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June 2012

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Dream the world awake

Imogen Wilson Marek CHORZEPA Kristiina WILSON Pablo saborido Vitor Pickersgill Tiago Chediak \ Igi AYEDUN Jean MATTOS Michael Willian David James Salvador Dali Grimes Cildo Meirelles


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VOGUE Paris BY SALVADOR DALI, 1970

scans by ciaovogue.com


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VOGUE Paris BY SALVADOR DALI, 1970


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VOGUE Paris BY SALVADOR DALI, 1970


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VOGUE Paris BY SALVADOR DALI, 1970


edito by Romeu Silveira INTRO by Luigi Torre INTRO 2 by Juliana Lopes A conversation with GRIMES by Rafael Carvalho MIRROR IMAGE: A conversation with photographer & dreamer Rogerio Cavalcanti

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A conversation with ANTOINE ESPIANESSEAU BEAUTY by Matthias Gabi REFERENCE LIBRARY: Vogue Paris circa 1970 by Salvador Dali as guest editor INTERPRETATION of DREAMS by Pablo Saborido, Jean Matos and Igi Ayedun KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido with creative direction by Godiva Art Studio 10

JACQUELINE & bRUNA photographed by Michael Willian PRIME TIME photographed by Marek Chorzepa The Bride Steps Forward photographed by Tiago Chediak in NY FUTURE BASICS photographed by David James with styling by Imogen Wilson EUGENIY photographed by Kristiina Wilson with styling by Michelle Carimpong CHLOE photographed by Bruno Ilogti with styling by Marcela Jacobina PERSONA a beauty special by Mel Freese and photographed by Vitor Pickersgill

contributors michael Willian, Mel Freese Vitor Pickersgill Igi Ayedun Pablo Saborido Godiva Art Studio Kristiina Wilson Michelle Carimpong Tiago Chediak Gianfranco Briceno Tony Muller Michele Rue Rogerio Cavalcanti Marek Chorzepa David James Imogen Wilson Marcela Jacobina Bruno Ilogti Carolina Castella George Krakowiak Rogerio Cavalcanti

LOST & FOUND Jessica Pauletto photographed by Gianfranco Briceno JULIA photographed by Michelle Rue with styling by Tony Muller

A conversation in video with ELIOT JOSEPH RENTZ VINTAGE EXTRAVAGANZA photographed by Caroline Castella with styling by George Krakowiak

U+MAG IS AN INDEPENDENT BRAZILIAN DIGITAL MAGAZINE THAT HAS BEEN ACTIVE SINCE 2004. A PLACE DEDICATED TO CREATIVE PEOPLE, RISING TALENTS, THINKERS AND A MODERN VIEW ON WHAT’S PAST, WHAT’S HAPPENING AND WHAT’S NEXT. REWIND/ FORWARD. A CONTEMPORARY REMIX. umagmag.com

cREATIVE DIRECTIOr & founder:

romeu Silveira EDITOR IN CHIEF

Andre Rodrigues FASHION EDITOR

Luigi Torre ART DIRECTOR

Romeu Silveira TYPEFACE:

Didot, Funtastic & Futura EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Rafael Carvalho EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTOR

Juliana Lopes


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The dream of the issue has become exaggeration, which has in turn become simplicity… which turned into new talents _something recurring in the U+MAG universe. It is impossible to talk about dreams without speaking of the people who are coming out now, that’s why our cover is signed by a new photographer, who has never shot any cover to any magazine. As it turned out, he delivered one of the best covers we ever had.

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Following the crisis/ emptiness we have delved into the last issue, the theme of this issue seemed even more challenging, although easier to be executed. In the first conversations we held about where we wanted to get with this issue, our fashion editor (Luigi Torre) suggested our theme should be DREAMS, since all dreamers of fashion have been long gone. In the meantime, Raf Simons and Hedi Slimane have occupied key positions in high-end brands (Dior and YSL). Fashion has surprised us and the ways we thought to establish for this issue couldn’t remain the same.

Also in the meantime, we have come to realize that curatorship is something ever more essential to a magazine that exists within the same scenario of tumblr/pinterest. Sort out the good things from the bullshit is fundamental. Maybe that could explain our delay, and also why we decided to come out every two months, and not every single month. For the better or worse, we do not work with an industrial magazine in which content is based upon templates with minor changes. As I have already said here, every issue comes out from zero, it is very similar to sculpting _in the beginning you have only powder and stone, then after months of hardwork you can see details for the first time. I am not saying this magazine is a piece of art, I am only say it is a visual experience _at least, that’s what we dream of.


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by Luigi Torre

Is it a mere coincidence? Two Oscar-nominated movies _“The Artist” and “Hugo Cabret”_ remind us of an age when the industry was fabricating dreams. Maybe that can find repercussion in the fashion venues. Fairy tale movie screenplays and even reality shows have been gaining a fantasy quality that has a lot to do with what fashion has been going through.

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Add to that the overload of digital information that leads us to brief windows of daydreaming escapism whenever we find an opportunity. Reality has then become our new obsession _be it in fashion, TV, movies, photography, arts or life. But is there reality without dream? Or is it a dream without reality? As the AW2012/13 reached its end _with Louis Vuitton evoking the theatrics that have been cast out from fashion in the 21st century_ a question emerged: if fashion was becoming

obsessed by reality (the commercial aspect), shouldn’t it also remember the old times it made us dream? Some fashion dream weavers have stayed forever in our memory: Alexander McQueen, John Galliano and Hussein Chalayan. Now reality is different and there is no room for nostalgia. Adapting fantasy to reality has become the greatest challenge of fashion creators. That’s why exhibition Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations, held at the MetMuseum in NYC, makes perfect sense. That’s why we chose dream as the theme of this issue. Reality and dream are both essential and complementary elements to the existence of the human race.


by Juliana Lopes

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to have a car. None of them I am now at a very beautiful has known violence. Everyone office in Milan, downtown. As of them has attended the best I wait for some people in a me- colleges in Europe. They have eting room, I check out my nail no idea what a health insuranpolish. I have been invited to ce plan is, because they have take part in a project and thus never needed such a thing. am very excited. I pour down The citizenship lessons they an espresso and approach have learnt have been imprinthe wide window. I look down ted in their DNA: it is clearly and I see a guy _an immigrant obvious they wait for others such as myself_ to get off the train cart before sitting on the pavement. He they themselves can hop on. may be near his thirties. He is It is obvious they won’t have carrying some bags and other to pay for a bus that comes at Made in China souvenirs no charge. They he is trying to sell. From are naturally well time to time, he checks dressed. They the messages in his cell listen to good phone _a worn out old music and atmodel, without intertend nice cultural 15 net access. We live in events. I ask for the same age; we have some restaurant apparently the same phytips and one of sical conditions. I feel emthem warns me: pathy towards him simply “We have nebecause we are human. ver been to that What separates us? What place, because makes our dreams be diffeit is only for rich people”. Say rent? I ask myself silently, and what? My idea of dreams, wianswer myself silently: it is the shes and richness gets twisted. place we were What I have, what I don’t, born in. what I dream of, what can’t I dream of? What separates me I am now at a wonderful from these young Danish peoapartment in Copenhagen, do- ple who have been born with wntown. It must be 300 square everything and crave for nometers large. There are six Da- thing? It is the place we were nish people living in here. All born in. of them are healthy and smiling. None of them wants I was Born in São Paulo, Brazil.

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Is beauty supposed to be a issue in contemporary art? Matthias Gabi thinks it needs to, and in his exhibition «Beauty» he deals with it in two series of works. Since 2005 Gabi has creating the series «Buchdruck» (letterpress printing), working with photographs found in books and magazines. From this archive choses specific images that work as prototypes for conventional ways of representation. Gabi, however, does not show readymades in the sense of Duchamps Fountain (whose image is part of the series) but intervenes in his material in multiple ways. Already printed reproductions, the photographs are scanned, scaled and reprinted. To decide on the size of the work, Gabi proceeds like a picture editor. Independent of its actual size, the picture gets just the space that is available. For the current exhibition he chose DIN A4 and so refers to a possible book format. Through the repetition of the reproduction process, print rasters are made and made visible. The photos’ focus lose their edge, thus they develop a pictorial quality. By reproducing the photographs, Gabi does not put their uniqueness into question, but assigns them with timelessness. They act as substitutes for thousands of other images that are in our collective memory. Their aesthetic is rooted in our familiarity with such types of images. The snow-covered mountains from a bird’s view, pink flamingoes

at a pond with green trees, a studio shot of model trains. The photographs are in no way chosen casually, on the contrary: their compositional and color quality harbor the potential for them to work beyond the pure illustrative function. «Beauty», the new eponymous series, also pays with conventions and deals with the term «aesthetic». By adopting the strategies of advertising photography Gabi stages normal women as models. Far from copying ads, Gabi mimicks their mechanisms. Thus, his compositions look strangely familiar but are not easily assignable. The lack of fonts and attributes makes a clear ref-erence impossible and further heightens the estranging effect. Considering his pictures on the street, you might think it’s just another ad. But looking more closely, you perceive disturbingand unusual imperfections - the absence of postproduction. With this act of denial the artist points to the synthetics of advertisements and questions our conventions of perception. Here consumer-criticism meets feminism in his commentary of these conventions. Behind it lies the question: What is it in a picture that makes us think of it as aesthetic? (Charlotte Matter, guest writer sic! Raum für Kunst 2010)

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by André Rodrigues & photography by Rogério Cavalcanti featuring Evelyn @ Ten wearing R.Rosner with beauty by Leandro Flandes @ BLZ

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Rogério Cavalcanti is not your average Brazilian fashion photographer. His images are a product of sheer true passion. And dreams. Every single detail _from lighting to angles to lenses and models_ are like pieces of a broken dream.


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Mirror Image / Evelyn @ Ten photographed by Rogerio Cavalcanti wearing R.Rosner

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Mirror Image / Evelyn @ Ten photographed by Rogerio Cavalcanti wearing R.Rosner

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I don’t believe there is a limit. Everything is a dream. I can’t cut myself off from my dreams. I am not talking about dreams of wishes, of future… I am talking about the dreams of dreams, of going beyond, imagination without expectations. Tripping, imagining, creating. I think I am living in a dream. I love the infinity you can find in a blank background, but that’s not nearly enough to me. YOUR BIGGEST DREAM. I never want to quit dreaming and taking pictures. I don’t believe in a biggest dream, but in several biggest dreams… Dreams feed me… YOUR LATEST DREAM. It has a lot to do with a shooting I am about to do. I deliver myself so much to every shooting that I end up living exclusively to it. I can’t stop dreaming of this new shooting, which is a mix of feelings I want to turn into images. YOUR WORST NIGHTMARE. There isn’t such a thing. Even the worst nightmare can produce wonderful images. HOW IS IT THAT DREAMS INFLUENCE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? In several ways and degrees… I always dream, and I always gather inspiration from my dreams. I love them! Once I had this dream in which I was imprisoned in a film roll and couldn’t find my way out, until it fell against the ground and shattered… it was a mirror. I was stuck inside a film-roll-mirror. Since then, I never let go of this obsession towards broken mirrors. WHAT SEPARATES DREAM FROM REALITY?


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computing to persue a degree in computer modelling of brain activity, so i guess that encouraged me to move into music. Could you explore the connection between Claire Boucher and the Grimes persona? They’re the same thing. Grimes isn’t a persona, it’s just the name of my brand, i guess. My art is all released as ‘grimes’ rather than Claire Boucher cuz i thought claire Boucher sounded boring.

How did your studies of eletroacoustic music at McGill influence what you now play? I will take what comes. I have no issues with success or notoriety, but i would never compromise what i do for that. I think I don’t have that much to do with the degree to which i am successful, because that all happens after the fact, i can only make art and hope people like it. I actually studied the ways in which music is processed by the human brain, so it was extremely technical and didn’t have that much to do with music. I ’m not sure it was particularly relevant to what I’m doing now, unless perhaps from a philosophical standpoint. What i did learn is that I’m not proficient enough in mathematics and

You have recently featured the cover of Dazed & Confused, one of the most influential magazines in the current fashion landscape. What’s your relation to fashion? Do you see yourself as an style icon? I don’t see myself as a style icon haha, im not sure i’m famous enough. But I do think fashion is important, it’s a statement to the outside world. it communicates a lot of one’s values or whatever. If I dressed really differently my music would be perceived differently. So I try to create something that is visually impactful but not overly sexual or anything. almost kind of androgynous, masculine or at times childlike. What’s next for Grimes? Any thoughts on the possibilities of becoming a superstar v. keeping a small, captivated and devoted audience? I will take what comes. I have no issues with success or notoriety, but i would never compromise what i do for that. I think I don’t have that much to do with the degree to which i am successful, because that all happens after the fact, i can only make art and hope people like it.

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Your early work is usually grouped together with an electronic scene usually related to a punk, do-it-yourself lifestyle. Could you describe your method of writing and recording music? I record everything using logic, midi, Roland Juno G or Roland Gaia, SM58 microphones and i used a tascam interface for visions. now i use an apogee. I write music mostly at night, alone, in the dark.

How has the momentum gained with the release of Visions affected both your life and your music? Besides the obvious quality of your work, do you have any explanation as to why it has found so much success in so little time? My life has been quite affected by the craziness of this album cycle because I don’t live anywhere anymore. so it’s pretty lonely. It’s also harder to find time to work cuz I get shuttled around a lot. But I feel even more inspired to work on music than i did before, which is really nice. I also feel a lot more confident. I think the album has achieved a lot of success because it is extremely passionate and uncensored. I think I just love making music more than anything else, and I think that’s very audible in the music.

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Any memorable experience regarding your carrer or your life you would like to share with us? once my friend, his dad, and myself were living in the woods in minnesota. We were very far from a town, and were rather broke. Someone hit a deer on the side of the highway, so we went to pick it up, skinned it, cut it up, salted and prepared the meat and were able to eat the deer for almost 3 weeks.

When have you started working on Visions and how has it come about? I started in early august of this year and finished by late august. I subjected myself to intense solitude and light and food deprivation. Ideally I will do this again next time.

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Bus Riders is a series of fifteen black and white photographs Sherman produced shortly after graduating from the State University College at Buffalo, New York, where she studied art (19726). They were not publically exhibited until the artist had them reprinted in late 2000 for an


exhibition at Glen Horowitz Booksellers at East Hampton, New York, together with another series from the same period, Murder Mystery People (1976/2000).

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As is indicated by the title, the characters enacted by Sherman in Bus Riders were based on people she had observed on the bus. One of them is male; three are androgynous in appearance; five of them are black. While male characters also appear in Untitled A-D andMurder Mystery People (as well as in such later series as the History Portraits 1988-90), Sherman has not portrayed black characters in any other work. In each of the fifteen photographs the artist appears in a different outfit, wearing wigs, glasses and make-up according to the character being staged. Such props as a cigarette, a make-up mirror, a briefcase, a bulging paper bag or a book provide additional elements to the possible narratives evoked by each bus rider. All but one of the characters are seated, usually facing towards the camera, like people riding in a bus. In the last image Sherman stands, holding onto an imaginary rail above her. She used two different chairs and a high stool for variation. As in her earlier Untitled A-D series, the artist has allowed the theatricality of the characterisations to remain evident. The cable and sometimes the pump of her camera’s shutter release, set off by the pressure of her foot, are plainly visible on the floor. In several of the images shoes from a previous characterisation have been left casually on the floor near the chair and appear at the edge of the frame. An anonymous leg and shoe protrude,

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Both series were reprinted in editions of twenty. Bus Riders and Murder Mystery People provide an important bridge between a series Sherman created as a student, Untitled A, B, C and D 1975 (Tate P11437-40), and her first major work, the Untitled Film Stills 197780 (Tate P11516-9). Like these other early series,Bus Riders may be seen as an exploration of portraiture and the mechanics of its staging.

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The characters in Bus Riders, originating from an ordinary, everyday activity, have an ordinary, everyday appearance. After producing many series of portraits which are far more extreme in their theatricality, Sherman returned to a staging of ‘everyday’ characters with her ‘West’ and ‘East coast’-type women in 2000.

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unaccountably, into the frame of the second image, suggesting that the artist was not working alone. Two parallel lines of masking tape on the floor-boards, presumably marking the intended limits of the bus rider’s position, provide further theatrical references. The photographs were clearly shot in a studio, against a white wall on which the shadow of each character reinforces the staged quality of the images. White toes peeping out of the front of open-toed shoes, below the blacked-out legs of one ‘black’ woman (number six in the series), add a comic edge to the pathos of this particular character.

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ant oine esp inas A conversation with Antoine Espinasseau by Igi Ayedun


IGI AYEDUN Are you architect? ANTOINE ESPINASSEAU Yes, I am.

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Particularly nowadays, the architecture is a little sad. When I was studying, I learned that the tone and way of doing architecture was the architect. I think to draw or shoot is my way of making architecture.

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aNTOINE ESPINASSEAU:

In your images, exist some influence of architecture? Yes, I think. But the majority of my friends - who give me feedback about my work - are architects also, leaving the common cultural background in architecture is hard. I don’t know if the fact that I am an architect is naturally exposed to other people or not. Even believing that the architecture is very present, even without knowing how or when. Are you a photographer? Yes, I believe. Although still not exact. Do you consider yourself a photographer of architecture or a lifestyle’s photographer? I confess that exist in a photography a way of life - almost natural - touch me a little. I see myself more and more thrown on the history of each character that I can tell in a inert way, than by a point of view. Do you draw too? Yes, I draw. But you draw more than shooting? Wow .. If I make more drawings than photos? In fact I believe that I like the idea that drawing, photography and architecture are different medias. But for me, they always start the same thing. Even though the practices of photography and illustration are quite different, with different questions and reflections. But at the end ... I may not feel comfortable talking about that ... For example, the last drawing I did - which is called ‘ La montagne Bleue’ - for me it’s very architecture. Because it is an artificial mountain that I reworked and covering an architectural hyper topic. So much so that when I made this image I really had not the impression of illustration, but the architecture. But there is a time when the practices are together? Yes, yes. When? For example, ‘La Montagne Bleue’ and architecture are super close. Is it more a question of vision than technique? Or the opposite? No, I think it is technically very different and that’s what I like! But when I say technique, I talk about the outlook, how you see things and life within a space. Maybe you have a point of view of an architect in your images ... Not only. I think that architecture is

a bit like my parents, a reference. But which determines a time of permanence so we can discover and see new things and change slightly the vision of family has taught us. And thus, the architecture has been against my pictures! A bit like when your mother gives you some advice you never know if you going for or against. So the architecture is the place where you live and the arts who you are? Maybe so. Or the art is where you live and the architecture who you are? No, I choose the first option. The first? AE Yes, because today I’m always trying to leave where I live. Not that architecture is not important, I can’t deny that, but I have to be free. Then, your formation is? AE Nowadays? IGI Your formation is? AE Hm ... Architect? IGI Your formation is? AE Oh, it’s a question? A new question? Yes. My formation is ... Well I would love to build it … ... Particularly nowadays, the architecture is a little sad. When I was studying, I learned that the tone and way of doing architecture was the architect. I think to draw or shoot is my way of making architecture. How? Oh, I do not know. I don’t know, but talking about my drawings and photos, to me these are a reflection about architecture. Even if an offer is not the architecture. But this is very subversive! Yes. And are things which you believe and only you know ... I hope not! I think there are not enough places in the world inside the artistic practice to really talk about architecture and the architect. When you want to see the sea is easier to be on the beach, than in water. When you swim you will not really see the sea, while on the beach - with a distance - is much easier to see, even if you can’t swim. And that’s the architecture? The sea is the architecture, the beach - I do not know exactly what it is - but the distance can be photography, drawing ... I don’t know yet. Maybe that’s why I look over

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the beach. For me I can see many architectural visions in your photos, but simultaneously there is a lot of feeling. Yes, feeling, yes. Because to me you are not an architect and perhaps an artist, or Imagist ... I like Imagist! Do you think you got a problem with 3D? With things you can touch, smell, or to come and live there ... AE I don’t know well. But on the history of the sea and the beach, I prefer to think about things from a distance. Has a Japanese film by the same author of “Aniki, Mon frere ‘... What is the name ... Oh, Kitano! Have already watched Kitano? I don’t usually like Japanese movie in general, but in this film there is always a distance from view of the subject and the images that are produced are very close, though made from far away. Things and the subject become nearly artificial. And I was awake face of this question of 3D - the reality -and image - 2D - that through the dimensions you can see a bit of distance from between things, I really enjoyed it! Do you know? Hhhh .. For example, I don’t like shows. I feel badly in shows, I can’t get inside the collective emotion of appreciation. Maybe I like, but I don’t go! The last big show that I went I was sick ... Perhaps this is the opposite of the work of observation and voyeurism of photography ... AE Maybe but ... I really like theater. Because the theater - even if there is an involuntary communication - exist an artificiality accepted. Do you watch the actions of the actors who together tell a story. It will be a matter of rhythm? No, I think it is perhaps more a question of how to accept reality, do you know? It will be a matter of punctum? Do you know the concept? A word that comes from the Latin that left one of the first observations from the study of aesthetics and has the studium as totally the opposite ... Oh yeah, you’re talking about Barthes ... Roland Barthes, I don’t understand but I really would love to understand. But I could say it’s the same difference? AE I do not know the word adequately to be able to say that. I think funny, because I never talked much about the history of the show and the theater to reflect, but I think it’s important because I always try to attach the situations to my place _. I really like this part of the architecture - more about urbanism - dealing with the distance from reality and setit to watch ... Maybe it’s a bit coward but … Are you a coward? Me? Coward? Not ... Yes, maybe. But I really like making things, for example I’m always more in my


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place than around the action. Do you know? A little ... Must be why I should quit _ of the architecture because ... Are you a coward! Maybe. In fact I think I have courage but I am not active. So you prefer to think than making? No, I like to make. Imagine? Yes, more imagine - we can say. More to imagine than to be? Maybe a little more. I mean, what interests me greatly is the distance betweenimagination and reality. Not that I prefer the imaginary, or that I’d rather be in reality but I appreciate the very both distances. I prefer when the two things are really away from each other while the reality produces the imaginary and imaginary back to reality. And I think to compress both is so violent. IGI What do you prefer between the beginning, middle and end? I prefer the middle. And maybe fly? Yes, this is a problem for ... Geminians! Yes, you got. Perhaps the fact that your preference for the middle and enjoying the space between things means that you don’t like any kind of decision so fatalistic ... I really like this story of decision, is an excellent question to think about, because I spent too much time of my life really obsessed by indecision. Really obsessed! And this created a big problem with my ex-girlfriends - in off - and so I come back to question the show and the theater, because a show has a band and even if I like the frontman I don’t want it to be the most important . Don’t you like to pick a stereotype then? I like stereotypes, I think beautiful, but I don’t like to choose. ... I don’t know if you going write everything in your interview, I should have said a lot of bullshit too. Okay, I’m not going to show you before publishing. And then, tell me the last memory of your childhood? Funny you ask me. Last night I watched Three Life and had plenty of images that made me remember my childhood. And to answer the question .... The last image of my childhood? Maybe it was yesterday, mmh?

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I think you’re a bit Peter Pan! Maybe I be a Peter Pan, who will never grow. For example, I remember having fallen once and have won an exchange of affection by my family and maybe that’s the last reminder of my childhood. Something else mimimimi. And I’m still very close to it. Do you know? All these questions of architecture, about wanting about the image has little to do with my current situation. And maybe that is why this memory is more recent. And this question is great because it speaks of a season in which everything, everything was possible. It’s crazy! When you have ten years you still able to do everything. IGI And then, the last reminder of maturity? .... Either have you not yet considered mature? I think I’m too young and yet very mature. At maturity we do everything naturally without a chastisement, an expression which here we call the garde-fou, as something that could numb my unconscious side and don’t drive me insane. I’m on this journey. Are you sure? Yes, yes I do. A beautiful moment that you saw and you were without the camera? I always forget my camera. It’s is always in my bag, but when I picked up the moment has gone away. The last thing you lost forever? A pelicula, when I was in Brazil in Caxambu - Minas Gerais. I was very sad. The last thing you ever won? AE We never won anything forever. A song? Now? Yes .. Everybody say I love You, I don’t know the lyrics but I love singing this song! A song makes you dance? Toxic, Britney Spears.


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INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS photographed by PABLO SABORIDO, with styling by Igi Ayedun and paper pieces created by artist Jean Matos

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INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS photographed by PABLO SABORIDO, with styling by Igi Ayedun and paper pieces created by artist Jean Matos


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INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS photographed by PABLO SABORIDO, with styling by Igi Ayedun and paper pieces created by artist Jean Matos

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INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS photographed by PABLO SABORIDO, with styling by Igi Ayedun and paper pieces created by artist Jean Matos

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“You may not tell the best that you know to the youngsters.�

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I remember now that the dream contains still another portion which so far our interpretation has not taken into account. After it occurs to me that my friend R. is my uncle, I feel great affection for him. To whom does this feeling belong? For my uncle Joseph, of course, I have never had any feelings of affection. For years my friend R. has been beloved and dear to me; but if I were to go to him and express my feelings for him in terms which came anywhere near corresponding to the degree of affection in the dream, he would doubtless be surprised. My affection for him seems untrue and exaggerated, something like my opinion of his psychic qualities, which I express by fusing his personality with that of my uncle; but it is exaggerated in an opposite sense. But now a new state of affairs becomes evident to me. The affection in the dream does not belong to the hidden content, to the thoughts behind the dream; it stands in opposition to this content; it is calculated to hide the information which interpretation may bring. Probably this is its very purpose. I recall with what resistance I applied myself to the work of interpretation, how long I tried to postpone it, and how I declared the dream to be sheer nonsense. I know from my psychoanalytical treatments how such condemnation is to be interpreted. It has no value as affording information, but only as the registration of an affect. If my little daughter does not like an apple which is offered her, she asserts that the apple has a bitter taste, without even having tasted it. If my patients act like the little girl, I know that it is a question of a notion which they want to suppress. The same applies to my dream. I do not want to interpret it because it contains something to which I object. After the interpretation of the dream has been completed, I find out what it was I objected to; it was the assertion that R. is a simpleton. I may refer the affection which I feel for R. not to the hidden dream thoughts, but rather to this unwillingness of mine. If my dream as compared with its hidden content is disfigured at this point, and is disfigured, moreover, into something opposite, then the apparent affection in the dream serves the purpose of disfigurement; or, in other words, the disfigurement is here shown to be intended: it is a means of dissimulation. My dream thoughts contain an unfavourable reference to R.; in order that I may not become aware of it, its opposite, a feeling of affection for him, makes its way into the dream. 19 The fact here recognised might be of universal applicability. As the examples in Section III. have shown, there are dreams which are undisguised wish-fulfilments. Wherever a wish-fulfilment is unrecognisable and concealed, there must be present a feeling of repulsion towards this wish, and in consequence of this repulsion the wish is unable to gain expression except in a disfigured state. I shall try to find a case in social life which is parallel to this occurrence in the inner psychic life. Where in social life can a similar disfigurement of a psychic act be found? Only where two persons are in question, one of whom possesses a certain power, while the other must have a certain consideration for this power. This second person will then disfigure his psychic actions, or, as we may say, he will dissimulate. The politeness which I practise every day is largely dissimulation of this kind. If I interpret my dreams for the benefit of the reader I am forced to make such distortions. The poet also complains about such disfigurement:

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INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS photographed by PABLO SABORIDO, with styling by Igi Ayedun and paper pieces created by artist Jean Matos

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Olivia wears RUBY pants and top ZORA BOYD rings from WUNDERKAMMER

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P F H M E a


Future Basics

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Photography by David James Fashion edition by Imogen Wilson Hair & Makeup: Sophie Garth Models: Olivia at 62 Models, Grace Elliot at N Model Management, Katie at 62 Models and Dasha at Vanity Walk.

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ISABEL MARANT top from WORKSHOP ALEXANDER WANG pants from WORKSHOP Rings ZORA BOYD from WUNDERKAMMER


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Olivia wears RUBY dress ZORA BOYD rings from WUNDERKAMMER

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Dasha wears ISABEL MARANT top from WORKSHOP ALEXANDER WANG pants from WORKSHOP Rings ZORA BOYD from WUNDERKAMMER

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JESSICA GRUBISA sweater ALEXANDER WANG pants from WORKSHOP ZORA BOYD rings from WUNDERKAMME


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Ella wears JESSICA GRUBISA sweater ZORA BOYD rings from WUNDERKAMMER


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katie wears JESSICA GRUBISA coat

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Photography by Caroline Castella Styling by George Krakowiak Hair & Makeup: Jonatan Nunes Models: Ruane Gracio @ Joy Special thanks to Lena Costa

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v in t ag e ex t r av ag an z a

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Versace body


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Calvin Klein top


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Dress Feelings Jacket Chanel

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Versace body necklace by Onassis vintage

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Body Versace

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Blazer by Versace DKNY dress

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DKNY dress


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says Walter Van Beirendonck


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Patti Smith and Lizzy Mercier Descloux as Arthur Rimbaud and his sister, Isabelle Rimbaud. Photographed in 1977 by Michel Esteban.

Venus Anadyomene As from a green zinc coffin, a woman’s head with brown hair heavily pomaded rises out of an old bath, slowly and stupidly, with its bald patches pretty clumsily hidden; Then the fat grayish neck, and the broad and protuberant shoulder-blades; the short back with its hollows and bulges; then the curves of the buttocks seem to soar; the lard beneath the skin appears as flat flakes; The spine’s rather red; the whole thing has a smell which is strangely disgusting; one notices especially oddities which should be studied with a lens… The buttocks bear two engraved words: CLARA VENUS; and this whole body moves and then sticks out its broad rump hideous bejeweled with an anal ulcer.


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Sensation On the blue summer evenings, I will go along the paths, And walk over the short grass, as I am pricked by the wheat: Daydreaming I will feel the coolness on my feet. I will let the wind bathe my bare head. I will not speak, I will have no thoughts: But infinite love will mount in my soul; And I will go far, far off, like a gypsy, through the countryside - as happy as if I were a woman. March 1870


Evening Prayer

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I spend my life sitting - like an angel in the hands of a barber - a deeply fluted beer mug in my fist, belly and neck curved, a Gambier pipe in my teeth, under the air swelling with impalpable veils of smoke.

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Like the warm excrements in an old dovecote, a thousand dreams burn softly inside me, and at times my sad heart is like sap-wood bled on by the dark yellow gold of its sweats. Then, when I have carefully swallowed my dreams, I turn, having drunk thirty or forty tankards, and gather myself together to relieve bitter need: As sweetly as the Saviour of Hyssops and of Cedar I piss towards dark skies, very high and very far; and receive the approval of the great heliotropes.


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Photography by Marek Chorzepa Model Andrew at Storm Models Styling by Joonatan Allandi Hair and Make Up by Natalie Bennet

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T-shirt Claiborne, Long Sleeve shirt H&M, Track Bottoms Puma, Trainers Cesare Paciotti, Wind Runner True USA, Track Bottom GTM, T-shirt Claiborne, Long Sleeve shirt H&M, Track Bottoms Puma, Trainers Cesare Paciotti, Leather Jacket D2, T-shirt Men Store, Shorts Stylist Own, Documents holder H&M, Jumper Nike, Shorts Athletic Works, Polo Shirt Selected, Shoes Solovair, Necklace Stylist Own, T-shirt Bekken & Strom, Jumper Fruit of the Loom, Shorts Starter, Nike Dart 9 Trainers Wind Runner True USA, Track Bottom GTM, T-shirt Bekken & Strom, Jumper Fruit of the Loom, Shorts Starter, Nike Dart 9 Trainers

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Photography by Pablo Saborido Creative direction & styling : Ganzaro & Léo Proença @ Godiva Art Studio | beauty: Eduardo Hyde @ BLZ | tattoos by Isabel Marinez Abascal | models: Aline Thiel @ Ten, Carla Monfort @ Oca, Giovanni Tosi & Tiago Vasques @ Elite, André Kherwald & Paula Zago @ Way

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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido


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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido

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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido

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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido


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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido

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KRIMES photographed by Pablo Saborido


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Chloe Price @ Trumph photographed by Bruno Ilogti with styling by Marcela Jacobina no 98

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photography by

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Kristiina Wilson styling by Michelle Carimpong Grooming by Margina Dennis OCCmakeup.com @ model: eugeniy @ major


Button up by WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK, cashmere vneck sweater by MARLON GOBEL

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o 98 Suit by MARLONnGOBEL, button up may/June by BURBERRY, bow tie by TOM FORD, Loafers by TOPMAN


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Print pajama top by TOPMAN

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Tuxedo shirt by BURBERRY, leather gloves by WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK, Trousers by TIMO WEILAND

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Suit by LODEN DAGER, button up by ISSEY MIYAKE, shoes by HEUTCHY

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Button up by ROBERT GELLER, polka dot scarf by by PAUL SMITH, trousers by WILLIAM WATSON

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Button up by WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK, cashmere vneck sweater by MARLON GOBEL

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Beauty by Mel Freese photography by Vitor Pickersgill

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starring

Cris Hermann @ @ Ford Angelica Erthal @ Way Paula Zago @ Ford Ruth Bock @ Way Vanessa Michels Ford


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JESSICA PAULETTO @ Way photographed by Gianfranco Briceno wearing R.Rosner, Osklen & American Apparel


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JESSICA PAULETTO @ Way photographed by Gianfranco Briceno wearing R.Rosner, Osklen & American Apparel

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JESSICA PAULETTO @ Way photographed by Gianfranco Briceno wearing R.Rosner, Osklen & American Apparel

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Photographed by Michelle Rue with fashion edition

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by Tony M端ller and beauty by Krisna Carvalho featuring model Julia Gubert


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Camisa estampada Espaテァo Fashion Top Adriana Degreas Shorts color com tachas verdes テ田ulos Absurda


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Camisa cotele Andréa Marques camisa cotele floral Sorbet saia Rober Dognani chapéu de palha Parafinos cinto Ângela Di Verbano


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Camisa de seda Adriana Degreas Legging de tule Billabong ChapĂŠu de feltro Parafinos

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camisa Lança Perfume cardigã de tricot Cantão sapato Maria Bonita meia wolford


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Photography by Tiago Chediak Styling by Ana Regal & Julia Neiva Beauty by Imane Fiocchi Model - Monika


Coat Lio de Faldas Dress Maria Bonita Shoes Via Spiga Necklace Acervo

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Necklace TopShop Shirt Zara Panties Sacks Vintage Tights House of Holland for Top Shop Shoes TopShop

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Shirt Acervo Short TopShop Tights American Apparel Shoes Belle by Sigerson Morrison


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Body Mariรก Vaz Leggings Alexander McQueen Shoes Via Spiga

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On 12 December 1972, Marie-Hélène gave her Surrealist Ball at Ferriéres. This time the guests were asked to come in black tie and long dresses with Surrealist heads. The invitation was printed with reversed writing on a blue and cloudy sky, inspired by a painting by Magritte.

To decipher the card, it had to be held to a mirror. For the evening the chateau was floodlit with moving orange lights to give the impression that it was on fire. The staircase inside was lined by footmen dressed as cats that appeared to have fallen asleep in a variety of staged poses. Guests had to pass throught a kind of labyrinth of Hell, made of black ribbons to look like cobwebs. The occasional cat appeared to rescue the guests and lead them to the tapestry salon. Here they were greeted by Guy with a hat to resemble a still-life on a platter, and by Marie-Hélène wearing the head of a giant weeping tears made of diamonds. Marie Hélène proved that she had the flare and imagination to create something unique and worthwhile. None of this was created by charm alone. It needed a degree of ruthless determination. She attended to every minute detail of style in her life and also in her entertaining. She was a great hostess with all the qualities. She loved parties and people. She was forever in quest of new talent and new figures to entertain from the world of the arts, literature, dance


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and haute couture. She mixed them with the more established set of Paris society. everyone was intrigued. Marie-Hélène’s parties took on such importance that one social figure threatened to commit suicide unless she was invited... It is not possible to repeat such things now for many reasons. But it is fascinanting to look back and to remember these occasions, which dominated our thoughts and plans to such an extent for so many months. I am happy that I took part in so many, and happy that I gave some myself.”

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Dream the world awake

Imogen Wilson Marek CHORZEPA Kristiina WILSON Pablo saborido Vitor Pickersgill Tiago Chediak \ Igi AYEDUN Jean MATTOS Michael Willian David James Salvador Dali Man Ray Cildo Meirelles

THE DREAMS ISSUE - JUNE 2012  

Michael Willian, David James, Vitor Pickersgill, Gianfranco Briceño, Caroll Castella, Marek Chorzepa, Pablo Saborido + Godiva Art Studio, Mi...

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