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PA P E R PLANES

BA Illustration Course Publication UCA Farnham

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The title of the publication this year, chosen by the students, reflects their ambitions and aspirations for the future. They are launching into their future careers, their journeys and destinations will be as individual and diverse as their personal narratives, interests and visions. The Illustration graduate show this year reflects the growing diversity of the subject. From drawing to digital, print to 3D, animation to ceramics what connects the work and the underlying strength and philosophy of the course is visual narrative, social documentary and storytelling. This 2018 show reflects the contemporary society and culture from where it came, the message is loud and clear‌ this work helps us frame our understanding of the world. Good illustration is defined by its message as well as its medium. But what lies ahead for them in their continuing creative journey? The successful illustrator needs to be adaptable, flexible and entrepreneurial in order to respond to the new opportunities that our increasingly visual culture demands. They need to be resourceful, open minded and confident to explore and create new contexts for illustration into the future. Our students have developed many transferrable skills; they are excellent researchers, entrepreneurs, communicators, team players, problem solvers, project managers, visual and critical thinkers as well as being sensitive to their surroundings and those they work with. But above all, to be an illustrator they need to be curious about everything around them. These are exciting and challenging times for our graduates to be launching their careers. We would like to congratulate them on their success on the course and wish them luck in their future creative careers.

Jane Cradock-Watson Course Leader BA & MA Illustration

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CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 4 STUDENTS WORK 8 COLLABORATIONS & EXCURSIONS 64 Chetham’s Library 66 Documentary Discourses Conference 74 Bologna Course Trip 78 Lion and Lamb Press 80 Student exchange to Poland 82 Witchcraft and Femininity 86 WHAT’S NEXT? 90 Alumni Updates 92 MA Illustration 100 Thanks to... 103

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INTRODUCTION

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UCA’s renowned and long established specialist Illustration course, based at the Farnham campus, has a strong reputation for visual narrative and storytelling, underpinned by an understanding that the best of illustration is based on exciting, original ideas.

both the traditional techniques of drawing, printmaking, animation and bookmaking, as well as new processes and media, such as digital illustration, digital photography, online publishing and interactive illustration. Students investigate ideas through drawing, text, sequential design, book production, moving image, printmaking, three dimensions and creative writing. They have the opportunity to explore a diverse range of media, processes and techniques that reflects the evolving nature of contemporary illustration.

The emphasis of the course is on visual experimentation, investigation and innovation, supported by the development of strong ideas, drawing and storytelling skills. Based in spacious, purpose built well lit studios, students have access to an extensive range of facilities on campus including animation, printmaking, risograph printing, book production, ceramics, Mac suites, digital printing, 3D work-shops, textiles, photography and moving image.

The delivery of the course curriculum reflects contemporary working patterns in the creative industries; collaborative and flexible, challenging and experimental, initiating new opportunities for shared and individual work. The studio community is central to student experience, supportive and friendly. They are taught largely through studio-based projects and workshops, supported by regular tutorials and group reviews - there’s a lively programme of visiting speakers, practical skills-based workshops, pop up exhibitions, live projects and external visits.

The course is ideally suited to students who want to develop a strong, individual style and explore the relationship between illustration and the wider socio-political and cultural contexts of contemporary life. Illustrators have a unique way of seeing the world, then interpreting and communicating this visually to a wider audience - harnessing

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introduction

Credit: Ellis Wixon – Gibbs

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Introduction

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STUDE NT

Credit: Alice Eckton

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WORK

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PAVLINA BELLAPAISIOTOU pavlinabella96@gmail.com Instagram: pbillustration 10


Student work

ZOE WHITE Zoewhite@lineone.net Instagram: @Zoewhiteillustrations 11


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NICOLAS HARPER Nicolasharper@live.co.uk Instagram @nicolasharper_

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Student work

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JASMINE DACE jasminedace@outlook.com jasminedaceillustration.co.uk Instagram and Twitter: @jasminedaceillustration

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STATEMENT ?

Student work

NATASHA BOND tashabond16@gmail.co.uk @natashaillustrations 15


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ROXANNE TIPPING roxy.tipping4@gmail.com @roxy.tipping

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Student work

YIDI WANG yidiwang93@yahoo.com Yidiwang16@gmail.com www.behance.net/yidiidiy @yidi0214 17


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SAM NARRAMORE @NarramoreArt @SamNarramore Spn1996@hotmail.co.uk 18


STATEMENT ?

Student work

NANA A KENA Nanaakua.kena@gmail.com Website: https://nanaakuakena.wixsite.com/nkillustration

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JADE SMITH jadesmithillustration@hotmail.com @jadesmithillustration facebook.com/jadesmithillustration jadesmithillustration.co.uk

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Student work

MEG SANDS megsandsillustration@hotmail.com @megsandsillustration facebook.com/megsandsillustration megsandsillustration.co.uk

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THEODORE EDWARD MATTHEWS theodorematthewsillustration.com theodorematthewsillustration@gmail.com @theodorematthews

Student work

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MONIKA JATAUTAITE monikajata@gmail.com cargocollective.com/ monikajata

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Student work

MARCUS BROWN marcus.artbase@gmail.com

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Student work

THEODOR FAHLÉN theodorfahlen@gmail.com theodorfahlen.com @theodorfahlen 27


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MARCUS BENTLEY mebentley234@gmail.com Marcus Bentley Illustration @marcusbentleyillustration

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Student work

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SAM FINNIMORE Sam.Finnimore@outlook.com sam@theace.life www.theace.life (The Ace Life) @samfinnimore

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Student work

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Student work

TOM GRIFFITHS www.tomgriffiths.online tombgriffiths@gmail.com @tomgriffithsillustrations @artomgriffiths

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ALEXIS KIPLING alexiskipling@gmail.com www.alexiskipling.com @akillustrated

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Student work

YASMIN KRISHNA - DAS @yamparidas yasminkdas@googlemail.com

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YOMI OLADUNJOYE yomioladunjoye@gmail.co.uk arty933.wixsite.com/ yomioladunjoye

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HANNAH HARGRAVE Hargrave.hannah@gmail.com @hannah_has_art

Student work

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HERMENIA POWERS Hermenia.powers@gmail.com @shesherpower

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Student work

ABBIE SMITH Abbie.smith96@hotmail.co.uk big8rother.wordpress.com 39


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EDEN MCCULLAGH edenmccullagh@hotmail.co.uk @eden_eats_souls_art

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Student work

REBECCA KATHARINE HURN rebecca_hurn@btinternet.com rebeccahurnink.blog @rebeccahurnink

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DALMA BUJNOVSZKY dalmabujnovszky@gmail.com www.dalmabujnovszky.com @dalmabujnovszky 42


Student work

DĂ IRE LAWLOR @daire_lawlor @dairelawlor dairelawlor.myportfolio.com/

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ALANA WATKINSON watkinsonalana@gmail.com https://alanawatkinson.com/ @alanawats 44


Student work

CATRIONA SHEPPARD catrionashepp.art@gmail.com www.sheppart.cargocollective.com www.shepp-art.tumblr.com @shepp_art 45


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ANDREIA CHEN andreia88chen@gmail.com www.behance.net/chenninz @andreiachen

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Student work

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NICOLA BARNARD nicolaclbarnard@gmail.com nicolabarnardillustration.com  @nbarnardillustration  48


Student work

ALICE ECKTON aecktonillustration@gmail.com @aecktonillustration

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MIRSADA DOMI mirsadadomi@live.com @mdillustrations_ www.flickr.com/photos/114261509@N08/

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Student work

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Student work

JOHN STROVER @j.strover @gnargoyle_ 53


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KATE PALMER Katepalmer_16@yahoo.co.uk @Kpillustrations_

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Student work

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TOBY CURDEN tobycurden@outlook.com tobycurden.com @tobycurden

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Student work

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JASMINE TUTTON jasminetutton08@live.co.uk jasminetuttonillustration.com @JazTutton jasminetuttonillustration 58


Student work

AMANDA PERRIN amandaperrin14@gmail.com @_amandadraws amandaperrin.com amandadraws

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CHARLIE SKINNER charlie.andrew.skinner@ googlemail.com @chazskinner 

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ALICE YOUNGHUSBAND Alice Younghusband younghusbandillustration@gmail.com @younghusband_illustration @aliceyounghusband

Student work

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Student work

JACK RICHARDS @jacknrichards Jack-n-richards.tumblr.com

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COLL ABO & EXCUR 64


RATIONS SIONS Credit: Andreia Chen

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C H E THA M ’ S LI B R A RY A collaborative project set by Iro Tsavala / UCA Illustration Year 3 Leader, Laura Smyth / Library and Archives Director Vaughan Williams Memorial Library & Susana Sanchez Gonzalez / Digital Project Officer Chetham’s Library

content could range from political propaganda to fairy tales, but a large number of broadsides and chapbooks contained the lyrics to popular songs of the day. The songs sometimes reflected contemporary issues, such as working conditions, political commentary, or reporting on a recent tragedy or grizzly murder – broadside songs became a key source for hearing the latest news.

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As part of our continued collaboration with External Partners, this year we were very pleased to work with two new institutions: the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library (VWML) and the Chethams’ Library. VWML is housed within Cecil Sharp House in London and is a specialist folk arts library dedicated to preserving and providing access to folk songs, dances, tunes, and customs from England and beyond. Chethams’ Library in Manchester was founded in 1653 and is the oldest public library in the English-speaking world. Founded by Humphrey Chetham, a gentleman merchant, to improve education in the Manchester region, the collection now focuses on the history of the Manchester area.

In this year’s brief, the third-year students were invited to respond to these broadside ballad collections and produced a range of outcomes, encompassing visual narratives, three dimensional objects, embroidered images, posters & zines. Their ideas were informed by research into the stories, characters and content of the songs, the aesthetic, format or design of the broadsides, as well as the history of the printing tradition & technology.

Both libraries have multimedia collections of print, sound recordings, film and photographs, as well as an assortment of broadsides and chapbooks. The latter are ephemeral pieces of literature which were sold across the country on streets, at fairs, and from pedlars’ packs between the 16th and 19th centuries. The

The final projects were presented in an exhibition at Chetham’s Library, alongside their collection of beautiful old books, adding to the renewed interest in broadsides and chapbooks in recent years. http://www.chethams.org.uk

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collaborations /excursions

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Credit: Ines Oliveira Araujo

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collaborations /excursions

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collaborations /excursions

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collaborations /excursions

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D O C U M E N TA R Y D I S C O U R S E S CONFERENCE This year the course team celebrated its rich history and engagement in documentary illustration by convening the Documentary Discourses conference. The event brought together researchers, practitioners, theorists from illustration, animation, photography, film, journalism and comic studies. The event aimed to draw together the different debates, views and experiences around documentary practices, in order to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue that could inform future directions of practice and discourse in documentary illustration. It was an exciting and packed filled day starting with Gabrielle Cariolle and Paul Roberts analysis of illustration reportage of the Jungle Camp in Calais in UK and French newspapers. Dr Nina Mickwitz discussed how documentary comics are used as a mode of advocacy for refugees to tell of their experiences. Alys ScottHawkins talked about the importance

of mark making and drawing in her practice and animation. Vanessa Rolf, Mairead McClean and Birgitta Hosea discussed the significance of materiality and memory in their documentary practice. The conference coincided with the Transcriptors exhibition held in the James Hockey Gallery which included work from documentary practitioners from the USA, India, Germany and the UK. These included the exquisite sketchbooks drawings of military trade fairs by Gill Gibbon, work by Oliver Kugler, Veronica Lawlor, Nina Sabnani, Vanessa Rolf, animation and original drawings from Kaputt/ Broken produced by Volker Schlecht, Alexander Lahl, Max Moench. Jim Walker

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documentary/conference

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documentary/conference

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BOLOGNA COURSE TRIP “Living and working for four decades in a Bologna apartment and studio he shared with his unwed sisters, Morandi painted little but bottles, boxes, jars, and vases. Yet like that of Chardin and the underappreciated William Nicholson, Morandi’s work seems to slow down time and show you things you have never seen before.”

made drawings and ordered pink cosmopolitans with their pasta. I became particularly enamoured with a bottle of Soave, which was noted by a number of year two students. My argument that I was supporting the local economy didn’t appear to hold water.

Jerry Saltz This years study trip to Bologna took in the Morandi Collection, amongst many diverse activities over the five day period. Temporarily housed in MAMBo, the museum of modern art, it proved to be an oasis of calm and focus. A beautiful city which glows with pale terracotta and yellow ochre. Narrow streets contrast with wide Piazzas, with something to draw at every turn. The students took trains to Venice and Florence, climbed the Garisenda and Asinelli Towers,

The perfect place to be a flaneur, to wander, sit, look, think and be impressed by history and architecture, fuelled by mortadella, ragu and tortellini. Our normal very early start, both travelling there and back was the only slight drawback, but what a trip. Robin Chevalier

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course trip

The Bologna Childrens Book Fair was impressive by both its size and content. An enormous display under glass, of original illustrations, gave the students the opportunity to view work from around the world and reflect on the competition. It provided opportunities for illustrators to make potential connections with publishers and was ridiculously busy.


LION AND LAMB PRESS

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This year has so far seen the production of ‘Secrets’ another collaborative publication by the MA students, as well as participation in three international book and illustration fairs.

course and in the UK for a few weeks, represented the Lion and Lamb Press at UCA Canterburys ‘All Inked Up’ Book Fair in the autumn, selling their prints and books as well as books by recent alumni Daisy Lee. Following this, in May this year, the MA students also managed and organised the Lion and Lamb Press at Turn The Page Book Fair in the historic city of Norwich, where they launched their collaborative narrative publication ‘Secrets’.

This year BA third year students presented the Lion and Lamb Press for the first time at the Illustration Fair at the Towner Gallery in Eastbourne. It was an inspiring location and an opportunity for the students to sell their work alongside many professional illustrators and to gain valuable experience in presenting and talking about their work to a new audience. The MA students, some of whom had only been on the

The Lion & Lamb press was launched by the Illustration course in 2012, as a publishing venture to support interesting projects from current students, recent graduates and staff alike. The press encourages experimentation as well as collaboration between individuals, other courses and small presses in the UK and abroad.

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lion &lamb and lamb press press

Credits: Yen Min Hsu, Zhuyi Li, Cathy Brett, Eunjeong Park

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STUDE NT E XCHANG E I have enjoyed studying at ASP Katowice in Poland. It has helped me to develop an understanding and appreciation of the countries rich visual history and culture.

The work I have produced in Poland differs in some ways to my practice at UCA. My first year of study at UCA allowed me to experiment with a wide range of materials and processes and I have developed this further at Katowice. I have done more printmaking utilizing what I had learnt at UCA this made my experience at Katowice more exciting and experimental. The cultural exchange has been an enriching experience. I have met many friends from different countries and have been able to learn some basic Polish. Trips and visits have helped me to build up an insightful view of a beautiful country and have inspired the work I have created at ASP Katowice.

At Katowice, I have learnt about the rich visual heritage of poster art, in particular film posters. This art form is less present in UK visual culture, whereas in Poland it is still relevant today. Research is a key element in my practice both in the UK and Poland. The research skills I developed at UCA have proved invaluable in supporting my studies in Katowice.

Ellie Daniel

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course trip

As part of my study programme, I selected units from both the graphic art and graphic design schedules. The units were poster design, digital graphics basics, interpretation of literature, intaglio printmaking and interdisciplinary actions. They all included some aspect of illustration in methods taught and the purpose of creating the work.


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Ellie Daniels Interpretation of literature work

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course trip

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My longstanding interest in mythology and monster-lore culminated in a dissertation in which I explored how contemporary cultural representations of women fueled the European witch-hunts, and how these representations affected women over the following centuries:

Over the course of my dissertation research, it became abundantly clear that this topic would stay with me even after I am done writing. After all it did not only satisfy my curiosity towards witch-lore, but also brought up questions about women and society that are more than relevant today.

“What seems to be lurking behind all these depictions and accusations is a much deeper male anxiety concerning power dynamics and female autonomy. In a society, which places such high value on male control of women’s sexuality, fertility and autonomy, the idea that this dynamic might somehow reverse must have been a frightening, unnatural thought whether it was conscious or subconscious.” (Bujnovszky, 2017:12)

Therefore I chose to continue my exploration of witchcraft and femininity in my Major Project, albeit from a less factual, more folkloristic point of view. I introduced witch related superstitions into my imagery with the intention to create a series of images that evoke the folklore with curious details and subtle, eerie atmosphere. Dalma Bujnovszky

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Witchcraft and Feminism

Credit: Dalma Bujnovszky

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Credit: Dalma Bujnovszky

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Witchcraft and Feminism

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T A WH ? T X E N

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ALUMNI STORIES

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FAYE MOOREHOUSE – 2011

http://fayemoorhouse.co.uk

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alumni stories

I have been working full time as a selfemployed illustrator since 2014! I still can’t believe it’s actually my job. The majority of my work is self-initiated, so I make and sell paintings and zines. I also work on client projects, such as editorial illustrations for magazines and more recently book projects with publishers. If I had one piece of advice for current illustration students I’d say; start getting your work out there now! I set up my online shop whilst at uni and that now contributes to around 80% of my income. It’s also really encouraging when you’re just starting out and people want to buy your art!


MELISSA SINCLAIR – 2014 After leaving university I felt a mixture of excitement about starting new illustration projects, as well as feeling a bit lost and overwhelmed as to what on earth I was to do next. I interned at Print Club London and helped out on various projects and workshops, but in terms of my own illustration work I felt that I wanted to develop further, so I looked in to studying towards a masters. The following year I started an MA in illustration, it was a lot of hard work but it has helped me to grow in confidence and feel more prepared as an independent artist. I work in a shop which sells prints, books, and all kinds of handmade pieces, and alongside that I take part in illustration fairs selling prints, books, paintings and cards, selling my own work, which I find really helps to get your work seen.

The main thing I learned from university was that if you keep working hard, your work will develop without you even realising, and that it really is rare to be able to spend a long time working on your own personal projects so make sure that you enjoy it instead of feeling worried and stressed like I often did. http://melissasinclair.co.uk

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alumni stories

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EMILY FLUEN – 2015 I own a hand drawn and embroidered clothing and accessory brand called Limpet Store, which I started up about a year after leaving uni. I design t-shirts, sweatshirts and accessories and sell them online alongside them being stocked by retailers such as Topshop and ASOS Marketplace.

is now in a place that I’m really proud of and fingers crossed it’ll keep going that way! Learning to trust in my own original ideas and instincts when doing work is the most useful thing I learnt on the course. My advice to new students would be just to try everything you can. I think being open minded when it comes to new and unfamiliar processes is really important. Even if you know it’s something you don’t like, it can lead to something new and might surprise you. The fact there is time to make mistakes at Uni is amazing too - I felt like that was the main method of how I discovered how I wanted my own style to be.

I didn’t really know what I wanted to do job wise once I’d left UCA, I knew I wanted to work in illustration/print design in some way but that was it. I did some freelance work and after applying for lots of jobs which weren’t exactly what I was looking for, I started to make and sell my own work on Instagram and at markets and fairs around London. Then I took my brand online and made my own website. I’m really happy with how much my brand has grown over the past 2 years and

www.limpetstore.com Instagram : @limpet_store

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NATALIE TURNER – 2013

ELISE GANNON – 2017

I left uni 5 years ago and got a job as a designer at De La Rue; I am now the Design Team Leader where 7 designers report into me, and I still do design work myself. My first role was as a Junior designer, I got this job through the New Designers exhibition where one of the designers noticed my work. My career has not developed in a way that I expected, however I think it's put me on the long term path that I wanted when I was at uni. The illustration course has helped me in a few ways. I would not have my job today if it wasn't for my degree. The regular critique has helped me in the real design world - you need to accept critique in a non personal way and create the best piece of work for the customer. Also, the course has helped me create connections with other graduates. To students just starting out, my advice is to experiment as much as you can, and take critique seriously. It's meant to make you a better designer. If you aren't able to take critique in a positive way you're only harming yourself and ultimately making you a more difficult person to work with in the real world.

I am a part time teacher at Hertfordshire Regional College teaching on the Animation and Graphic Design pathways, and I am also a freelance illustrator. Since graduation, I have illustrated a children’s book and in January, started teaching drawing and design skills to students between the ages of 17-23. I originally planned on applying to more creative industry jobs and try to make my own work. Teaching at a college/ university level was something I had hoped to get into in about five year’s time. The course helped me build on many of the skills I use now for this job. If I could do it all again, I would make more use of the facilities available at the uni and create more digital work. My advice to new graduates, would be to make sure you develop versatile skills so you can work in many different medias and be more flexible when finding clients if you want to go freelance. https://www.elisegannonillustration. com

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LOUIS DYSON – 2015 I’m currently working as a Graphic Designer at Sky Sports News. Predominantly designing on-screen designs through After Effects and Photoshop.   Since graduating I’ve worked as a Graphic designer for Greenways Publishing, Puma and Sky. I started to understand in 3rd year this was the path I was passionate about and was more natural for me to pursue. I believe anyone on this course can steer their career in any path, it’s whether they really desire it. If they don’t, then no it won’t happen. Noticing others talent is vital. You can’t do it alone in my industry, accepting criticism and noticing when you can learn from others, sets you apart from the rest. I collaborated with fellow illustrator Josh Lewis, I knew incorporating his work into my designs, would make my pitch a much stronger one. Team work is the key. The professional practice part of 3rd year helped me collate a suitable portfolio to steer my career down this route.

I wouldn’t change anything, or it wouldn’t have got me to where I am today. Follow your head, but listen to people more. My advice to current students is to shape the course how you want, but you need to use the support of peers and tutors, this is vital. When I wake up I feel excited to go to work and UCA made that possible.

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M A I L L U S T R AT I O N

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“Contemporary Illustration practice has grown to en- compass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for the image makers and storytellers.� The MA Illustration course offers students the chance to challenge the boundaries of illustration, both in its practice and its context. Contemporary Illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for the image makers and story tellers. The growth of online digital cultures and the impact of digital image making on traditional image making requires flexible and adaptable practitioners as well as providing unique opportunities for the entrepreneurial illustrator. This course is primarily concerned with the illustrated narrative and offers a creative and intellectual environment in which you can rigorously pursue a project of self-directed study. It also promotes in-depth rigorously conducted research to ensure that students are able to contextualise their own work in relation to the leading edge practice in Illustration.

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In recent years Illustration is increasingly seen in many different contexts in contemporary visual culture, including Illustration for publishing, book illustration, book arts, comic strip, graphic novels and moving image. This diversity of practice in illustration can be seen in the variety of work, which the students have produced this year, which has included photography, book works, letterpress, 3D models and installation pieces. Illustration at UCA has a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas. Students will explore narrative storytelling, authorship, self publishing, book production and visual narratives through the development of a personal project. The MA course supports students to develop their own independent voice and are encouraged to take a self directed entrepreneurial approach, to develop and explore creative opportunities and options for their work. This entrepreneurial emphasis is supported by access to specialist facilities such as digital media suites, photography, printmaking and bookmaking.


Collaborating with others is a distinctive feature of the course. This year in addition to their individual collaborative projects, they have been involved in several exciting external collaborative projects as a group. Producing a collaborative publication and managing the Illustration departments table at the Turn The Page Book Fair in Norwich, All Inked Up Book Fair at UCA Canterbury, as well as working with a local surgeon and his colleagues on an external research project. Graduates go on to work successfully as freelance

Illustrators, University academics and designers. Two recent graduates were selected to be part of Talent 100 at Taipei Creative Expo in Taiwan 2018. The MA Illustration course provides students with the opportunity for extended critical debate, a high degree of critical reflection and integration of theoretical and practical concerns as part of the realisation of an ambitious body of work. MA illustration

Credit: Boonyapat Deedenkeeratisakul

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Credit: Ellis Wixon-Gibbs

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THANKS TO... Designed, Art Directed & Edited by Emma Mills and Jane Cradock-Watson All Photography Teaching staff and students on BA Illustration With thanks to all the Illustration Academic staff team, including: Jim Walker, Robin Chevalier, Iro Tsavala, Fiona White and Tom Dowse, as well as the students and alumni who contributed articles, Dalma Bujnovzky, Ellie Daniel, Emily Fluen, Catherine Pape, Louis Dyson, Lucy Waldman, Melissa Sinclair, Natalie Turner, Elise Gannon and Faye Moorehouse. All Farnham support teams especially Jonathan Jarvis, Tony Lee and Katie Prendergast. Printers PPG Publishers The Lion and Lamb Press @Ucaillustration @Ucamaillustration www.ucreative.ac.uk

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UCA BA Illustration Yearbook 2018  

Examples of work from the graduates of the UCA Farnham BA Illustration, along with reports on activities and events on the course throughout...

UCA BA Illustration Yearbook 2018  

Examples of work from the graduates of the UCA Farnham BA Illustration, along with reports on activities and events on the course throughout...

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