everywhere and to forge a discipline that can stand with others as a contribution in its own right and within multi-disciplinarity, that 'everywhere' has to become 'somewhere'. Currently twentythree departments contribute their gender experts within their particular field for a rigorous M.Phil that students can take into practical or academic fields. The particularity of our theoretical stance and academic high standing are internationally recognized."


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MPhil in Multi-Disciplinary Gender Studies The seventh year of the MPhil in Multidisciplinary Gender Studies programme (201516), successfully concluded with the External Examiner’s visit in September 2016. Professor Susan James, Birkbeck, University of London, concluded in her report that “This is an intensive and intensively taught course” and that “the seminars are intellectually exciting and a great success”. She also noted, “[The staff’s] work and enthusiasm strikes me as admirable”.

The Bell Scholar Each year the author of the best research dissertation for the MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies is awarded the title of ‘Bell Scholar’ in recognition of outstanding scholarship.

Above: © ‘Sleep Dealer' (dir. Alex Rivera 2008)

T

he Master of Philosophy degree course at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies provides rigorous advanced training in multi-disciplinary gender analysis.

Lady Primrose and Sir David are key supporters of the Centre and we are extremely grateful to them for all their help and guidance.

Students follow four mandatory components: • • • •

Gender Theory and Controversy Research Methodologies Multi-disciplinary Texts Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminar Series

Sir David Bell

© Bill Knight

© Bill Knight

The MPhil introduces the very brightest students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds, cultures and nationalities to the traditions, methods and front-line research which shape gender analysis at an advanced level, incorporating insights from various feminist theories, lesbian and gay studies, queer theory, transgender/trans* theory, and critical sexuality studies. The MPhil provides a variety of intense taught courses and close supervision in

undertaking an original research project on any gender-related topic in subject areas such as diverse as Conflict and Violence, Development, Technology, Education, Globalization, Labour Markets, Social Policy, Culture and Antiquity, Representation, Art, Literature, Bio-medical Advances, Human Rights and International Law.

Lady Primrose Bell

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Amanda Padoan - Bell Scholar 2015–16 MPhil Thesis Snake in the Cooking Pot: Decoding the Colonial Origins and Social Impact of Uganda’s AntiHomosexuality Act

One of the great pleasures of this programme was the teaching. We engaged with world-renowned scholars who encouraged us to challenge assumptions, seek intersections, and think creatively along the margins. My own research involved extremely sensitive interviews with LGBT people in a country where their existence remains illegal. I needed excellent guidance to undertake my work, and this was given freely. Coming to this course, my circumstances reflected some of the debates we explore in Gender Studies. I came to Cambridge as a student who had not written, or even read, an academic paper in fourteen years. I had spent most of that time as a stay-at-home mom, teaching my children everything from walking to talking, swimming to reading. But those efforts seldom make it on a résumé. It felt daunting to return to university and undertake an ambitious course of study, but this programme made it a truly wonderful and life-changing experience.” Ms Amanda Padoan 8

© Ben Curtis

In 2015-16 Amanda Padoan was selected as the Bell Scholar for her excellent MPhil thesis entitled Snake in the Cooking Pot: Decoding the Colonial Origins and Social Impact of Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Act

Abstract: The empirical questions I sought to answer were: This research examined the impact of the How did the specter of eviction, ostracism, arrest Anti-Homosexuality Act (AHA) on the family and imprisonment affect family relationships relationships of sexual minorities in Uganda. and social ties in the community? What coping In December 2013, the Ugandan Parliament mechanisms were employed to avoid detection passed AHA, which bolstered existing laws that and to maintain these ties? I conducted qualitative criminalised homosexual conduct. AHA increased interviews of some 20-30 individuals affected penalties for same-sex relationships between by AHA. Sexual Minorities Uganda, a local NGO, consenting served as a adults, gatekeeper for including a this study. penalty of life in prison My broader for persons theoretical engaging in question a same-sex concerned the wedding meaning of ceremony; life basic human in prison for rights in Uganda LGBT people and its political who work as dimensions. teachers; and Support for AHA Above: Protesting the AHA in Uganda (© Ben Curtis) a three-year was often framed prison term in anti-colonial for persons “promoting homosexuality,” which terms. In Parliamentary debates, proponents was construed as activism, sex education and argued that homosexuality is an alien import from provision of health care to sexual minorities. the West and un-African. Ugandan academic Some polling data suggests a revived AHA enjoys literature, including the writings of Sylvia Tamale support among Ugandan voters. Conversely, and Stella Nyanzi, contend the opposite. However, AHA is condemned internationally and has cost the perspective of the parliamentary majority Uganda tens of millions of dollars in donor aid as has been adopted by broad sectors of Ugandan Western nations withdrew their support in protest. society and framed the debate over AHA. This President Yoweri Museveni described AHA as “a study explored the implications of politicization snake in the cooking pot,” the Ugandan proverb for of sexual minority status in Uganda. It is well an intensely problematic situation.  understood how these tensions manifested in international relations, but their enduring effect In this project, I charted the social impact of AHA at a community level in Uganda has yet to be with an emphasis on the pressures it has brought explored. to bear on sexual minorities and their families.


MPhil students A list of last year’s students and topics can be found in Appendix I. This year, the MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies has 12 international students, notwithstanding a University cap on numbers of MPhil offers. In line with previous years, the current Gender Studies students come from a very wide range of disciplinary backgrounds and are pursuing diverse research interests. Current working titles of research are as follows:

Emma Goldberg (USA) Towards a Feminist Notion of Cybersecurity Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

Lisa Vickers (USA) Feminist Political Parties Supervisor: Dr Jude Browne, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

Huaying Gu (China) Win-Yip Cambridge Trust Scholarship Rethinking Art History Supervisor: Dr Erica Segre, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Xiaozhe Wang (China) Researching gender in China Supervisor: Dr Anna Bagnoli, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge

Sara Kolber (Poland) The economic and political undercurrents in the works of early modern Venetian women writers Supervisor: Dr Alessia Ronchetti, Department of Italian

Kerry Anne Mackereth (New Zealand) How to be a Domestic Cyborg Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

Holly Williams (United Kingdom) Disrupting the Silence: Critical Discourse Analysis and New Feminist Social Movements Supervisor: Dr Anne Alexander, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

Louise Williams (United Kingdom) Gendered discourses of ‘vulnerability’ and homeless lives Supervisor: Dr Alice Evans, Department of Geography

Ching Kwong Wong (Hong Kong) Clinical Management of Gender Dysphoria Supervisor: Dr Vickie Pasterski, Department of Psychology

Miu Yin Wong (Hong Kong) TWF Scholarship LGBT Right Advocacy in Hong Kong’s Democratic Movement Supervisor: Dr Jude Browne, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

Annabel Smith (United Kingdom) They Cut, We Bleed: Gender and Austerity in the United Kingdom Supervisor: Dr Jude Browne, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

Reetika Subramanian (India) Chevening Scholarship Contested realities in the Anti-Khatna Movement in India: Negotiating the Ideals of Female Respectability and the Performance of Sexuality Supervisor: Dr Anjali Datta, Department of Politics and International Studies

ANNUAL REPORT Academic Year 2016/17

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MPhil Lecturers

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Dr Anna Alexandrova History and Philosophy of Science THEME: Gender, Evolution and Bio-medical Sciences

Professor Brad Epps Modern and Medieval Languages THEME: Gender and Representation

Dr Caroline Gonda English Literature THEME: Gender and Representation

Dr Jude Browne UCCGS THEME: Gender, Public Policy and Social Justice

Professor Robert Foley Human Evolution THEME: Gender, Evolution and Bio-medical Sciences

Dr Philip Howell Geography THEME: Gender, International Relations and Development

Dr Clare Chambers Philosophy THEME: Gender, Public Policy and Social Justice

Professor Sarah Franklin Sociology THEME: Gender, Identity and Family

Professor Tony Lawson Economics THEME: Gender methodologies

Dr Leigh Denault History THEME: Gender, Culture and Antiquity

Professor Susan Golombok Centre for Family Research THEME: Gender, Identity and Family

Professor Judith Lieu Divinity THEME: Gender, Culture and Antiquity


Professor Juliet Mitchell UCCGS, Psychoanalysis THEME: Gender, Identity and Family

Dr Helena Sanson Italian THEME: Gender and Representation

Professor Marie Louise Sørensen Archaeology THEME: Gender, Culture and Antiquity

Dr Eleanor O’Gorman International Studies and Development THEME: Gender, International Relations and Development

Dr Jens Scherpe Law THEME: Gender, Public Policy and Social Justice

Dr Arathi Sriprakash Education THEME: Gender, Public Policy and Social Justice

Professor Robin Osborne Classics THEME: Gender, Culture and Antiquity

Ms Erica Segre Modern and Medieval Literature THEME: Gender and Representation

Dr Brigitte Steger Asian and Middle Eastern Studies THEME: Gender, International Relations and Development

Dr Vickie Pasterski Psychology THEME: Gender, Evolution and Biomedical Sciences

Dr Sertaç Sehlikoglu Social Anthropology THEME: Gender, Culture and Antiquity

Dr Lauren Wilcox UCCGS THEME: Gender, International Relations and Development

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2

Scholarships

Gates Cambridge Scholarships (www. gatescambridge.org) are awarded to outstanding applicants from outside the UK to pursue a postgraduate degree in any subject at the University of Cambridge. The highly competitive programme aims to build a global network of future leaders committed to improving the lives of others. Applicants to our MPhil and PhD programmes are strong contenders for the Gates Scholarships and this year we were delighted to have a Gates International Scholar studying at the Centre.

Current UCCGS Gates Cambridge International Scholar 2016–17 Sharmila Parmanand (Philippines) PhD in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies 2016–17 Critical inquiry into Anti-Trafficking discourse in the Philippines This research will explore the factors that shape anti-trafficking discourse in the Philippines, in particular the dominant depictions of trafficking in the Philippine media and policy-making discourse, the prominent civil society organisations, the impact of US International Development funding and the involvement of Catholic/Christian organisations.

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CEO, The Women’s Foundation Su-Mei Thompson

The Women’s Foundation Hong Kong Scholarship The Women’s Foundation in Hong Kong, headed by CEO Su-Mei Thompson, funds the TWF Hong Kong Scholarship Scheme for the MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies. The Women’s Foundation is one of Hong Kong’s leading NGOs dedicated to the advancement of women. They aspire to conduct ground-breaking research, to run innovative and impactful community programmes and engage in education and advocacy in the pursuit of three main goals: (i) challenging gender stereotypes, (ii) increasing the number of women in policy and decision-making roles, and (iii) empowering women in poverty to achieve a better quality of life for themselves and their families. You can read more about the TWF’s projects at: http://twfhk.org

TWF Scholar 2016–17 Miu Yin Wong

Miu Yin Wong is the fourth student to be awarded The Women’s Foundation Hong Kong Scholarship, to study for the MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies in 2016–17. MPhil Thesis: LGBT Right Advocacy in Hong Kong’s Democratic Movement Abstract: Research in western countries has examined the interaction between democratization and the development of LGBT rights, focusing especially on the effects of the democratic political system and international normative pressure in favour of recognition of same-sex relationships (Ayoub, 2016; Kollman, 2016). This dissertation examined democracy and LGBT rights in a non-western setting, using Hong Kong, a postcolonial city where the democratic movement and LGBT equality advocacy has been rapidly developing, as a case study. The study first investigated the political stances and participation of LGBT individuals in Hong Kong’s democratic movements, and then looked into the struggles and discourse construction concerning LGBT rights advocacy and democratic development. Both micro- and macro-level analysis were used in this research: on a micro-analytic


level, the study looked at LGBT individuals’ personal motivations and experience for joining democratic movements, focusing particularly on the pressure, or even discrimination, they have received from other activists in democratic movements. On the macro-analytical level, this study addressed framing and mobilization in both social movements, and focussed on the intersectionality between LGBT right advocacy and democratic activism. In-depth interviews were conducted with the core activists of Hong Kong’s LGBT movement, as well as selfidentified LGBT individuals who also participate in Hong Kong’s democratic movements, in order to understand these individuals’ perceptions, negotiating processes and strategy adoption techniques in their advocacy work. This study aims to contribute to the debates on sexual citizenship that concern assimilation and radicalization, as well as highlight the interaction between LGBT rights advocacy groups and democratic movements in countries that are not established western democracies.

Chevening Scholarship Reetika Subramanian, MPhil. Chevening Scholarships are the UK Government’s international awards scheme aimed at developing global leaders.

Cambridge International Trust and Murray Edwards Scholarship Farhana Rahman, PhD

Contested realities in the Anti-Khatna Movement in India: Negotiating the Ideals of Female Respectability and the Performance of Sexuality.

Rickety Boats to Refuge(e): Gender, Identity, and Everyday Negotiations of Rohingya Refugee Women in Southeast Asia.

Yale Fox International Fellowship Emma Goldberg, MPhil. Toward a Feminist Notion of Cybersecurity.

CSC Cambridge International Trust Scholarship Eddie Wei, PhD.

James Pantyfedwen Foundation Scholarship Holly Williams, MPhil.

Understanding the Sentencing of Women: Evidence from Chinese Courts.

The James Pantyfedwyn Foundation supports students from Wales with tuition fees.

The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies has provided a solid theoretical training, which has sharpened my capacity for rigorous gender analysis. The multi-disciplinary training has not only come from the courses (especially the text seminars) but also the in-depth intellectual discussions with classmates, which I have particularly enjoyed. The University of Cambridge has provided me with numerous opportunities to learn from the most prominent global scholars, to participate in seminars, workshops and conferences, and to engage in profound academic and social debates.

Disrupting the Silence: Critical Discourse Analysis and New Feminist Social Movements.

Mary-Anne Ewart studentship from Newnham College, Cambridge Loui Williams MPhil. Gendered discourses of ‘vulnerability’ and homeless lives.

Cambridge Trust Africa Scholarship Maimuna Mohamud, PhD Gender, Citizenship and Peacebuilding in Somalia.

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3 The Distinguished Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professors 2016–17 Visiting Professorship Report, Judith Butler, December 2016 Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley, USA, served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2016. While in residence at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies Professor Butler undertook work on her project “New forms of vulnerability”.

Professors Carl Djerassi and Diane Middlebrook

The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship was generously established by Carl Djerassi (29 October 1923 - 30 January 2015), Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Stanford University, inventor of the contraceptive pill and an internationally renowned playwright, poet and author. He established the professorship in honour of his wife Diane Middlebrook, (16 April 1939 - 15 December 2007) who was Professor Emerita of Stanford University and Chair of Feminist Studies there. The Visiting Professorship scheme is a unique academic position designed to host the most distinguished international scholars from any academic discipline with an interest in gender at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies. As seen on pages 14-19 this scheme enables an exceptional range of scholars to think on the fundamental questions of humanity through a gender lens and we are extremely grateful to Carl and Diane for such an extraordinary endowment.

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Thank you for the chance to occupy the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship during the Michalemas Term of 2016. I found my accommodation at St. John’s College very comfortable and I was generously assisted by the Centre staff and I.T. Personnel at the Alison Richard Building. This was an inspired and productive time for me, and I was glad to make so many interesting connections with scholars at Cambridge. Lecture I gave a large public lecture in October, which, I believe, drew its audience from many fields within the University. I also then engaged in a series of conversations with young students and faculty members from philosophy, anthropology, theology, political science and literary studies on the issues raised by the lecture. Indeed, every day at Cambridge I met with some small group or an


individual who sought to have a conversation on gender and politics, gender in translation, or the contemporary political climate in the US and the UK, with special focus on the implications for gender studies and gender relations. I gave an interview to Professor David Runciman, Head of Department, Political Science and International Relations, and I met with a small group of faculty to discuss another essay of mine concerned with ethical obligations, their grounding and their implications. That group consisted of faculty from Philosophy, Spanish, Anthropology, Sociology and Gender Studies. We also welcomed a postdoctoral fellow in Philosophy to the discussion, visiting from Germany. I had the chance as well to meet informally with students studying media, and to meet with the MPhil students in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies for an open discussion of gender, power and politics, convened by the Centre for Gender Studies. I was glad to share meals with faculty from German Studies, Anthropology and Theology. I spoke with one of the chaplains on matters of gender, sexuality and theology, met with a small group of literature students to discuss queer theory and its implications for literary readings, and had a small meeting with graduate students pursuing work in theology. I was able to meet as well with two editors from Polity Press on the Cambridge campus to discuss the transformation of my Cambridge lecture into a published monograph, and other plans for a set of publications in the field of critical theory. Research During my time in Cambridge, I was able to continue my scholarship, focusing on an essay concerned with gender in translation, focusing on the implications of monolingualism for the

Professor Judith Butler and Dr Lauren Wilcox

development of gender theory. My public lecture was drawn from that manuscript, and I continued to write further on that topic at Cambridge. I also revised work that I am preparing on “new kinship” that engages the work of Euripides’ play, The Bacchae, and continued work on a long-term project on Kafka and legal theory, focusing on his prescient account of indefinite detention. The Cambridge University Library holdings were very helpful to these efforts. Because I was hosted by the Centre for Gender Studies in Cambridge, I was able quite easily to meet with colleagues in the London vicinity during my stay, including those at Birkbeck, Goldsmiths, and the London School of Economics.

I am most grateful for the opportunity, and have learned substantially from the students and faculty with whom I was able to meet during my lively stay on campus. I thank the Centre for Gender Studies again for the great opportunity and for the wonderful hospitality. I was honoured to be among you. Sincerely, Judith Butler Maxine Elliot Professor Department of Comparative Literature, Program in Critical Theory UC Berkeley, USA ANNUAL REPORT Academic Year 2016/17

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Visiting Professorship Report, Seyla Benhabib, May 2017 Seyla Benhabib, Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, Yale University, served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Lent 2017. While in residence at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies, Professor Benhabib undertook work on her new book project, Legal Utopianism and Democratic Pessimism. Transnational Law and Democratic Sovereignty. It is an honour and a pleasure to write this report on my term as the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor at the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies during the Lent Term of 2017. I wish to express my gratitude to Dr Jude Browne, the Frankopan Director of Gender Studies, for her incisive intellectual comments, good humour, energy, and infectious ability to make connections among people. Dr Lauren Wilcox, the Deputy Director, made me feel less desperate about the fate of the American Republic through sharing many anecdotes and news about current politics in the USA. I am thankful to Joanna Bush, the Centre Administrator, for her infinite patience with the many mishaps created by the whims of national and university bureaucracies and for taking me through them patiently and efficiently.

Judith Butler, Judith Shklar, Albert Hirschman and Isaiah Berlin. My stay at the Centre for Gender Studies was invaluable in helping me complete this project, which will be published by Princeton University Press in 2018, with due acknowledgment to the Visiting Professorship. This work (around 400 manuscript pages) is a contribution to intellectual history and contemporary political theory in that it seeks to bring to light the significance of these autobiographical themes in the systematic work of these thinkers.Two chapters in this forthcoming work formed the basis of the major lectures I delivered during my stay.

crisis from a European and a global perspective, and it proceeded to an analysis of Hannah Arendt’s famous phrase “the right to have rights” and its critique by the contemporary French thinker, Jacques Rancière. Hannah Arendt’s reception in the UK has never been effusive, but the growing interest in her work on the part of feminist theorists such as Judith Butler and Jacqueline Rose (both former Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professors), as well as the attention paid by the general public to her far-sighted diagnoses of statelessness and the refugee crises, have changed this.

Lectures The Visiting Professorship Lecture was held on February 13, 2017 at Peterhouse - also dear to my heart from the time I spent there during my Seeley Lectures. Entitled “From the Right to have Rights to the Critique of Humanitarian Reason. Migrants and Refugees in Political Theory,” this lecture began with my discussion of the contemporary refugee

I am grateful to Jude Browne and to Duncan Bell, who chaired the session, for their incisive questions after the lecture. I would like to mention the thoroughly festive dinner during which I had the pleasure to meet Dale Djerassi, Professor Carl Djerassi’s son, who took a special interest in the lecture topic because his father had in fact written a fascinating book called Four Jews on Mt. Parnassus [A

Research I arrived in Cambridge with a book project called “Exile, Statelessness, Migration: Jewish Themes in Political Thought.” Over a span of nine chapters, I discuss these themes as they arise in the work of Hannah Arendt, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Mr Dale Djerassi (Professor Carl Djerassi's son) and his partner, Ms Alexandra MacDowell, at Professor Benhabib's public lecture as the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor.

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Professor Seyla Benhabib and Dr Duncan Bell

Conversation]. Benjamin, Adorno, Scholem, Schönberg (New York, 1983). I am delighted to integrate insights from these imaginary but historically quite insightful dialogues into my own book. It was also inspiring to attend a theatrical reading of Carl Djerassi’s work in London on March 2nd at which some segments of the music of Schoenberg, as discussed in this work, were performed. Special thanks also go to Professor Emeritus John Dunn, who has never agreed with me either about Hannah Arendt or about human rights but who always shows the patience to engage in rigorous conversation. On February 20th I held another public seminar, based on a pre-circulated paper on the question

of legalism in Judith Shklar’s work, in Dr Duncan Kelly’s “History of Political Thought Seminar,” at Trinity College. An overflow crowd of faculty and students was present. My commentator was Katrina Forrester, who has written on Judith Shklar and Bernard Williams, and I greatly benefited from her sensitive attempts to split the middle between realism and normativism in Shklar’s views of legalism and liberalism. Professor David Runciman and PhD student Samuel Zeitlin raised questions that have enabled me to produce a better chapter on these issues in my forthcoming book. Teaching On February 16th, I held a seminar for the masters’ students enrolled in the Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies programme and discussed the anthology,

Feminist Contentions (New York, 1995), which I had co-edited with Drucilla Cornell, Nancy Fraser and Judith Butler. The graduate students were interested in the ramifications of these theoretical debates for their more empirical work. Many students subsequently sought me out to discuss their projects in greater detail: Hakan Sandal, a Turkish PhD in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies student, sought my advice on democratic theory and Kurdish self-determination; Alexia Rose Alkadi Barbaro discussed with me her Master’s thesis on Hannah Arendt’s political philosophy; Scott Remer, a recent Yale undergraduate, was interested in advice on his Masters’ thesis on Erich Fromm, to be submitted under Duncan Kelly’s supervision. I should also mention Samuel Zeitlin, a PhD student

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from Berkeley, who greatly impressed me through his written comments on my Shklar paper, and who was my research assistant for a period of 3 weeks and greatly enhanced my writing as well as scholarship. He is a superbly well-informed young man who will make significant contributions to the history of political thought. A lively cohort of female Turkish graduate students, post-docs and some faculty sought me out on various occasions, and Dr Sertac Sehlikoglu, a post-doctoral student in the Social Anthropology Department, organized a Turkish women’s festive lunch on March 8th to celebrate International Women’s Day. Given the great significance of the upcoming referendum on the Turkish Constitution on April 15th 2017, it was hard not to get involved in discussions and meetings about this issue. On March 17th, I attended and spoke at an all-day conference on the referendum at Birkbeck College, London. Kerry Mackereth, a current MPhil in Multidisciplinary Gender Studies student, interviewed me early on in my stay to produce a video for the website of the Department of Politics and International Relations. Our discussion focusing on the refugee crisis has been posted on the Department’s website blog, The Long Run: http://inthelongrun.org/articles/article/ nothing-is-more-dangerous-for-humanbeings-than-to-be-forgotten-seyla-benha Clare Hall My husband, James Sleeper, and I are grateful to Clare Hall for having made available to us a wonderful flat with terrific views of Cambridge gardens. I would like to thank Master David Ibbetson and Dame Gillian Beer for their graciousness and hospitality. It was truly an honour that Dame Beer would spend time with me on a freezing morning in early February to welcome me to Clare Hall. Subsequently I attended a book party

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in honour of the publication of her work, Alice in Space. The Sideways Victorian World of Lewis Carroll (Chicago University Press, 2017). On February 8th and 9th Melanne Verveer, former United States Ambassador at-large for Global Women’s Issues, and currently the Director of Georgetown’s Institute for Women, Peace, and Security, located at Georgetown University, delivered the Tanner Lectures at Clare Hall on the topics of women, war and violence. I was one of the commentators on this occasion and I greatly enjoyed meeting her and our exchanges on many issues. We have remained in touch since that meeting. On March 14th I participated in an event at Clare Hall on women in science and academia, which discussed how to reconcile work, family, and career demands. This was an enriching conversation, which enabled me to draw upon my experiences and brought me further into contact with young women colleagues and to share experiences with them. In conclusion, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the Centre for Gender Studies for this invitation. I know that the friendships and contacts established during this time and the intellectual exchanges I had during this period will accompany me for many years to come. Seyla Benhabib Eugene Meyer Professor for Political Science and Philosophy Yale University

Upcoming Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professors Sandra Harding, Distinguished Research Professor of Education and Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, will serve as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2017, conducting research on Feminist Philosophy of Science and Technology: Thinking from Latin America. Bina Agarwal, Professor of Development Economics and Environment, Global Development Institute, School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester, will serve as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2018, conducting research on Group Farming in Asia and Europe: Potential Models for Sustainable Agriculture? Rosi Braidotti, Distinguished University Professor, Utrecht University, will serve as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2019, conducting research on The Post-human Turn in Feminist Theory.


Previous Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professors Mignon Nixon, Professor, History of American Art, The Courtauld Institute of Art, served as the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor for the Michaelmas Term 2015, conducting research entitled Sperm Bomb: Art, Feminism, and the American War in Vietnam. Jack Halberstam, Professor of American Studies Ethnicity, Comparative Literature and Gender Studies, at the University of Southern California, served as the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Lent 2015, conducting research on The Wild: Histories and Futures of Queer Anarchy. Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2014, conducting research on Feminism and the Abomination of Violence. Nancy Fraser, The Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Political and Social Science and Department Chair at The New School for Social Research, served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor

during Lent 2014, conducting research on a new book project: A Feminist Theory of Capitalist Crisis: re-reading Marx, Polanyi, and Habermas in the 21st Century. John Dupré, Professor of Philosophy of Science and Director of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis) at the University of Exeter served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2013, conducting research on Gender and 21st Century Biology. Sara Ahmed, Professor of Race and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Lent 2013, conducting research on Willful Women: Feminism and a History of Will. Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington DC served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2012, conducting research on Gender, Security, and Inter-Generational Conflict in Muslim Societies Post 9/11.

Cindi Katz, Professor of Geography Environmental Psychology Program & Earth and Environmental Sciences Program at The City University of New York, Graduate Center served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2011 and Lent 2012, conducting research on Childhood as Spectacle: Relays of Anxiety and the Reconfiguration of the Child. Catharine MacKinnon, the Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School and James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, served as The Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Lent 2011, conducting research on Trafficking, Prostitution and Inequality. Marcia Inhorn, the William K. Lanman Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs at Yale University, served as the inaugural Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor during Michaelmas 2010, conducting research on Global Gametes: reproductive ‘tourism’ and Islamic bioethics in the high-tech Middle East.

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Public Engagement Series

The public events programme consists of high profile lectures, symposia and a multi-disciplinary gender research seminar series. The Centre has an unparalleled record of eminent speakers on gender including Nobel Prize winners such as Amartya Sen and Shirin Ebadi; academics such as Judith Butler, Catharine MacKinnon, Carol Gilligan and Onora O’Neill; cultural figures, writers, and activists such as Jane Fonda, Larry Kramer and Nawal el Saadwi; professionals such as Helena Kennedy, scientific pioneers such as Carl Djerassi and political figures such as SRSG Margot Wallström (see the Centre’s ‘Public Events’ archive at www.gender.cam.ac.uk). The Centre’s Public Event Series is extremely popular and consistently attracts large audiences to events that span the disciplines. Below are the academic events organised in 2016–17:

Public Lectures and Seminars Professor Seyla Benhabib (Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science & Philosophy, Yale University) on From the Right to have Rights to the Critique of Humanitarian Reason. Migrants and Refugees in Political Theory Dr Anjali Bhardwaj-Datta (Centre of South Asian Studies, University of Cambridge) on Gendering Urban Space: State, Household, and the Market in Post-Colonial Delhi Dr Mwenza Blell (Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge) on “We’re Pakistanis, we don’t do that”: Menopause, Reproduction and Meaning among British Pakistanis in Bradford and Leeds

Dr Lucy Delap (Faculty of History, University of Cambridge) on Feminist History, Space and the Marketplace Dr Robbie Duschinsky (Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge) on Pulling the World in and Pushing it Away: Thinking, Food and Sex as Coping Strategies in Lauren Berlant and Mary Gaitskill Professor Sanjeev Goyal (Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge) on Gender and Social Networks

Professor Judith Butler (Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley, USA) on Gender in translation: on the limits of monolingualism

Dr Ian Horton (London College of Communication, University of the Arts London) on Deconstructing Daisy: Gender and National Identity in Donald Duck Weekblad

Dr Ian Cooper (Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge) on Political Party Quotas as a Facilitator of Gendered Parliamentary Representation: Evidence from Namibia

Dr Sneha Krishnan (Junior Research Fellow, St John’s College, University of Oxford) on What does a Good Girl Look Like? Moral Minds and Model Bodies in Chennai

Dr Sara De Benedictis (Independent Researcher, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham) on “It’s the NHS we work in so...”: The Austerity Politics of Televisual Representations of Childbirth and Midwifery

Dr Ina Linge (Modern Humanities Research Association Scholar, University of Cambridge) on “Different from the Others”: Narrating Queer Livability in German Sexological and Psychoanalytic Life Writings (c.1900-1930)

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Professor Catharine A. MacKinnon (Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School and the James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School) on Butterfly Politics Professor Carol Sanger (Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law, Columbia Law School) on About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in Twenty-First-Century America Dr Marco Wan (Associate Professor of Law and Honorary Associate Professor of English, University of Hong Kong) on Masculinity, Fiction and Law in Nineteenth Century France: The Case of Paul Bonnetain’s Charlot s’amuse Ms Anne-Kathrin Weber (Research Group for Gender Studies, University of Giessen, Germany) on Compassion, Pity and Empathy as Political Emotions - Potentials for Justice or Elements of Destruction? A Systematic Comparison of the Political Theories of Hannah Arendt and Martha Nussbaum Ms Sigal Spigel, Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminars Coordinator, UCCGS Ms Sigal Spigel is the Coordinator and Chair of the Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminar series. She works as a psychologist and psychotherapist and her research is on motherhood, feminism and psychoanalysis. Sigal was a founding member of the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies and a member of the original Working Party, serving as a Deputy Director. Subsequently she has been an active member of the Centre’s Academic Advisory Committee. Sigal can be contacted about the Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminars at: sis22@cam.ac.uk ANNUAL REPORT Academic Year 2016/17

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Professor Carol Sanger About Abortion The Centre for Gender Studies hosted an excellent talk and book signing by Professor Carol Sanger, The Barbora Aronstein Black Professor of Law, Columbia Law School for her new book About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in Twenty-First-Century America, on Thursday 25 May 2017 at the Alison Richard Building.  Professor Carol Sanger

“One of the most private decisions a woman can make, abortion is also one of the most contentious topics in American civic life. To pry open the silence surrounding this public issue, in About Abortion Carol Sanger distinguishes between abortion privacy, a form of nondisclosure based on a woman’s desire to control personal information, and abortion secrecy, a woman’s defence against the many harms of disclosure”.

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Professor Catharine A. MacKinnon Butterfly Politics The Centre for Gender Studies and the Faculty of Philosophy co-hosted a presentation and book launch for Butterfly Politics by Professor Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School and the James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, on Monday 15 May 2017 at the Faculty of Law.

Professor Catharine A. MacKinnon

“A powerful critique of the legal and institutional denial of reality that perpetuates practices of gender inequality, Butterfly Politics provides a model of what principled, effective, socially conscious engagement with law looks like”.

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PhD Programme in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies

Current PhD Students Maimuna Mohamud (Cambridge Trust Africa Scholarship)

Lena Moore

Sharmila Parmanand (Gates Cambridge International Scholarship)

Gender, Citizenship and Peacebuilding in Somalia Supervisor: Dr Devon Curtis (Department of Politics and International Studies)

Human, Transhuman, Posthuman: The United States Military and the End of Vulnerability Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox (University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies)

Saving Our Sisters: A critical inquiry of anti-sex trafficking discourses and interventions in the Philippines Supervisor: Dr Tomas Larsson

Abstract: In my doctoral research, I examine the theoretical and practical implications of conceptualizing citizenship rights as a form of restitution (understood in its broader political sense), in the aftermath of civil war. My current central question is, how do various groups of women and historically marginalized communities in post-conflict Somalia understand citizenship and what rights do they demand? Related questions include, what becomes of the individual rights and the duties of a citizen after a violent conflict?  Is it possible to reconcile groupbased citizenship with the broader objectives of state and nation building projects? Situating my research within broader debates on gender and citizenship in non-western, non-liberal contexts, the outcomes of my research may have implications for post-conflict states in Africa and elsewhere, and it may contribute to discussions on citizenship in postconflict societies.  

Abstract: My doctoral research focuses on ways in which, in a United States military context, automation, ‘precision,’ and healing technologies that appear to protect against war-related risk and suffering produce ‘human,’‘transhuman,’ and/or ‘posthuman’ subjects through differential assignations of vulnerability and invulnerability. This research is grounded in case studies of ‘precision’ warfare, the exceptionalization of Special Operations forces, and militarized/military ‘healing’ technologies. Through examinations of these particular cases, and by situating the US military’s ‘posthuman project’ within a greater system of white supremacist patriarchy, this research reveals ways in which new military technologies and the production of ‘posthuman’ subjects may reproduce insecurities and exclusionary logics globally. Further, in making that which the state seeks to erase or render invisible the object of inquiry, this project aims to challenge dominant narratives of a civilizing military transhumanism that signals the emergence of a ‘safer,’ more ethical way of war.

Abstract: My research focuses on the anti-human trafficking ecosystem in the Philippines. In particular, I look closely at the policy-making process, the relationships among international funders, the state, and civil society actors, the knowledge claims made about women in vulnerable employment situations and how these claims are negotiated and produced, and finally, the effects of interventions such as raids and rescue operations on their target populations, especially sex workers. With my work, I hope to give primacy to the experiences of individuals directly affected by these interventions and contribute to the ongoing conversation about how best to uphold their agency and human rights.

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Farhana Rahman (Cambridge International Trust and Murray Edwards Scholarship) Rickety Boats to Refuge(e): Gender, Identity, and Everyday Negotiations of Rohingya Refugee Women in Southeast Asia Supervisor: Dr Manali Desai (Department of Sociology) Abstract: Through feminist ethnographic research, my doctoral research seeks to explore how forced migration and the mass exodus of the Rohingya community to Southeast Asia have transformed Rohingya gender relations and roles in displacement – specifically, how forced migration has affected the gendered subjectivities and lived experiences of Rohingya refugee women. The theoretical framework of this project lies at the junction of gender studies, anthropology, and studies in forced migration, and will engage with issues such as the body, gendered violence, culture, victimhood and agency, and social transformation.

Hakan Sandal

The Kurdish LGBT Movement: Survival Under Colonial Practices Supervisor: Dr Ayse Zarakol (Department of Politics and International Studies) Abstract: My doctoral research focuses on the intersection of ethnic and gender identities, particularly on Kurdish

LGBT’s. Studying how LGBT+ communities situate themselves in ethnic and class struggles presents a holistic understanding of identity construction processes and of the resistance practices. Understanding the boundaries and formation of identities in the Kurdish LGBT+ context, and studying the Kurdish struggle and the LGBT+ struggle together, will contribute to gender studies, queer politics, postcolonial studies and subaltern studies, and will engender new debates on the global LGBT+ movements. The research will eventually shed light not only on an LGBT+ struggle in the Middle East context but also make an an alternative reading and historicization on Kurdish movement/society.

Eddie Wei (CSC Cambridge International Trust Scholarship)

Understanding the Sentencing of Women: Evidence from Chinese Courts Supervisor: Professor Loraine Gelsthorpe (Institute of Criminology)

Elizabeth Yarrow

Gendered bodies: institutions, sex binarism, and the experiences of gender minority youth within health and education systems Supervisor: Dr Robbie Duschinsky (Department of Public Health and Primary Care) Abstract: My doctoral research is focused on gender variance in childhood and adolescence, particularly amongst individuals assigned female sex at birth. Through examining the experience of trans, intersex and genderqueer children in their interactions with core social institutions, including schools, health services and the justice system, her work explores how notions of sex, gender, and sexuality organise aspects of identity during childhood; how gendered embodiment is regulated through institutional practice, and the consequences of ‘deviant’ or ‘unintelligible’ embodiment.

Abstract: Despite frequently voiced concerns about discrimination in the criminal justice system there has been surprisingly little new research during the last decade into the way women are sentenced. My thesis seeks to fill that gap: it examines statistical data on Chinese men and women offenders from eight provinces; and it also looks at the factors (blameworthiness, dangerousness, and practical constraints) judges identify as influences on their decision-making. The aim, therefore, is to describe how judges at three main levels (district, intermediate and high courts) set about taking account of substantive differences in men’s and women’s lives and their perceptions of ‘real justice’ for women.

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Gender Studies Profiles Dr Jude Browne The Jessica and Peter Frankopan Director of UCCGS

Dr Jude Browne has been awarded the Pilkington Prize in recognition of outstanding teaching. The Pilkington Prizes were initiated by Sir Alastair Pilkington – graduate of Trinity College, and the first Chairman of the Cambridge Foundation – who passionately believed that teaching excellence was crucial to Cambridge’s future success.

thing I have studied here!’ is a wholly typical response. Jude has been a superb supervisor and Director of Studies for King’s College and has played a significant role in ensuring the overall success of the HSPS Tripos. It is hard to think of anyone who has done more for social science teaching in Cambridge in recent years: Jude has helped to change its focus, to engage our students and to draw different subjects together.”

In his letter of support, the Head of the Department of Politics and International Studies, Professor David Runciman wrote: “For fifteen years Jude Browne has been an outstanding teacher of Gender Studies, pioneering both undergraduate and graduate courses and contributing an enormous amount to help raise the profile of interdisciplinary approaches to the teaching of gender across the University. Her personal commitment has been tireless and transformative. As course director and a fully engaged, hands-on teacher she has developed the MPhil in Multidisciplinary Gender Studies into one of the leading programmes in the country, designing and delivering courses that have received consistently outstanding feedback. In the last two years she has introduced a new paper in Gender and Politics into the HSPS Tripos, which has garnered glowing tributes from students, who speak of its range, its topicality and its ability to broaden their horizons. ‘The best

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Jude Browne receives her 2017 Pilkington Prize Award from Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Graham Virgo QC

Current Research: In keeping with previous themes of my research, I am working on the lack of fit between theories of equality and justice and their translation into practice, including contexts such as technology-use, the function of regulation and interpretations of efficiency, and structurally-focused public policy. I have just completed two research projects. The first is critical structural analysis on the fertility insurance industry and its promotion as a means

to enhancing gender equality in the economy. The second is a project on the demise of the public body as a central feature of democratic politics and its potential impact on reproductive technology services by way of a case study. I am currently working on a new project focused on Artificial Intelligence (AI) replacement of the human labour force as well as an on-going bookproject on gender, theory and policy.


Dr Lauren Wilcox Deputy Director of UCCGS and UTO in Gender Studies My research is focused on embodiment, contemporary political violence, technology, and feminist, queer, and International Relations theory. Bodies of Violence, my first book, was recently honoured with two book awards, from the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies section as well as the Theory section of the International Studies Association. My current work engages with the concept of the ‘posthuman’ as a way of engaging with the dynamics of race, gender, and sexuality in theories about war. I’ve presented work from this project at the Millennium Conference at the LSE, the University of Westminster, University of Aberdeen, SOAS, University of Gotenburg, and University of Stockholm this past year. I also organized a closed workshop here at Cambridge on ‘Queer Theory and International Relations’. Next year I’ll be on leave as a CRASSH Early Career Fellow in which I hope to make substantial progress toward my next monograph tentatively entitled War Beyond the Human.

Wilcox, L. (2017) “Practicing Gender, Queering Theory,” forthcoming at Review of International Studies. Wilcox, L. (2017) “Drones, Swarms, and Becoming-Insect: Feminist Utopias and Posthuman Politics” forthcoming at Feminist Review, Special issue on Feminist Utopias and Dystopias. Wilcox, L. (2017) “Embodying Algorithmic War: Gender, Race, and the Posthuman in Drone Warfare.” Security Dialogue 48:1, pp. 11–28. Wilcox, L. (2015) Bodies of Violence: Theorizing Embodied Subjects in International Relations. (New York: Oxford University Press).

Key and recent publications include: Wilcox, L. and Fishel, S. (2017) “Politics of the Living Dead: Race and Exceptionalism in the Apocalypse,” Forthcoming at Millennium: Journal of International Studies, special issue on Racialized Realities in International Relations.

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Dr Bogdan Popa Temporary University Lecturer in Gender Studies My research lies in queer and feminist studies, history of political thought, critical race studies, and Marxist theories of labour. My first book, Shame: A Genealogy of Queer Practices in the Nineteenth Century, was published in Edinburgh University Press’ Take on the Political Series in May 2017. The book’s key intervention in the fields of political theory and history of sexuality is to extend Jacques Rancière’s understanding of “politics” to nineteenth-century feminist activism. Also, this monograph provides a radical reframing of shame as a vital impetus of queer feminist activism. I am presently working on two new book projects. The first one is titled Sexual Horror and the Invention of a New Future. Turning to the work of queer feminist and critical race theorists ranging from W.E.B. Du Bois to Lauren Berlant, Fred Moten and Sara Ahmed, it shows that horror became a key mechanism to produce a global history of white heteronormativity. In illuminating that whiteness produces distinct historical types of sexual monsters, the book draws on various archives from early American documents and political theory to film studies and the history of socialism. In particular, it is focused on a major conceptual shift. Late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century became a turning point in global history when Europeans have started to speak from the position of the slave, as they were “slaves” to various coercive figures. In analyzing what led to this change in vocabulary,

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I claim that the new conceptual frame draws on a new understanding of sexual terror. From exclusively terrifying, blackness and indigeneity were marked as sexually exciting. The payoff of the book is to suggest that a new future can be re-imagined by elaborating tactics to break the frame of white monstrosity. The second book project, tentatively titled How Queer is Socialist Realism? investigates the production of films and literature in Eastern Europe (particularly in Romania) between 1950 and 1970. By decentering a history of anti-communist narratives, it identifies hidden possibilities in a genre such as socialist realism, which is generally regarded as ideological trash. In analyzing erotic dynamics between older and younger party activists, communist children, and enraged peasants, it suggests that socialism was a project that offers an exciting history and an unrecognized queer future.

Ms Joanna Bush Centre Administrator, UCCGS I have just completed my second year at UCCGS, and I came to the Centre after spending over six years with the University’s Human Resources Division, managing highprofile events and specialist administration for professional development programmes. This year the Centre has welcomed seven PhD in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies students and it has been a pleasure to support them in their first year, through to the successful completion of their formal review and registration for the PhD. 201617 has also been another strong year for our MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies programme and I wish our MPhil students all the very best for their future plans.

Publications: Shame: A Genealogy of Queer Practices in the Nineteenth Century (May 2017), New York and Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

I have particularly enjoyed meeting and working with our prestigious visiting academics this year. It was a privilege to host hugely successful public lectures for our 2016-17 Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professors, Judith Butler and Seyla Benhabib, and to arrange book launch events for Professors Catharine A. MacKinnon and Carol Sanger. I look forward to welcoming Professor Sandra Harding to the Centre as our Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor for Michaelmas 2017, and to working with our new Lecturer in Gender Studies, Dr Bogdan Popa.


Appendix I MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies 2015–16 - student list 1.

Yalda Afif (Afghanistan) Gender Inequalities faced by Afghan Women in Afghan Diaspora in London Supervisor: Dr Shana Cohen, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

2.

Milena Bacalja Perianes (Spain) Menstruation, Gender and Power: Moving Beyond a Public Heath Approach in Malawi Supervisor: Dr Jessica Johnson, Peterhouse, Cambridge

3.

Camille Bigot (France) Fathers, Patriots, And Villains: Men’s Violence in Global Politics Supervisor: Dr Alex Jeffrey, Department of Geography

4.

Emily Black (United Kingdom) Queers to the Front Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

5.

6.

Jana Cattien (Germany) Gender, Policy and Development in Uganda: Imagining a Transnational Feminist Solidarity Supervisor: Dr Andrea Grant, Emmanuel College, Cambridge Shilei Chen (China) Present State of China’s Feminist Art: Gaining Insight into Chinese Female Artists’ Art Creations Supervisor: Dr Anna Bagnoli, Wolfson College, Cambridge

7.

Akos Erzse (Hungary) The Islamic State of Dispossession Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies

8.

Siobhan Fenton (United Kingdom) Sexual Violence and Sexual Orientation: Bisexual Women’s Experiences of Sexual Violence in the United Kingdom Supervisor: Dr Katie Dow, Department of Sociology

9.

Sofija Ftes (Serbia) How did the Revolution of the Arab Spring affect Working Women in Tripoli, Libya? Supervisor: Dr Geoffrey Edwards, Department of Politics and International Studies

10. Yushu Geng (China) Early Chinese Feminisms (1897-1911) Supervisor: Dr Rachel Leow, Faculty of History 11. Elspeth Hayward (United Kingdom) Bodies Behaving Badly: A Study of Sexuality at the Intersection of Disability and Commercial Sex Supervisor: Dr Sylvana Tomaselli, Department of Politics and International Studies 12. Hester Hockin-Boyers (United Kingdom) Imagining Intersex: A Genealogical Discourse Analysis of Medical Approaches to Intersexuality 1931-2016 Supervisor: Professor Martin Johnson, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

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13. Asma Jamil (United Kingdom) Gendered Violence: Understanding Dowry Practice and its Link to DowryRelated Violence (DRV) in British South Asians Supervisor: Dr Sara Silvestri, Department of Politics and International Studies

19. Lauren Power (Australia) Feminist Engagement Online: the Personal is Political is Participatory Supervisor: Dr Anne Alexander, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

14. Mathias Jensen (Denmark) Women, Men and Part-Time Work in the UK: Gendered Trends, 1979-2015 Supervisor: Dr Mark Ramsden, Department of Sociology

20. Miriam Shovel (United Kingdom) Consuming Gender: Using Ellipses to Read Nostalgic Masculinity in The Great Gatsby Supervisor: Dr J. D. Rhodes, Department of Italian

15. Rachel Katz (USA) Masculinities and Femininities: Romance and Authenticity on American Dating Apps Supervisor: Dr Katie Dow, Department of Sociology 16. Qi Li (China) Queering Digital Images in Cyberspace: A Study of Rainbow-tinged Image in ‘Celebrate Pride’ Online Activism Supervisor: Dr Phillipe Bourbeau, Department of Politics and International Studies 17. Tsz Lam ‘Natalie’ Ngai (Hong Kong) Women in Politics and Media: A Critical Study of News Representation of Women Politicians during the Umbrella Movement in Post-handover Hong Kong Supervisor: Dr Olivier Driessens, Department of Sociology 18. Amanda Padoan (Italy) Snake in the Cooking Pot: Exploring the Social Impact of the AntiHomosexuality Act on Sexual Minorities in Uganda Supervisor: Dr Adam Branch, Department of Politics and International Studies

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21. Heather Spain (United Kingdom) Military Bodies: The Mobilisation of Masculinity in the Contemporary British Military Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies 22. Swetha Sridhar (India) Mediated Selves: Gender and Intimacy in Indian Reality Television Supervisor: Dr Norbert Peabody, Wolfson College, Cambridge 23. Christopher Tso (New Zealand) Trans Gendering Language: Trans Men’s Bodies, Language, and Identities Supervisor: Dr Monica Moreno Figueroa, Department of Sociology 24. Shuai ‘Eddie’ Wei (China) Gender and Judging in China: Empirical Data and Participant Observation in Three Distinct Courts Supervisor: Dr Lauren Wilcox, University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies


Does yoga once (We gratefully acknowledge permission from Celeste Barber for the use of this image)

And to end on a lighter note, Celeste Barber (Actor, Writer and Comedian) has gifted us this image as a commentary on media portrayals of women’s lives!

http://celestebarber.com/writing www.instagram.com/celestebarber The University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies Alison Richard Building 7 West Road  Cambridge CB3 9DP 

www.gender.cam.ac.uk

Print: Esson Print


“Having spent a considerable amount of time on the field, documenting stories of sexual violence in India, I often grappled to establish a more critical perspective. The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies programme perfectly filled this void by enabling me to theorise my practical insights. The most rewarding part of the programme was to listen first-hand to academic stalwarts, whose works I had previously savoured only through research journals and books.” Reetika Subramanian MPhil student 2016-2017

“The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies enriched my worldview in ways I never could have anticipated. Every morning I came to class eager to learn from the profound insights of our lecturers and the stimulating discussions facilitated in our seminars. The faculty members of the Centre for Gender Studies were incredibly devoted to our intellectual growth, and dedicated so much of their time to helping us refine our projects. I am proud to be an alumna of the MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies and I know that the lessons from the course will serve my classmates and I for many years to come in any fields that we may choose to enter. I am grateful for the rigor of our courses, the trailblazing leadership and commitment of our faculty members, and the warm community of my classmates.” Emma Goldberg MPhil student 2016-2017

UCCGS Annual Report 2016-17  

University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies: Annual Report 2016-17

UCCGS Annual Report 2016-17  

University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies: Annual Report 2016-17

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