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UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES COLLEGE OF NURSING

Fall 2010

Spring 2011

THE HEART OF

giving DONORS PROVIDE SUPPORT FOR FUTURE NURSES


From the dean’s desk For nearly five years, I have had the honor to serve as dean of the only academic health sciences center College of Nursing in Arkansas. I would like to share that I will be stepping down as dean June 30, 2011. It has been a joy to witness the accomplishments of our faculty, staff and students during my tenure as dean and to serve as leader of this organization. Since becoming a faculty member in 1990, I have had the opportunity to see the vision for nursing education at UAMS become a reality in our state. Our College has had so many accomplishments— the result of relationships that have been built since the College’s inception. Individuals have donated time, talent and gifts; as a result, our faculty, staff and students have been supported and have benefited in ways that I am certain far exceed the expectations of those who worked so diligently to establish this College in 1953.   I will continue to hold an appointment with the College and look forward to long-lasting relationships with each of you. 

Our college has had so many accomplishments – the result of relationships that have been built since the college’s inception.

Pathways is published by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing. UAMS Chancellor Daniel W. Rahn, MD Direct comments and inquiries to Dean Claudia P. Barone, EdD, RN College of Nursing University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences 4301 W. Markham, Slot 529 Little Rock, AR 72205 Website: www.nursing.uams.edu Editors: Cynthia Gregory Elizabeth Caldwell Contributors: Claudia Beverly Linda Calhoun Cynthia Gregory Nate Hinkel Robert Kennedy Leanne Lefler Sandie Lubin Donna Middaugh Osmonetta McRae Jean McSweeney Kimberly Morton Rebecca Patterson Latrina Prince-Williams PJ Reed Mary Robertson Sarah Rhoads Cheryl Schmidt Kimberly Scruggs Nancy Shaver Linda Shock Elaine Souder Kristine Stump On the Cover: Sharon Harwood Knighten and Nicholas Lang, M.D., have established scholarships in the College of Nursing. Cover photo: Johnpaul Jones Design: Mikel Holloway

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Editorial From the Dean’s Desk............................................................................................................................... Inside Cover Education BSN Honors Program: Training the Brightest and Best.................................................................................... 4 Bridging the Gap: RN to BSN Program............................................................................................................. 6 Reaching Out with Advanced Care across Arkansas......................................................................................... 8 Recruitment and Enrollment: Not a One-Size-Fits-All Approach................................................................... 10 Off-Campus BSN Program at Hope Celebrates 10th Anniversary................................................................. 12 Research Arkansas Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence............................................................................ 14 Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center ................................................................................... 16 Tsai Receives Professorship in Geriatric Nursing............................................................................................. 18 Hidden Treasures............................................................................................................................................... 19 Annual Research Day Conference 2010........................................................................................................... 20 College of Nursing Scholarship and Research Center..................................................................................... 21 Service Leadership Course Encourages Service............................................................................................................ 22 UAMS College of Nursing Inspires Red Cross Course.................................................................................... 22 Students Win 2009-10 Blood Drive Contest..................................................................................................... 23 Cover Story Building Bridges ................................................................................................................................................ 26 Development 2010 Phonathon............................................................................................................................................... 28 Decades of Giving ........................................................................................................................................... 29 Donor Spotlight Dean’s Circle of 100.......................................................................................................................................... 30 Daughters Honor Mother’s Legacy.................................................................................................................. 31 The BSN Class of 2010 Honors Crystal Webster............................................................................................ 32 New Scholarship Corner................................................................................................................................... 33 14th Annual Scholarship Donor Appreciation Dinner.................................................................................... 34 Honor Roll of Donors....................................................................................................................................... 34 New to You Program Provides Book Stipend................................................................................................... 35 $50,000 Award to Assist Minority Students...................................................................................................... 36 Beaumont Foundation COO Visits Campus.................................................................................................... 36 Alumni News Alumni Accolades.............................................................................................................................................. 38 Bridging the Gap............................................................................................................................................... 39 PhD Program Celebrates 10 Years.................................................................................................................... 39 In Loving Memory............................................................................................................................................ 39 Accolades Chancellor Honors Faculty for Teaching Excellence....................................................................................... 40 Scholarship Recipients....................................................................................................................................... 42 2010 Dean’s Award Recipient........................................................................................................................... 42 Faculty and Staff Recognition........................................................................................................................... 43 Student Recognition ......................................................................................................................................... 43 Publications........................................................................................................................................................ 44 Grant Funding................................................................................................................................................... 46

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Education BSN Honors Program:

Training the Brightest and Best

Photo caption here.

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PATHWAYS • 2010


The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Nursing undergraduate Honors Program continues to thrive with nine students completing an externship during the summer 2010 semester. Undergraduate students participating in the Honors Program must meet stringent criteria to be selected. They are among the brightest and best of their class. During their undergraduate program, they completed 10 hours of master’s coursework. Courses such as master’s level Research Methodology and Nursing Theory replace similar courses on the undergraduate level. These 10 hours of coursework allow Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduates to have a jump start on their Master’s of Nursing Science degree. During the 2010 Summer Externship, four students were selected to participate in the UAMS Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence program. This group of students worked with geriatric scholars and traveled throughout the state to gain knowledge in health policy and geriatric care in Arkansas. Two honors students were involved in direct patient care at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock. They had excellent opportunities to explore pediatric nursing and worked in a preceptored role with a BSN-Registered Nurse in areas such as the Burn Unit, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and in Pediatric Intensive Care. Two honors students worked with a BSN-Registered Nurse in UAMS Medical Center in areas such as women’s health and cardiovascular nursing. One honors student was selected as a participant in

PATHWAYS • 2010

the Veterans Administration hospital’s VALOR program. This is a highly competitive role open to applicants throughout the state. The student was able to rotate to multiple units in the VA system for direct patient care opportunities preceptored by a BSNRegistered Nurse. During the summer externship program, honors students participated in a seminar course that requires several class meetings and journals, a written paper and podium presentation. In addition, they are enrolled in a master’s level course focused on professional practice. The College is very proud of the work these students accomplished. Linda Calhoun, MNSc, RN, coordinator of the BSN Program on the Little

Rock campus and director of the Honors Program, says the importance of the program cannot be overstated. “The summer externship experience is a life-changing event for these students,” Calhoun said. “They have a very rigorous schedule as they meet the challenges of working as a nurse and completing two additional courses at the same time. They move into the fall semester prepared to excel in their senior coursework because of this opportunity. I am honored to serve as the director of the Honors Program and to watch these young nurses grow so tremendously both personally and professionally during this short 10week timeframe.”

(First row, left to right) Candice H. Baker, Deborah Witonski, Carol Ann Meadors, Linda Calhoun, (Back row, left to right) Ben White, Ashley Hunter, Sarah Gray-Staples, Elizabeth Mitchell, Angela Harris and Adam Boone

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Bridging the Gap

RN to BSN Program The UAMS College of Nursing RN program is a statewide program designed for the working nurse. It allows registered nurses to broaden their education and greatly increase their career options. The online courses are based on the principle of adult students becoming lifelong independent learners. Just as nurses attempt to help their patients become more independent, the faculty attempts to make students more independent. Through the program, critical thinking skills are sharpened, communication and leadership abilities strengthened and relationships built with other highly motivated students. Research concepts are woven throughout the curriculum and evidence-based practice forms the foundation for learning and practice. “Our RN program is not the only place where RN students earn degrees, but it is one of Arkansas’ best—both for quality of the program and the personal interest of our dedicated RN faculty,”said Rebecca Patterson, APN, DSN, PNP-BC, coordinator of RN Programs. The UAMS Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are a key component to the program’s success. They are located in HelenaWest Helena, Jonesboro, Batesville, Mountain Home, Fort Smith, Fayetteville, Texarkana and El Dorado. The nurse faculty members in the AHECs serve as recruiters, advisors and preceptors for area students. They work closely with the Little Rock-based 6

faculty in identifying and arranging clinical sites and preceptors for the RN to work in his or her community. The College of Nursing offers three Web-based options for RN students who hold an associate degree or hospital diploma in nursing. The three options are the RN to BSN (Pathway I), the BSN/MNSc Articulated (Pathway II) and the Bridge (Pathway III). All three are designed to allow nurses to continue working while completing the requirements for an advanced degree. Students complete the program online and work with a preceptor in their geographic area to complete clinical requirements. Total credit to complete either Pathway I or Pathway II is 26 hours. The Pathway III requires 16 hours to complete. “The time to complete the program is individualized to fit the student’s needs. Each option may be completed on a full-time or part-time schedule. Pathway I – RN to BSN: Students with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher are eligible to apply. Students complete 26 hours of undergraduate course work to receive their BSN. Pathway II – BSN/MNSc Articulated: Students with a cumulative GPA of 2.85 or higher are eligible to enroll. It’s designed for registered nurses who do not have a baccalaureate degree but possess the background and ability to pursue leadership and specialty preparation at the master’s level. The curriculum

combines elements of the BSN program with the MNSc program by substituting master’s courses for BSN courses. With this option, students complete eight credit hours of graduate course work that is applied to completion of the BSN. These hours are in place of eight credit hours of undergraduate course work. Total numbers to complete BSN, including the graduate hours, is 26 credit hours. Pathway III – Bridge: Students who have a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing may apply to the graduate program in the College of Nursing as a bridge student. With this option, the student completes three undergraduate courses and then may immediately begin graduate course work. The student may also choose to submit a portfolio of work experiences to be considered for exemption for up to two of the three required courses. The student in this track does not earn a BSN. For more information contact: Rebecca Patterson, APN, DSN, PNP-BC Clinical Associate Professor, Coordinator, RN Programs Office: (501) 686-5216 rpatterson@uams.edu Osmonetta McRae, BBA, MM Recruiter Office: (501) 296-1040 McRaeOsmonetta@uams.edu


AheC North Central (Batesville/Mountain home) AheC Northwest (Fayetteville) AheC Northeast (Jonesboro) AheC West (Fort Smith) delta AheC (helena-West helena) AheC South Central (Pine Bluff) AheC Southwest (texarkana) AheC South Arkansas (el dorado)

Off-Campus BSN Program at hope Celebrates

10th Anniversary

May 2010 marked the 10th class to graduate from the UAMS Off-Campus BSN program at the University of Arkansas Community College at Hope (UACCH). Thirty new graduates were added in May for a total of 236 graduates since the progam’s inception. These new graduates, along with UAMS College of Nursing graduates on the main campus, provide a much-needed addition to professional nursing across the state. This unique program began at the request of former UACCH Chancellor Johnny Rapert because of the large numbers of LPNs who had graduated from the UACCH LPN program but had no way locally to become registered nurses. The visionaries instrumental in achieving this goal through an unprecedented partnership were B. Alan Sugg, phD, president of the University of Arkansas System; the late harry Ward, MD, a former UAMS chancellor; linda hodges, EdD, rn, dean of the College of Nursing from 1989-2006; patricia E. thompson, EdD, rn, former

associate dean for the Academic Programs; gloria Mugno, MS, rn, director of nursing education at the Area Health Education Center Southwest in Texarkana; and Charles Cranford, DDS, retired UAMS vice chancellor for regional programs. Mugno was the founding coordinator in 1998. She continued in this position through the fall of 2000. The first class graduated from Hope in 2001 and achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the NCLEX exam, setting a high standard of excellence for future classes. A majority of these 2001 graduates have continued their education, earning master’s degrees in nursing and helping to raise the standards of health care delivery in southwest Arkansas. Since the establishment of the Off-Campus BSN program in 1999, the curriculum at UACCH has been adjusted to educate and prepare quality students for acceptance into this program. The UAMS College of Nursing Advisory Board in Hope has given its support. For the past eight years enrollment has increased. The dedicated faculty and staff create an atmosphere that encourages students to achieve their goals. The cooperative spirit between UAMS and UACCH continues today. Claudia Barone, EdD, rn, dean of the College of Nursing, and Chris thomason, JD, UACCh chancellor, are committed to continued growth and development of this program. 77


Reaching Out

with Advanced Care across Arkansas

In 1971, administrators at the UAMS College of Nursing had a vision to advance the education of nurses in Arkansas by creating the Masters of Nursing Science program. Since that time, 1,070 nurses have earned an advanced practice master’s degree at UAMS. In fall 2010, another record was set with an enrollment of 295 master’s students. Minority enrollment is at an all-time high and more than 12 percent of the students are male. Students can now select from 10 advanced practice specialties for their master’s education. Advanced education should be accessible to nurses across the entire state. To keep up with the increasing student population, various methods of distance technologies are used. Classes are telecommunicated live to more than 13 sites throughout Arkansas. This mode assisted 134 students last year to attend classes from their home area. Like most colleges today, UAMS is challenged by a shortage of classroom space and scheduling conflicts. Also, students desire to have their courses offered online. To meet these needs, the College is now offering classes via Blackboard online and WIMBA. WIMBA is an online, live interactive “classroom” that allows students to attend classes from their home, work or any remote location. In 2010, the College exceeded its goal of 50 percent of the graduate courses incorporating distance technology.

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In challenging economic times, lack of funds to attend graduate school becomes more of a reality. In 2010, 31 students received a total of $25,000 in college scholarships. The need for advanced practice nurses is greater than ever in Arkansas. In the 2009-2010 school year, 58 new advanced practice nurses were provided in Arkansas, including: • 17 new family nurse practitioners • 10 acute pediatric nurse practitioners • Seven primary care pediatric nurse practitioners • Three adult acute care nurse practitioners • Three family psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioners • Four women’s health nurse practitioners • Three gerontology nurse practitioners • In addition, 11 new nursing administration graduates will assume mid- to top-level administration positions.


Recruitment and Enrollment

Not a One-Size-Fits-All Approach for the College of Nursing The world of college recruitment is not a one-size-fits-all concept. Millions of students are matriculating into college each year and each has his or her own idea of success. The role and responsibility of a Student Services Office is more critical to the success of a student than ever before. Marketing and advertising have become a crucial part of targeting prospective students. The office gathers inquiries from several outlets to ensure a large applicant pool. These sources include technology (Internet and e-mail, Facebook and podcasting); direct mail; phone calls and face-toface visits to schools, hospitals and clinics. The heaviest reliance has been on technology, and one of the major reasons is the cost savings. Vast amounts of program information can be posted to the website where a prospective student has 24/7 access. In the last three years the College of Nursing has reduced the amount of paper, toner and postage used. Before 2007, prospective students were mailed a bulky envelope containing brochures describing the programs and also outlining the steps to apply. Since then, the information packet has been made available electronically to anyone with computer access. When contact is made with a prospective student, goals are set to help them be successful. This may include encouraging them to maintain their grade point average, advising them to repeat courses or evaluating past coursework for equivalency.

It is important that those goals are realized early to help ease the minds of students who desire admission to the College of Nursing. All of the strategies the College has implemented to recruit interested students, along with the trend toward technology and the popularity of the nursing major, have proven successful. In 2009-10, enrollment in the junior class increased 18.26 percent, with an increase of 34.78 percent from 2007 to 2010. If the senior class enrollment is included, the College of Nursing has seen a 23 percent increase in the total undergraduate enrollment for fall from 2007 to 2010. Another area of enrollment growth for the College has been the Master of Nursing Science program. From 2009 to 2010, the program grew by 40 students, or 13.9 percent. Even more notable is the student population growth from 2007 to 2010. The Master of Nursing Science program has seen a 27.8 percent increase in enrollment from 2007 to 2010. Taking into account both the undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, the College of Nursing has grown 25 percent from 2007 to 2010. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, enrollment rose by 3.5 percent for entry level baccalaureate programs nationally, while the UAMS College of Nursing enrollment for that level grew 18.26 percent. The AACN said enrollment in master’s programs grew by

9.6 percent, while UAMS College of Nursing enrollment grew 13.9 percent. The process to entice a prospective student to enroll is a long one. It takes the efforts of many to bring someone from interest to enrollment. The Student Services Office is dedicated solely for students and has been operating as one unit since 2007. Enrollment numbers prove that this effort is working. For more information contact: Student Services Office 4301 West Markham, #529 Little Rock, AR 72205 College of Public Health Building, 5th Floor, Room 5234 (Phone) 501-686- 5224 (Fax) 501-686-7591 Hours Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

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Research Arkansas Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence

The Arkansas Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence (HCGNE) was established in 2001 with funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation. For the past 10 years the Center’s goal has been increasing the capacity of academic geriatric nursing to provide expert geriatric care that improves the health of older adults in Arkansas and the southern region of the United States. Efforts were focused on three initiatives: education, research and leadership. The Foundation invited the Center to apply for another round of funding with the focus on geriatric nursing faculty development and sustainability. Elaine Souder, phD, rn, Hartford Center co-director, also serves as the director of the doctoral program at the UAMS College of Nursing. Currently five College of Nursing doctoral students are committed to a career in geriatric nursing: Beth Evans, linda Crumpton, lana Brown, Judy laBonte, and Carol Compas. Evans and Brown are faculty members of the UAMS College of Nursing. Crumpton is a faculty member at Arkansas State University College of Nursing, and Labonte is on faculty at the Baptist College of Health Sciences in Memphis. Compas is with the Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care. 10

The Summer Geriatric Nursing Externship is an eight-week program that began in 2003 for BSN nursing students between their junior and senior years. The externship provides a stipend of $4,000 for each student supported by the HCNGE and external funding from friends of the HCGNE through a benefit luncheon hosted by the College’s Community Advisory Committee. The purpose of this externship is to provide learning opportunities in leadership, practice, education and research related to geriatric nursing. Souder leads this program. In May 2010, four externs were selected: Carol Meadors, Adam Boone, Elizabeth Mitchell and Sarah Gray Staples. The externs worked with preceptors from the Arkansas Aging Initiative (AAI) and the Coalition for Nursing Home Excellence. They also attended the Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care Quality Improvement Conference in Hot Springs and worked with leaders in the nursing home field and in Alzheimer’s disease education. Cornelia Beck, phD, rn, FAAn, and pao-Feng tsai, phD, rn, Hartford Center co-directors, lead the Aging Research Interest Group, an interprofessional monthly meeting held to discuss scholars’ research and to foster collaborations. The meetings focus on developing proposals for external funding, the conduct of research and the

preparation of presentations and publications. This group offers an excellent opportunity to receive critiques from experts in many disciplines and initiate interdisciplinary research collaborations, which have proven successful in obtaining research funding and in dissemination of research findings. The John A. Hartford Foundation awards BAGNC Scholarships (for doctoral students) and Claire M. Fagin Fellowships (for postdoctoral faculty) each year. Since 2001, the Hartford Center has supported eight fellows and eight scholars. The BAGNC scholar program supports two years of doctoral work and awards a total of $100,000 ($50,000 per annum) to each scholar. The Claire M. Fagin Fellowship provides $120,000 for the two-year fellowship ($60,000 per annum) for advanced research training and mentorship designed to assist doctorally prepared nurses committed to faculty careers in geriatric nursing. Current awardees are: Donna Bowren, phD, rn (Claire M. Fagin Fellow 2009-2011); Susi Sifford, phD, rn (BAGNC Scholar 20082010); Leanne Lefler, PhD RN (Claire M. Fagin Fellowship for 20082010). The Geriatric Psychiatric Nursing Collaborative seeks to improve care provided by nurses to elders with dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and other psychological problems. Gerontological Psychiatric Nursing


Competencies have been developed by faculty from the Hartford Centers from the University of Pennsylvania, University of Iowa and UAMS. UAMS’ Beck said this group is focusing on the development and dissemination of geropsychiatric nursing curricula using the Portal of Online Geriatric Education (POGOe) as a next step. The national Advancing Excellence in America’s Nursing Homes announced Feb. 1, 2010, that Arkansas was the first state to reach 100 percent enrollment of nursing homes in Phase II of the campaign. Carole Ault, BSN, RN, project director for the Arkansas Advancing Excellence Campaign (AR AEC), also received a bonus for the program of $2,000 to use for nursing home culture change programs and education. Claudia Beverly, PhD, RN, serves on the national steering committee. As part of the Coalition for Nursing Home Excellence and the AR AEC, UAMS offered Partners in Caregiving training to nursing homes across the state. The Partners in Caregiving program promotes enhanced communication between administration, nurses, staff and families. To date, 67 percent of the nursing homes in Arkansas have received this training. The AR AEC is utilizing the educational directors from the eight Arkansas Aging Initiatives to provide training for nursing homes in all eight regions of the state.

In 2009, the Center partnered with the Arkansas Community Foundation and was awarded a two-year grant of $250,000 with a required $250,000 match to promote the geriatric nursing work force in Arkansas. The principal investigator for the grant is Beverly and the project director is Charles R. Jones, APN, RN. This award will allow the assessment of the status of the geriatric work force and the ability of schools of nursing in the state to accept students into their programs. The speaker for the 2010 Distinguished Nursing Leader Lecture was Joanne Disch, PhD, RN, FAAN. Disch is a clinical professor and the director of the Katharine J. Densford International Center for Nursing Leadership and holds the Katherine R. and C. Walton Lillehei Chair in Nursing Leadership at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.

She has extensive experience as an educator, chief nurse executive, researcher, leader and policy maker. While at UAMS, she met with doctoral students, scholars, fellows and nursing faculty to discuss issues facing nurses today. The UAMS Hartford Center led state, regional and national efforts in various organizations. Beverly serves as a faculty member for the Geriatric Nurse Leadership Academy supported by Sigma Theta Tau International. As a result of her leadership, the Academy’s meeting was held in Little Rock in spring 2010. Beck continues to serve as the national leader for the Nursing Home Center for Excellence, formerly the HCGNE Nursing Home Collaborative. Tsai received the Alice An-Loh Endowed Professorship in Geriatric Nursing. Lefler received the 2009-2010 College of Nursing Research Excellence Award.

The 2009-2010 Hartford Externs (From left to right): Sarah Gray Staples, Elizabeth Mitchell, Adam Boone and Carol Meadors

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Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center

As the Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center enters its final year for funding by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), it can report much accomplished by the research team, funded investigators and faculty scholars. The National Institute of Nursing Research sponsored a twoday conference in August 2010 at the NIH campus to examine outcomes from the centers it has sponsored over the previous 25 years. Jean McSweeney, phD, rn, FAAn, as TBIRC director, presented a paper on how the Center-sponsored projects have impacted science related to symptom management and quality of life. McSweeney also displayed a poster featuring the Center Model and outcomes of the Center-funded studies. She also displayed this poster Sept. 30, 2010, at the National Institute of Nursing Research 25th Anniversary Scientific Symposium. The College of Nursing established the research center for individualized nursing interventions, named the Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center, to bring together a cadre of scientists to facilitate and enhance the development of the science of individualized nursing interventions and inform clinical practice. The Center is composed of the Administrative Core, which facilitates research on individualized nursing interventions, and the Pilot/Feasibility Studies Core, which educates and mentors the 12

Center’s pilot investigators and faculty scholars in conducting research on individualized nursing interventions. The Center has funded 19 pilot studies and three faculty scholars. The core and pilot investigators have discovered scientific evidence for individualized interventions; developed, refined and published a conceptual model to guide research; and published a manuscript on developing and testing tailored interventions based on the Center’s model. Pilot investigators have received more than $11 million in additional extramural funding. The Center also developed a database of more than 1,000 scientific articles related to tailoring and testing interventions, and the Administrative Core has three related publications. To date the pilot investigators and faculty scholars have conducted and disseminated relevant clinical research on individualized nursing interventions with more than 50 papers or posters from local to international conferences, and have published 12 manuscripts, with more under review. Additionally, three of the pilot investigators have proposals under review at the NIH. The Centersupported research has made a significant impact on improving the health and well-being of people across the lifespan. Due to change in direction and criteria, the College did not meet criteria for renewal. The principle investigator, Jean McSweeney, phD, rn, FAhA, FAAn, and College of Nursing Dean Claudia Barone, EdD, rn continue to explore the possibility of sustaining the Center through private foundations or by individual endowments. Faculty remains committed to the science of tailoring of interventions and the

College plans to pursue research funding in this area. The Center has provided a strong foundation to pursue this research area.

Recently Published Manuscripts supported by the Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center Cole, C.; Doan, C.; Ballinger, N. & Brown, G. (2009). The costs of recruiting: Reflections of a bean counter. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 2(4), 251-255. Beck, C.; McSweeney, J.; roberson, p.; richards, K.; tsai, p. & Souder, E. (2010). Challenges in tailored intervention research. Nursing Outlook, 58(2),104-110. gullette, D.; Booth, B. M.; Wright, P. B.; Feldman, Z. & Stewart, K. E. (2009). Stages of change, self-efficacy, decisional balance, and condom use in rural African-American stimulant users. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 20(6), 428-441. Mitchell, A.; Green, A.; & Jeffs, D. (2010, February). Eye examinations for retinopathy of prematurity: Do infants suffer adverse effects? Southern Nursing Research Society, Annual Conference Proceedings, Austin, Texas. Said, Q.; Li, C.; Hastings, J. & Souder, E. (2010, May 15-19). The effect of Medicare part D prescription drug coverage gap on medication adherence. ISPOR 15th Annual International Conference Proceedings, Atlanta, Ga. Sheffer, C. E.; Barone, C. p. & Anders, M. E. (2009). Training health care providers in the treatment of tobacco use and dependence: Pre- and post-training results. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 15, 607-613.


College of Nursing

Scholarship and Research Center

The Scholarship and Research Center (SRC) provides services to faculty and students working with faculty on research-related projects throughout the year. The SRC grant managers work with a principal investigator (PI) to establish a schedule for proposal preparation and to identify the persons responsible for sections of the proposal. In general, the grants manager is responsible for formatting biographical sketches; preparing graphs, charts and signature pages; typing portions; and copying and mailing. The grants manager may also assist with preparation of the IRB Review Board packet. The grant manager stays in contact with the PI to ensure that the application process flows smoothly and that each component is completed in a timely fashion. To avoid last-minute rushes, many components can be scheduled in advance and completed before the due date. Another service provided by the SRC is arranging for internal and external reviews for research grant proposals. Internal reviews are done by a mock peer review panel composed of College of Nursing faculty and other faculty. The primary and secondary reviewers write detailed critiques of the proposal. External reviewers are recommended by the PIs based on their content expertise and are coordinated by the grant manager. SRC director Rob Kennedy, PhD, is chair of the Nursing Science Department and a clinical professor who teaches statistics to the PhD nursing students. He is assisted by Latrina Prince-Williams; PJ Reed; Edna Rodgers; and Jamie Williams. Kennedy helps the PIs with research design and data analysis. PrinceWilliams, a certified grant manager, has been recognized with a Staff Achievement Award and is working on a Certified Research Specialist designation and a doctorate at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Reed, also a certified grant manager, was recognized as Staff Member

of the Year, is a Certified Research Specialist and has a master's degree. Rodgers, an administrative specialist, has been instrumental in preparing the annual report and assisting faculty with numerous other tasks. She received the College of Nursing Staff Achievement Award for 2010 and is completing a master's degree from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

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hidden

Treasures As the world leader in treating multiple myeloma patients, the UAMS Myeloma Institute for Research and Therapy houses a treasure chest of momentous data just waiting to be discovered. Thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, a pioneering duo hopes to crack the lid and reveal a gem that could significantly improve the quality of life for patients with the rare cancer. All they needed was the awarding of a National Institute of Nursing Research "GO" grant, so called because they are given in scientific areas the National Institutes of Health identified as "Grand Opportunities." The primary focus of the two-year, nearly $840,000 grant is to study genes associated with the development of severe chemotherapy-induced mucositis, a common side effect of treatment that strikes about 75 percent of all patients treated, causing ulcers and infection in and around the mouth or anywhere along the digestive tract. "Chemo-induced mucositis can prevent patients from getting the drug they need — melphalan — that's a must-have to treat multiple myeloma," said Elizabeth Ann Coleman, phD, professor in the College of Nursing and College of Medicine. "It affects patients from the mouth all the way down the gastrointestinal tract and it can get so severe that we can’t give them the full dose they need."

In the Genes

Multiple myeloma is a rare cancer of the plasma cells that claimed more than 10,000 lives in 2009 alone. But the Myeloma Institute has helped push the survival rate of its patients to eight years and beyond over the last decade,

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By Nate hinkel

compared to the previous survival rate of about three years. The results of this study, says Coleman, can potentially improve that and cut back on length of hospital stays and number of visits by improving treatment regimens. The Myeloma Institute is the leading referral center for myeloma treatment in the world, leading to a wealth of genomic information readily attainable to complete this study. Coleman says key data — largely in DNA samples — from 1,168 myeloma patients treated at UAMS with a total therapy of melphalan and autologous stem cell transplant will be used to examine what patients might be at more risk to develop mucositis. "We'll be able to go back and look at all of the side effects patients had from their chemotherapy to ultimately see if we can predict who's going to get specific side effects from certain treatments," Coleman said. "Others have looked at one gene at a time, but we'll be examining the entire genome."

Add a Leg

Another integral part of the study will be to use the information to develop a predictive model to more efficiently cater to individual patients’ treatment, lessening the likelihood of harmful side effects. Elias Anaissie, MD, director of the Myeloma Institute’s Supportive Care Program and Coleman's coinvestigator in the study, said the current model for treatment is based on only two factors — the dose of melphalan itself and the degree of decreased kidney function in the patient. The genetic information culled from this study will add a third leg to that equation, improving upon the

current 66 percent predictive model and boosting it as high as 90 percent. "I admit, 66 percent is not nearly good enough and we can do better," Anaissie said. "With the genomic information we'll get from this study, the formula we can use to prescribe treatments on an individual basis will be vastly improved." And a simple spreadsheet including all three factors can then be developed to better predict what patients are more apt to get mucositis and how much mephalan physicians can get away with administering.

Expanding Genes

Though the study is limited to mucositis being the only chemotherapy side effect under the microscope, it will eventually spin off to answer all kinds of other questions. "Does this patient have something in their genomic background that opens them up to develop blood clots? Why are this patient's side effects so much worse here?" Anaissie said. "But you can't say we're going to initially study everything. Once we have the information we can go from there." Coleman said another exciting outcome from the study will help answer hereditary questions about multiple myeloma, which accounts for only 1 percent of all cancers. "If there are family members with it then there must be something genetic going on here that I'd like to know about," she said. "Once we have the data from these genome studies, we'll have an extremely rich database that other people can also use for further study."


Annual Research Day Conference 2010 “The Future is NOW” More than 240 nurses, nursing students and nursing scientists attended the College of Nursing’s annual Research Day Conference on April 16, 2010. Under the theme “The Future Is Now: Celebrating Evidence-Based Practice,” the Conference offered its annual rich fare of science, evidencebased clinical research and innovative teaching strategies with inspirational and thought-provoking speakers. Dynamic poster presentations by both clinicians and students displayed work and best practices accomplished by nurses and students across Arkansas. In recognizing and fulfilling the mission of the College of Nursing, this conference is important at the undergraduate, graduate and doctorate levels. Because nursing is a research-based discipline, this conference helps advance the College’s mission through faculty and student participation in the scholarship of teaching, research and service. It is especially important for students who may have never attended a professional conference and are learning about collegial presentation as an important part of the professional BSN graduate. The College of Nursing mission states that service includes participation in academic, professional and community organizations, and that dissemination of intellectual products is needed to advance the science of nursing. In 2010, the College hosted the nationally known Dr. Ellen FineoutOverholt, director of the Center for the Advancement of EvidenceBased Practice at Arizona State. She is a national leader in the field and author of a popular textbook used by many universities across the nation. “Implementing, Integrating, and Sustaining

Evidence Based Practice as THE Paradigm for Healthcare” was the title of her keynote presentation.” Research Day 2011 was held April 15. The event was planned by the Research Day Committee, chaired by Assistant Professor Leanne Lefler, PhD, ACNS-BC, APN, and many faculty and students. The conference theme, “Celebrating 3 Decades of Leadership through Nursing Research, Evidence Based Practice and Education” was a celebration of the College’s ongoing commitment to excellence in all aspects of nursing. Keynote speaker, Dr. Eileen Sullivan-Marx, is an internationally known nursing leader from the University of Pennsylvania. She is associate dean for practice

and community affairs, a nurse practitioner, a health and aging policy fellow, and a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Her research focuses on sustaining models of care using advanced practice nurses and research concerning outcomes of care for frail, older adults. Co-sponsors for the conference are Arkansas Children’s Hospital, the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, the UAMS Medical Center, Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing, Gamma Xi Chapter and the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

Donna Elrod MSN, AOCNS and Heather Alverson BSN, RN presented the Reducing Medication Administration Errors That Reach the Patient by Implementing ONS Guidelines for Chemotherapy/Biotherapy Dose

Kara Haynie, BSN, RN-BC and Bendi Bowers, MSN, RN presented the Enhancement of Patient-Family Centered Care Through Physician-Nurse Rounding

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Tsai Receives Professorship in Geriatric Nursing In April 2010, Pao-Feng Tsai, PhD, RN, an associate professor in the College of Nursing, was invested with the Alice An-Loh Sun Endowed Professorship in Geriatric Nursing. Tsai joined the College of Nursing in 1999 as assistant professor and was promoted to tenured associate professor in 2005. She completed an intensive

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postdoctoral program in 2005 with training in leadership and research to provide better care to older adults in America. The program was funded by the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Scholar program, begun in 1986 by the John A. Hartford Foundation. Along with teaching duties in the College’s master’s and doctoral programs, Tsai’s research focuses on pain assessment and management in elders with dementia and is funded through several sources, including the Tailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center, Dementia Pilot Grant Program through the Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging, Alzheimer’s Arkansas, Beverly Healthcare Corp. and the Mayday Foundation. Two projects funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research include a predicting model for pain in elders with osteoarthritis knee and hip pain, which she soon hopes will be used in practice, while an ongoing project examines the effect of an ancient martial art, Tai Chi, on knee pain in elders with dementia. “Dr. Tsai is a true geriatric nursing expert with a genuine dedication to research that we are extremely fortunate to have at UAMS,” said

Claudia Barone, EdD, RN. “We look forward to watching her expertise and penchant for discovery continue to grow while helping to train the next generation of geriatric nursing professionals.” Tsai received her initial training and associate degree in nursing and midwifery from the Taiwan Provincial Junior College of Nursing in 1982. In 1984, she earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Kaohsiung Medical College, Taiwan, and in 1987 a Master of Science in Public Health from the Institute of Public Health at the National Yang-Ming Medical College, Taiwan. She earned a Master of Science in Nursing in 1996 from Wayne State University in Detroit, where she also earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing in 1998. Tsai co-published results of the first-ever epidemiologic survey for leprosy in Taiwan. She also developed and published a theory on caregiver stress, which was included in a theory textbook. More than 20 of her articles have been published about assessing pain in elders with both dementia and osteoarthritis and on using Tai Chi and exercise for elders with dementia. The Alice An-Loh Sun Professorship in Geriatric Nursing was endowed just prior to her death in 2002. An-Loh Sun was born in Nanking, China, where she graduated from the Chin Lin School of Nursing. Her husband, C.N. Sun, MD, was a longtime professor of pathology at UAMS and the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System. She dedicated 53 years to the nursing profession before retiring in 1979.


Left to Right: Mr. Tzai-Hei Tsai, Mrs. Mei-Chaz Cheng, Dr. Pao-Feng Tsai and Dr. Jason Chang

Left to right: Dr. Cornelia Beck, Dr. Claudia Barone, Dr. Pao-Feng Tsai, Dr. Daniel Rahn, and Dr. Yun-Chi Yeh

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Service Spotlight on Student Service Leadership Course Encourages Service

Students Win 2009-10 Blood Drive Contest

Leadership and service activities have always been important to nursing students, faculty and staff at the UAMS College of Nursing. Those activities became even more vital with the introduction of a Leadership Development Special Topics Seminar, begun in 2003 by Cheryl Schmidt, PhD, RN, based upon the National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA) Leadership University model. Students enrolled in the course create a learning contract listing the leadership and service activities they plan to complete during the semester. At a minimum, students are required to join the NSNA; attend four association meetings at either the class, Student Nurses Association (SNA), or professional organization level; serve in a leadership role in the SNA; and complete three service activities. Most students do far more than they initially plan. They can earn up to three academic credits by enrolling in the course three semesters. In 2004, former faculty member Elaine Gardner, PhD, RN, joined Schmidt in teaching the course and added a Mentorship Program that could count as one of the service activities. Seniors volunteered to serve as mentors to their junior protégés, and provided valuable advice about how to succeed in the challenging nursing curriculum. Eventually the class grew from one faculty and 10 students to enrollment as high as 180 students with 20 faculty. In 2007, Schmidt and Gardner co-authored a manuscript about the course in Nurse Educator. The course syllabus is listed on the NSNA website, and Schmidt receives frequent requests for information or permission to adapt the course for other nursing programs. Faculty who help teach the course by reviewing and approving learning contracts are awarded adjunct faculty status in NSNA’s Leadership University. One of the service activities nursing students participated in during the 2009-10 academic year involved 15 seniors who served as “victims” for a disaster drill conducted by the American Red Cross of Greater Arkansas. The drill was part of its annual Rapid Response Team Training Camp for high school students who wanted to learn first aid, incident command system principles and leadership skills for rapid response during disasters in their schools. Schmidt served as one of the Camp Nurses, while UAMS nursing students were fitted with fake wounds, then pretended to be earthquake victims. During the debriefing, the nursing students helped educate the high school students about the best way to manage injuries and illnesses.

During the 2009-10 academic year, nursing students defeated students from other UAMS colleges to win the Golden Eagle Trophy for bringing the most student donors to the monthly American Red Cross Blood Drives. The winning students received a large trophy in the shape of an eagle with the American Red Cross symbol on it. The eagle travels each month to the college that has the most student donors until it is awarded permanently at the end of the year. The number needed to win the trophy is adjusted for each college as a percentage of that college’s enrollment. Nursing students also volunteered at the canteen table for the blood drives and were given points toward services projects for class credit. Under the leadership of senior American Red Cross Blood Drive student ambassador Crystal Pearson, the College of Nursing was able to take the eagle away from the College of Medicine, which won the contest for 2008-09. Pearson was recognized in front of her peers with a certification of appreciation from the College of Nursing and the American Red Cross.

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Left to Right: Dr. Cheryl Schmidt, Ann Jacobs, Crystal Pearson, and Kimberly Morton


UAMS College of Nursing Inspires Red Cross Course Since 2004, UAMS College of Nursing faculty has collaborated with the American Red Cross of Greater Arkansas Region to offer senior students four disaster courses: Introduction to Disasters, which is an overview of all the services the Red Cross provides during disaster relief efforts; First Aid, which is required of all Red Cross disaster volunteers (CPR/AED components are omitted since nursing students enter the program with those certifications); Shelter Operations Overview, which explains the operation of Red Cross shelters; and Disaster Health Service Response, which orients students to the protocols and guidelines that Red Cross nurses follow when providing health care to clients. Course faculty are Cheryl Schmidt, phD, rn, and all master’s-degree prepared nurses, Dona Dorman, MnSc, rn, rnp, Shannon Finley, MSn, rn, Debbie Cooley, BSn, rn, huff, Joy Jennings, MSn, rn, CnE, Susan ritchie, Mn, rn and Devin terry, MSn, Apn, rn, ACnS-BC,. This curriculum model received the 2009 American Red Cross Susan Hassmiller Nursing Award for Excellence. The award provided funding to the Red Cross of Greater Arkansas to host train-the-trainer classes for faculty in other Arkansas nursing programs. The success of this model led Dr. Sharon Stanley, chief nurse of the American Red Cross in Washington, D.C., to seek a way to create a course to provide nursing students the information needed to serve, under supervision, as disaster volunteers. Janice Springer, an expert disaster health services Red Cross nurse from

Minnesota, Stanley and Schmidt serve as course development team for the project. The end result: a single four-hour course, Red Cross Sheltering and Disaster Health for Nursing Students, offered as part of a Red Cross national student nurse program, with Schmidt as project director. During development of the program, an advisory committee provided feedback. Members represented the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the American Nurses Association (ANA), the Collegiate Commission on Nursing Education (CCNE), the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN), the National League for Nursing (NLN), the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA), and staff at Red Cross national headquarters. Periodic conference calls kept the Advisory Committee informed, and the course was ready for pilot testing by early Fall 2010. From more than 20 applicants, 12 pilot schools located across the United States, from Hawaii to Maine were chosen to test the course during the 2010-2011 academic year. Criteria included a nursing program with a dedicated faculty member who would partner with an experienced Red Cross nurse in a local Red Cross chapter. Pilot schools were selected based upon geographic distribution throughout the Red Cross regions, as well as the strength of ties between the nursing programs and their local chapters. The course development team

selected a mix of ADN, BSN and LPN programs for the pilot phase; no diploma programs applied. Nursing faculty will collaborate with their Red Cross partner nurses to access the course materials through a Learning Management System (LMS), hosted by the Heartland Center associated with Saint Louis University in Missouri. The LMS tracking aspect will allow the Red Cross to determine how many of the students who take the course become Red Cross volunteers. The program’s goal is to instill a sense of volunteerism in nursing students to better serve client needs in disaster. One course objective is to increase the number of nurses available to volunteer with the Red Cross during disaster relief operations. The course developers believe it will also better prepare nurses as spontaneous volunteers, even if they choose not to volunteer with the Red Cross or another disaster response organization. After the pilot phase and final course refinements are completed in August 2011, the Red Cross will make this unique program available to all interested nursing programs. Nursing faculty interested in the Red Cross course are encouraged to establish strong working relationships with their nearest Red Cross chapter.

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Cover Story Building

Bridges

By Nate Hinkel

Nursing professionals are a patient’s connector to top-notch care Serving as a vital bridge between the highly skilled work of physicians and their patients, nursing professionals are the key to delivering successful quality health care as efficiently and friendly as possible. Recognizing the integral role of the nursing profession, two families with strong ties to the field and to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) have used their generosity to strengthen those bridges. Gifts totaling more than $260,000 in the last two years have been given to the College of Nursing for four scholarships to prepare surgical nurses, oncology nurses and family nurse practitioners who serve patients in rural parts of Arkansas where health care is limited. “We are very lucky to have won the support and generosity of these wonderful donors,” said Claudia Barone, Ed.D., R.N., dean of the College of Nursing. “In both cases these are people who understand on a very intimate level the importance the nursing profession plays in delivering quality health care. That makes each one of these newly established scholarships very meaningful.” The Helen F. Lang R.N. Scholarship Fund, announced in February 2009 and totaling $160,000, was established by Nicholas Lang, M.D., chief medical officer of the UAMS Medical Center, in honor of his wife, Helen. The Knighten family, led by Sharon Harwood Knighten, gave $100,000 announced in February 2010 to establish three scholarships in specific areas. 20

“The beautiful thing about these scholarships is the relationships involved and the genuine and heartfelt manner in which they were given,” Barone said. “The lucky students studying with the help of these scholarships should feel honored.”

Honor Thy Wife

Helen F. Lang, R.N., has spent her entire career devoted to the care of patients and to the education of surgical house staff. Her husband, Nicholas Lang, M.D., a longtime respected surgeon and former professor of surgery in the UAMS College of Medicine, has spent his fair share of time in the operating room and knows the importance of a well-trained surgical nurse. “As a doctor married to a longtime registered nurse, I’m in a unique position both professionally and personally to fully understand the importance of nursing in patient care and with assisting doctors,” Lang said. “What better way to honor that relationship than by ensuring the training of more skilled professionals through a scholarship?” Helen is a veteran surgical nurse who spent her career serving both Arkansas Children’s Hospital and the John L. McClellan Veteran’s Hospital. Nicholas Lang pledged an annual $20,000 for four years that will be matched by UAMS’ Faculty Group Practice, the group practice for UAMS physicians, to total $160,000. The Helen F. Lang RN Scholarship Fund will be awarded annually to a senior Bachelor of

Science in Nursing student holding a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. The student must also be interested in surgical nursing with the commitment to pursue working in the operating room or caring for patients recovering from surgical procedures upon graduation. “This is a very special gift to our students enrolled in our Bachelor of Science Nursing (BSN) program that signifies the importance of the role that registered nurses play in the medical profession and the surgery subspecialty,” Barone said. “We are honored to receive this gift and look forward to being stewards of this scholarship.” Once fully funded, the scholarship will be awarded annually beginning with the fall 2013 semester. “The idea is to honor the career and dedication of my wife by ensuring future generations of extraordinary care inside and outside of the operating room,” Lang said.

Good Things in Threes

Similar to the Lang scholarship, it was also family members that gave Sharon Knighten the inspiration to help train future generations of nurses. Knighten’s daughter, Kim Knighten Oelke, is a 1982 graduate of the UAMS College of Nursing. Kim is working on her master’s degree and works as an advanced practice nurse. “I’m very proud of my mother for doing this,” Oelke said. “I think nurses are some of the most important people in medicine. They deal with the patients one-on-one everyday and


I think we need to continue to provide educational opportunities for these professionals.” Though surgical nursing students, like the Lang scholarship, will benefit from Knighten’s gift, so will nurse practitioners and oncology nurses. “Though it’s ultimately the doctors who make the tough decisions, I’ve always felt that it’s the nurses who put a face on the care patients receive,” Knighten said. “They’re often the first person a patient sees and sets the tone for the care they’re given. It’s important for me to see to it that a little money won’t keep those wanting to further their education from doing so.” Knighten got a chance to meet the first recipients of the scholarships at a reception held at the Little Rock Country Club in October. “I wanted to meet them and put a face on these scholarships,” she said. “I spent a lot of time thinking about these scholarships and it’s a treat for me to see how they’re changing people’s lives.” These three Knighten family scholarships began being awarded the fall 2010 semester: • Kim Knighten Oelke Family Nurse Practitioner Scholarship Established by Sharon Knighten in honor of her daughter, Kim Oelke. It will support master’s students in the family nurse practitioner program who demonstrate academic achievement, financial need and are active in community service.

• Sharon Knighten Oncology Nursing Scholarship Established by the Knighten family in honor of Sharon Knighten, it will support a Bachelor of Science in Nursing student committed to a career in oncology who demonstrates academic achievement and financial need. • M.B. Knighten Memorial Surgical Nursing Scholarship Established by the Knighten family in memory of M.B. Knighten, it will support a Bachelor of Science in Nursing student committed to a career in surgical nursing who demonstrates academic achievement and financial need. Barone said the scholarships will be a lasting reminder of Knighten’s generosity. “Mrs. Knighten’s gift and legacy will live on forever and we are extremely grateful for this opportunity,” Barone said. “We’re grateful for the gift but also for our relationship with this incredible woman and her family.” Editor’s Note: We are sad to report that Sharon Harwood Knighten passed away shortly before this article went to press.

“We are very lucky to have won the support and generosity of these wonderful donors.” 21


Development

2010 Phonathon Connects Students and Alumni The College of Nursing hosted its annual phonathon April 15, 20, 22 and 26. Students who are recipients of a name-endowed scholarship

30,000.00

volunteer their time by calling alumni 25,000.00

for scholarship financial support. 20,000.00 Three call nights were dedicated 15,000.00 10,000.00 on the Little Rock Campus and one call night on the

Hope Campus.

5,000.00 1000.00

“The phonathon is a great avenue for our students to connect with the alumni and fellowship with their classmates,” said Cynthia Gregory, associate director of development. “It also provides them an opportunity to experience philanthropy.” Donations and gift cards were provided by Boulevard Bread Company, Starbucks, Cantina Laredo, Dixie Café Restaurant, Chick-fil-A West Markham, Premium Refreshments Service, Sam’s Club and Whole Hog Café.

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Thank you for your generous support to the 2010 College of Nursing Phonathon: Mrs. Joan H. Adkins Dr. and Mrs. L. B. Allen Dr. and Mrs. J. David Allen Mr. and Mrs. Mark Alvarez Dr. and Mrs. James Aronson Dr. and Mrs. Clark M. Baker Dr. and Mrs. Robert V. Baker Dr. and Mrs. David L. Baker Mr. and Mrs. Emery J. Baldwin, III Mrs. Katrina A. Banks Mr. and Mrs. W. Gene Barentine Drs. Gary and Claudia Barone Mrs. Debbie Barron Dr. and Mrs. James P. Bell Mr. and Mrs. Micheal Beran Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Biggers Mrs. Hubert H. Blanchard Mr. and Mrs. Don Blessing Mr. and Mrs. Tim Boettger Mrs. Susan L. Bona Dr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Boop Ms. Tommye I. Boyd Dr. and Mrs. John Brandebura Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Tyrone Brown Dr. Keneshia Bryant-Bedell Mrs. Denise Buercklin Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bushmiaer Dr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Byrd Ms. Sandra J. Campbell Mrs. Nancy E. Betty Casali Mr. and Mrs. David Chamness Dr. and Mrs. Sidney G. Chetta Ms. Carla J. Chote Ms. JoAnn Clark Ms. Lori J. Cline and Mr. Ric Bailey Mrs. Lynda Cloe Mrs. Virginia S. Cobb Mr. and Mrs. John F. Coffin Dr. Ann G. Coleman and Mr. Lawrence A. Coleman Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Conway Ms. Alicia A. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Joe D. Cook Mrs. Judith Crawford Ms. Rosemary P. Cuffman Mr. and Mrs. Mark Dail Mr. and Mrs. Eli Davis Ms. Mary C. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Harrison M. Dean Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dennis Ms. Sandy K. DeSalvo

Ms. Charlotte Dillon Mrs. Kelley L. Easley-Dotson Mr. and Mrs. Mark W. Dunavan Mrs. Jimmie L. Duncan The Reverend E. Eugene Efird and Mrs. Gwendolyn Efird Dr. Jujuan English Ms. Susan Erickson Ms. Melinda Fair Ms. Stephanie Farmer Mr. and Mrs. Fenton Fitzpatrick Mr. and Mrs. Edward France Mr. and Mrs. James Frank Mr. and Mrs. Mark Franklin Mr. Jeff Levin and Mrs. Susan Gateley Dr. Julia A. Goodwin Mr. and Mrs. Doug Gordon Mrs. Sally L. Grace Ms. Linda R. Gray Dr. and Mrs. William R. Green Mr. and Mrs. William Green Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gregory Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gumble Mr. and Mrs. Brian Hanna Mr. and Mrs. Barry Haas Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hargis Mr. and Mrs. A. Everett Harris Ms. Antoinette Hartman Drs. Mary and Charles Hartwig Mr. and Mrs. J. Hathaway Ms. Jean D. Hayes Mr. and Mrs. William Henderson Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Herod Mr. and Mrs. John Heuston Drs. Martha and Ronald Highfield Mr. and Mrs. Victor Hiryak Mr. Ralph Honomichl Dr. and Mrs. Marion E. Hord Ms. Arlyn E. Howard Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hoyle Ms. Mary J. Ingle Dr. and Mrs. M. E. Ivancic Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. William Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Sandy Jolly Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Jones Mr. and Mrs. Johnny L. Jynes Mr. and Mrs. Doug Kilgore Dr. and Mrs. Timothy A. Kimbrell The Reverend Doctor Jimmie L. and Mrs. Lancaster Mrs. Laurie A. Lee

Commander Lisa E. Lessley Dr. Janet E. Lord Ms. Duanne P. Markman Mrs. Carolyn Marshall Mr. and Mrs. Luigi Martone Mr. and Mrs. Tim Massanelli Mr. and Mrs. Bill May Mr. and Mrs. Larry May Dr. Robin McAtee and Mr. Brent McAtee Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. McCaskill Mrs. Jayanna McCulloch Dr. Jean McSweeney and Mr. John Holtam Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Meador Mr. and Mrs. John Montgomery Ms. Elizabeth A. Moseley Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mosenthin Mr. and Mrs. Jim Murphy Dr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Nagel Ms. Sally H. Naucke Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Neil Dr. and Mrs. Richard W. Nicholas Jr. Mr. Walt Nickels Ms. Mary A. Norton Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Oakhill Dr. and Mrs. Timothy J. O'Brien Dr. Elizabeth O'Connell Mr. and Mrs. Charles Orr Dr. and Mrs. Terryl J. Ortego Ms. Johanna C. Oswald Mr. and Mrs. Dan L. Parker Dr. Barbara Pate. and Mr. Richard Pate Dr. and Mrs. Randall S. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Gregory M. Pianalto Ms. Teresa K. Pilgrim Mr. and Mrs. John E. Pope Ms. Suzanne Post Mr. and Mrs. Robert Powell Mr. and Mrs. Tim Rainey Mr. and Mrs. Michael Reed Mr. and Mrs. Fermin Renteria Mr. and Mrs. Roby Robertson Dr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Ross Ms. Shalunda Sasser Drs. Cheryl K. and Michael J. Schmidt Mr. and Mrs. Martin Schneider Ms. Angela R. Scott Mr. and Mrs. Tony Seamon Dr. and Mrs. James W. Seay

Ms. Sue Senn Dr. and Mrs. Neil C. Shaver Ms. Lona W. Sheehan Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Shields Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Sisson Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith Dr. and Mrs. William Snow Dr. J. Elaine Souder Mr. and Mrs. Richard Spadoni Mr. and Mrs. John Stanley Ms. Marilyn Stanley Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stephens Dr. and Mrs. Phillip Stone Ms. Kristine Stump Mr. and Mrs. John D. Sullivan Dr. Sunghee Tak and Dr. Song Hee Hong Mr. and Mrs. David Miller Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Terrell Mr. and Mrs. David Terry Dr. and Mrs. K. J. Thomas Dr. and Mrs. S. Berry Thompson Mrs. Jackie Thorne Mrs. Nancy Toon Ms. Marsha L. Trammel Dr. and Mrs. Bill Tranum Mr. and Mrs. Ray Trower Dr. Pao-Feng Tsai and Dr. Jason Y. Chang Dr. and Mrs. Wallace C. Vaughan Dr. Beth C. Vaughan-Wrobel and Mr. Kenneth Steele Mr. and Mrs. John C. Vaughn Dr. Ralph J. Vogel Mr. and Mrs. James P. Wallent Mrs. Harry P. Ward Mrs. Wanda M. Weise Ms. Karen J. White Ms. Sherry White Mr. and Mrs. Gary Williams Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Willems Dr. Jonathan J. Wolfe and Mrs. Donna M. Wolfe Mr. and Mrs. Max Wright Mr. and Mrs. Robert Yada Mr. Harold Zook AARP Pulaski Heights No. 2362 Landis Revocable Trust Northeastern Ohio Urology Surgeons, Inc. Suellen M. Marinoni 2007 Revocable Trust

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Sa

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vine

vine


Decades of

Giving

A Guide to Charitable Giving at the Right Time

Philanthropy is a lifelong activity. Over the years, changes in lifestyle, family situations and finances will influence the ways in which you contribute to the College of Nursing. Take the time during each stage of your life to make the giving choices that benefit you and the future of nursing education at UAMS.

Here’s a simple guide to help you plan.

In Your

40s

Make Annual Contributions While in your working years, you may consider making a yearly contribution to the College to help support our annual operating costs. If you have children at home, include them in deciding which programs to support.

In Your

Your Benefits: A gift of cash allows you to take a charitable income tax deduction if you itemize on tax return.

50s

Use Life Insurance to Leverage Your Gift Did you buy life insurance in your 20s or 30s to cover critical expenses, such as mortgage payments or education costs, should something happen to you? Perhaps those expenses have since been paid off and you no

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longer need that policy. Donating the ownership of a paid-up policy will provide you with a welcomed income tax deduction.


In Your

60s

Use Life Insurance to Leverage Your Gift With retirement here or just around the corner, your 60s are a good time to think about a charitable remainder unitrust. If you are concerned about future income needs and want a gift vehicle that keeps up with inflation, the unitrust may work well for you. The trust pays you — and perhaps other beneficiaries you select — a variable

In Your

amount for life or a term of years, up to 20 years. Thereafter, the balance in the trust supports our mission. Tip: You’ll need to appoint someone or an entity as the trustee of your trust. Donors often use professional trust companies.

70s

Secure Fixed Income for Life In this stage of your life, you may want to consider a charitable remainder annuity trust. It’s similar to a unitrust but instead of variable payments you receive fixed payments.

if your gift is made with securities, you can also eliminate upfront capital gains taxes. This type of gift is popular for retirees because of its fixed payments, which aren’t affected by stock and real estate market fluctuations.

Your benefits: You are eligible for a charitable income tax deduction, and

In Your

80s, 90s and Beyond

Look to the Future

How will you be remembered when you are gone? To leave a lasting legacy, consider including the College in your will. You can specify programs or projects you wish to fund or leave your gift unrestricted to be used for our most pressing needs. Please call us for official language to share with your estate planning attorney. He or she can help draw up a new will or an addendum to your existing will to complete a gift to our organization.

Tip: Recent research shows that nearly three-fourths of people who expect to receive an inheritance would not mind if their loved ones gave a small percentage, 5 or 10 percent, of the inheritance to charity. For more information about this article or other planned giving opportunities, please contact Robert Kinzel, assistant director of planned giving, at (501) 686-7894.

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Donor Spotlight

Dean’s Circle of 100 The Dean’s Circle of 100, established in 2008, has 27 members who have donated $1,000 per year in unrestricted funds. This year, Dr. Claudia Barone, dean of the College of Nursing, has set a goal to have 100 members by 2012. “Because of the members’ generosity the College was able to replace 21 desktop computers for our faculty and staff,” said Barone. Becoming a member of the Dean’s Circle of 100 is one of the College’s most prestigious honors. If you would like to become a member of the Dean’s Circle of 100, contact Cynthia Gregory, director of development of the College of Nursing, at 501-603-1413 or by e-mail at cmgregory@uams.edu.

Honor Roll Members (as of January 2011)

Mrs. Kelly Betts Dr. Claudia J. Beverly Mrs. Laura H. Byrd Dr. Kathy Bock Chambers Dr. Frances Dalme Mr. Paul M. Francis Dr. Angela Green Mrs. Neena Grissom Mrs. Riesa J. Gusewelle Dr. Matthew Hadley Mrs. Elizabeth A. Harris Dr. Robert L. Kennedy Ms. Sharon H. Knighten Ms. Martha G. Kuhlmann

Dr. Louanne Lawson Ms. Alice L. Martin-Watson Dr. Donna J. Middaugh Mrs. Karen Oelke Mrs. Susan R. Ritchie Mrs. Mary G. Robertson Mrs. Janet S. Rooker Dr. Cheryl Schmidt Mrs. Nancy L. Shaver Mrs. Cornelia Sundermann Mrs. Devin K. Terry Dr. Ralph J. Vogel Mr. Harold Zook

Attending the second annual Dean’s Circle of 100 luncheon at Trios Restaurant were (left to right, front row) Lavada Price, Sharon Knighten, Ann Franklin, Claudia Beverly, Debra Garrett, (second row) Devin Terry, Susan Richie, Angela Green, Donna Middaugh, Claudia Barone, Martha Kuhlmann, Jan Rooker, Mary Robertson and Nancy Shaver.

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Daughters Honor

Mother’s Legacy Nancy Ann Griffey Jordan and Carla Marie Griffey Hazlewood, daughters of the late Flora Mae Griffey, have chosen to honor their mother’s life legacy by establishing a scholarship in her honor. Flora Mae Griffey established Griffey’s Professional Uniforms in 1970, an era when it was uncommon for women to establish a business. Early in her career, a uniform sales’ representative told her that she would never make it in the uniform business. Forty years later and with four stores across that state, she proved him wrong. It was important to Griffey that health care uniforms were professional and she was adamant in portraying this message to all her customers. She especially had an interest in the nursing profession and admired the uniforms that nurses wore. Griffey followed many of her customers in the 40 years she ran her business. She saw medical professionals attend school, graduate, pursue careers and some retire. Flora Mae Griffey died in June 2009 and the family business was passed to her daughter, Nancy Griffey

Jordan. Because it was imperative to her daughters that they give to the profession that their mother carried so close to her heart, Jordan and Hazlewood established The Flora Mae Griffey Nursing Scholarship and the Griffey’s Professionalism Award at the College of Nursing. The scholarship will support a baccalaureate student with financial need and the award will support a baccalaureate student who demonstrates leadership in setting the professional standards in the nursing practice. They also established scholarship endowments at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and the Baptist Health Foundation. “We are proud of our mother, and we are honoring her by providing financial support to nursing students,” said Nancy Jordan. Today, Griffey’s Professional Uniforms provides uniforms to health care professionals who work in hospitals, private clinics and nursing homes.

Left to right: Dr. Claudia Barone, Nancy Jordan and Carla Hazlewood

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The BSN Class of 2010

Honor Crystal Webster

Before a tragic car accident took her life Dec. 27, 2009, Crystal Webster was known among family and friends for her belief that she could make the world a better place one smile at a time. Thanks to loyal and dedicated classmates, Webster’s mantra is sure to live on at the College of Nursing through a scholarship created in her name. “The way everyone came together was pretty unbelievable,” said Sandra Burton, a 2010 UAMS College of Nursing graduating senior. “It goes to show what kind of person Crystal was and the impact she had before she was taken from us. Everyone just seemed to naturally want to help out.” Webster was on track to graduate with the College of Nursing Class of 2010 until a fateful trip back to her home after delivering a Christmas gift to a friend. Her car slid off the road and into a North Little Rock lake, where rescue attempts were too late. “Right down to her last day, it serves as an example of the kind of person Crystal was,” said Burton. “Always thinking of other people and trying to make people happy with whatever she had to give.” Webster’s senior classmates vowed to keep her spirit alive by raising money to start a scholarship fund. Burton spearheaded a series of fundraising events involving faculty, Webster’s family members and classmates all came together to ensure success. Those efforts culminated May 14 at the annual College of Nursing Recognition Ceremony for the Class of 2010 when Burton presented a $15,159 check to the UAMS College of Nursing for the Crystal Webster Nursing Scholarship. “What a wonderful way to ensure the spirit of Crystal Webster lives on,” said Claudia Barone, EdD, RN, dean of the UAMS College of Nursing. “Everyone who contributed their time, money or effort to this cause should be very proud of this accomplishment.”

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Her classmates organized five fundraising events: • A spaghetti luncheon kicked off the drive Jan. 25. Nursing students and faculty cooked a variety of pasta dishes and desserts to raise nearly $1,000.

• A Rock-a-thon was organized by Burton. She and several classmates spent March 13 in rocking chairs at the North Little Rock Cracker Barrel Country Store and Restaurant taking pledges and donations that totaled $1,400. The event was featured on two central Arkansas television stations.

• On March 18 the College of Nursing student Bible study group hosted a Knit-a-thon on campus. Donations were accepted in return for knitting lessons. Money earned from selling yarn and needles totaled $50.

• Students and faculty held a rummage sale April 10 that raised $1,600.

• A soup and salad luncheon held April 26 on campus with faculty and students donating homemade soup and sandwiches. The event raised $700.

In addition, Burton and other classmates raised money after issuing a challenge within the College of Nursing for $20.10 donations in honor of the Class of 2010. Kimberly Morton, MA, BBA, a faculty member in the College of Nursing, was so touched by the students’ efforts that she created a “Crystal Webster Memorial Bracelet” made from Swarovski crystal beads, moonstone and other stones as a personalized memento to honor Webster. More than 60 were sold to add more than $1,200 to the scholarship fund. “The senior class also did a T-shirt and magazine fundraiser to help us get to $15,159,” Burton said. “Honestly we were able to raise more than we all originally envisioned, especially having accomplished this with small donations and no corporate donors. Everyone’s efforts and the bonding experience we all shared were simply amazing.” Because of those efforts, the Crystal Webster Nursing Scholarship will be a lasting reminder to UAMS College of Nursing students.


2010 BSN classmates, family and friends fundraising events

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14th Annual Scholarship Donor Appreciation Dinner

Honoring Our Donors On October 12, 2010, the College of Nursing hosted its 14th Annual Scholarship Donor Appreciation Dinner at the Country Club of Little Rock. The College awarded 61 scholarships to 126 students for the 2010-11 academic year. The keynote speaker was Art Horne, executive director of development for the colleges at UAMS. Horne provided insight on philanthropy and highlighted the College of Nursing’s fundraising accomplishments. Ashley Hunter, a BSN student, and Pamela Gouner, a PhD student, shared the significance of being recipients of their scholarships and why they chose the nursing profession. “This evening is so important to all of us,” said Cynthia Gregory, director of development. “We have the opportunity to thank our supporters for their generosity, and the students are filled with appreciation for their scholarships.”

Suzanna Mallory (left) donor and Class of 1997 representative, pictured with Shannon Cobb, BSN student and scholarship recipient

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Caitlin Abiseid, BSN student and scholarship recipient (center), thanks Mike Spades Jr. (left), Rebecca Wood and Danny Wood

LaToya Lewis, (left) and Christine Goodwin (center), BSN student and scholarship recipients, thank Jerry and Darlene Giffin, donors and parents of the late Cammy Giffin Hayes

Ashley Hunter, (center), BSN honor student and scholarship recipient, pictured with Dr. J. Larry and Nikki Lawson

Adam Boone (center), BSN honor student and scholarship recipient shows his gratitude to Dr. Nicholas and Helen Lang

Elizabeth Bobo (left), BSN student and scholarship recipient, thanks Ruth Johnston, daughter of the late David L. Johnston

Pat Lavender (left) Jane Texter (center) and Sue Williamson (left), members of the Arkansas Hospital Auxiliary Association, pictured with Lauren Lisenbee, BSN student and scholarship recipient


New Scholarship Corner Crystal Webster Nursing Scholarship This scholarship was established in memory of Crystal by her family and the College of Nursing Senior Class of 2010. It will support a BSN student demonstrating financial need.

Cheryl Schmidt (center), BSN student and scholarship recipient, thanks John G. and DeDe Ragsdale

Walter Walker (center), donor, is pictured with Misty Foshee (left) and Lauren Reynolds (right), BSN student students and scholarship recipients

Ellen Sullivan Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Scholarship Established by Ellen Sullivan, the scholarship will support graduate students who pursue a nursing career in hematology or cardiology and who demonstrate academic excellence and financial need.

Award The Eric Ashworth Hodges Award for the Best Dissertation Michelle Dallas (left), MNSc student and scholarship recipient Katie Burns , and Kristin Jimenez (left), BSN scholarship recipients thank Sharon Knighten and Kim Oelke (center) for their scholarships

Sarah Gray-Staples (left), BSN student and recipient of the Little Rock Departmental Club Scholarship, is pictured with Ethel Curry, a member of the LRDC

Nedra Allen and Vunkisha Nash (left), MNSc students and recipient of the Sophronia R. Williams Scholarship, thank Sophronia Williams for their scholarships

Carla Hazelwood (center), Nancy Jordan (right) and her daughter (left) attended the dinner and donors of the Flora Mae Griffey Nursing Scholarship

This award will be given to the graduate student in the PhD program who presents the best dissertation.

Lauren Henson (left), BSN student and scholarship recipient pictured with donors Delbert and Benni Fambrough

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Honor Roll of Donors

December 2009 – December 2010 $102,000-$25,000

Arkansas Community Foundation Arkansas Health Care Association Arkansas Minority Health Commission Beaumont Foundation of America George Frederick Jewett Foundation Ms. Sharon H. Knighten The Madelyne M. and Edward C. McCarty Foundation

$24,999-$5,000

The Gertrude E. Skelly Charitable Foundation Griffey’s Professional Uniforms Inc. The Jon and Karen Huntsman Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas P. Lang Little Rock Departmental Club Mr. and Mrs. John D. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Smith

$4,999-$1,000

3M Product Donations Arkansas Hospital Auxiliary Association Baker Eye Institute P.A. Drs. Gary and Claudia Barone Mr. and Mrs. Mark Betts Dr. Claudia J. Beverly Dr. and Mrs. John C. Byrd Bob and Marilyn Bogle II Charitable Trust Drs. Michael and Sarah Carter Drs. Aubrey P. and Kathy B. Chambers Dr. and Mrs. Carl Covey Ms. Lauraetta M. Edgar Dr. and Mrs. James W. Fletcher Mr. Paul M. Francis and Ms. Jeannie Winston Dr. and Mrs. Paul M. Gardner Dr. Kenneth R. Goosen Dr. and Mrs. Jerril Green Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Harris Ms. Carla Hazlewood Mr. and Mrs. John Heuston Dr. Linda Hodges and Mr. Robert Orr Ms. Sandra A. Holmes Innovative SpineCare Ms. Nancy Ann Jordan Dr. Robert L. Kennedy Ms. Irma Klaetke Drs. Robert E. and

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Donna Middaugh Ms. Linda Rickel Peter A. Ritchie, Management Co. PA Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery B. Rooker Drs. Michael J. and Cheryl K. Schmidt Dr. and Mrs. Neil C. Shaver Mr. and Mrs. Norman K. Southerland Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Sundermann UAMS College of Nursing Seniors 2010 Mr. Robert J. Webster Mr. David H. Williams Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Wilson Dr. and Mrs. Jonathan Wolfe

$999-$100

AARP Pulaski Heights No. 2362 Ms. Shannon Alexander Dr. and Mrs. J. David Allen Arkansas Student Nurses Association Dr. and Mrs. Clark M. Baker Dr. and Mrs. David L. Baker The Ballard Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. W. Gene Barentine Ms. Debbie Barron Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Biggers Dr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Boop Ms. Patricia C. Bowie Mr. and Mrs. Michael Brennan Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Bruce Ms. Sandra L. Burton Dr. Martha and Mr. Thomas L. Bush Dr. and Mrs. Carlos E. Camargo Ms. Rebecca Camp Ms. Nancy E. Betty Casali Dr. and Mrs. Sidney G. Chetta Chick-fil-A at West Markham Ms. Carla J. Chote Mrs. Virginia S. Cobb Dr. Ann G. Coleman and Mr. Lawrence A. Coleman Mr. and Mrs. Joe D. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Jim D. Cornelius Ms. Kathleen J. Courtney Ms. Lynn C. Cruz Drs. William C and Jessica Dannenmaier Ms. Mary C. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Harrison M. Dean Ms. Sandra E. Degraftenreed

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dennis Ms. Sandy K. DeSalvo Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Devine Mr. and Mrs. J. Douglas Dewease Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Dumond Dr. Jujuan English Ms. Susan Erickson Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Fambrough Mr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Fleming Mr. and Mrs. Mark Franklin Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Giffin Golden Eagle of Arkansas Inc. Dr. Julia A. Goodwin Mr. and Mrs. Ryan Goodwin Dr. and Mrs. William R. Green Mr. and Mrs. Troy W. Green Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gregory Ms. Keitha S. Griffith Mr. and Mrs. Neil Gusewelle Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Hadley Dr. Melodee L. Harris and Mr. Terry W. Harris Mr. and Mrs. A. Everett Harris Ms. Margaret Hatchett Ms. Jean D. Hayes Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Herod Hilburn, Calhoon, Harper, Pruniski & Calhoun Dr. and Mrs. John C. Holder Mr. and Mrs. J. Arthur Horne Mr. Charles R. Horner Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hoyle Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hunt Inspiring Women Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Jones Ms. Virginia H. Kelly Dr. and Mrs. Timothy A. Kimbrell Ms. Martha G. Kuhlmann Ms. Mary Ann Langston Dr. and Mrs. Christopher L. Lee Little Rock Hematology/ Oncology Associates Dr. Janet E. Lord Mr. and Mrs. William E. Lukasik Mr. and Mrs. Riley E. Majors Mr. and Mrs. Dale W. Manor Mr. and Mrs. Dean Martinez Ms. Alice L. Martin-Watson Mr. and Mrs. Luigi Martone Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Matz Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. McCaskill Mr. and Mrs. James McClelland Mr. David J. McCullough Dr. Jean McSweeney and Mr. John Holtam Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Meador Mendel Capital Management, Inc. Midwest Fire Consulting

Group LLC. Mr. Marc A. Moody Ms. Rachael R. Moreno Ms. Kimberly J. Morton Ms. Elizabeth A. Moseley Dr. and Mrs. Richard W. Nicholas Jr. Mr. Walt Nickels Northeastern Ohio Urology Surgeons Inc. Ms. Mary A. Norton Dr. and Mrs. Terryl J. Ortego Ms. Johanna C. Oswald Dr. David L. Ouellette Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Overhiser Mr. and Mrs. Eric Pearson Mr. and Mrs. Edward Penick Ms. Virginia I. Penick-Parra Mr. and Mrs. Tim Rainey Ms. Anne M. Redo Mr. and Mrs. Fermin Renteria Ms. Eleonore B. Rickover Mr. and Mrs. Roby Robertson Mr. Robert M. Rogers Ms. Lillian D. Rorie Dr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Byron Schriver Ms. Angela R. Scott Semke Consulting Inc. Mr. Bryan Sexton Mr. Phillip B. Sexton Ms. Cynthia Shaw Mr. Eric R. Siegel Dr. and Mrs. William Snow Dr. J. Elaine Souder Mr. Mike Spades Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Speltz Mr. and Mrs. Brad Taylor Mr. and Mrs. David Miller Mr. and Mrs. David Terry Dr. and Mrs. S. Berry Thompson Dr. Patricia E. Thompson Dr. and Mrs. David R. Tribble Dr. Dr. Jason Y. Chang and Pao-Feng Tsai Dr. and Mrs. Wallace C. Vaughan Dr. Beth C. Vaughan-Wrobel and Mr. Kenneth Steele Mr. Neal Vines Dr. Joe D. Waldrum Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Walker Mrs. Harry P. Ward Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Nahley Ms. Shanna Watts Ms. Mildred D. Webster Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Webster Ms. Sherry White


Ms. Sophronia R. Williams Ms. Mary Annie Williams Ms. Fann J. Woodward

$99-$1

Ms. Joan H. Adkins Dr. and Mrs. L. B. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Mark Alvarez Arkansas Medical Society Alliance Inc. Ms. June Armstrong Dr. and Mrs. James Aronson Ask Medical Inc. Ms. Carole A. Ault Dr. and Mrs. Robert V. Baker Mr. and Mrs. Emery J. Baldwin III Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ball Mr. Daniel Balls Ms. Katrina A. Banks Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Barnett Mr. and Mrs. E. Ray Bedford Dr. and Mrs. James P. Bell Mr. and Mrs. Scott A. Belt Mr. and Mrs. Micheal Beran Mr. and Mrs. John Berryman Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Blair Ms. Hubert H. Blanchard Mr. and Mrs. Don Blessing Ms. Rebecca Bloodworth Mr. and Mrs. Tim Boettger Ms. Susan L. Bona Dr. and Mrs. Warren C. Boop Jr. Ms. Janet Bowen Ms. Beverly S. Boyd Ms. Tommye I. Boyd Mr. and Mrs. Jay Michael Bradley Dr. and Mrs. John Brandebura Mr. and Mrs. Bob Brisco Mr. and Mrs. Tyrone Brown Mr. and Mrs. H. Douglas Brown III Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. Brumback Dr. Keneshia Bryant-Bedell Ms. Denise Buercklin Mr. and Mrs. Andy Burden Ms. Stephanie Burgess Ms. Cindy A. Burns-Shaw Ms. Kathy S. Burton Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bushmiaer Ms. Rose M. Butcher Dr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Byrd Ms. Sandra J. Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Gerald E. Carman Ms. Alice Regina Severn Cave Mr. and Mrs. David Chamness Ms. JoAnn Clark Ms. Lori J. Cline and Mr. Ric Bailey Captain Bobbie K. Clinton Ms. Lynda Cloe Ms. Shannon C. Cobb Mr. and Mrs. John F. Coffin Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Conway Ms. Alicia A. Cook

Ms. Diana L. Corbit Mr. and Mrs. H. Core Ms. Judith Crawford Mr. and Mrs. David C. Crouch Ms. Melanie E. Crowder Ms. Rosemary P. Cuffman Mr. and Mrs. Mark Dail Mr. and Mrs. Eli Davis Ms. Charlotte Dillon Ms. Darra Dismuke Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dodson Ms. Grace Donoho Ms. Kelley L. Easley-Dotson Mr. Ralph A. Downs Mr. and Mrs. Bradley L. Driskell Dr. and Mrs. John R. Duke Mr. and Mrs. Mark W. Dunavan Ms. Jimmie L. Duncan The Reverend E. Eugene and Mrs. Efird Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Elissalde Dr. and Mrs. Garry M. Enderlin Executive Recruiters Agency, Inc. Ms. Melinda Fair Ms. Stephanie Farmer FastTrack Fundraising Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Finley Dr. Rachel F. Fitch Mr. and Mrs. Fenton Fitzpatrick Mr. and Mrs. Karl M. Fletcher Mr. and Mrs. Joe T. Ford Mr. and Mrs. Edward France Mr. and Mrs. James Frank Mr. and Mrs. Marc Franklin Mr. Jeff Levin and Mrs. Susan Gateley Ms. James L. Glass Mr. and Mrs. Eric Goble Mr. and Mrs. Doug Gordon Ms. Sally L. Grace Ms. Linda R. Gray Mr. and Mrs. William Green Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Guerrero Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gumble Mr. and Mrs. Arlon Hall Ms. Michelle L. Hames Mr. and Mrs. Brian Hanna Mr. and Mrs. Barry Haas Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hargis Ms. Angela C. Harris Ms. Antoinette Hartman Drs. Charles and Mary Hartwig The Haskins Family Trust Mr. and Mrs. James E. Hathaway Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William Henderson Drs. Ronald and Martha Highfield Ms. Carol A. Hinger Mr. and Mrs. Victor Hiryak Mr. and Mrs. Larry W. Holcomb Mr. and Mrs. Michael Holland Mr. Ralph Honomichl Dr. and Mrs. Marion E. Hord

Ms. Arlyn E. Howard Mr. and Mrs. Howard D. Hughes Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hurn Ms. Mary J. Ingle Dr. and Mrs. M. E. Ivancic Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Johnson Mr. and Mrs. William Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson Ms. Terry Diane Jolliffe Mr. and Mrs. Sandy Jolly Mr. and Mrs. Johnny L. Jynes Mr. and Mrs. Rick Kersey Mr. and Mrs. Doug Kilgore Ms. Karan Kinton Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Kinton Mrs. Tracy Kremer Ms. Emily R. Lambert The Reverend Doctor Jimmie L. and Mrs. Lancaster Landis Revocable Trust Ms. Michelle E. Landry Mrs. Laurie A. Lee Dr. Leanne Lefler and Mr. Martin Lefler Commander Lisa E. Lessley Mr. Antonio R. Long Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Long Ms. Nancy Lovett Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Maese Mr. and Mrs. Alejandro Manriquez Ms. Duanne P. Markman Ms. Carolyn Marshall Dr. and Mrs. R.A. Mason Mr. and Mrs. Tim Massanelli Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Masters Mr. and Mrs. Bill May Mr. and Mrs. Larry May Dr. Robin McAtee and Mr. Brent McAtee McClelland Consulting Engineers Inc. Ms. Joan M. McCoy Ms. Jayanna McCulloch Mr. and Mrs. Jim McKenzie Mr. and Mrs. Ward R. McKinley Mr. and Mrs. Wilson McKnight Drs. Carol A. and Frederick A. Meadors Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Miller Mr. and Mrs. David Miller Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Willems Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Minton Dr. Anita H. Mitchell and Mr. Dennis O. Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. John Montgomery Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mosenthin Ms. Melba Munnerlyn Mr. and Mrs. Jim Murphy Dr. and Mrs. Frederick G. Nagel Ms. Sally H. Naucke Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Neil

Mr. and Mrs. Brian R. Nettleton Mr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Nichols Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Oakhill Dr. and Mrs. Timothy J. O’Brien Ms. Nancy O’Brien Dr. Elizabeth O’Connell Mr. and Mrs. George Oliver Mr. and Mrs. Charles Orr Ms. Melissa J. Overturf Mr. and Mrs. Dan L. Parker Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pate Mr. and Mrs. Bob Paulk Dr. and Mrs. Randall S. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Gregory M. Pianalto Mr. and Mrs. Dana Pierce Ms. Teresa K. Pilgrim Mr. and Mrs. Michael Plumlee Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey W. Polster Mr. and Mrs. John E. Pope Ms. Suzanne Post Mr. and Mrs. Robert Powell Ms. Ellen S. Powell Mr. and Mrs. Wayne O. Pyland Ms. Geraldine M. Rambo Mr. and Mrs. Michael Reed Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Hollis Rogers Ms. Cheryl M. Rojas Mr. Dave Rowland Ms. Anita C Rundle Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Rusin Mr. Robbie N. Rust Ms. Kathleen O. Ryan Dr. Edward H. and Mrs. Saer III Ms. Shalunda Sasser Mr. and Mrs. Martin Schneider Mr. and Mrs. Burley G. Scissell Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Tony Seamon Dr. and Mrs. James W. Seay Ms. Shantay Sellers Ms. Sue Senn Dr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Shearin Ms. Lona W. Sheehan Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Shields Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Sisson Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith Ms. Cacey L. Smith Ms. Lori Smith Mr. and Mrs. Travis W. Snider Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Somers Mr. and Mrs. Richard Spadoni Mr. and Mrs. Lane Stafford Mr. and Mrs. John Stanley Ms. Marilyn Stanley Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stephens Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stewart Dr. and Mrs. Phillip Stone Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Stramel Ms. Amanda Strawn Suellen M. Marinoni 2007 Revocable Trust

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Ms. Kristine Stump Ms. Hermione Swindoll Dr. Song Hee Hong and Dr. Sunghee Tak Mr. and Mrs. Christopher S. Talley Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Terrell Terri Lynne McNaughton Inc. Dr. and Mrs. K. J. Thomas Ms. Anna M. Thomason Ms. Jackie Thorne Ms. Nancy Toon Mr. and Mrs. Robert Torvestad Ms. Marsha L. Trammel Dr. and Mrs. Bill Tranum Mr. and Mrs. Ray Trower Ms. Deborah J. Tull Ms. Kimberly Turner Ms. Delores Tyler Mr. and Mrs. J. Stuart Tyndall Mr. and Mrs. Joel Uy Mr. and Mrs. John C. Vaughn Dr. Ralph J. Vogel Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Waite Mr. and Mrs. James P. Wallent Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Watkins Mr. and Mrs. James D. Watson Dr. and Mrs. Mark E. Weaver Ms. Jillian M. Weinberg Ms. Wanda M. Weise Ms. Karen J. White Mr. Bill Wilkerson Mr. and Mrs. Gary Williams Ms. Odette P. Willis Ms. Emily A. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Justin R. Wisdom Mr. and Mrs. Max Wright Mr. and Mrs. Robert Yada Mr. Harold Zook

New To You Program Promotes

Book Support

The New to You Program began with an idea that James Smalley, a member of the Pulaski Heights AARP Chapter 2362, created in 2007 to provide book stipends to students pursuing their education. It opened an avenue for members to donate their old books for sale, with the proceeds funding book stipends to students “Each member was asked to bring old books or DVDs during our monthly meetings,” Smalley said. “The books are displayed each month on a table for other members to purchase for $1 or less.” Frank Putt, president of the Pulaski Heights AARP chapter, explained the process. “Most of the members will buy two or three books, then donate those books or DVDs and buy more the next month,” he said. “It's like a rental library.” The Pulaski Heights AARP Chapter 2362 members selected the College of Nursing to be a recipient of the funds. Kristi Bowden, a graduate nursing student, received the $500 book stipend. “We are honored that the Chapter selected our College to be the first recipient of this thoughtful gift,” said Cynthia Gregory, director of development. “Our hope is that this stipend opportunity will continue.” The Pulaski Heights AARP Chapter 2362 formed in November 1975. The chapter has 87 members. The AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that helps people 50 and older improve their quality of life. The members of AARP also are active in community projects and take annual trips.

Gifts in Kind

Boulevard Bread Cantina Laredo Catering to You Inc. Dixie Café Restaurant Little Caesars Pizza Administrative Little Rock Hematology/ Oncology Associates Pioneer Printers Premium Refreshments Service Popeye’s Chicken Quiznos Sam’s Club Starbucks Whole Hog Cafe

Left to right James Smalley, Kristi Bowden and Frank Putt

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$50,000 Awarded to Assist

Minority Students

In an effort to address a shortage of minority nurses teaching in the state’s nursing programs, the Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC) donated $50,000 to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Nursing’s doctoral nursing program. The AMHC Healthcare Workforce Diversity Scholarship fund will provide financial assistance to minority UAMS College of Nursing graduate students who are in need of financial aid. “We are thankful to the commission for committing these ongoing funds,” said Dean Claudia Barone, EdD, RN, dean of the UAMS College of Nursing. “At UAMS we work diligently to increase the number of minority students represented in all of our programs. This scholarship will significantly aid our efforts toward reaching those goals.” Idonia Trotter, executive director of the AMHC, spoke about the endowed scholarship at a ceremony that also featured Barone and UAMS Chancellor Dan Rahn, MD.

“This is all about recognizing the need to address the dire shortage of minority, graduate-prepared nurses teaching in the state’s nursing school programs,” Trotter said. “Today, May 19, 2010, is a landmark day in taking a big step forward to ensure we’re moving toward reversing that trend. I’m very proud to be a part of this and look forward to seeing this scholarship’s intentions come to fruition.” The mission of the AMHC is to ensure all minority Arkansans access to health care that is equal to the care provided to other citizens of the state and to seek ways to provide education, address issues and prevent diseases and conditions that are prevalent among minority populations. The goal is to bridge the gap in health issues among minorities and the majority.

(Left to right) Cynthia Gregory, Dr. Claudia Barone, Dr. Daniel Rahn and Idonia Trotter

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Beaumont Foundation COO Visits Campus

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PAthWAYS • 2010


An executive from a Texas-based foundation that has awarded nearly $100,000 to help the UAMS College of Nursing provide financial assistance to students from rural areas made a visit to the campus July 27, 2010. C. Edward Keller, chief operating officer of Beaumont Foundation of America, met with UAMS Chancellor Dan Rahn, MD, and College of Nursing Dean Claudia Barone, EdD, RN, during his visit. Since 2006, the Beaumont, Texas-based foundation has awarded $95,000 in grants to the college for financial assistance to students, especially those in rural south Arkansas and east Texas. “The Beaumont Foundation of America funding allows the College of Nursing to reach out financially to assist students with their educational expenses and emergency funding,” Barone said. “Without this source of funding, we could possibly lose students from those rural areas of the state that bring much diversity to our program.” Keller also met four nursing students who received scholarships funded by the foundation. Latoya Young, an Air Force veteran working toward her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BSN), said she thought she would have to work full time in addition to school. Her scholarship has allowed this single mother to cut back to part time, and given her more time with her 4-yearold son and for studying. “I worked as an emergency medical technician in the Air Force and seeing the nurses in the hospital and in the field left no question about what I wanted to do,” Young said about her decision to enter nursing school. Another recipient, 40-year-old Relanda Mason, said she hopes to continue her studies after she completes her BSN and earn a master’s degree.

Keller said he was pleased to hear the students’ stories. “We are proud of you and pleased to know that we are able to help,” Keller said. The foundation’s grants fund scholarships targeting first generation nursing students from medically underserved areas, especially minority applicants; financial incentives for those who make a commitment to stay as faculty in nursing education upon graduation; and for emergency grants to students experiencing a crisis that would have otherwise interrupted their education without some financial assistance. The foundation’s grants have funded more than 60 scholarships and provided for emergency loans to students for items that included textbooks and uniforms. Of the 29 Beaumont Foundation scholarship recipients in the 20092010 academic year: • 18 were enrolled in the BSN program on the Little Rock campus • Seven were enrolled in the BSN program on the Hope campus • Two were pursuing a Master of Nursing Science (MSNc) degree • Two were in the RN to BSN program. In addition: • Nine (31 percent) were minority students • 24 (83 percent) were first generation college students • 11(38 percent) said they were willing to teach upon graduation • 15 (52 percent) lived in medically underserved areas • Four (14 percent) lived in health professional shortage areas • Nine (31 percent) had dependent children • 23 (79 percent) were one-income households • Five (17 percent) were male minority students

With a growing nursing shortage, Barone said, those students who plan to teach following graduation are critical for allowing nursing schools to produce more nurses in the future. The foundation’s initial grant to the College of Nursing in 2006 marked the first time the organization had provided funding to a nursing school. Keller said the organization’s founder and president, W. Frank Newton, along with board members Wayne A. Reaud, Gilbert I. “Buddy” Low and Jon M. Huntsman, felt strongly about programs like those at the college that improved lives by giving people the tools to become educated, healthy and self-reliant. He noted that it was Huntsman who first became acquainted with the college when he served on the American Red Cross board of directors with former UAMS faculty member and College of Nursing alum Deborah Carman, MNSc, RN. Carman is instrumental in maintaining a close partnership for the College with Hunstman and the Beaumont Foundation of America. The Beaumont Foundation, established in 2001, is a nonprofit grant-making institution dedicated to enriching the lives and enhancing the futures of less fortunate children and youth, families and the elderly. The Foundation provides grants and scholarships to a broad range of charitable, religious and educational organizations across the United States.

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Alumni News

Alumni Accolades Heather Brown, BSN, RN, was named the 2010 August Outstanding Nurse of the Month. Brown is originally from Mammoth Spring, a small town in north central Arkansas. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in dietetics from the University of Central Arkansas and then decided to return to school, obtaining her Bachelor of Science in Nursing in May 2001 from the UAMS College of Nursing. Brown began her nursing career on her home unit, F7-Stem Cell Transplant. After five years, she left UAMS for three months, only to return to the same unit that she had missed so much. Nursing is the feeling of goodness that she gets while helping others. “I love our patients and the diversity of team,” Brown said. “There is always something new on F7. I love my coworkers, too. I can’t imagine doing anything else.” Brown is married with two daughters, ages 8 and 5, with whom she loves spending her spare time. She enjoys the outdoors with her family, especially camping, canoeing, hiking and swimming.

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Lazelle E. Benefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, was named dean of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center College of Nursing. Benefield is an adjunct professor and holds the Endowed Parry Chair in Gerontological Nursing at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences. Benefield is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing and holds degrees from the University of Florida, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Old Dominion University. She completed postdoctoral work at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences as a John A Hartford Fellow in Geriatrics. Dr. Benefield is the principal investigator of one federally funded and two foundation supported research grants. Her grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research supports the study of distance family caregiving of elder home-dwelling persons with cognitive impairment who live alone. The grant will identify care giving issues and needs of geographically distanced family members and explore technology-based interventions to address those needs.

Dana L. Carthon, PhD, RN, was selected as a 20102012 John A. Hartford Foundation Claire M. Fagin Fellow. Carthon was one of eight scholars awarded $120,000 to support advanced research training in “Trajectory of Self-management Activities and Provider Support Among African-American Primary Caregiving Grandmothers.” Carthron was the first African-American to receive her doctoral degree at the UAMS College of Nursing and is on faculty at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. Miriam Richard Lawrence, BSN, RN, was named 2010 November UAMS Nurse of the Month. A 2006 graduate of the College’s BSN program, Lawrence is a nurse on Unit F8—Medical Specialties. She is enrolled in the College’s master’s program, concentrating on women’s health in preparation of becoming an APN in that field. Her career goal: decreasing health disparities in the underserved populations and communities.


Sarah Rhoads, DNP, APN, and Stephanie Wyatt, MNSc APN, were accepted as mentees in the Sigma Theta Tau International Maternal-Child Leadership Academy. Rhoads and Wyatt were two of 110 nurses selected nationally to participate in this 18-month program. The Academy prepares maternal-child health nurses and nurse midwives for effective interprofessional team leadership as they strive to improve the quality of health care of childbearing women and children up to 5 years old.

Bridging the Gap Lauren Langston, a nurse in the RN to BSN program, and Amy Hester, a nurse in the BSN to PhD program, were both recipients of the International Daisy Award for Extraordinary Nursing for the month of August 2010. The award recognizes nurses for their skills, excellence, advocacy and being “caught in the act of extraordinary compassion.” Langston has worked in the pediatric intensive care unit at Arkansas Children’s Hospital for more than four years. Hester manages a nursing unit at UAMS Medical Center, where she has worked for18 years. Coincidentally, Hester was Langston’s preceptor in her Leadership and Management course in 2010. “It was surprising when we realized we were both August Daisy recipients,” Hester said. “It clearly demonstrates the caliber of students in our UAMS nursing programs to have two students receive this award.” The participation of UAMS leadership in precepting nursing students from the UAMS College of Nursing has strengthened over the last few years and has been significantly facilitated by College of Nursing Dean Claudia Barone, EdD, RN, and UAMS Chief Nursing Officer Mary Helen Forrest, RN, MNSc, CNAA, BC. ”We are working hard to bridge the gap between academics and clinical practice on our campus,” Hester said. “We have a lot to offer each other and together we create comfort, hope and healing for our patients and families.”

Karen H. Morin, RN, DSN, ANEF Karen Morin (seated) is the 2009-2011 president of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International

Alumni, Let’s stay connected! www.uams.edu/nursing Left to Right: Lauren Langston and Amy Hester

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PhD Program

Celebrates 10 Years Although a hot, steamy Arkansas summer day, the weather on June 25, 2010, did not interfere with the hugs, laughs and animated conversations of those attending the 10-year celebration of graduates of the College of Nursing Doctoral Program in Nursing Science. Alums arrived from as far away as Greensboro, N.C., and Washington, D.C., in addition to those from all four corners of Arkansas. Faculty teaching doctoral courses over the past 10 years also attended and caught up on the news of graduates. “This reunion was wonderful and we are proud of all our graduates and their accomplishments,” said Elaine Sounder, PhD, RN, professor and director of the PhD program. The barbecue event was hosted at the home of Jean McSweeney, PhD, RN, professor, associate dean for research and director of theTailored Biobehavioral Interventions Research Center. “I am pleased to see our program reach 10 years. It was a special time to reconnect and celebrate our success,” said McSweeney. A special remembrance gift of UAMS Culinary Prescriptions, a cookbook produced by the College of Nursing, was given to each alum attending.

Left to right-Drs. Pao-Feng Tsai, Elaine Souder, Tammy Jones, and Patricia Crane

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Left to right-Drs. Cheryl Lee and Cheryl Smith


Left to right-Drs. Tammy Jones, Susan Gatto and Jean McSweeney

Left to right-Front row-Drs. Tammy Jones, Susi Sifford, Jujuan English, Donna Burge, Angela Green and Cherly Smith Back row-Drs. Susan Gatto, Rebecca Burris, Patricia Crane, Julie Meaux, Cheryl Lee and Leanne Lefler

Left to right-Drs. Julie Meaux, Patricia Crane, Susan Gatto, Leanne Lefler and Tammy Jones

Left to right-Dr. Donna Burge and Dr. Pao-Feng Tsai

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Accolades Chancellor Honors Faculty for Teaching Excellence Four College of Nursing faculty members were among 14 UAMS faculty members who received the Chancellor’s Teaching Award in 2010 for their contributions to excellence in teaching and education. The four were honored at a Nov. 17 reception in the Fred W. Smith Conference Center of the UAMS Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute, where Chancellor Dan Rahn, MD, presented the awards to recipients from each of the colleges, the Graduate School and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs). Kelly Betts, MSN, RN, began her career at UAMS in 2008 as a clinical assistant professor, teaching pediatrics in the undergraduate program. The following year, she assumed the role as interim coordinator of the Simulation Lab, formerly known as the Nursing Learning Resource Center. Then in July 2010, she accepted the position as coordinator. She continues to also coordinate the undergraduate pediatrics course. Despite being at the College for just two years, her talents and abilities also were recognized in August 2010 with the Faculty Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award. Professional activities include serving on the College’s Continuing Education Committee and the Social Affairs Committee, and as a member of the Department of Education Journal Club. On the university level, she is a member of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Committee and the Teaching with Technology Committee. She is also one of two faculty advisors for the UAMS College of Nursing’s chapter of the Student Nurses Association. 42

Betts is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, Gamma Xi chapter; the American Nurses Association; Arkansas Nurses Association, serving on the Program Planning Committee in 2009 and as a delegate in 2007-2009; Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society, serving on the Education Committee; American Diabetes Association; American Association of Diabetes Educators; National League for Nursing; National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners; and the Association of Women’s Health Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. In addition, she serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Pediatric Nursing as a reviewer for endocrine submissions and was editor from 20062009 for the Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) Resource Manual. She has been a reviewer for PENS education committee since 1999. In May 2010, she was invited to present a poster, The Effects of Surgical Management on the Quality of Life of Children with Chronic Gastric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study, at the annual American Pediatric Surgical Nurses Association conference Active in community service, Betts serves as a Single Parent Scholarship Fund mentor; American Red Cross Nurse Volunteer, Central Arkansas Chapter; and American Diabetes Association Volunteer, serving on the Planning Committee for Diabetes Walk for 2008-09. Betts received her MSN degree from Walden University in Minneapolis, and her BSN from UAMS. She is enrolled in the EdD program at Walden University. Neena Grissom, MSN, RN, was a staff education instructor at UAMS Medical Center before joining

the College of Nursing faculty as a clinical instructor in 1991. She is a clinical assistant professor, teaches in the baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs and serves as coordinator for the Nurse Educator Specialty in the master’s program. She has given presentations in integrating technology into the classroom at local, regional and national education conferences and workshops. In April 2010, Grissom presented the poster, Reinventing the Test Preparation Process Using Interactive Learning Technologies at the 10th Annual Nurse Educator Institute conference. Her excellence in teaching was recognized with the Best Classroom Instructor Award from senior nursing students from 1994 through 2008 and the Faculty Award for Excellence in Classroom Teaching in 2001, 2005 and 2010. In 2008, she received the Sigma Theta Tau International, Gamma Xi chapter award for Excellence in Nursing Education. In 1995, Grissom was honored with a My Favorite Teacher Award by Channel 4 News in central Arkansas after being nominated by one of her senior nursing students. She serves on the College’s Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee and as chair of the Faculty Orientation Committee. For two years, she served on the planning committee for the College’s annual Nursing Education Conference. At the campus level, she is a member of the Patent and Copyright Committee. Her service activities include teaching CPR for health care providers. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, Gamma Xi chapter, serving as a board member and chair of the By-laws Committee; the National


League for Nursing; American Nurses Association; Arkansas Nurses Association; and Academy of MedicalSurgical Nurses. Grissom earned her MSN degree from the University of Alabama School of Nursing and her BSN degree from the UAMS College of Nursing. She is working on her doctorate in education at UALR. Jo O’Guinn-Charles, MSN, RN, RNP, began her career as a staff RN at UAMS in 1979. After moving to south Arkansas in 1984, she used her talents to develop the One Day Surgery Department at Ouachita County Hospital. In 1987, she began working with nursing students as an assistant professor in the ADN program at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. After holding faculty positions at Grambling State University, Southern Arkansas University, and Baptist Health Systems, in 2002 she joined UAMS as a clinical instructor in the College’s undergraduate program on the Hope campus. She left this position in 2003 to serve as curriculum chair in the development of the Southern University at Shreveport ADN program. While in Shreveport, she developed a Performance Based Development System as a nurse recruiter for Christus Schumpert Health System. She rejoined the Hope faculty part time in 2006, accepting a full-time clinical assistant professor position in 2007. She serves as course coordinator for Nursing Care of the Older Adult and Community Health and teaches Nursing Care of the Adult. Her talents as an educator have earned her the Hope for Success Outstanding Faculty Award for the UAMS Hope Campus in May 2009 and the student to faculty Outstanding Hope Faculty Award in May 2010. Professional activities include being a member of the Gerontological Association of Nurse Practitioners; Arkansas Cancer Coalition; American Nurses Association; and Sigma Theta Tau International, Gamma Xi chapter. She served as District #1 vice president

of the Arkansas Nurses Association in 2010 and was elected president for 2011. She is also one of the founding members of the Little Rock Black Nurses Association. O’Guinn-Charles earned her MSN degree from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La., and her BSN from UAMS. She completed the College’s Gerontological Nurse Practitioner post-master’s program in December 2009. Mary S. Hartwig, PhD, RN, APN, was honored as recipient of this year’s 2010 AHEC Excellence in Teaching Award. She holds the rank of associate professor in the College and has been the AHEC Northeast director of nursing education since 1997. She taught advanced physiology and pathophysiology to graduate nursing students for 10 years and was one of the earliest users of interactive video for nursing distance education. Hartwig annually coordinates clinical rotations for undergraduate nursing students in Jonesboro. She also teaches medical students and family medicine residents such topics as the care of the diabetic patient and

motivational interviewing. Students and residents taught by Hartwig have noted she is “always willing and ready to teach and to guide” and she consistently exhibits the qualities of an outstanding teacher. In addition, Hartwig is involved in academic scholarship. As the chair of the AHEC Northeast Research Committee, she has collaborated on a number of quality improvement projects involving other members of the AHEC Northeast faculty and residents, resulting in numerous improvements in patient care practices. She is the primary author on many publications and poster presentations. Community service activities include serving on the board of directors for the Women’s Crisis Center of Northeast Arkansas and as a board member of the Arkansas Child Abuse, Rape, and Domestic Violence Commission. Hartwig earned her PhD from the University of Tennessee-Memphis, her MN from the University of Washington School of Nursing, and her BSN from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.

Dr. Daniel Rahn (left) and Dr. Claudia Barone (center) presents award to Jo Charles (right)

Dr. Daniel Rahn (left) and Dr. Claudia Barone (center) presents award to Kelly Betts (right)

Dr. Mary S. Hartwig (center) accepts award from Dr. Daniel Rahn (left) and Dr. Mark B. Mengel (right)

Neena Grisson (right) accepts award from Dr. Claudia Barone (center) and Dr. Daniel Rahn (left)

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Scholarships 2010-11 BSN Nursing Scholarships— Little Rock Campus Arkansas Hospital Auxiliary Lauren Lisenbee

Barbara Pearson Nursing Scholarship Cassandra Cooper Brooke Dutton

Barton Scholarship Candice Baker Melanie Bolen Adam Boone Allison Borden Lauren Castleberry Sally Cunningham Angela Gerke Kelsey Gilmore Sarah Gray-Staples Angela Harris Lauren Henson John Hill Ryan Hughes Ashley Hunter Kristin Jimenez Stephanie Kitch Angela Kruse Kathleen Lee Cassie Martin Carol Meadors Allison Miles Elizabeth Mitchell Wendy Neel Jeffrey Oliver Terry Prowse Amanda Quinn Josh Rowland Emily Schmitz Jessica Spohr Sarah Thane Cady Vowell Chloe Ward Deborah Witonski

Beaumont Foundation of America Scholarship Bahiyyah Dawan Jessica Disotell Francisco Dixon Patricia Hernandez Crystal Johnson Tiffany Jones Relanda Mason Chidinma Uwadineke LaToya Young

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Benni Ogden Fambrough Scholarship

Florence C. Zook R.N. Nursing Scholarship

Blue Jeans for Books Award

Florence Grabiel Ellis Scholarship

Lauren Henson

Caitlin Abiseid Shannon Cobb Ashley Johnson Tameca Oliver Kari Williamson

Jenny Rea

Gertrude E. Skelly Charitable Foundation

Cammy Giffin Hayes Scholarship Christine Goodwin LaToya Lewis

Ashley Johnson

Gloria Rauch Scholarship Angela Harris Wendy Neel

Class of 1997 Scholarship Shannon Cobb

Helen F. Lang R.N. Scholarship Adam Boone

College of Nursing General Scholarship Candice Baker Allison Miles Josh Rowland Sarah Thane Kari Williamson

Jacob Ponder

College of Nursing Miscellaneous Gifts/Scholarship

Helene Fuld Health Trust Scholarship for Baccalaureate Nursing Students Elizabeth Mitchell Amanda Quinn

Kathryn Crandall Scholarship Kelsey Gilmore

Little Rock Departmental Club

Jordan Carmon Scholarship Shane Colquitt Sarah Gray-Staples Brandi Crowell Laura Dedman M.B. Knighten Memorial Rachel Furnell Surgical Nursing Scholarship Holly Laureano Katie Burns Jessica Matheny Rachel Pack Madelyne M. and Edward C. Haleigh Power

McCarty Scholarship

College of Nursing Scholarship Nora Orr Theresa Summers Catherine Waters

David L. Johnston Jr. Scholarship Elizabeth Bobo

Dean’s Excellence Award for Future Teachers Cassie Martin

Dr. Elizabeth O’Connell Scholarship Linh Nguyen

Dr. Janet Lord Nursing Scholarship Sally Cunningham

Dr. Lee and Mrs. Maria Nauss Scholarship Joshua Mosley

Andrea Peace Ethina Roberts Jana Sowards

Marie Stephens Scholarship Christopher Hardison Tina Larson

Martha Harding Gann Memorial Scholarship Ashley Hunter

Mary Katherine Mourot Scholarship Kathleen Lee

Mike W. Spades Scholarship

Caitlin Abiseid

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Ragsdale Scholarship for Nursing Cheryl Schmidt


Neil and Clara Spain Scholarship

College of Nursing Scholarship Catherine Waters

Shakyia Hale Jean McClendon Scholarship Bernard Hall Misty Foshee Lauren Reynolds Ray Woods Scholarship April Leslie Paul O, Canaday Scholarship Ashley Cole Rita M. Woods Scholarship Cloretta Moore Master’s Program

Dr. Patricia Evans Heacock Scholarship Jeri Spurlock

Dr. Sheila Collier Horner Scholarship Jennifer Arnold Charlene Brown Lucy Cypher Sarabeth Nail Anna Passmore

Sharon Knighten Oncology ARKLA College of Nursing Grant Nursing Scholarship Nedra Allen Jean McClendon Scholarship Kristin Jimenez

Veronica McNeirney Scholarship

Eric King

Tammie Dennis Tiny Johnson Kennetta Wiggins

Kim Knighten Oelke Family Nurse Practitioner Scholarship

Leah Frederick Ryan Hughes Alicia Sandubrae

Becky Moore Scholarship

BSN Program— Hope Campus

College of Nursing Scholarship

Barton Scholaship Chelsi Chandler Channing Day Lindsay Hooper Sandra Moses Jennifer Perry Sasha Sain Jessi Schmitt

Beaumont Foundation of America

Kiffany Golston Brittny Mills Derrick Stoker

Carolyn B. Purtle Scholarship Kirsten Cox Kayla Stockton

Mark Spears Kathy Woodward

Michelle Dallas

Cindy Huffer

College of Nursing General Scholarship-AARP Book Stipend

Mr. and Mrs. Jon Huntsman Scholarship

Kristi Bowden

James Nichols

College of Nursing Miscellaneous Gifts/Scholarship Dana Beierle Timothy Crabtree David Shew

Dr. and Mrs. W.B.H. Pool Scholarship

Sophronia R. Williams Scholarship

Beaumont Foundation of America Scholarship

Nedra Allen Vunkisha Nash

Tara Hubbart

Virginia Ivey Penick Scholarship

Cornelia J. Sundermann Scholarship

Amanda Bickford Katie Loetscher

Kimberly MacConaugha

Daphine Doster Scholarship

Cassidy Adams

Marion Pool Scholarship

RN to BSN Program

Dr. Ann King Cashion Scholarship

Alexandria McCloud

Barton Scholaship Margaret McNeece Yvette Reynolds Melissa Smart

Dr. Carolyn Cason Scholarship Dr. Cornelia Kelly Beck Gerontology Research Award Linda Crumpton

Dr. and

Marilyn Hughes Charity Lowdermilk

Heather Grigsby Tiny Johnson

Dr. Beth Vaughan-Wrobel Scholarship Gregory Fluitt

Doctoral Program Lana Brown

Alison Baldridge Rebekah Bowling

Mrs. William Pool Scholarship

Patrick Joseph McNeirney Scholarship Julia Mullenax

Jessica Stevens College of Nursing Miscellaneous Gifts/Scholarship Deborah Dorsa Carman Sandra Moses Scholarship Timothy Paslay Sasha Sain

Mary Emma Smith Scholarship

Lisa Fields Shanda Vinson

Dr. Elois Field Scholarship

Amy Huett

Hartford Scholarship Linda Crumpton

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Scholarship Sondra Bedwell Pamela Gouner Rebecca Parnell

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Mark Hagemeier, JD 2010 Dean’s Award Recipient Mark Hagemeier, associate general counsel with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Office of General Counsel, was honored with the Dean’s Award on May 14, 2010, at the College’s Recognition Ceremony.

The award is presented each year to recognize individuals who have contributed to the growth and success of the College of Nursing. Dean Claudia Barone, EdD, RN, and others described Hagemeier as thoughtful, insightful, realistic, practical, reasonable and prudent. “When complex situations arise, we are extremely grateful that he always makes himself available, that we always have his full attention and that he is carefully listening to hear all sides of whatever situation has arisen before providing us with counsel,” Barone said. “There is no doubt that he loves his position, and we don’t think he has ever met a stranger — he is one of the friendliest people we know.” Growing up in Russellville, Hagemeier graduated from Baylor University in 1986 and received a law degree from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville in 1994. Prior to becoming a lawyer, he served as a Russian linguist in the U.S. Army, taught English in Japan and worked 46

as an Outward Bound instructor in Florida, Maine and New Hampshire. At Outward Bound, he supervised and coordinated 28-day wilderness expeditions for youthful offenders. Prior to joining UAMS, Hagemeier was a senior assistant attorney general in the Civil Litigation Division of the Arkansas attorney general’s office, where his primary litigation focus was in employment

discrimination, education and civil rights. From 1994 to 1999, he served as a law clerk for Chief Judge Stephen M. Reasoner of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas. In addition to his responsibilities for the Office of General Counsel, Hagemeier is an adjunct professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Bowen School of Law.

“There is no doubt that he loves his position, and we don’t think he has ever met a stranger— he is one of the friendliest people I know.”


Faculty and Staff Honors Faculty Recognition Laura Anderson-Jones • Earned a Master of Nursing Science degree, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing

Claudia Barone • 2010 Faculty Award for Leadership Excellence • Serves on the advisory board for the Single Parent Scholarship Fund (SPSF) for Pulaski County

Kelly Betts

• 2010 Faculty Award for Clinical Teaching Excellence

Keneshia Bryant-Bedell

• Selected for the inaugural class for the Collaborative Center for Health Equity Scholars, Health Equity Leadership Institute, University of Wisconsin Institute for Clinical and Translational Research • Selected to attend the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Translational Health Disparities Course October 2010 • Accepted into UAMS Teaching Scholars Class 2010-2012

Cynthia Burns

• Students to Faculty: Best Classroom Instructor Award

Linda Calhoun

• Recognized as an Exceptional Reviewer for the Journal of Rural Health May 2009-June 2010

Jo Charles

• Students to Faculty: Outstanding Hope Campus Faculty Award

Karen Davis

• Students to Faculty: Outstanding RN to BSN Faculty Award • Promoted to rank of clinical assistant professor

Carol Enderlin

• Selected to receive funding from the Medical Research Endowment Fund for her project, “Guided Imagery to Relieve Insomnia Symptoms in Older Women with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study”

Susan L. Gatto

• Earned Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree

Angela Green • Selected to serve on Research Advisory Committee, South Central Affiliate American Heart Association • Appointed associate editor of the Journal of Pediatric Nursing

Donna Middaugh • Students to Faculty: Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award

Anita Mitchell • 2010 Faculty Award for Research Excellence

Carmen Paniagua • Inducted as fellow of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (FAANP)

Christina Pettey

• 2010 Faculty Award for Classroom Teaching Excellence

• Accepted to Summer Genetics Institute sponsored by the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health • Selected to attend the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Translational Health Disparities Course October 2010

Jessica Hambuchen

Trenda D. Ray

Neena Grissom

• Students to Faculty: Best Clinical Instructor Award

Melodee Harris • Promoted to clinical assistant professor

Charlotte K. Jeans • Earned Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree

Debra Jeffs • Recognition Award for Leadership, Tau Kappa Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau International

Tammy Jones • Earned Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree

Leanne Lefler •

Accepted into the 2010 Advanced Training Institute in Health Behavior Theory Course, sponsored in part by the National Cancer Institute

Jean McSweeney • Recipient of Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing • Recipient of Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Texas at Arlington

• Earned Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree

Fermin Renteria

• Promoted to clinical assistant professor

Mary Robertson

• Selected as a 2010 summer fellow, Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College Professional Institute for Higher Education Management

Janet Rooker

• Promoted to clinical assistant professor

Cheryl Schmidt • Students to Faculty: Best Professional Role Model Award • 2010 Faculty Award for Service Excellence

Sandee Sealey • Students to Faculty: Most Supportive Faculty Award

Susi K. Sifford • Earned Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree

Pam Tabor • Earned a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree, University of Tennessee Health Science Center-Memphis

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rebecca Webb • Earned a Master of Nursing Science degree, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing

Staff Awards latrina prince-Williams • Accepted into the Doctor of Education Workforce Development Education Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

pJ reed

• 2010 Staff of the Year Award

Edna rodgers

• 2010 Staff Achievement Award

Kimberly Scruggs

• Earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Management with an emphasis in Healthcare Administration, John Brown University

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Student Recognition 2010-11 Emily Arnold

• 2010-2011 Junior Class Secretary-Little Rock Campus

Kristen Bradley

• 2010 Little Rock Departmental Club Award-Little Rock Campus

Joann Brennan

• 2010 Little Rock Departmental Club Award- Little Rock Campus

Sandra Burton

• 2010 Nursing Excellence Award-Little Rock Campus • 2010 Faculty Award for Outstanding Achievement and Contribution

Shannon Bustamante

• 2010 Virginia R. Jarratt Award

Heather Carney

• 2010 Willa Belle Adams Award-Little Rock Campus

Dana Craig

• 2010 Nurse’s Nurse Award-Hope Campus

John Crane

• 2010 Most Supportive Student Award-Hope Campus

Rachael Daugherty

• 2010 Outstanding RN to BSN Award-Little Rock Campus

Christina Ennis

• 2010-2011 Senior Class Historian Hope Campus

Beth Evans

• 2010 Kathryn “Bucky” Thomas Award Little Rock Campus

Lauren Greenwood

• 2010-2011 Senior Class Treasurer Hope Campus

Jacqueline Hall

• 2010 Most Supportive Student Award Little Rock Campus

Charles Hickman

Susi Sifford

• Dr. Eric Ashworth Hodges Award for Best Dissertation • Outstanding Future Nurse Leader Award

• 2010-2011 Junior Class Treasurer Little Rock Campus

Kayla Stockton

Lindsay Hooper

Seth Thomson

Holly Hurn

Samantha Weaver

Kristian Kidd

Rebecca Webb

Kristen King

Monica Williams

• 2010-2011 Senior Class Vice President Hope Campus

• 2010 Nightingale AwardLittle Rock Campus

• 2010-2011 Senior Class SecretaryHope Campus

• 2010-2011 Junior Class PresidentLittle Rock Campus

• 2010-2011 Senior Class Historian Hope Campus • 2010 Gloria Rauch AwardLittle Rock Campus

• 2010 Griffey Professionalism Female Award -Little Rock Campus

• 2010 Veronica McNeirney Award Little Rock Campus

• 2010 Nightingale Award-Hope Campus

Katherine Kleitsch

• 2010 Gold Key Faculty Award Little Rock Campus

Stephanie Langley

• 2010-2011 Senior Class Social Chair Hope Campus

Mary Manriquez

• 2010 Nurse’s Nurse AwardLittle Rock Campus

Rebecca McEuen • •

2010 Outstanding Hope Student Award- Hope Campus 2010 Nursing Excellence AwardHope Campus

Brittny Mills

• 2010 -2011 Senior Class President Hope Campus

Michael Moring

• Griffey Professionalism Male Award Little Rock Campus

Callie Reynolds

• 2010 Ina Swetnam Award Little Rock Campus

Haleigh Power

• 2010-2011 Junior Class Vice PresidentLittle Rock Campus

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Faculty Publications BOOKS/CHAPTERS Schmidt, C. K.; Finley, S.; Jennings, J.; Ritchie, S.; and Rooker, J. (2010), “Preparing Nursing Students to Respond to Disasters,” in National League for Nursing’s Giving Through Teaching: How Nurse Educators are Changing the World. New York: Springer Publishing Co. Middaugh, D. (2010), “Healthcare Quality,” in D. M. Nickitas, D. J. Middaugh and N. Aries (Eds.), Policy and Politics for Nurses and Other Healthcare Professionals: Advocacy and Action (pp. 287-307), Boston: Jones & Bartlett. Robertson, R. and Middaugh, D. (2010), “Conclusion: A Policy Toolkit for Healthcare Providers and Activists,” in D. M. Nickitas, D. J. Middaugh & N. Aries (Eds.), Policy and Politics for Nurses and Other Healthcare Professionals: Advocacy and Action (pp.327-351), Boston: Jones & Bartlett. Schmidt, C. K.; Finley, J.; Jennings, J.; Ritchie, S. and Rooker, J. (2010), “Preparing Nursing Students to Respond to Disasters,” In J.J. Fitzpatrick, C.M. Shultz & T.D. Aiken, Giving Through Teaching: How Nurse Educators are Changing the World, New York, NY: National League for Nursing and Springer Publishing Company. Springer, J.; Schmidt, C. K. and Farrell, K. (2010), “Disaster Nursing and the American Red Cross,” in P.S. Cowen & S. Moorhead, 8th Ed., Current Issues in Nursing (pp. 669-675), St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier. MANUSCRIPTS Enderlin, C. A.; Coleman, E. A.; Cole, C.; Richards, K. C.; Hutchins, L. F. and Sherman, A. (2010), “Sleep Across Chemotherapy Treatment: A Growing Concern for Women Over 50 with Breast Cancer,” Oncology Nursing Forum, 37(4):461-468. Coleman, E. A.; Goodwin, J. A.; Coon, S. K.; Richards, K.; Enderlin, C.A.; Kennedy, R.; Stewart, C. B.; McNatt, P. K.; Lockhart, K.; Anaissie, E. J. and Barlogie, B., “Fatigue, Sleep, Pain, Mood and Performance Status in Patients with Multiple Myeloma,” (2010) Cancer Nursing, Vol. 00, No. 00, 2010.

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Heath, J. and Barone, C. P. (2010), “BBQ Smoke, Smoking Habits and Carbon Monoxide Exposure,” Bold Voices, 2(6), 5. Barone, C. P.; Walthall, B.; Fenton, M.; Tinsley, M., and Fikes, B. D. (2010), “Better Pain Relief in the PACU,” OR Nurse, 4(1), 21-26. Beck, C.; McSweeney, J.; Roberson, P.; Richards, K.; Tsai, P. and Souder, E. (2010), “Challenges in Tailored Intervention Research,” Nursing Outlook, 58(2),104-110. Beck, C.; McSweeney, J.; Roberson, P.; Richards, K.; Tsai, P. and Souder, E., (2010), “Challenges in Tailored Intervention Research,” Nursing Outlook, 58(2), 104-110. Frost, M.; Green, A.; Gance-Cleveland, B.; Kersten, R. and Irby, C. (2010), “Improving Family Centered Care Through Research,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 25, 144-147.

Lefler, L.L. and Yang, S. (2010), “Cluster Analysis of Women’s Prodromal and Acute Myocardial Infarction Symptoms by Race and Other Characteristics,” Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 25(4), 311-322. McSweeney J.C.; O’Sullivan P.; Cleves, M.A. and Lefler, L.L.; Cody, M.; Moser, D.K.; Dunn, K.; Kovacs, M.; Crane, P.B.; Ramer, L.; Messmer, P.R.; Garvin, B.J. and Zhao, W. (2010), “Racial Differences in Women’s Prodromal and Acute Myocardial Infarction Symptoms,” American Journal of Critical Care, 19(1), 63-73. Paniagua, C. T. and Diaz, Z. (2010), “Mondor’s Disease: A Case Study,” Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 22. Souder, E. (2010), “Dementia Overview and Update,” Arkansas Nursing News, CE Offering, 6 (1), 6-12.

Green, A. (2010), “Growing Up with Congenital Heart Disease Challenges of Adolescents: Developmental Needs and Psychosocial Issues,” Society of Pediatric Cardiovascular Nurses Newsletter, Volume XXIV, Number 1.

Tak, S.; Benefield, L. and Mahoney, D. (2010), “Enriching the Lives of Long-Term Care Residents with Technologies: Reforming LongTerm Care Through Technology,” Research in Gerontological Nursing, 3(1), 61-72.

Collins, A. S.; Graves, B. A.; Gullette, D. L. and Edwards, R. (2010, in press), “Developing a Micro-Simulation in Pharmacology DecisionMaking,” Journal of Nursing Education.

Student Publications

Collins, A. S.; Graves, B. A.; Gullette, D. L. and Edwards, R. (2010). “Developing A Micro-Simulation in Pharmacology DecisionMaking,” Journal of Nursing Education, 49(7), 408-413. Harris, M. (2010), “The Effects of Slow-Stroke Back Massage on Minutes of Nighttime Sleep in Persons with Dementia in the Nursing Home: A pilot study,” 2009 Judith V. Braun Clinical Research Award finalist, Geriatric Nursing, 31(1), 70. Harris, M. and Richards, K. C. (2010), “The Physiological and Psychological Effects of Slow-Stroke Back Massage and Hand Massage on Relaxation in the Elderly,” Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19, 917-926. Hartwig, M.; Cummins, D. and Frank, T., et al, “Medication Reconciliation In Transitions: The MERIT Program,” The Arkansas Family Physician, 2010, Volume 13, Number 1, pp. 12-14. Lefler, L.L., “Research Day: Celebrating the Scholarship of Education, Evidence-Based Practice and Research,” Pathways (2010): 2021 [Contributed to authoring the manuscript]. McSweeney, J.C.; Cleves, M.A.; Zhao, W.;

Jones, T.C. (2010), “It Drives Us To Do It: Pregnant Adolescents Identify Drivers For Sexual Risk-Taking,” Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, 33, 82-100. Sifford, K. and Bharucha, A. J. (2010), “The Benefits and Challenges of Electronic Surveillance in Nursing Home Research,” Research in Gerontological Nursing, 3(1), 5-9.


Grant Funding Research Grants New Funding-Extramural Continuation Funding– Extramural Beverly, C. (PI)., Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care in Arkansas Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future Award, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $434,000, September 2009 August 2011. Beverly, C. (PI), Specht, J., Maas, M., & Souder, E., Development of Best Care Practices for Patients with Dementia, Golden Living Center, $125,000, September 2008 - September 2010. Coleman, A. (PI), Anaissie, E. (PI), Kadlubar, F., Lee, J., Goodwin, J., & Enderlin, C., Predicting Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis with Genetic and Clinical Factors, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (RC2), $1,638,294, September 2009 - July 2011. McSweeney, J. (PI), Cleves, M., Fischer, E., Moser, D., & Wei, J., Predicting CDH Events in Black and White Women–Competing Continuation, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (R01), $2,302,176, February 2005 - January 2011. McSweeney, J. (PI), Barone, C., & Roberson, P., Research Center for Tailored Bio-behavioral Nursing Interventions, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (P20), $1,506,955, September 2004 - June 2011. Tak, S. (PI), Beck, C., & Roberson, P., Therapeutic Computer Activity Intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research–Academic Research Enhancement Award (R15), $216,000. September 2007 August 2010. Tsai, P. (PI), Beck, C., Chang, J., & Roberson, P., Effect of Tai Chi on Osteoarthritic Knee Pain in Elders with Mild Dementia, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (R21), $396,000, September 2007 - May 2010.

Schmidt, C. (PI), Assessing and Promoting Nursing Students’ Preparedness for Disasters, National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA) Disaster Relief Task Force, $500, April 2007 present.

New Funding–Intramural McSweeney, J. (PI), Cole, C., Cleves, M., Fischer, E., Mayeux, P., Tilford, M., & Wei, J., Clinical Indicators to Inform Clinicians’ Referral Decisions for Cardiovascular Evaluation in Women, CCTR – High Impact Award, $115,091, April 2010 - December 2010.

Perception of End-of-Life Care, South Central MIRECC 2007 Clinical Partnership Program, $24,694, September 2007 - September 2010. Hall, R. Whit (PI), & Mitchell, A., Does Noninvasive Electrical Stimulation of Acupuncture Points (NESAP) Reduce Heelstick Pain in Neonates?, Mayday Foundation, $401,884, September 2008 - August 2010. Hall, R. Whit (PI), & Mitchell, A., Does Noninvasive Electrical Stimulation of Acupuncture Points (NESAP) Reduce Heelstick Pain in Neonates?, MayDay Foundation, $401,884, September 2004 - April 2014.

Program Grants

New Funding-Collaborative West, D. (PI), & McSweeney, J. Enhancing Healthy Food Environments: Exploring Influences on Food Store Selection, Arkansas Center for Health Disparities, $98,436, January 2010 - December 2012. Garner, K. (PI), Lefler, L., Smith, T., Creasey, K., & Sullivan, L, A Typology of Heart Failure Patients’ Preferences for End-of-Life Communication with Healthcare Providers, South Central VA Health Care Network Research Grants Program, $100,000. October 2009 - September 2011.

Continued FundingCollaborative Fischer, J. (PI), & McSweeney, J., Perspectives on Enhancing Family Involvement in Treatment for PTSD, VA Health Services Research and Development Service, $239,000. April 2009 - March 2011. Lipschitz, D. (PI), & Beverly, C., Schmieding Center for Senior Health and Education, Schmieding Foundation, $14,000,000. January 1999 - December 2019.

New Funding-Extramural Barone, C. (PI), Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship, Department of Health and Human Services–Health Resources and Services Administration, $61,646, July 2010 June 2011. Calhoun, L. (PI), 3M Technology Grant, $4,200, 2009.

Continued FundingExtramural Barone, C. (PI), Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship, Department of Health and Human Services–Health Resources and Services Administration, $75,715, July 2009 June 2010. Beverly, C. (PI), Souder, E., & Beck, C. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, John A. Hartford Foundation, $1,050,000, January 2006 - December 2010.1,050,000. January 2006-December 2010.

Pyne, J. (PI), & McSweeney, J. Patient-Centered Medication Adherence Intervention for Schizophrenia, VA Health Services Research and Development Service, $700,000, April 2004 - June 2010. Stewart, K. E. (PI), & Gullette, D., Reducing Sexual Risk Behaviors among Rural African American Stimulant Users, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, $3,045,459, September 2007 - September 2012. Garner, K. (PI), & McSweeney, J., Qualitative Analysis of Hospital Executives, Physician Administrators, and Hospital Legal Counsels’

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