Page 1

U_MAG / MAY 2011

1


INTRO by Diego Duailibi | ED tes: Nike, Jum Takahashi, Jean M lenciaga, Cristopher Raeburn, M ni phtographed by Hugo Toni | Wilson with styling by

He&She by Eric photographed by Iva ta by Daniela Toviansky dico | Bodies in Motion & Ricardo

Simulacrum by Pablo Sab | PERSONA: Daiane Conte gerio Cavalcanti | Im NOT Sardenberg with styling Lessons of function nando Pinheiro with sty FUNKTION PORTUGUESE 3

by

S

MAY 2011/U_MAG


DITO by Andre Rodrigues | NoMatos, Pierre Cardim, Ballet , BaMary Katrantzou, Ed MarqueziWiktor photographed by Kristiina y Michelle Carimpong |

Daniela Nogueira an Musseli | Maria Boniy | AXEL by Vinna Laun by Rogerio Cavalcanti dos Anjos |

borido with Carla Momfort erato photographed by RoT THAT Innocent by Yuri g by Marcela Jacobina | photographed by Feryling by Marcio Banfi |

Shawn Reinoehl CONTENT U_MAG / MAY 2011

3

| |


5

MAY 2011/U_MAG


long- term, rather than just its form. Lucy Niemeyer, another power player in the national design field, believes design is about integrating all needs: from raw material decision to the use it will have in the hands of a certain target audience. One thing is certain: design cannot be bound to practical function alone.

We all share a common difference toward daily events that happen in our lives. Experience ends up reshaping what, and mainly how, we feel things. When we see an object, our choice to like it or not may simply depend on what is more beautiful. As the saying goes, beauty lies in the eye of the beholder. However, there is a strong need to try and translate such feeling, such ambiguous feeling, into something that is real and useful to us, something that captivates either by its form or its function. This endless search comes from our purest human relationships. Artworks are different from design in the light of the possibilities an object may have, especially if we consider its quality, performance, resilience, raw materials, research and creativity. If we walk into the field of graphic design, we can say it is in charge of turning information into communication or – via a nice magazine cover, a well illustrated book, good-looking typology – charm people, bringing culture and facilitating people’s access to new information. The very same design can have totally different impacts on people from distinct global regions and cultures. In order to try and encode such complex human relationships, there came the design schools that still bear strong influence upon us. One of them was the german Bauhaus, which stood for everything that was pure. There, function overcame form, because the simplicity in the objects would end up making them more useful in several different applications. The school of Ulm, one of Bauhaus successors, adopted extreme functionalism as a motto, making the design more ideological than just practical, hence highlighting the form instead of the function. Here in Brazil design has not embodied a true identity, but instead it is derived from a series of ideas and trends that come from several different sources. To Alexandre Wollner, one of the biggest names in Brazilian design, the idea is to make something everlasting, which means, we have to worry about the object’s function and its final destination in the

U_MAG / MAY 2011

5

All human relationships are connected to it, hence its final use may not be simply to satisfy a material need, but rather satisfy our emotional needs as well. Such relativism leads us to look for what is beautiful, what visually appeals to the masses, for the same object can bear several different functions and just one form. If we add here the need to “sell” products, such quest for what is beautiful becomes fundamental, irrespective of how dependable beauty might be. Steve Jobs, from Apple, says that design is the soul of human creations. His company takes relativism to the last consequences – and makes a lot of money out of it. Apple has strayed from function and tackled concept in the heart. It is all about aesthetics, for it is what qualifies their products: they judge it is better to satisfy this dependable need rather than give the object a clear function. Other companies also believe that design is more than just a project: it is something bigger, something that touched human emotions in the nerve. The market demands a product must be different than all the others. Furthermore, it demands an object must be reproduced in its original form or possible variations. This quest for new forms and new functions confers higher reversibility, making objects convertible and extensible – they might even gain new functions throughout the process. This desire to accomplish something better and unique is what drives innovation. Limit breaking. We cannot cling to the past. Design has trespassed the edge between form and function. Diego Duailibi is a graduated engineer and a naturally-born designer. He is also a trend hunter in complete love with his job. + duailibidesign.com


7

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

7


9

MAY 2011/U_MAG


SCAN DINAVIA DESIGNS + Tufi Duek+ Eduardo Pombal For this AW 2011, TufiDuek’s creative director, EduardoPombal, gathered inspiration from Scandinavian design. The clean lines that took over the collection, hence, came from the dÊcor and architecture of typical Stockholm buildings that have recently become a major trend in interior design. Accessories made of fake wood and copper also followed along the path, with a slightly rustic feel. Structures assaulted the collection, finding a breath of fluidity only in the frilled skirts or in the voluminous sleeves of (some) looks. Sometimes, in a somewhat obsession with form, the designer ended up constraining the garment movement, making the final image a bit too stiff. Textures popped everywhere, giving some emotion to the quiet mood of this season. Rugged leather and sequins sewed so tightly together, as if to mime fur, were one of the super hits here.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

9


Chris top her Rae burn LONDON UK Sustainable fashion and ethical design aretwo words that could provoke endless mental yawning. Yet, it is upon those very concepts that British designer Christopher Raeburn has constructed his namesake brand _and, the best of all, staying away from the clichés. Graduated from the London Royal College of Arts in 2006, Christopher soon got the attention from major retailer with his clothes made from re-appropriated military garments. Liberty was the first to carry his collection, even giving him an installation to receive his jackets made of parachute fabric. Soon, other big retailers followed, such as Harvey Nichols and Selfridges. It didn’t take long for Raeburn to become one of the most sought after designers at the London Fashion Week. His installation for SS11 was one of the most acclaimed presentations from the menswear shows. His clothes, almost unique pieces tagged “remade in London”, are mostly outerwear made entirely out of recycled military materials, fabrics and garments, always with some functional property, be it ultra-resistance, impermeability or thermal control. The precise and unique combination of ethical design, functionality and innovation soon caught the eye of established brands, such as Victorinox, which tapped the designer for several different collaborations.

11

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Mary Ka tran zou

U_MAG / MAY 2011

11

Her inspirations range from robotics to constructivism and the 1960s minimalism à la Pierre Cardin. But it is her passion for hyper realistic images that earns her a special place under fashion’s lim light. Mary Katrantzou was born in Athens, Greece, and attended Rhode Island School of Design in order to become an architect. It didn’t take long, though, for her to realize that her approach to design was from another point of view. After just one year, she transferred her course to Central Saint Martins where she got her BA and MA as a print designer. It was there that she developed her accurate taste for trompe-l’oeil prints. Designers from the 1920s and 1930s, along with Sonia Rykiel, Karl Lagerfeld and Jean Paul Gaultier played an essential part in her repertory, but while these designers tried to simulate reality through prints, Mary had a slightly different approach. Working almost with hyper realistic images her prints never imitate the real world. While other designers would do a trompe-l’oeil pocket, drape or even an entire garment, Mary, for her graduate collection, created gigantic jewelry prints that could never exist in real life. Success was immediate. With simple 60s shapes, strong colors and the most amazing prints, her grad-collection was soon available at Browns. Her debut at LFW followed on the next season (AW09), again with a huge success _perfumes-dresses, with prints of enormous bottles in a vast range of shapes and colors. Since then, Mary has consistently improved her techniques, reaching the climax with her SS11 collection. Hotel rooms and luxury salons from the 70s gained life in hyper-realistic prints. Images, or fragments of images, taken from old magazines such as “AD” and “The World of Interiors”, digitally amplified and then applied with extreme precision onto the garments. The most striking of it all was how well the prints dialoged with the clothes’ shapes. One in function of another, in perfect harmony. With structured tops and shoulders, the body gained a slightly fluidity, maximized in the delicate draped skirts. A 3-D trompe-l’oeil with allusions from perspective, light and shadow. Curtains became colorful fringes; chandeliers were transformed in maxi accessories; and lampshades into skirts. For AW11, Mary took a step further, proving that the impossible is not always so. She took inspiration from homes such as Diane Vreeland’s and Coco Chanel’s, transforming the richest objects into clothes. Chinese porcelain, Fabergé eggs and a vast range of decoration items had their shapes adapted to the functionality of a modern wardrobe, with an incredible attention not only to shapes and prints, but also color and fabrics.


Ifasingle shapecould definethe wholelegacy offashiondesigner Pierre Cardinit wouldbethe circle. At age 88 _out of which 60 years have been dedicated to fashion alone_ he says: “We cannot be stopped when we are round. If you throw a ball, it will go far beyond a square could reach. The circle symbolizes infinity. The moon, the sun, even the Earth are limitless creations, they have no beginning, no middle, no end”. The circle makes total sense in the life and work of this elderly man who was born in Italy, close to Treviso, son to an agricultural family, and who has been granted a major exhibition this year in Brazil: “Creating Fashion, Revolutionizing Costumes”. Pierre Cardin never stopped. He has always looked forward in his career, which started out when he was a 14-year old boy, as a couturier apprentice. He went through the maisons of Madame Paquin and Elsa Schiaparelli, and at age 24 he took over the disputed position of first couturier at maison Christian Dior, where he remained until 1949, thus helping shape the infamous New Look. There he found his passion for sculptural cutting and clothes construction, which would later become his trademark and dub him the “architect of fashion”. Cardin was indeed talented, and that brought him to the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, right after he founded his own brand. Years later, the designer shocked the institution and was cast out of it because he decided to launch a prêt-à-porter collection. According to Cardin, he always had this socialist inclination, so he always wanted to design clothes that working women could wear. “I had these very rich clients, and things started to get boring. As a good socialist, I wanted to take over the streets”, he said during an interview in Brazil. Cardin not only changed the way people sold clothes, but also the way clothes were manufactured. Even in the 1950s, when every woman wanted to have nice hips, Cardin was making clothes that used heavy materials such as wool, vivid colors, high necks and accessories made out of weird materials, such as vinyl. The quest for new materials that could make real that which Cardin dreamed of, added to his future vision, ignited his interest for technologies and science, resulting in his most emblematic collection: “Cosmocorps”, accomplished in 1964, a few years before the man stepped on the moon surface. “I have always suffered heavy influence from the cosmos, astronauts, and satellites. And I always knew the man would end up in the moon. I was making clothes inspired in that: how people would dress if they lived in the moon”. At that time, the collection was seen as pure joke. Today, it is regarded to as a beacon that Cardin was fearless and, just like a circle, he saw no limits. 13

MAY 2011/U_MAG


“I’MA BUBBLE!” By Augusto Paz Unusual shapes have always dotted Cardin’s work and it is very interesting to perceive how the designer uses organic forms _he declares himself as very much inspired by nature_ to build aseptic and inorganic silhouettes. The Bubble Dress, created in 1954, is a piece that synthesizes this argument. The dress despises feminine contours while maintaining natural shapes. Cardin’s work is revolutionary because it shatters the image of the bourgeois female body, created at the Modern Age _emphasized breasts, thin waist and broad hips. The designer’s shapes are atypical and its clothing is a functional one. Nevertheless, we must be very careful when saying that his work is a futurist one, after all his references are known _nature, historic buildings, etc._ it is, however, the way he works these allusions out that makes Cardin’s magic. When the designer conceives a bubble dress, he attributes to the body values that were once applicable only to machines, like efficiency and aerodynamics. This is the human condition overcoming itself.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

13


Wunder BAR

as an extension of the artist’s body. That’s the case of the Dance of the Sticks, an act in which the dancer has long bars set along his members. The desired movement is not a human one. It is a mechanical movement, instead. Syncopated beats dictate the rhythm of a nervous dance, even stiff in some points. The latent Modernism observed the body as a machine. Centro Universitário Senac, in São Paulo, reproduced some of the original garments of the ballet in 2010 and presented a re-edition of the original presentation in three acts. It’s possible to watch the spectacle on Youtube. In a very particular way, this ballet garments change human gesture, in the moment of the presentation as well as in the moment of its preparation, after all, you don’t wear a big iron head as easily as you wear a pair of jeans. Through form and function relations, Triadic Ballet creates new dimensions for human body and subverts the theatrical character’s temporality and identity notions.

By Augusto Paz A king dresses differently than a plebeian; a housewife doesn’t wear the same clothes that a prostitute does; Ulysses didn’t dress like King Lear, Medea didn’t wear the same clothes that Lady MacBeth did. Costume is a character’s essential part and, as well as in real life, it helps build its identity and situate it historically. The forms applied on those costumes allow us to associate each personage to its character. We can even say that in this case, shape is subordinated to function. Now, think of a spectacle whose characters’ human shapes are hidden by sophisticated frames and foam filled costumes. A play composed by a genderless bizarre doll-like cast, and then you have the Triadic Ballet, a dance spectacle developed by German artist and choreographer Oskar Schlemmer. Its première happened in 1922, in Stuttgart, Germany. Oskar was a professor at Bauhaus, and that already says a lot about his work at the Ballet. Triadic Ballet subverts the figurine logic while an ergonomically system provides the actor with complete freedom of movements. This spectacle’s clothes, through their construction, inhibit sex, status, age and localization recognition. Besides, many of the garments were composed so as the dancers had their movements obstructed. The ballerina cannot put her arms down because she wears a belt with tons of metallic hoops. The dancer has its head covered by a metallic globe. Other pieces, on the contrary, contribute in the sense that the costume works 15

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

15


IN SI DE OUT: Jun Taka hashi + Nike By Luigi Torre Gyakusou is the exclusive sportswear line developed by Nike in partnership with Japanese avant-garde designer Jun Takahashi. The main focus here is to unite design and function in order to improve athletic performance, without compromising the final look. The first collection of this collaboration was launched last October, having Takahashi’s passion for long distance runs as inspiration and driving force. Now, for the second collection Nike and Undercover’s designer are back with a slightly revolutionary concept. The new line applied reversal engineering in order to provide for the best comfort possible. Takahashi developed each piece of this collection from inside out, leaving seems, bindings and all other conceptive process noticeable on the outside. Meanwhile, the interior of the garments feature an exclusive finishing touch, capable of providing not only comfort, but extremely precise fitting.

17

MAY 2011/U_MAG


BA LEN CIA GA RU LES By Luigi Torre With Stephanie Noelle Born in 1895, in Guetaria, coastal region of Spain, Cristóbal Balenciaga was dubbed by none other than Christian Dior as the “master of us all”. His career started out fairly early. At age 16, he already had his own atelier and, in 1937, when he established himself in Paris, he already owned two stores in Spain. However, it was only after World War II, during the 1950s, that he was acknowledged a genius of shapes. It was then the couturier started to become obsessed with geometries and architecture, refining his eyes to the choice of materials _their weight, structure, hardness_ making clothes just like an artisan etches marble.

It feels like every season a different designer is honored. If SS 2011 was Yves Saint Laurent’s, then AW 11 is Cristóbal Balenciaga’s. With a major retrospective weeks before the fashion shows and another exhibition in San Francisco, USA, Balenciaga’s works have been the strongest reference to several brands this season.

Such geometric precision could be seen all around in AW11 _from Jil Sander to Burberry Prorsum, from Yves Saint Laurent to Louis Vuitton, from Marc Jacobs to Calvin Klein. Focus is on the round jackets that seem to be drawn using a compass. Fallen and round shoulders, sleeves that follow the cocoon shapes, everything seems to protect the body against instabilities and uncertainties that are so very common in our lives today.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

17


1 What’s your imaginary name? Jean Der Son

2

Which part of your body would you like to be the bigger than the rest of it? My brain stretches way beyond than my leg does. I’m satisfied.

3

Eyes wide open or eyes wide shut? In between…

4 What do you do when it is dark? Think about emptiness and about the unknown.

5

What does morning taste like? Bittersweet.

6

Pastel or water paint? Water paint.

7

What was the last thing that made you smile? To see my mother when I came back from a trip.

8

Where does sincerity lie? Inside the strong ones.

9

A street or an avenue? A street.

10

Your last olfactory memory? ES

11

Where does comfort lie? In silence.

12

In which point to you deny yourself? In almost every one of them.

13

Your biggest lie? Say I’m good, whenever I’m asked how am I.

14

What are you gonna be when you grow up? Big.

15 And do you want to be when you grow up? Cosmopolitan.

19

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

19


16 Where does the other wait for you? … Where?

17 Your favorite way to seat? With my legs crossed. (laughs)

18 Your best way to live? Freely.

19 What’s special? Everything, and a bit of anything.

20 In which side does your conscience walk? In the emotional side, but pretending it’s rational and then getting confused.

21 What’s your color? Today, black. Absence.

22 What did you do yesterday, while the world end? I felt afraid and didn’t enjoy the day.

23 Where does far away lives? Right over there, far, far away.

24 Man or woman? …Man…

25 Create in one word, a new mantra for the universe: shhh…

26 With how many lines a life is made? One tortuous one…

27 How may creatures do you see a day? Two.

21

MAY 2011/U_MAG


28 How many creatures do you create until they become grown enough to carry on on their on? Two.

29 What do you expect? Somebody and the world.

30 Dance or sing? Dance.

31 How would you cry without tears? I don’t work that way.

32 How are you missing? Courage.

33 A description? Beautiful.

34 A label? For what?

35 An analysis? You suffer from pranoia.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

21


23

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

23


25

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

25


27

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

27


29

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

29


31

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

31


33

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

33


35

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

35


37

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Blazer by GENERAL IDEA, tshirt by DAVID ANDERSON

U_MAG / MAY 2011

37


Zip up jacket by FIFTH AVENUE SHOE REPAIR

39

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Shirt and trousers by JOSE DURAN, shoes model’s own

U_MAG / MAY 2011

39


Hoodie by TAKE YOUR CLOTHES OFF, leather pants and shoes MODEL’S OWN

41

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Zip up jacket by FIFTH AVENUE SHOE REPAIR

U_MAG / MAY 2011

41


Pants by DAVID ANDERSON, shirt by PLAIN, shoes model’s own

43

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

43


saia usada como gola e vestido Bruno Gonzaga, leggings Cynthia Hayashi e casaco Brech贸 Volta ao Mundo

MAY 2011/U_MAG

45


U_MAG / MAY 2011

45

camiseta À la Garçonne, cinto Brechó Volta ao Mundo, bermuda Maison Martin Margiela


camiseta À la Garçonne, cintos Stefânia Curumbaba, moletom usado como calça acervo pessoal

47

MAY 2011/U_MAG


saia usada como gola e vestido Bruno Gonzaga, leggings Cynthia Hayashi e casaco Brech贸 Volta ao Mundo

47

U_MAG / MAY 2011


calรงa usada como blusa com laรงo atrรกs Alexandre Herchcovitch

49

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

49


Camisas amarradas na cintura como saia: Levi’s, Lee, Rockster e måscara Mariana Popovic

51

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

51


53

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

53


55

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

55


Terno masculino usado como vestido Alexandre Herchcovitch e sapatos Helena Abbud

57

MAY 2011/U_MAG


vestidos Walério Araújo

U_MAG / MAY 2011

57


calรงa Mariana Popovic e blusa de cabelos Gaia Prado

59

MAY 2011/U_MAG


tailleur usado como vestido Thierry Mugler e blusa Stef창nia Curumbaba

U_MAG / MAY 2011

59


61

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

61


camisa, bermuda usada como chap茅u e 贸culos acervo pessoal

63

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

63


Photography byDaniela Nogueira Styling byRodrigo Polack Photo Assistant: Viniccius Mayer Fashion production: BrisaIssa 65

A drawing is simply a line going for a walk.

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Macac達o Neon

U_MAG / MAY 2011

65


body e hot pants Cyan Meia Wolford

67

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

67


69

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

69


Vestido eme per me

71

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

71


73

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

73


75

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

75


Vestido Walerio Araujo Hot Pants e luvas cyan テ田ulos Cantテ」o

77

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Vestido é FIT

U_MAG / MAY 2011

77


Vestido e maio usado como top ambos Missoni Faixa e capa ambos Neon

79

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

79


81

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

81


83

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

83


85

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

85


87

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

87


89

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

89


91

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

91


93

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

93


95

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Photography by Vinna Laudico Stylingby LuPhilippe Guilmette Hair& makeup by Emmanuelle Campolieti Model:Axel U_MAG / MAY 2011

95

Shirt by Alexander McQueen


Shirt by Alexander McQueen Collar made by stylist

97

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Shirt by Alexander McQueen Collar and waistband made by stylist U_MAG / MAY 2011

97


99

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Top Comme des Garcons Hat made by stylist

U_MAG / MAY 2011

99


101

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

101


Hat made by stylist

103

MAY 2011/U_MAG


“Color has taken possession of me; no longer do I have to chase after it. I know that it has hold of me forever… Color and I are one. I am a painter”. ~ Paul Klee U_MAG / MAY 2011

103


105

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

105

Sweatshirt Dead Meat, trousers and shoes Maison Martin Margiela


Jacket Ermenegildo Zegna, shirt Costume National Homme, trousers Maison Martin Margiela

107

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

107


109

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Sweatshirt Roberto Cavalli, short Missoni, sunglasses Ray-Ban.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

109


111

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Jumper Ermenegildo Zegna, trousers Stone Island, shoes Maison Martin Margiela

U_MAG / MAY 2011

111


Jumper Maison Martin Margiela, short Z Zegna, sunglasses Ray-Ban.

113

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Sweatshirt American Apparel, trousers Z Zegna U_MAG / MAY 2011

113


115

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Sweatshirt Maison Martin Margiela, short Costume National Homme

U_MAG / MAY 2011

115


117

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

117


119

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

119


121

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

121


123

MAY 2011/U_MAG


“My aim is a passionate longing for rigorous spatial design.. without painterly intoxication of any sort.� ~ Lyonel Feininger

U_MAG / MAY 2011

123


125

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

125


127

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

127


129

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

129


131

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

131


133

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

133


135

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

135


137

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

137


139

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

139


141

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

141


143

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

143


145

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

145


147

MAY 2011/U_MAG


PHOTOGRAPHY by Rogério Cavalcanti STYLING by Juliano pessoa & Zuel ferreira BEAUTY: Raul Melo PHOTO ASSISTANT: Jorge Escudeiro PHOTO TREATMENT: Premedia crop SPECIAL THANKS TO: Vinicius Freire, Isabella Coffers & Ford Models staff U_MAG / MAY 2011

147


149

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

149


151

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

151


153

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

153


155

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

155


157

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

157


159

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

159


161

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

161


163

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

163


165

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

165


167

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

167


169

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

169


171

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

171


173

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

173


175

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

175


177

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

177


179

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

179


181

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U_MAG / MAY 2011

181


wire sleeve dress, leather spiked jacket with Horn gold chain by Victor Luna, shoes by Aldo

183

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Blue butterfly skirt and blue hair bolero by Victor Luna, booties by Walter Steiger bangle by Noir, Belt- stylist own.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

183


185

MAY 2011/U_MAG


liquid latex Monarch dress by Victor Luna, cuff by Noir, Necklace- stylist own.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

185


One shoulder Monarch dress with tulle by Victor Luna, Belt, cuff and ring-stylists own.

187

MAY 2011/U_MAG


dress by Flinga, booties by Walter Steiger, ring by Noir.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

187


Egg black coat by Victor Luna, booties by Walter Steiger.

189

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Eva and Bernard dress, Mercura sunglasses, Ring-stylists own

U_MAG / MAY 2011

189


Black chiffon poncho is style “theresa� 100% silk chiffon by Sylvia Heisel, Drama safety pin necklace by Victor Luna, Walter Steiger booties.

191

MAY 2011/U_MAG


White Tulle dress, all over spiked Jacket, and 4 tier gold chain by Victor Luna, Aldo shoes.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

191


Victor Luna black vest, pink animal print dress is “randi” 100% washed silk organza & black pants are “robert” in polyamide by Sylvia Heisel, Walter Steiger shoes

193

MAY 2011/U_MAG


Flinga dress,Mercura cuff.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

193


EDITO A decisão de fazer um número da U+MAG em cima do tema forma e função nasceu de um jeito muito óbvio: com o gancho da Semana do Móvel em Milão, queríamos ganhar relevância extra na internet. Mas, como de costume, nosso conteúdo ganhou vida própria, assumiu muitas formas (e, quem sabe, alguma função) e caminhou sozinho, pra bem longe da proposta inicial. Além do limite que a gente havia estabelecido na nossa cabeça. Este limiar, inclusive, é um tópico recorrente ao longo desta edição: o que separa a forma da função? O meio da mensagem? A modelo da roupa? O texto do leitor? Não pretendemos responder a estas questões, porque, assim como a problemática da forma e da função, elas podem ter infinitas respostas. Essas respostas podem ser somadas, subtraídas, multiplicadas, divididas, esquecidas, relembradas, retorcidas, distorcidas e, assim, podem gerar outro infinito de novas respostas. A gente olha pra natureza, e vê que tudo tem uma forma atrelada a alguma função. O formato da folha na árvore, os chifres na cabeça de um touro, o tronco de uma palmeira, as patas de um grilo, o polegar do ser humano. O ser humano. Elemento subversivo e também subversor, que se apropria das coisas do mundo e encontra, para uma mesma forma, funções inimagináveis. A apropriação é o sopro de vida da U+MAG. Foi nela que Romeu Silveira, nosso diretor de arte, encontrou seu talento avassalador de violar as formas _as imagens_ às vezes sem nem pensar numa função determinada. É essa vicissitude que nos move adiante, que faz com que o nosso editor de moda, Luigi Torre, busque novos fotógrafos, novos stylists, novas maneiras de se mostrar, de se sentir a moda. É a vontade de subverter o que é forma, o que é função, e o que não é nenhuma dessas duas coisas também. Esta edição da U+MAG não tem um destino final, mas ela tem um ponto de partida: começamos depois do limite. Andre Rodrigues 195

MAY 2011/U_MAG


SCANDINAVIA DESIGNS Por Luigi Torre Para o inverno 2011, o design escandinavo serviu de inspiração para Eduardo Pombal, diretor criativo da Tufi Duek. Da decoração e desenhos das casas de Estocolmo vieram os traços puros que definem as formas desta temporada. O constante uso de madeira _na verdade, fachete de couro, material usado para cobrir saltos_ e os ótimos acessórios feitos de cobre também encontram ali, na Escandinávia, suas raízes. “O trabalho de design nórdico com madeira é produzido de um jeito a valorizar, e não diminuir, as características deste material”, explica o estilista. As formas seguem estruturadas, mas com volumes calmos, geralmente nos babados das saias _ora com cintura bem baixa, ora marcada no lugar_ que vez ou outra migram suavemente para as mangas. Porém, às vezes um tanto obcecado por tal estudo de formas, as estruturas acabam limitando um pouco o movimento da roupa e imagem final pesa. Texturas por toda parte avivam à moda calma desta estação. Destaque para os couros e os paetês bordados aos montes, conseguindo visual de pele animal, e para as peças em tecido acobreado, principalmente nos vestidos curtos, meio tubinhos.

(RE)MADE IN LONDON Por Luigi Torre Moda sustentável e design ético são duas daquelas expressões usadas à exaustão, de maneira a mera citação já causa uma preguiça enorme. Ainda assim, o estilista britânico Christopher Raeburn construiu a sua marca sobre esses mesmos pilares sem cair em clichês ou politicagens. Formado em 2006 pela Royal College of Arts, em Londres, Christopher logo chamou atenção de compradores com suas roupas criadas a partir de materiais militares reciclados, ou melhor, re-apropriados. A primeira grande loja a perceber o potencial de suas roupas _um mix exato de funcionalidade, design ético, atenção aos detalhes e inovação_ foi a Liberty, onde o estilista pôde ainda criar uma instalação para abrigar suas jaquetas feitas de tecidos de paraquedas. Suas peças, quase todas únicas, são em geral itens de outerwear _ jaquetas, parkas e outros casacos feitos a partir dos mais variados tecidos dupla-face, lãs super espessas de uniformes de soltados britânicos, borracha, couro e outros materiais com as mais variadas propriedades _desde ultra-resistência, controle termal e impermeabilidade. E tudo devidamente etiquetado: “re-fabricado em Londres”.conseguindo visual de pele animal, e para as peças em tecido acobreado, principalmente nos vestidos curtos, meio tubinhos.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

195


INSIDEOUT Por Luigi Torre Gyakusou é o nome da linha da Nike concebida em parceria com o estilista japonês Jun Takahashi. Aqui o principal objetivo é unir design e função em prol da performance esportiva. A primeira coleção da colaboração entre a tradicional marca de esportes e o estilista por trás da Undercover foi lançada em outro 2010, tendo como inspiração o amor de Takahashi por corridas de longa distância. Em abril de 2011, a dupla voltou a ativa com a segunda coleção que reflete ainda melhor a missão do estilista em unir seu estilo único de concepção funcional com a inovação tecnológica. A nova linha traz uma estética de engenharia reversa em busca do melhor desempenho esportivo. Takahashi focou na construção das peças “de dentro para fora” a fim de minimizar o atrito da roupa com a pele durante a corrida. Esse processo cria um visual exclusivo com vincos, emendas e costuras expostas do lado de fora, enquanto o interior proporciona um ajuste contínuo projetado para maior conforto. Combinando cortes e partes elásticas a coleção Gyakusou foi desenvolvida para garantir facilidade nos movimentos.

“I’MABUBBLE!” Por Augusto Paz As formas inusitadas pontuam o trabalho de Cardin e é interessante perceber como o estilista se apropria de formas orgânicas _ele se diz muito inspirado pela natureza_ para construir silhuetas assépticas e inorgânicas. O vestido “Bolha”, criado em 1954, é uma peça que sintetiza esse raciocínio. Ao mesmo tempo em que despreza os contornos femininos, tem forma natural. O trabalho de Cardin é revolucionário porque esfacela a imagem do corpo feminino burguês criada na Idade Moderna _seios marcados, cintura fina e quadris largos. Os formatos do estilista são inusitados e sua roupa é funcional. Pierre Cardin mexia com elementos que, à sua época, eram intangíveis. Em um mundo sem internet era difícil imaginar que o homem chegaria à lua um dia. Todavia, devemos ter cuidado ao dizer que suas criações são futuristas, afinal suas referências são conhecidas _natureza, construções históricas, etc._ mas é a maneira como são trabalhadas que fazem a magia de Cardin. Quando o estilista cria um vestido bolha, atribui ao corpo valores antes empregados às máquinas, como a eficiência e o aerodinamismo. É o humano superando a si mesmo.

197

MAY 2011/U_MAG


THE END IS THE BEGINNINGISTHEEND Por Valentina Rodrigues Se uma forma pudesse definir o trabalho de Pierre Cardin, senhor de 88 anos _mais de 60 só na moda_, esta forma seria o círculo. “Não paramos quando somos redondos; quando você lança uma bola, ela vai longe, enquanto um quadrado quica e para. O círculo é o símbolo do infinito. A lua, o sol, a Terra, são puras criações, sem limites, sem começo, meio e fim”. A tal forma, e a justificativa, não poderiam fazer mais sentido no trabalho deste homem nascido na Itália, numa região próxima a Treviso, filho de pais agricultores emigrados para o HauteLoire, na França, que ganhou exposição no Brasil, chamada “Criando Moda, Revolucionando Costumes”. Pierre Cardin nunca parou, e olhou para frente em todos os momentos de sua carreira, que se iniciou cedo. Aos 14 anos começou como aprendiz de alfaiate, passou pelas casas de Madame Paquin e Elsa Schiaparelli, e aos 24 anos assumiu o cobiçado posto de primeiro alfaiate de Christian Dior, onde ficou até 1949 e ajudou a criar o New Look. Em seu trabalho na Maison, já era clara sua paixão pelos atributos esculturais do corte e construção da roupa, o que se tornou sua marca registrada, além de torná-lo conhecido como “arquiteto da moda”. Cardin era bastante talentoso, o que lhe rendeu um convite para integrar a Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, assim que abriu sua marca própria, mas anos depois o estilista escandalizaria a instituição e seria expulso por ser o primeiro membro a lançar uma coleção de prêt-à-porter. Segundo Cardin, ele sempre teve uma veia socialista, o que o influenciou a querer fazer roupas que as mulheres trabalhadoras também pudessem usar. “Antes, eu atendia somente clientes muito ricas e isso começou a ficar chato. Como bom socialista, queria invadir as ruas”, contou em entrevista no Brasil. O estilista não só revolucionou na maneira de vender roupas (ele é o líder de licenciamentos _ e provavelmente o mais rico), mas também em como elas eram feitas. Nos mesmos anos 50 da cintura marcada e saia rodada, Cardin fazia roupas que resistiam às curvas sedutoras das mulheres e assim criava sua própria silhueta, por meio de linhas minimalistas e tecidos pesados _como a lã_, com exímio trabalho de alfaiataria, e para equilibrar a escassez de complementos, colocava uma gola extremamente grande, cores vibrantes (vermelho e roxo, principalmente) ou acessórios feitos de materiais inesperados, como vinil. A busca por materiais que pudessem transformar em realidade aquilo que Cardin colocava nos croquis, além do olhar constante no futuro, gerou um entusiasmo pela tecnologia e ciência, que resultou em sua coleção mais emblemática: “Cosmocorps”, feita em 64, poucos anos antes do homem dar “um grande passo para a humanidade”. “Sempre fui influenciado pelo cosmo, por cosmonautas, satélites. E eu sempre soube que o homem iria para a Lua. Fiz roupas inspiradas nisso: como as pessoas se vestiriam se estivessem na Lua”, explicou o estilista. Á época, a coleção foi vista como piada, hoje, no entanto, é um símbolo de que Cardin não tinha medo de, assim como o círculo, não ter limites.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

197


LIMITBREAK

importante do que a função propriamente dita. A concorrência oferece produtos de qualidade técnica semelhante, durabilidade desempenho, fazendo com que o design deixe de ser visto apen projeto, e passe a aceitá-lo como algo maior que abrange també emoções humanas.

Por Diego Duailibi* Cada um de nós tem uma percepção diferente dos acontecimentos do dia a dia. As experiências ao longo da vida influenciam nossas emoções. Quando ficamos diante de um objeto, nossa escolha simplesmente pode se basear no argumento do que é mais bonito. O que é belo para alguns, pode ser repulsivo para outros. Há uma necessidade latente de conseguir traduzir esse sentimento, essa dualidade de emoções, em algo palpável, atendendo às necessidades do ser humano, cativando, atraindo ou pela forma ou pela função do objeto. Essa busca constante é resultado da relação humana pura. O que difere obra de arte de design é a possibilidade de replicar o objeto, levando em conta fatores como qualidade, desempenho, durabilidade, matérias-primas diferentes, pesquisa técnica e criatividade. Transferindo para o campo do design gráfico, ele é responsável por transformar informação em comunicação ou – por meio de uma capa de revista bem elaborada, de um livro com imagens instigantes, da escolha de tipologias adequadas ao público que se destina – encantar, levando cultura e facilitando o acesso a novas informações. Um mesmo design interfere de maneira diferente pessoas de diferentes regiões e culturas. Na busca por traduzir essas relações humanas, surgiram escolas de design que nos influenciam até hoje. Uma delas é a escola alemã Bauhausiana, que defende a pureza dos elementos. Aqui, a função se sobrepõe à forma, pois a simplicidade possibilitaria uma maior abrangência do objeto em diferentes contextos. A escola de Ulm, sucessora de Bauhaus, adota o extremo funcionalismo, tornando o design mais ideológico do que prático, privilegiando a questão formal do objeto em detrimento do seu uso. No Brasil, o design não assumiu uma identidade, mas sim um conjunto de ideias e tendências provenientes das mais diversas regiões. Na visão de Alexandre Wollner, um dos principais nomes na formação do design brasileiro, a proposta do design é ser atemporal, ou seja, preocuparse mais com sua função e com o destino que será dado a ele no futuro do que apenas com sua forma. Lucy Niemeyer, outro grande nome do design nacional, acredita que o designer tem a função de integrar todas as necessidades, desde a escolha de materiais até a utilização que será dada nas mãos do público-final. Mas o design não pode ser limitado a uma única função. Todas as relações humanas são intrínsecas a ele, sua funcionalidade não deve ser apenas para satisfazer uma necessidade material, mas também as necessidades emocionais. É esse relativismo que nos leva à busca do belo, do que agrada visualmente à maioria, pois um mesmo objeto pode ter diferentes funções e apenas uma forma. E se levarmos em consideração a necessidade do mercado em “vender” produtos, essa busca pelo novo e pelo bonito, por mais subjetiva que seja, se torna fundamental. Steve Jobs, presidente-executivo da Apple, fala que o design é “a alma das criações humanas”, e não é de hoje que a empresa dele leva o relativismo muito a sério – e faturam alto com isso. Afastaram-se do funcionalismo, aproximando-se cada vez mais do conceitual, do estético, pois a estética é o que o qualifica como produto, a forma se sobrepõe à função, pois eles julgam que satisfazer esta necessidade subjetiva do público é mais

199

Esta necessidade de lucro e vendas do mercado atual exige que produto se diferencie do outro. E mais, ela exige que essas peça replicadas ao máximo, seja em sua função inicial ou até mesmo E por essa busca de novas formas, novas funções, a chamada Ex Formal acrescenta ao item um caráter de conversibilidade, reve e extensibilidade, capazes de ampliar ou até mesmo dar nova fu objeto.

Este desejo de termos algo cada vez melhor, diferente, único é q motiva a inovar. Quebrar barreiras. Assim não ficamos presos a ultrapassado. Não há mais um limite entre a forma e a função.

*Diego Duailibi é engenheiro por formação, designer por opção tendências apaixonado pelo o que faz. + duailibidesign.com

BALEN CIAGA RULES Por Luigi Torre Colaborou Stephanie Noelle

É como se a cada temporada um estilista fosse homenageado. o verão 2011 foi de Yves Saint Laurent, o inverno 2011 é, sem Cristóbal Balenciaga.

Com uma grande retrospectiva fechada semanas antes do iníc temporada de desfiles e outra em São Francisco, EUA, o traba foi referência máxima entre as mais diversas marcas para o pr

Nascido em 1895, em Guetaria, região do litoral basco espanh Balenciaga foi chamado por ninguém menos que Christian D mestre de todos nós”. Sua carreira começou cedo, como assist alfaiate madrileno. Aos 16 anos, já possuía um ateliê de costu

quando se estabeleceu em Paris, já tinha duas lojas próprias n No entanto, foi só depois da Segunda Guerra Mundial, já nos Balenciaga se tornou o gênio das formas. Foi nessa época em couturier aboliu todo e qualquer tipo de artifício e se envered moda geométrica e arquitetônica, com olhar apurado nos tec peso, estrutura, rigidez, caimento_ para construir uma roupa artesão talha o mármore.

É essa precisão geométrica que reverberou pelo inverno 2011 a Burberry Prorsum, de Yves Saint Laurent a Louis Vuitton, e a Calvin Klein. O foco está nos casacos de formas arredondad tivessem sido desenhados com compassos. Ombros caídos e a mangas acompanhando as formas de casulo afastadas do corp protetores contras as instabilidades e incertezas dos dias de h

MAY 2011/U_MAG


a também e, nas como ém as

um as sejam o em outras. xpansão ersibilidade unção ao

que nos a um ideal

o. Um caçador de

. Assim, se m dúvida, de

cio da alho do estilista róximo inverno.

hol, Cristóbal Dior de “o tente de um ura e, em 1937,

na Espanha. s anos 50, que que o grande dou por uma cidos _em seu a tal qual um

TROMPELA MODE Por Luigi Torre Suas inspirações passam pela robótica, construtivismo e por aquele minimalismo 60’s de Pierre Cardin. Porém foram suas estampas hiperrealistas que lhe garantiram lugar privilegiado sob os holofotes da moda. Mary Katrantzou nasceu em Atenas, Grécia, foi estudar arquitetura na Rhode Island School of Design, nos EUA, mas não demorou muito para percebesse que seu interesse por design era outro. Depois de apenas um ano, se transferiu para a Central Saint Martins onde se formou em design de estampas e estilismo. Foi lá que desenvolveu seu gosto por estampas trompe-l’oeil. Estilistas dos anos 1920 e 1930, assim como Sonia Rykiel, Karl Lagerfeld e Jean Paul Gaultier, exerceram imensa influência sobre seu trabalho, porém, enquanto outros estilistas tentam reproduzir efeitos possíveis, Mary busca o impossível. Trabalhando com imagens hiperrealistas, suas estampas jamais existiriam no mundo real. Ao invés de simular bolsos, drapeados e até outras peças, Mary mostrou em sua coleção de formatura desenhos de joias imensas _tão grandes que jamais poderiam ser sustentadas pelo pescoço de um ser humano. O sucesso foi imediato. Com formas simples, meio anos 1960, muitas cores e estampas absurdas, a coleção foi direto das passarelas para as araras da Browns. Sua estreia na LFW veio na temporada seguinte (inverno 2009), acompanhada de mais uma onda de sucesso. Vestidos-perfumes, com maxi estampas dos mais variados frascos. Desde então, Mary vem refinando sua técnica de estamparia digital, atingindo seu ápice no verão 2011. Quartos de hotéis e salões luxuosos ganharam vida em estampas hiperrealistas. Eram imagens, ou fragmentos destas, retiradas de antigas revistas de decoração como a “AD” e “The World of Interiors”, ampliadas digitalmente e aplicadas com imensa precisão sobre os tecidos ora estruturados, ora fluídos. Porém, o mais marcante foi a relação entre forma e desenho. Um em função do outro, em perfeita harmonia. Com partes de cima quase sempre rígidas, as saias ganhavam drapeados delicados. Um trompe- l’oeil tridimensional em alusão aos reflexos de luz, espelhos d’água ou simplesmente a perspectiva das escadas. Cortinas vinham em franjas coloridas, castiçais e lustres se transformavam em maxi acessórios de acrílico, quando não em saias. Para o inverno 2011, Mary foi ainda mais a fundo, mostrando que o impossível, às vezes, é possível. Olhou para o interior de casas como as de Diane Vreeland e Coco Chanel e transformou suas roupas em verdadeiros objetos de arte e decoração. Imagine louça chinesa, ovos Fabergé e mais uma infinidades de artefatos transformados em peças de cores claras e formas estruturadas que desenham o contorno original de cada peça, porém adaptando-se às funções do vestuário contemporâneo.

1, de Jil Sander e de Marc Jacobs das, como se arredondados, po quase como hoje.

U_MAG / MAY 2011

199


WUNDERBAR Por Augusto Paz Um rei traja-se de modo diferente de um plebeu; uma dona de casa não se veste como uma prostituta; Ulisses não usava os mesmos trajes de Rei Lear, Medeia não se vestia como Lady Macbeth. O figurino é parte compositiva do personagem e, assim como na vida real, ajuda a construir sua identidade e situá-lo historicamente. É através da roupa que compomos a primeira imagem dos personagens do teatro e da vida real. São as formas empregadas nesses costumes que permitem que associemos cada personagem a seu caráter. Agora, pense em um espetáculo cujas formas humanas dos personagens estão ocultas por armações sofisticadas e malhas com enchimento. Uma peça de teatro composta por um elenco que mais parece uma coleção de bonecos esquisitos e sem gênero. Em outras palavras, o Balé Triádico, espetáculo de dança desenvolvido pelo artista e coreógrafo alemão Oskar Schlemmer. Sua estreia se deu em 1922, em Stuttgart, Alemanha. Oskar era membro da Bauhaus, escola de artes e design do início do século 20, e isso nos diz muito sobre seu trabalho no Balé Triádico. Nele, a lógica do figurino enquanto sistema ergonomicamente projetado para o livre movimento do ator é completamente subvertida. Aqui roupa, através de construção, inibe o reconhecimento do sexo, do status, da idade e da localização do personagem. Além disso, muitas das peças são compostas para que os dançarinos tivessem seus movimentos tolhidos. A bailarina não pode abaixar seus braços porque em sua cintura estão afixados dezenas de aros. O dançarino _ ou seria dançarina?_ tem sua cabeça coberta por um globo metálico. Outras peças, pelo contrário, contribuem para que a roupa sirva como extensão do corpo do artista, como é o caso da dança das varetas, ato em que o bailarino tem longas hastes afixadas em seus membros. O movimento almejado não é o humano. Existe o desejo do movimento mecânico. Compassos sincopados ditam o ritmo de uma dança nervosa, até um pouco tensa. O modernismo latente via o corpo como máquina. O Centro Universitário Senac reproduziu alguns dos trajes originais do balé em 2010 e fez uma reedição da apresentação em três atos. É possível assistir ao espetáculo pelo Youtube. De uma forma bastante particular as roupas desse balé alteram o gestual humano, tanto no momento da apresentação, quanto no momento da preparação do espetáculo, afinal, não se veste uma grande cabeça de lata ou uma roupa de varetas com a mesma facilidade com que se veste um par de jeans. Através das relações de forma e função, o Balé Triádico cria novas dimensões para o corpo humano e subverte as noções de temporalidade e identidade do personagem teatral.

201

MAY 2011/U_MAG


U+MAG 89 CREATIVE DIRECTOR & FOUNDER Romeu Silveira EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AndrĂŠ Rodrigues FASHION EDITOR Luigi Torre ART DIRECTOR Romeu Silveira ART CURATOR Igi Ayedun EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS Diego Duialibi Valentina Rodrigues Augusto Paz Stephanie Noelle CONTRIBUTORS Marcela Jacobina Michelle Carimpong Rodrigo Polack Yuri Sardenberg Drica Cruz Marcio Banfi Joe Adaeze Fe Pinheiro Pablo Saborido Kristiina Wilson Rogerio Cavalcanti Ricardo dos Anjos Juliano Pessoa & Zuel Ferreira Agnes Mamede Daniela Nogueira Daniela Toviansky Ivan Muselli Matteo Grecco Shawn Reinoehl Vinna Laudicco Lui Philippe Guilmette Helder Rodrigues Raul Mello FASHION PRODUTOR Brisa Issa

U_MAG / MAY 2011

201


202

MAY 2011/U_MAG

THE FORM & FUNCTION ISSUE - MAY 2011  

HUGO TONI, WIKTOR, KRISTIINA WILSON, ED MARQUEZINI, IVAN MUSELLI, GAETANO GAISO, MARIA BONITA, BALENCIAGA AND MORE

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you