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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN W.K. KELLOGG EYE CENTER 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


Annual Report Highlights 13 Kellogg Partners with Hope Clinic

LEADERS AND BEST IN OPHTHALMOLOGY 2 The Vision of Paul R. Lichter, M.D. 8 Meet Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D.

RESEARCH TO SAVE SIGHT 10 Building a Center for Gene and Molecular Therapy 14 Understanding Diabetic Complications

14 Understanding Diabetic Complications

ADVANCING PATIENT CARE 16 Patient and Doctor Agree: Repair of Damaged

Retina Is a Miracle

18 Looking Inside the Eye with State-of-the-Art Ultrasonography

EDUCATION AT HOME AND AROUND THE WORLD 20 Training Neuro-Ophthalmologists in China 22 Experiencing the VA

22 Residents Value Their Experience at the VA

FRIENDS OF THE EYE CENTER LEND SUPPORT FOR AMD RESEARCH 25 A Patient’s Legacy: Clinical and Basic Research

for AMD

26 Family Foundation Plants the Seed for Breakthrough

Research on AMD

28 Endowed Research Professorship Will Advance

New Avenues of Research

26 Foundation Supports AMD Research

Front and back covers: The W.K. Kellogg Eye Center as viewed from Wall Street.

2011 Annual Report • University of Michigan • W.K. Kellogg Eye Center This report covers the period July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011


Dear Friends, It has been a great pleasure to share the Department’s activities with you each year in our Annual Report. This letter, my last as Chair, gives me the opportunity to take a longer view—reflecting on the Department’s rich history and on our future. In 1971, I was invited to join the U-M ophthalmology faculty to start a Glaucoma Service, and seven years later was appointed as Chair. The Department was very small in 1978—though we didn’t think so at the time—with just 8 faculty and a handful of staff. In these 34 years we have grown dramatically, to a faculty of 85 and a staff of 350. As I assumed the position of Chair, I believed the Department would benefit greatly by building an eye center where our faculty could interact and work together at one location. The new facility was ultimately named the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center, and it was dedicated in 1985. The spirit of collaboration among clinical and research faculty has served us well ever since. From that point on, the Department evolved rapidly. We continued to recruit the Paul R. Lichter, M.D. best and brightest people to help us emerge as a leader in patient care, education, and research. We acquired community clinics to serve surrounding areas, and we expanded our fellowship and residency programs. Just as important, we created a culture in which each of us was committed to service and professionalism. By the late 1990s it was clear that our growth would soon be limited by lack of space in our then “new” building. I found myself in the peculiar position of proposing another major facility to the Dean of the Medical School. Many of you joined us in April 2010, when our dream was realized with the dedication of the greatly expanded W.K. Kellogg Eye Center. Our facilities—the original tower and the new building named the Brehm Tower—are breathtaking. Yet I continue to believe that the facilities are simply the means to an end. A state-of-the-art building gives us the opportunity to attract the best people who can build the best program in ophthalmology and the visual sciences. And that brings us to the future. Through the efforts of the Dean and his commitment to the achievements of the Department, Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D., becomes Chair of the Department on February 1. He is an outstanding physician, holds a law degree along with his medical credentials, and is an alumnus of Michigan and its Medical School. Dr. Lee’s expertise in health care delivery and health policy will serve the Department and the Medical School well amid the ongoing national debate on health care. I am proud to have known Dr. Lee as a mentor and colleague, and welcome him as he takes on the leadership of the Department. And so I thank all of you—our friends, patients, alumni, faculty, and staff—for your enthusiastic support over these 34 years. This exceptional Department is the result of our combined efforts; together we have created a world-class eye center filled with compassionate and forward-thinking individuals.

Paul R. Lichter, M.D. F. Bruce Fralick Professor and Chair University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Director, W.K. Kellogg Eye Center


“Certainly, I’m proud of building the facilities, but the facilities are the means to an end. They attract the finest people who can help build the best clinical, educational, and research programs.” — Paul R. Lichter, M.D.


Dr. Paul R. Lichter’s Vision Is One of Continuous Growth and Enduring Excellence He is an international leader in ophthalmology and a champion for his faculty Paul R. Lichter, M.D., is wistful as he looks over a proposal he prepared for the Dean of the Medical School in 1978 before being named Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. It was a 10-year plan outlining the faculty, staff, space, and funding needed to build “one of the finest departments of ophthalmology in the country.” “I think we have generally realized the vision put forth in that proposal,” he says. Such understatement is characteristic of Dr. Lichter, whose vision, enthusiasm, and leadership have fueled the remarkable growth and success of the Department and its faculty during his 34-year tenure as Chair. Dr. Lichter, the F. Bruce Fralick Professor of Ophthalmology, has created a program of unusual breadth and depth, is praised by his faculty for his unwavering support, has won countless awards and honors as a leader in the field of ophthalmology, and has presided over the construction of two stunning buildings to expand the Department. Alan Sugar, M.D., a prominent cornea specialist, was one of Dr. Lichter’s first recruits. During a recruit-

ment interview, a senior faculty member told Dr. Sugar that the Department was not likely to grow. “He was completely wrong,” says Dr. Sugar, who went on to join the Department and later became Associate Chair. “Since Paul became Chair, our growth has been continuous in programs, facilities, reputation, and research.” Dr. Lichter’s original 10-year plan called for renovations to two existing buildings to provide space for eye clinics and the construction of a major research facility. This new eye center would attract faculty and establish the Department as a leader in patient care, education, and vision research. And, with research and clinical faculty together in one facility, Dr. Lichter reasoned, there would be many opportunities for them to intermingle and spark new ideas to advance ophthalmology. Quick to understand the importance of philanthropic support in building a strong and enduring program, the new Chair embarked on a plan to seek major gifts, which led to a $4 million grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the opportunity to name the Eye Center in Mr. Kellogg’s memory. Dr. Lichter’s ability to attract top faculty is also legendary. When the new eye center opened in 1985, he had increased the faculty from 8 to 15 (including Paul A. Sieving, M.D., Ph.D., now director of the National Eye Institute); added several subspecialties; and established the first endowed chair in pediatric ophthalmology in the country. Nonetheless, a few residents, now among a large and loyal alumni group, wondered how the new Chair would ever fill the spacious new building. Championing his faculty From the beginning, Dr. Lichter has given his faculty exceptional autonomy to pursue their strengths and

Three Department Chairs: F. Bruce Fralick, M.D., John W. Henderson, M.D., Ph.D., and the newly appointed Paul R. Lichter, M.D. Alumni Fleming Barbour, M.D., and Don Marshall, M.D., join Paul Lichter, M.D., at the groundbreaking for the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center, May 1983.

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Mrs. Berkowitz, who also values Dr. Lichter’s ability to interests. “Paul’s philosophy has been to hire good show his concern for the “whole patient.” A retired law people and give them the freedom to do what they professor, she has worked with many organizations over do best,” says Dr. Sugar. “It has worked well.” the years and observes that the patient-centered focus of No one has appreciated that freedom more than the Kellogg Eye Center is rare. “Dr. Lichter has created the research faculty, says Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., the a culture in which every person at Kellogg is kind and Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professor of Ophthalmology caring. It is very special, and you know it comes from and Visual Sciences. “Paul’s support is striking because the top. I am fortunate to be Dr. Lichter’s patient.” his background is clinical, yet he has this amazing grasp of research and of how the exchange between scientists Building a legacy in ophthalmology and clinicians can build a stronger program,” says Early on, Dr. Lichter made his mark as a leader in the Dr. Richards. field of ophthalmology, first serving on a series of com In addition to building an exceptional basic science mittees for the American Academy of Ophthalmology research program, Dr. Lichter has encouraged his (AAO). In succession, he was apfaculty to evaluate treatment through pointed to the AAO’s Board of Trustclinical trials, and he has led by “Since Dr. Lichter became ees in charge of the Annual Meeting example. For 10 years he was principal Chair, our growth has been program, then as Editor-in-Chief of the AAO journal Ophthalmology, investigator of a multi-center clinical and finally as AAO President durstudy comparing treatment options— continuous in programs, ing an historic year—the Academy’s surgery vs. medication—for patients facilities, reputation, and 100th anniversary in 1996. newly diagnosed with open-angle By the end of his term, Dr. Lichter glaucoma. Funded by the National research.” had served the Academy in committee Eye Institute, the Collaborative and leadership positions for 27 years, Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study — Alan Sugar, M.D. of which the final 17 were on the followed patients at 14 study centers Board of Trustees. “Like most positions I’ve held, when across the country. “It was one of the few studies at the it’s over I try to move on. It’s important to me to step time that considered the patient’s quality of life along aside and give others the opportunity to lead,” he says. with treatment outcomes,” says Dr. Lichter. “The study Dr. Lichter held several other leadership positions yielded good information for the care of glaucoma during his years on the AAO Board, including Chair patients—and still gives us information today.” of the American Board of Ophthalmology, President Then, there is his highly respected clinical pracof the Association of University Professors of Ophthaltice. Rhoda Berkowitz, a patient for many years, was mology, President of the American Ophthalmological referred to Dr. Lichter when she started to experience Society, President of the Pan American Association of vision loss from glaucoma. “He saved my sight,” says

Dr. Lichter in his office in 1986; the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center under construction (middle) and in the spring several years later.

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ten years and the space needed to accommodate Ophthalmology, and, closer to home, President of the those programs. Michigan Ophthalmological Society. Currently, he is Dr. Lichter again made a compelling case and President of Academia Ophthalmologica Internatioreceived the go-ahead for a new clinical and research nalis, having previously served for eight years as its building. Plans were altered somewhat—in a most posiSecretary-General. tive way—when William and Delores Brehm made a Dr. Lichter has delivered 40 named lectures, major gift to the U-M Health System to build a diabetes including the 50th Jackson Memorial Lecture, which research center. Two floors were added to the Eye opens the AAO Annual Meeting each year and is Center Expansion Project. According to Dr. Lichter, considered by many as the most prestigious lecture “It has worked out beautifully. Collaboration between in ophthalmology. In 2008, Dr. Lichter received the the Brehm Diabetes Research Center and the Eye Center Lucien Howe Medal from the American Ophthalmohas been significant and productive already.” logical Society. The Howe Medal recipients—77 in The Kellogg Eye Center expansion opened in all since its inauguration in 1922—include some of March 2010. The new building, the most prominent names in the named the Brehm Tower, is an recent history of ophthalmology. “Dr. Lichter’s support is striking elegant eight-story building with “In many ways, this award and because his background is clinical, eight major clinics, six operatothers I’ve received are recogniing rooms, and an expanse of tion of the Department and our yet he has this amazing grasp of open-design laboratories. Dr. faculty members, alumni, staff, Lichter was involved in every and trainees. If it weren’t for them, I couldn’t have done many research and of how the exchange facet of the project, from clinic design to selection of the art of the things I’ve been able to between scientists and clinicians gracing the walls of public do,” he says. spaces—and the addition of a can build a stronger program.” beautifully designed garden and Planning for continued growth water sculpture. The garden is and innovation — Julia E. Richards, Ph.D. named the Helmut Stern Garden The establishment of one major to recognize Mr. Stern’s leadership of the Expansion medical facility would be ample accomplishment for Project Advisory Committee. any chair, but Dr. Lichter understood that continued Even before construction was complete, Dr. Lichter growth was essential to maintaining Kellogg’s position looked to the program, recruiting two physicianas a top-tier institution. In the late 1990s, realizing that scientists from the University of California, Los the Eye Center would soon run out of space, he set in Angeles, who had established an impressive body of motion another 10-year plan. He asked faculty to idenresearch on thyroid eye disease. What would make tify the programs they envisioned for the next five to

Dr. Lichter led a major clinical trial on glaucoma treatment with help from Carol Standardi, R.N., and David Musch, Ph.D. At right: Dr. Lichter at the groundbreaking ceremony, September 2006.

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them leave a well-known eye center and a pleasant climate? “Dr. Lichter showed us he was building something uniquely different,” says Raymond S. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D. “He showed us his commitment to establishing a new treatment center and his belief that our research findings could be translated to benefit patients. Dr. Terry Smith [professor and senior collaborator of Dr. Douglas’] and I knew he would get it done and we wanted to be part of it.” Within the year, Dr. Lichter pulled off another recruiting coup, bringing a nine-member research team from Pennsylvania, led by Drs. Thomas Gardner, David Antonetti, and Steven Abcouwer, to Michigan to investigate and treat diabetes-related eye disease. Most recently, with major backing from an anonymous donor, a new Resident Education Center was constructed and opened on the sixth floor of the original tower. When asked what he is most proud of, Dr. Lichter returns to the people he has worked with over the years. “Certainly, I’m proud of the facilities we’ve built, but the facilities are the means to an end. They help to attract the finest people who can help build the best clinical, educational, and research programs,” he says. He takes pride also in the many residents, graduate students, and fellows—clinical and basic science alike—who have trained at Kellogg during his tenure. Perhaps most of all he wishes to acknowledge the partnership he has shared with his wife, Carolyn Lichter, who has hosted faculty, visitors, and residents and has helped in filling the building with art and in planning countless special events. “She has served the Department in so many ways over the years, and she is respected and admired by the faculty, residents, alumni, and staff,” says Dr. Lichter.

In the past several years, Dr. Lichter has become interested in how relationships with industry can affect medical practice and now leads a committee for the Dean to guide Medical School policy. “It has taken me some time to come to my own understanding of what makes for appropriate relationships,” he says. “My faculty colleagues and I are pleased that the Department has not taken non-research funding from industry—and that we had incorporated broad ethics discussions into our residents’ training well before it was required.” Dr. Lichter is also pleased that the Dean has selected Paul P. Lee, M.D, J.D., to succeed him as Chair. They have known each other for years; and during Dr. Lee’s medical school years, Dr. Lichter served as one of his mentors. “Dr. Lee is a brilliant and accomplished physician, and he will be an outstanding leader to continue the Department’s legacy,” he says. When Dr. Lichter steps down as Chair on February 1, 2012, he will remain on the faculty, and his patients will be happy to know that he will continue his clinical practice. He will hold a partial appointment in the Dean’s office as Chair of the Clinical and Educational Conflict of Interest Committee. And he will assist Dr. Lee with his transition to lead what has become one of the finest ophthalmology departments in the country. Faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the Department are celebrating Dr. Lichter’s tenure as Chair by establishing a research endowment in his name. The Paul R. Lichter, M.D., Research Discovery Fund will endure in perpetuity, providing critical support to the robust and vibrant vision research program that grew and thrived under his leadership. Please see page 29 for more information.

Dr. and Mrs. Lichter at a celebratory dinner during the dedication of the Eye Center; the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center’s original tower (left) and the expansion that opened in 2010.

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Leaders and Best in Ophthalmology Faculty and Staff Growth 1985 1995 2005 2011

The numbers tell the story of Dr. Paul Lichter’s tenure as Chair of the Department. The Eye Center has grown by every measure, from faculty to philanthropy. Dr. Lichter started

Faculty

15 31 57 85

Staff

75

167

329

350

with a faculty of 8 when he was named Chair in 1978. He recruited steadily through the years, and more actively when the

Sources of Department Funding 1985 1995 2005 2011

construction of two new buildings—in 1985 and 2010—created space for many more clinicians and scientists. Today, 85 research and clinical faculty and 350 staff members represent the Department. And, as Chair,

Operating Budget Research Funding

$5.6M

$0.9M

$14.0M $34.2M $39.3M $4.1M

Dr. Lichter has trained 38 glaucoma fellows

Philanthropic $0.2M $2.0M Gifts

and 229 residents.

Endowment

Patient Visits to the Eye Center

$1.5M

$7.5M

1995

$28.7M $33.3M

1995

2011 Surgeries

2005

57,081

$3.6M

1985

Outpatient Visits

36,852

$3.4M

Surgical Procedures Performed

1985

2011

$11.5M $12.2M

125,572

2005

140,104

1,825

2,944

5,528

5,783

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Meet Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D., Next Chair of the Department Creating opportunities for Kellogg faculty to do “what they are passionate about”

Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D., who becomes Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences on February 1, believes that Michigan is one of the world’s great universities, providing opportunities for students, staff, and faculty looking to fulfill or even find their purpose in life. In 1980, as an undergraduate on his way to earning a medical degree at the University of Michigan, Dr. Lee spent the summer as a Congressional intern in Washington, D.C. There, a staff member suggested that Dr. Lee pursue a law degree. “He gave me great advice,” says Dr. Lee. “You can always find expert witnesses to come before Congress. But if you want to have a role in public policy, a legal education is the better pathway.” Dr. Lee recognized the opportunity before him and soon met with his medical school advisors, including a dean, Robert Reed, M.D., who counseled him to complete his third year of medical school before beginning law school. Another mentor, William Kelley, M.D., then Chair of Internal Medicine at Michigan, arranged for Dr. Lee to have an outpatient clinic rotation just down the street from the law school at Columbia University, where he earned his J.D. in May 1986, the same month he received his M.D. from Michigan. “The constant in all of this,” says Dr. Lee, “is the wonderful experience of being at the University of Michigan during my formative years and the incredible people who provided mentoring along the way.” Dr. Lee returns to Michigan from Duke University, where he has served as Vice Chairman of the Ophthalmology Department and the James Pitzer Gills, III, M.D. and Joy Gills Professor of Ophthalmology. In addition, he has held appointments as Director of Applied Health Systems Research at Duke University Health System and as Senior Advisor to the Chancellor. Dr. Lee’s other administrative leadership positions 8

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D.

at Duke include Chair of the Finance Committee of the physician practice and member of the Executive Management Committee of the Duke University Health System. Prior to joining Duke in 1997, Dr. Lee was with RAND, a nonprofit research organization in Santa Monica, California, and an associate professor at the University of Southern California School of Medicine.


Current and future Chair of the Department: Dr. Paul Lichter and Dr. Paul Lee.

From left: The NEI’s Brian Brooks, M.D., Ph.D., John Heckenlively, M.D., and Paul Lee, M.D., J.D., during Kellogg’s Fall Reunion.

to understand their clinical, educational, and research After earning his medical degree at Michigan, interests. “The terrific work of Dr. Paul Lichter and the Dr. Lee completed an internship in internal medicine faculty positions us to help reshape the future of vision at Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Hospital and health and eye care,” he says. “Dr. Lichter has been an his ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute inspiration and role model to all who have been forof Johns Hopkins Hospital. Following his residency, tunate to be at Michigan during his time as Chair. It Dr. Lee completed a glaucoma fellowship at the Massais a special privilege to help build on what he and the chusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. Department have already accomplished.” Dr. Lee’s early interest in public policy—and his Looking ahead, Dr. Lee anticipates that many new legal training—have been central to his research and partnerships will be formed across the University, the publications. His research focuses on assessing and state, and, indeed, around the world. improving quality of care, quality of life and outcomes Dr. Lee notes that Dr. Lichter research, and health systems utiliwas an important mentor during zation and policy—issues that “Our obligation is to create his medical school years, and later are at the heart of the national discourse on health care. opportunities for our people as a leader in the field of ophthalmology. “Dr. Lichter’s philosophy Central to his activities is the is to hire the best people and give desire to work with colleagues to to do the things they are them independence and the means help empower individuals to live to pursue their passions,” says Dr. healthier lives and to pursue their passionate about, things Lee. “Dr. Lichter and other leaders dreams. The vision he shares with that will make a difference.” whom I’ve had the good fortune Kellogg and the University is to to work with have followed that preserve health and vision, cure — Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D. principle with great success.” disease, and optimize each person’s Now, as Dr. Lee turns to his visual functioning and capabilities. tenure as Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology “Everything we do comes down to this question,” says and Visual Sciences, he has a similar philosophy. “What Dr. Lee. “Can we help the person who trusts us with sets Michigan and Kellogg apart are our people— his or her vision?” As a clinician, Dr. Lee focuses on faculty, trainees, staff, alumni, and community,” he complex glaucoma patients, with his practice in the last says. “Our obligation is to create opportunities for few years devoted to referrals from other specialists. our people to do the things they are passionate about, In the months before he assumes his position as things that will make a difference.” Chair, Dr. Lee has been meeting with Kellogg faculty Dedicated to Discovery

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“We can identify gene mutations in well over 100 forms of retinitis pigmentosa— and we need to find a cure for every one of them.” — John R. Heckenlively, M.D.

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From left: Kari Branham, M.S. CGC, K. Thiran Jayasundera, M.D., Naheed Khan, Ph.D., Debra Thompson, Ph.D., David Zacks, M.D., Ph.D.; seated: John Heckenlively, M.D.


Kellogg’s Retinal Dystrophy Clinic — a Destination for Patients with Inherited Eye Disease Coming next, a gene therapy center to move treatment to patients For years, John R. Heckenlively, M.D., a world expert in inherited eye disease, has collected genetic profiles of his patients so that he can notify them when treatments for these blinding diseases become available. Now, as breakthroughs in gene therapy begin to emerge, Dr. Heckenlively and his research colleagues believe the time is right to form a molecular treatment center at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center. The Center for Gene and Molecular Therapy will build on the success of Kellogg’s Retinal Dystrophy Clinic—which today is a destination for patients with rare genetic eye diseases—and the Eye Center’s years of experience in the genetics of eye disease. Such a center could not exist without the decades of work conducted by Dr. Heckenlively and his predecessors in identifying gene mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of diseases that cause slow but progressive vision loss. Dr. Heckenlively is one of a handful of physicians skilled at making a precise diagnosis for a disease with many variations, each appearing nearly identical to the other. “Twenty-five years ago, clinicians would tell you there are three types of retinitis pigmentosa,” says Dr. Heckenlively, the Paul R. Lichter Professor of Ophthalmic Genetics. “Now we can identify gene mutations in well over 100 forms of the disease—150 if you include syndromes—and we need to find a cure for every one of them.” In Kellogg’s Retinal Dystrophy Clinic, patients undergo eye examinations, extensive testing, and genetic counseling—all essential pieces leading to an eventual diagnosis of the disease. “Data generated in the clinic— genetic history and electrophysiological testing—are integral to both current and future treatment,” says K. Thiran Jayasundera, M.D., who completed a fellowship in retinal dystrophies with Dr. Heckenlively and another in vitreoretinal surgery at McGill University before joining the Eye Center.

Dr. Heckenlively illustrates the features of retinitis pigmentosa as seen in an image of the back surface of the eye. “Our patients know that gene therapy is evolving,” says Dr. Jayasundera. “For now, they appreciate having comprehensive care; the opportunity to participate in research studies; and, ultimately, knowing what genetic mutation they have.”

Building a center for gene and molecular therapy— gene by gene In the most basic terms, gene replacement therapy involves identifying a defective gene and replacing it with a “normal” copy of the gene. This therapy won’t work for every retinal dystrophy, and it’s not likely to be effective for people who have experienced a degenerative disease over a long period of time. Thus, some of the early promise lies with diseases that affect children and young adults.

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“Nearly every one of my patients wants to hear about the latest research. More specifically they ask, ‘When will there be a cure for me?’ We are closer than ever to giving our patients an answer.”

— John R. Heckenlively, M.D.

a continuation of the Department of Ophthalmology’s One of the driving forces behind the Center for rich history in ophthalmic genetics. Professor Harold F. Gene and Molecular Therapy is Debra A. Thompson, Falls, M.D., helped to establish the first Heredity Clinic Ph.D., a senior scientist at Kellogg who investigates in the nation in 1941. “Dr. Falls studied genetic diseases the molecular mechanisms of retinal degenerations and long before the structure of DNA was discovered,” says has contributed to the discovery of a number of diseaseKellogg clinician-scientist David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. causing genes. Among them is RPE65, a gene that Dr. Zacks’ research points to yet another strategy has come to play a pivotal role in gene therapy. the Center will adopt in treating retinal disease— “Individuals with a mutation in RPE65 have intervening in the disease process rather than targeting lost their light sensitivity,” explains Dr. Thompson. a specific gene. He studies the mechanisms that lead to “So adding back the correct gene gives an immediate cell death and thus the deterioration measurable response.” She points of the retina. The concept is neuroto recent pioneering Phase I clinical “We know which gene protection, finding ways to keep trials in which gene therapy with causes the most prevalent these vital cells alive and working RPE65 produced stunning results, despite the presence of a genetic disrestoring vision in more than a form of X-linked RP, and we ease. And, he adds, “We have drugs dozen children and young adults. in the pipeline for that purpose.” The team is perhaps most ophave identified hundreds The Center for Gene and timistic about the knowledge and Molecular Therapy will develop over data they have amassed through of patients who could be time. Some clinical studies could years of study on a form of RP begin within one to two years; other known as X-linked RP (XLRP), treated with gene therapy therapies for age-related diseases with research support from the that have multiple genetic and enviFoundation Fighting Blindness. once the technology has ronmental causes will take longer. Among rare diseases, this form of been sufficiently tested.” And, there is always the chalRP affects a relatively large number lenge of support for cutting-edge of people, accounting for 20 per— Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D. research. “We have talented sciencent of retinitis pigmentosa cases. tists and the newest facilities, but “We know which gene causes research at this level requires significant funding,” the most prevalent form of X-linked RP, and we have says Dr. Heckenlively. identified hundreds of patients who could be treated “Nearly every one of my patients wants to hear with gene therapy once the technology has been sufabout the latest research,” observes Dr. Heckenlively. ficiently tested,” says Dr. Thompson. Current research “More specifically they ask, ‘When will there be a cure for XLRP involves analyzing treatment outcomes in for me?’ We are closer than ever to giving our patients animals with the disease. an answer.” Many view Kellogg’s new gene therapy center as

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Kellogg Offers

Hope Kellogg partners with local free clinic to provide eye care

Kellogg recently hosted its first eye care clinic for patients of the Hope Clinic, which provides free medical services to low income children and adults who do not have medical insurance. The clinic was held in early November with 36 patients —from a waiting list of over 60—receiving the eye care they needed. “Dr. Lichter felt it was an opportunity for us to give back to the community,” says Michael W. SmithWheelock, M.D., Medical Director of the Eye Center. “When the faculty discussed hosting this clinic, there was overwhelming support.” The Hope Clinic was founded in 1982 as a Saturday morning clinic and, by 2010, had grown to provide over 8,571 medical visits, 4,621 dental visits, and access to basic but much-needed prescriptions. Dr. Smith-Wheelock chose fellow Paula Anne Newman-Casey, M.D., who is passionate about community health, to lead the effort. After completing her residency at Kellogg in 2011, Dr. Newman-Casey was accepted into U-M’s Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Master’s Program in Health and Healthcare Research, which teaches research methodology skills as a means of finding solutions for public policy, community health, and clinical practice issues. “There has been an outpouring of support for this clinic,” says Dr. Newman-Casey, who worked with the team at Hope to coordinate the effort. “I’m impressed with the number of people who have volunteered. The Hope Clinic is a wonderful organization that does a lot for the community.” More than 20 Kellogg employees —including physicians, residents, technicians, and other staff members—took time to give something back, and even more have volunteered to staff upcoming clinics to be held in January, March, and May.

Among the patients and ophthalmologists who participated in the open clinic were, from top: Terry Petrowski and Paula Anne Newman-Casey, M.D.; Alice Freeman and Harjeet Kaur, M.D.; and Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D., and Denise Whitfield. Dedicated to Discovery

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Kellogg Team Will Study Eye Complications of Diabetes under New Grant Research signals greater understanding of the mechanisms contributing to complications of type 1 diabetes Steven Abcouwer, Ph.D., David Antonetti, Ph.D., and Thomas Gardner, M.D., M.S., Researchers and clinicians across the University of are studying the eye complications of diabetes. Michigan Health System have been awarded a $3.5 million multi-disciplinary grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. with the disease. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy Under the grant, the U-M team will study the causes nerve damage in the legs and feet, while diabetic underlying mechanisms of the debilitating complicanephropathy causes kidney disease and, in many cases, tions of type 1 diabetes affecting the retina, peripheral leads to kidney failure. nerve, and kidney. While metabolic pathways have been widely studied Kellogg retinal specialist and Taubman Scholar in tissues prone to diabetic complications, little attenThomas W. Gardner, M.D., is one of three key researchtion has been given to responses that may disrupt the ers who will focus on the eye-related complications metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids in a component of the study. Dr. Gardner is joined by Steven tissue-specific manner—also called F. Abcouwer, Ph.D., Research metabolic reprogramming. Associate Professor, and David A. “This knowledge may help The Kellogg team will meaAntonetti, Ph.D., Professor of Ophsure the metabolites from glucose thalmology and Visual Sciences, us develop new drugs, or and lipid metabolism in the eyes of who has also been awarded a Jules and Doris Stein Professorship from suggest that existing drugs individuals with DR, and in the diabetic mouse model. The information Research to Prevent Blindness. gained will help to determine how Together, the team brings enormous or even diet modification these metabolites might be modified expertise in the study of diabetic to improve the health of the retina. retinopathy (DR), a complication are effective therapies.” “This knowledge may help us dethat causes damage to blood vessels — Thomas W. Gardner, M.D. velop new drugs, or suggest that exinside the eye and, in severe cases, isting drugs or even diet modification leads to blindness. are effective therapies,” says Dr. Gardner. “The stud A leading cause of health care expenditures in the ies may also reveal that not all persons with diabetic U.S., type 1 diabetes affects nearly 25.8 million Ameriretinopathy have the same problem. So, we may identify cans, while its complications cause poor quality of life personal profiles to more specific treatment.” and, in some cases, even death. In type 1 diabetes, the The new grant marks the first time researchers will body’s immune system destroys the pancreatic beta cells look at all of the complications of type 1 diabetes in a responsible for making insulin, a hormone the body comprehensive way. “Taken together, this work is some needs to convert food into energy. of the first to suggest that an important set of metabolic In addition to DR, two equally serious complicapathways may contribute to complications of type 1 tions play havoc on the well-being of those suffering

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“The thought of losing your sight is very unsettling, and very personal. Patients with diabetes stand to benefit a great deal from the research underway at Kellogg.”

— Robert Gilmore

diabetes,” says Dr. Gardner. “And, if we can understand those pathways, we can design interventions to prevent development and progression of these complications.” Millions of individuals with type 1 diabetes stand to gain from the research made possible by this grant. Among them is a patient of Dr. Gardner’s who asks about research advances at nearly every visit. Robert Gilmore, of Brooklyn, Michigan, has suffered from type 1 diabetes for over 45 years—along with debilitating complications which have caused vision loss in his right eye and nerve damage in his hands, feet, and legs. “I was on a downward spiral before coming to the Kellogg Eye Center,” says Mr. Gilmore. “My vision was 20/100 in my right eye. And, I was told time and time again that my sight would continue to deteriorate.” Today, Mr. Gilmore’s vision is an astounding 20/60 in his right eye. “The thought of losing your sight is very unsettling, and very personal,” says Mr. Gilmore. “Patients with diabetes stand to benefit a great deal from the research underway at Kellogg.” Leading the kidney-related complications component of the research is nephrologist Frank C. Brosius, M.D., one of the study’s principal investigators. “With type 1 diabetes, there appears to be a significant increase in the metabolism of glucose in the kidney. But, in the eye and nerve cells, there is Frank Brosius, M.D. actually a reduction in the metabolism of glucose,” says Dr. Brosius. “This tells us that the metabolic changes in the eye, kidney, and peripheral nerve may not be the same.

Dr. Gardner with his patient, Robert Gilmore, who sees patients as the beneficiaries of research underway at Kellogg.

The presumption has been that these changes are simlar, but most of our preliminary data suggest differently.” The Brosius team will examine the increase in metabolism to find out why it leads to specific downstream damage to the kidney. Eva L. Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., Russell N. DeJong Professor of Neurology, will lead the peripheral nerve-related complications component of the research. “We will establish for the first time how the nervous system turns sugars and fats into energy in patients with diabetes,” says Dr. Feldman. Eva Feldman, M.D., Ph.D. “Understanding this process will allow us to develop mechanismspecific therapies to target ways to increase energy output in the nervous system. We believe this will prevent the most common complication of diabetes—the injury to the nerves in the feet and hands—known as diabetic neuropathy.” Drs. Gardner, Antonetti, and Abcouwer, now in their second year at Kellogg, were initially attracted by the University’s depth of expertise in diabetes research. “It took a critical mass of laboratory, clinical, and technical knowledge across the U-M Health System to get to this place,” says Dr. Gardner. “We have a really tremendous team of people here.” Dedicated to Research

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“I would put this outcome into the realm of miraculous recovery.” — Mark W. Johnson, M.D.

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Losing Vision, Gaining Sight of a Miracle A tragic turn of events brings Arlene Snider to blindness and back

Ms. Snider had severe retinal damage, but regained her vision after Dr. Johnson performed surgery.

Ms. Snider and Dr. Johnson spent many hours In the fall of 2010, following treatment for an ongodiscussing her condition. “I told her there was little ing medical condition, Arlene Snider of Grand Blanc, chance of restoring her vision to a level she could read Michigan, developed a severe bloodstream infection or drive with, or recognize faces,” says Dr. Johnson. that eventually spread to her eyes. Her vision continued “But, I was hopeful that, at least in one eye, we could to decline until she was blind in both eyes. provide enough vision for her to get around unaided.” “I was completely traumatized when I lost my vi In January 2011, with little to lose and much to sion,” says Ms. Snider. “Not being able to see anything gain, Ms. Snider went ahead with the first of two at all changes your whole life. It was a rude awakening.” surgeries. “We spent eight hours working on the first Fearful that she would live in a world of darkness eye,” says Dr. Johnson. “We removed the cataract, for the rest of her days, Ms. Snider found her way to vitreous [the gel-like substance inside the Kellogg Eye Center, where she the eye], and scar tissue covering the saw renowned retinal specialist Mark “I wouldn’t be in this entire surface of the retina. We also put W. Johnson, M.D. a scleral buckle on the eye to offset scar Ms. Snider’s consultation was disposition had I not met tissue. Then we treated each hole in the heartening. Absent proper treatment retina with a laser.” for her eye condition over the course Dr. Johnson. It’s just From there, Dr. Johnson filled his of several months, she had developed patient’s eye with a gas bubble to temtotal retinal detachment in both eyes. a miracle.” porarily hold the retina in place. As the “Ms. Snider had one of the worst bubble gradually dissolved, the best of all cases of retinal detachment I’ve ever — Arlene Snider outcomes took place—the retina stayed encountered,” says Dr. Johnson. “The attached and did not reform scar tissue. One month infection had essentially eaten holes in her retinas. later, Ms. Snider underwent surgery on the second eye. They were not only detached, but were bound by “I would put this outcome into the realm of miracuextensive scar tissue. Added to this, she had severe lous recovery,” says Dr. Johnson. “It’s almost inexplicable cataract in both eyes.” how a retina could go through all this and still recover to Dr. Johnson carefully weighed the next steps. this extent. Ms. Snider far exceeded my expectations.” “First, we had to determine whether we could repair Today, after four months of debilitating blindness, the situation. There was a chance we would find a Ms. Snider can see again. She faces some limitations, retina so severely damaged it would be impossible to but with the aid of contact lenses, is reading quite easily re-attach,” says Dr. Johnson. “And, even if we could with one eye and using a magnifying lens to read with re-attach the retina, there was no guarantee of useful the other eye. “Thank goodness I can see anything at vision afterward—because of longstanding detachment, all,” says Ms. Snider. “I wouldn’t be in this position scar tissue, and infection. Each of these factors alone had I not met Dr. Johnson. It’s just a miracle.” would discourage you. Ms. Snider had all three.” Dedicated to Patients

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“Ultrasonography is an essential tool — providing our physicians with timely analysis of detailed images of the eye.” — Alexis Smith, CRA, CDOS

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View from the Inside New ultrasound team helps physicians see inside the eye When most people think of ultrasound, they recall those first images of a baby in the womb, that faint silhouette shaded in black and white. Ultrasound, however, has advanced to the point where it now can be used to see inside the eye. Ultrasound has become an important tool in ophthalmology, especially for ocular oncologists like Hakan Demirci, M.D., director of Kellogg’s Orbital and Ocular Oncology Service, who provides consultation on adult and pediatric tumors that occur in the eye and orbit. Dr. Demirci leans heavily on the ultrasonography team to provide comprehensive examinations of his complex patients so the proper care can be provided. Since there are only a few ophthalmic ultrasonographers in the state of Michigan, Kellogg is fortunate to have two on staff: Elizabeth Parrish, COA, CDOS, and Alexis Smith, CRA, CDOS. “We began working as a team in June 2011 after training under an ophthalmic ultrasonographer who recently retired,” says Ms. Parrish. “And I think our different backgrounds make us a great team.” Ms. Parrish joined Kellogg in 2007 and has worked as an ophthalmic technician for 25 years. Ms. Smith had several years of experience as an ophthalmic photographer before joining Kellogg in 2010. Both recently earned their CDOS—Certified Diagnostic Ophthalmic Sonographer—certification. “Adding two friendly, energetic, and detail-oriented ultrasonographers to our team is improving patient care and efficiency,” says Dr. Demirci. For Dr. Demirci’s patients, ultrasound is an essential tool for diagnosis and follow-up of intraocular tumors. “We can examine the inside of the eye as well as the front of the eye using a technique called ultrasound biomicroscopy,” says Ms. Parrish. “This technique requires experience, efficiency, and attention to detail. Only certain ophthalmology centers can perform it.” Each ultrasound takes about 20 minutes and is typically performed, without any discomfort to the patient, using numbing drops and a lubricating gel.

Dr. Demirci views ultrasound as an essential tool in the management of patients with eye tumors.

Improved technology has allowed the ultrasonographers to share scans with Dr. Demirci and his patients more quickly. “Everything we now do is digital,” says Ms. Smith. “Before, our reports were hand-written in the chart, sent for dictation, printed, and finally scanned into electronic medical records a week or two later. Now, the process is so much faster for the doctor and the patient.” Kellogg’s physicians appreciate the timely analysis provided by state-of-the-art ultrasonography equipment. Because of this improved process, physicians from other clinics—including cornea, glaucoma, and retina as well as Kellogg’s community locations—also refer patients for testing. “It’s clear that demand for ultrasound is growing,” says Ms. Smith. “Ultrasonography is an essential tool—providing our physicians with timely analysis of detailed images of the eye.”

Dedicated to Patients

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“There is a need for more training in this hybrid between neurology and ophthalmology.” — Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D.

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Practical NeuroOphthalmology Kellogg neuro-ophthalmologist brings innovative, problem-based training course to China

Dr. Trobe reviews case studies with physicians attending a course held in Beijing.

“We need to switch the emphasis away from students Over 100 neurologists, neurosurgeons, and ophthalsimply listening to lectures and taking notes to a probmologists from all corners of China attended the first lem-based model where students actually solve real case national training course in neuro-ophthalmology held problems for which there are real conclusions. When in Beijing in April 2011. students become active participants in the learning Designed and led by Kellogg neuro-ophthalmologist process—testing their abilities to reason from newand educator Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D., the two-day found knowledge—it’s empowering and exciting.” interactive, problem-based training course, entitled Accompanied by a 100-page syllabus, the training “Practical Neuro-Ophthalmology,” covered diagnosis course included four half-day sessions presenting the esand management of patients’ conditions in a medical sentials of vision loss, double vision, and abnormal eye subspecialty that deals with visual disorders of the movements. Dr. Trobe delivered his eyes and brain. lectures in English, with translation “There is a need for more “It’s becoming more and to Chinese by co-instructors Xiaotraining in this hybrid between neurology and ophthalmology,” more obvious that traditional jun Zhang, M.D., chief of neurology, Tongren Hospital, Beijing, and says Dr. Trobe, a professor in the Shihui Wei, M.D., chief of ophthalDepartments of Ophthalmology teaching methods are not mology, People’s Liberation Army and Visual Sciences and Neurolthe most effective means for Hospital, Beijing. ogy. “Most ophthalmologists Following each lecture, have relatively little experience in training medical students.” students gathered over laptops— neuro-ophthalmology. Moreover, reviewing data from patient cases most neurologists and neurosur— Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D. and making diagnostic and managegeons have limited experience in ment decisions, while instructors this subspecialty because they’re circulated to coach the students. The course concluded not trained to examine the eyes.” with a discussion of relevant features of diagnosis and While the majority of ophthalmologists, neurolomanagement. gists, and neurosurgeons have traditionally learned “Educators in China are avidly pursuing some of about neuro-ophthalmology from lectures and encounthese open teaching methods—especially the opportuters with patients, medical educators agree that retennity that our medical students have to question what tion from lectures is generally low; and patient encounthey are being taught,” says Dr. Trobe. “The students ters often lack broad exposure to the host of conditions embraced the interactive format of learning. They had physicians handle. Given such challenges, medical never been taught like this before.” schools around the world are adopting more innovative A long-time advocate of international outreach, teaching modalities. Dr. Trobe hopes to take the course to Thailand, “It’s becoming more and more obvious that traAustralia, and France. He also plans to expand the ditional teaching methods are not the most effective model to other subspecialties. means for training medical students,” says Dr. Trobe. Dedicated to Education

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“The experience we gain during rotations at the VA is invaluable.” — Duna Raoof-Daneshvar, M.D.

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VA

Rotating Residents through the

Kellogg residency program

balances oversight and autonomy

Dr. John, Chief of Ophthalmology at the VA, meets with Dr. Raoof-Daneshvar, a second-year resident.

As a second-year resident, Dr. Raoof-Daneshvar is Residents at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye expected to independently develop treatment plans for Center give high marks to their experience at the Ann her patients under the guidance of the faculty superviArbor Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. During sor. Second-year residents are also charged with keeping each year of their residency, Kellogg’s residents navigate the clinic running efficiently. First-year residents are through two, seven-week rotations at the VA. In the allotted more time to examine patients, while third-year end, approximately one-quarter of their residency is residents spend more time in surgery. spent there. Experience in the operating room is another Second-year resident Duna Raoof-Daneshvar, highlight of the VA rotation. In addition to learning to M.D., feels it’s time well spent. “We all love our time perform retina and glaucoma laser treatments, retina at the VA,” she says. “It’s the perfect balance between injections, and minor oculoplastics procedures, the oversight and autonomy.” VA is where residents first learn to Oversight is of the utmost perform cataract surgery and then importance, says Denise A. John, “At the VA, the residents gain the bulk of their surgical exM.D., who, as Chief of Ophthalperience. In fact, last year, residents mology at the VA, oversees the get a balance of increasing participated in more than 1,130 program. “At the VA, the resicases at the VA. dents get a balance of increasing autonomy while still main“We have a step approach to autonomy while still maintaining surgery, and we learn a little each the appropriate level of faculty taining the appropriate time we go into the operating room,” supervision,” she says. Although there is no typical level of faculty supervision.” says Dr. Raoof-Daneshvar. Firstyear residents assist in the OR with day at the VA, the clinic is fast— Denise A. John, M.D. cataract surgeries and observe other paced with different subspecialty types of procedures. The second-year clinics offered each day of the residents begin to handle their own cataract surgeries week. The entire clinic sees about 70 patients per day with the goal of completing 10 on their own by year’s and, on this day, a Tuesday, Dr. Raoof-Daneshvar will end. The third-year residents serve as primary surgeon see 15 patients—comprehensive cases in the morning in cataract surgeries and also start taking on other types and oculoplastics cases, accompanied by some minor of surgeries—all with faculty supervision. clinical procedures, in the afternoon. “We treat patients from all over Michigan and “The technicians will have worked up the patients, nearby states, and they are wonderful,” says Dr. Raoofand when we arrive, each resident takes a chart and Daneshvar. “They are always appreciative of the care gets to work,” says Dr. Raoof-Daneshvar. “There are they receive and their thankfulness makes you want to six of us together at the VA—two from each resident work that much harder for them. The experience we class—which really helps build a team approach to gain during rotations at the VA is invaluable.” patient care.” Dedicated to Education

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Kellogg Brings Eye Care Services to Chelsea Ypsilanti offices consolidate to offer more services The opening of a new clinic in Chelsea and a consolidation of services in Ypsilanti will allow Kellogg to better serve the growing vision needs of the community. During the first quarter of 2012, the new ophthalmology clinic will open at the University of Michigan Chelsea Health Center. Christopher T. Hood, M.D., will head up the Chelsea office, where he will provide comprehensive eye care as well as diagnose and treat cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetes-related eye disease. And, as a fellowship-trained cornea and refractive surgery specialist, he also will diagnose and treat dry eye disease, corneal infections, dystrophies, and tumors and provide LASIK screenings. For some time, managers at the Chelsea Health Center saw a need for eye care services at their facility. “I’m honored to be the one to bring the Kellogg experience to Chelsea,” says Dr. Hood. “I’m looking forward to establishing a great community clinic where I can spend time with my patients,” he continues. “I also want to establish strong communications with other physicians, not only at the Chelsea Health Center, but throughout the U-M Health System. This will provide my patients continuous care and great

Dr. Hood will see patients at the new Kellogg clinic in Chelsea, Michigan.

access to all that our Health System has to offer.” The early part of 2012 also will bring about the consolidation of Kellogg’s two Ypsilanti offices: the pediatric ophthalmology clinic of Gary S. Sandall, M.D., and the larger comprehensive ophthalmology practice led by James L. Adams, M.D. The new office, located in the River Place Offices building at 1974 North Huron River Drive, will feature 7,400 square feet of space for exam rooms, waiting areas, testing rooms, and offices. Now, patients in the Ypsilanti area will be able to arrange eye examinations for themselves and their children all at one location. And those needing a specialist in oculoplastics can consult with Dr. Adams in the new office.

The new Residency Education Center opened this year, thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor. At left, faculty member Elizabeth Du, M.D., works with first-year resident Ira Schachar, M.D., who observes, “The surgical training center not only provides an amazing opportunity to practice surgical skills, it allows us to interact one-on-one with faculty away from the distractions of the OR.” 24

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Patient’s Gift to Advance Research A planned contribution to Kellogg will fund a range of work to find answers to AMD Quick to smile and to make a joke, Barbara H. Raven was a patient at the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center and lit Carol Standardi, R.N., with Mrs. Raven up the clinic whenever she visited. She passed away in March 2011, but she left a lasting legacy. The Eye Center had been named as a beneficiary to a life insurance during the disease process. policy, leading to a significant gift to fund basic science We are also working to uncover genetic patterns and clinical research that will help in the battle against of AMD. We have developed and maintain a clinical age-related macular degeneration (AMD). database of more than 2,000 AMD patients and their “Mrs. Raven was a wonderful person, and we apfamilies, which we use to study the role inheritance and preciate her foresight and her generosity,” says Dr. Paul environmental factors play in AMD. R. Lichter, F. Bruce Fralick Professor and Chair of the Mrs. Raven and her husband, George, were Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. Jackson, Michigan, natives. Mr. Raven graduated from “It is very meaningful when our patients remember us the University of Michigan in 1938 with a degree in in this way. This gift provides significant support for engineering, and the couple married in 1942. When our retinal research program, which Mr. Raven took a job in California, is growing in both size and promise.” the Ravens moved west and lived Mrs. Raven was moved Mrs. Raven was moved by the there for 45 years. When Mr. Raven prevalence of AMD and by the difby the prevalence of AMD passed away in 2001, however, Mrs. ficulties faced by individuals who Raven moved back to Michigan to be have the disease. More than 2 milclose to family and friends. She served and by the difficulties lion people in the United States are as a family historian, and she kept in faced by individuals who experiencing vision loss from AMD, close touch with friends whom she and the problem is increasing as our had spent holidays with over the have the disease. population grows older. years. She was an enthusiastic fan The condition affects the retiof classical music, and she apprecina—the sensory membrane that lines the back of the ated the talent and hard work it took to perform. eye—and causes individuals to lose their central vision. Mrs. Raven enjoyed helping others, and in addition Because it has risk factors that range from an individto her gift to Kellogg, she supported such organizations ual’s genetic makeup to environmental effects, faculty as the Red Cross and Jackson Community College. In members at the Kellogg Eye Center are searching for 2006, she established the George and Barbara Raven answers using many different approaches. Our cliniEndowed Scholarship at the University of Michigan cians participate in clinical trials for medications that College of Engineering. have been developed to treat the wet, more aggressive Kellogg’s Carol Standardi, R.N., helped care for form of the disease. Our scientists are striving to idenMrs. Raven and became a friend. “Mrs. Raven was tify where retinal disease begins, to define how diseased a warm and engaging person,” she says. “She shared cells communicate and multiply, and to find ways to much of herself with others. We will always remember save light-sensing photoreceptor cells from dying her stories and her laughter.” Dedicated to Discovery

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“We’re taking relatively small dollars and marrying them with gifted researchers with a promising idea.” — Richard Northrup

Richard Northrup, III, Swanson Foundation advisor, with Dr. Howard Petty, whose research examines mechanisms underlying AMD.

Remembering Mildred Swanson A small family foundation supports enormous gains in the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration Mildred E. Swanson was a career woman at an unlikely time. Born in 1912, she graduated from high school at age 16 with the distinction of valedictorian. One of the first employees of Owens Corning, Toledo, Ohio, she retired as manager of the payroll department after 40 years of service. “Mildred was an amazing lady,” says great nephew Richard C. Northrup, III, a U-M alumnus who resides in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Unlike many women of her period, Mildred did not marry nor have children. She was a true businesswoman on a career path.” At the age of 85, Ms. Swanson began to suffer diminished vision from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition that would progress until her death

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in 2003, at age 90. The leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older, AMD destroys sharp, central vision—making it difficult or impossible to read or recognize faces. “Mildred was very unhappy that she was losing her sight,” says Mr. Northrup. “She was discouraged that nothing could be done about it.” True to Ms. Swanson’s enormous spirit of generosity, she established the Mildred E. Swanson Foundation through her estate plan with the dual mission of funding medical research and higher education scholarships— both dear to her heart. Following Ms. Swanson’s death, the Foundation was funded in 2004 and is managed by advisors Mr. Northrup, great nephew Michael J. Giesecke, a U-M alumnus, and nephew John R. Giesecke.


Mildred Swanson on the family farm in 1945.

Ms. Swanson with her brothers, Kenneth, Milton, Stanley, and Glenn.

an important gene relevant to AMD,” says Dr. Petty. As the Foundation explored research concepts, they “We knew there was a correlation, but we didn’t became interested in funding “orphan” ideas—ideas understand the mechanism. That was the impetus for that appeared promising, but had not received funding. this research.” And now, for the past four years, the Foundation has Soon, the team discovered proteins that promote generously supported an AMD research project led by the programmed death of RPE cells in an in vitro model Howard R. Petty, Ph.D., Professor of Ophthalmology of the process of macular degeneration in the eye. and Visual Sciences and Professor of Microbiology and Further research revealed another important Immunology, and Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., Ravitz discovery. When CFH was added Foundation Professor of Ophthalto the in vitro model, it blocked mology and Visual Sciences and “These foundations provide the death of RPE cells. “These Professor of Pathology. findings suggest that selectively “We’re taking relatively small an invaluable opportunity to interfering with this mechanism dollars and marrying them with gifted researchers with a promising create the kind of preliminary may be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of AMD,” says idea,” says Mr. Northrup. “Our Dr. Petty. “This work could lead small family foundation has the data that can eventually go to identification of a drug that potential, through those dollars on to a large-scale grant.” would be useful clinically.” and Drs. Petty and Elner, to have Small family foundations are an outsized impact on the world. — Paul R. Lichter, M.D. vital in helping Kellogg achieve There’s another Aunt Mildred out its mission of advancing vision there. Maybe we can help her.” research. According to Paul R. Lichter, M.D., F. Bruce And, that help is on the way. After years of reFralick Professor of Ophthalmology and Chair of the search, Drs. Petty and Elner have identified mechanisms U-M Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, in the eye that kill retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) “These foundations provide an invaluable opportunity cells, key players in the development of AMD. to create the kind of preliminary data that can eventu “A few years ago, it was discovered that Complement Factor H (CFH), an immunological protein, was ally go on to a large-scale grant.”

Dedicated to Discovery

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Alvin and Edna H. Perkiss were married for 61 years. They are pictured here in 1965 (left) and 2007 (right). At center is Mrs. Perkiss in 1947.

A Legacy of Giving Husband honors his wife’s penchant for helping others with professorship bequest

When Edna H. Perkiss heard that an old friend of her husband’s was struggling after the death of his wife, she put a check in the mail, wanting to assist him in any way that she could. “It was typical of her nature,” says her husband, Alvin Perkiss. “Helping others was part of who she was.” To celebrate her memory and her spirit of giving, Mr. Perkiss this year made arrangements in his estate plans to establish the Edna H. Perkiss Research Professorship in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center. The endowed professorship will exist in perpetuity, helping advance work being done to find more effective treatments and a cure for age-related macular degeneration, a disease Mrs. Perkiss experienced in her later years. Mrs. Perkiss was born in 1918 and passed away in 2008. She grew up in Detroit and spent 32 years as a secretary at Ford Motor Company. She worked with a number of Ford vice presidents and was devoted to her job. Sometimes, she would come home at 5 p.m., eat dinner, and go back to work, Mr. Perkiss says, recalling 28

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her enthusiasm for a Ford Mustang launch in particular. She also loved to read and travel. Mr. Perkiss’s sister introduced the couple to one another when he returned from serving in the Army in Africa and Italy during World War II. They were married for 61 years. After attending college on the G.I. Bill, Mr. Perkiss founded a Dearborn-based machine tool distributorship supplying automobile plants in Michigan and throughout the country. When Mrs. Perkiss lost her vision due to age-related macular degeneration, she didn’t let it affect her love of life and of others. But she struggled as her eyesight grew worse during the course of seven years, and she had to give up some of her favorite pastimes. The Edna H. Perkiss Research Professorship in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences will help move science forward so that others may not have to face the obstacles Mrs. Perkiss experienced, says Dr. Paul R. Lichter, F. Bruce Fralick Professor and Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. “We are very grateful that Mr. Perkiss selected us to do this work in his wife’s memory. His gift will enable faculty members to maintain steady, uninterrupted courses of investigation as well as to explore promising new avenues of research.” Mrs. Perkiss would have been grateful to know that, her husband says. “This would have meant a lot to her. I hope that it helps scientists at the Kellogg Eye Center realize the maximum benefit from the work they are doing.”


With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011

Annual Honor Roll of Donors With heartfelt thanks to donors who made gifts from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. Included in this listing are contributors whose donations are part of multi-year pledges. $1 million and above Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

$500,000 to $999,999 B.H. Raven

$100,000 to $499,999 The Carls Foundation The Foundation Fighting Blindness Richard and Jane Manoogian Research to Prevent Blindness The Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation

$50,000 to $99,999 Anonymous Donors (2) American Diabetes Association Judy F. Gordon, D.M.V. Midwest Eye-Banks Kenneth H. Musson and Patricia Musson Timothy and Laurie G. Wadhams

$10,000 to $49,999

$5,000 to $9,999

Anonymous Donor (1) Amjad Z. Ahmad, M.D. Alliance for Vision Research Bell Charitable Foundation Birkhill Family Foundation Michael and Joanne Bisson Mary L. Boyers Trust Thomas W. Breakey Scott M. Corin and Nina Blumenthal Sandra and David Detrisac Ann and Joseph W. Edwards Hal and Donna Estry Fight for Sight M. and H. Ghandour Frances and David H. Grossman Michael G. and Deborah L. Harrison John W. Henderson Trust James G. and Carolyn Knaggs Knights Templar Eye Foundation Carolyn and Paul Lichter Elizabeth I. Lind Trust (Estate) The Gillson Longenbaugh Foundation Lowy Medical Research Institute Keith and Della McKenzie The Meijer Foundation Joel and Susan Mindel John C. and Phyllis J. Napley Michael Pachtman Colleen Pallister Mark and Kimberly Phelan Rennie and Michael Roth Mildred E. Swanson Foundation Genevieve E. Walinski Trust (Estate)

Harry E. and M. Patricia Bash Frank and Barbara Batsch Jason M. Burgett, M.D. Keith D. and Cheryl D. Carter Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Jim and Marty Conrad Joe and Beth Fitzsimmons Jean Craig Flynn Richard and Lisa Garfinkel Richard F. and Susan Gutow Andrew J. Hanzlik, M.D. David S. Hemmings, M.D. Mr. Leslie Kahn Helen and Richard Kerr Susan J. Lane Lawrence and Linda Levy Kim Lindenmuth and Matthew Bueche Regent Olivia P. Maynard and S. Olof Karlstrom Andrew L. Moyes, M.D. Michael R. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D. and Elizabeth Binasio Gerald and Joyce Trocchio David and Jayne VerLee Richard L. and Kay E. Watnick W. Scott and Jill Wilkinson Michael and Kimberly Yen

Paul R. Lichter, M.D., Research Discovery Fund After 34 years, Paul R. Lichter, M.D., is stepping down as the F. Bruce Fralick Professor and Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. The Paul R. Lichter, M.D., Research Discovery Fund has been established to continue his legacy of unwavering support to research. The Fund will provide important resources to our vision research program —one of the top in the country. We have 20 laboratories and a large cadre of basic and clinical scientists who are moving the field forward in exciting ways. They are searching for treatments and cures for vision-robbing eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and thyroid eye disease. If you would like to make a gift to the fund, which has a goal of $3 million, please call 734.615.0243 or visit www.kellogg.umich.edu/giving.

Dedicated to Discovery

29


With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011 $1,000 to $4,999

“Science proceeds in baby steps interspersed with leaps forward. As we pursue multiple lines of investigation, the big question is: which experiments will provide the next big leap forward? Support for our research programs provides backing for the major areas of investigation in which we think the next big leaps will come.” — Julia E. Richards, Ph.D.

Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professor of

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

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Associate Professor of Epidemiology

Gerald and Gloria Abrams Anthony and Mary Adamis James and Kathryn Adams Steven and Carol Archer Anne and Terry J. Bergstrom Thomas A. Bersani and Joan Christy Duane and Jean Bingel Stephen Boorstein, M.D. Eleanor E. Brownell Susan K. Burden Janet and Bill Cassebaum Mark and Janet Cichowski Mark and Judith Cohen Claude M. Coleman Mr. Frank and Dr. Theresa Cooney Gloria P. and William E. Dean, Jr. Jane and Irwin Deister, Jr. Monte A. and Kristen G. Del Monte Rosemarie DeLand Gayle D. Dickerson John S. Dunn Srini Dutt, M.D. Magdalen Skuba Edwards Michael and Elizabeth Eichler Bita Esmaeli, M.D. Arnold D. and M. Joan Feener Douglas P. and Shelley Felt Jacqueline A. Forrest Victor P. Freliga Cheryl Terpening Frueh Margaret E. Gallup Dasa and Nalini Gangadhar Gabriel and Denise Garcia Sunir J. Garg Larry and Mary Gerbens Joanne R. Gradowski Daniel and Norma Green Mr. Daniel and Dr. Holly M. Gross Robert and Teresa Grosserode Kenneth B. Gum Fawzia Hanna Myron Hepner Gerald and Mignon Heppler Barry P. Hoffman and Mary Ann Schrock-Hoffman Robert O. and Carolyn S. Hoffman James and Kathy Holmes Walter L. and Barbara J. Hungerford Barbara A. Irish and Matthew J. Hoberg Professor Judy M. Judd Nancy and Jeffrey Kahn, M.D. Douglas and Linda Katz Michael A. Kipp, M.D. Ann Novak-Krajcik and Joseph S. Krajcik, M.D. Paula and Henry Lederman

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Katherine Lee, M.D., Ph.D., and Alan Pitt, M.D. Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D. Betty and Seymour Lichter Hugh Logan Dr. and Mrs. Marvin J. Lubeck James Albert Maraldo Donald and Jacqueline McCulloch Dr. and Mrs. P. Anthony Meza Shahzad I. Mian and Uzma Ahmad Dr. Corey A. Miller and Nancy J. Miller Dean and Lynn Mitchell Vijaya R. Narwani Bruce and Roberta Oliver Gilbert S. Omenn and Martha A. Darling P & G Fund Allen and Kathy Pearce Scott M. and Jennifer Pinter Donald and Debra Puro James and Nancy Ravin Retina Research Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Milton Rochman Perry and Faith Schechtman David W. Schmidt, M.D. Don and Jane Schriver Roni and Max Shtein Dr. and Mrs. Gregory L. Skuta Drs. Karin Sletten and Ayad Farjo Michael and Linda Smith-Wheelock Mark and Romana Solent H. Kaz Soong and Barbara Nevins-Soong Peter K. Speert, M.D., J.D. Carol Standardi Alan and Gail Sugar James B. Thompson and Mary Ann Brandt Susan and David Thoms Triford Foundation Adele and Peter Vaculik James F. Vander, M.D. Thomas G. Varbedian, M.D. Margaret W. Vezina Danny D. Wang and YiLi Liu Lee S. and Stephen T. Webster Carol and Jack Weigel Herbert E. Weston George C. Whitaker Marina V.N. and Robert F. Whitman Dr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Wolner The Lawrence and Sylvia Wong Foundation Martha M. Wright and John P. Fennig Jung and Chiung Yao Wu Fuxiang and Fenfen Zhang Kate and Jeffrey Zink


With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011 $500 to $999 Anonymous Donor (1) Olga Alber Roger D. Arnett Betty Baier and Mark Kesson Steven and Constance Benz Rhoda L. and Roger M. Berkowitz Elizabeth A. Bertz Robert D. Biggs, M.D. Garry N. Binegar, M.D. Henry A. Boldt, Jr., M.D. James and Jacqueline Bowen Christine R. Buse Arlene R. Caon Richard and Enid Carlin William S. Clifford, M.D. Damon’s Grill Roland R. DeMartin James R. Devine Deborah M. Eadie Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Robert and Cassandra Estes Dennis and Christine Fornal Ralph M. Fox Philip J. Gage and Wendy Rampson-Gage GE Foundation Harry C. Gibson, M.D. Elizabeth Frueh Goldsmith and Bernard Goldsmith Mary and Edwin Good Kathryn G. Gray Geza L. and Elizabeth F. Gyorey Adrienne W. and Mark R. Hemmila Millicent Higgins, M.D. Darrel and Andrea Huff Issa Foundation Dr. Robert S. Jampel Ms. Effie D. Jenks David and Patricia Johnson James A. Johnson Mark W. and Linda B. Johnson C. Byron Landis, M.D. Professor Emeritus Myra A. Laryson Danute M. Leveckis, M.D., and Timothy Van Every, M.D. Thellea and Jean-Christopher Leveque Richard Alan Lewis and Patricia N. Lewis John and Suzanne Ley Carolyn E. Mesara Betsy and Ken Nisbet Mohammad I. and J. Elizabeth Othman Patrick J. Parden, M.D. Drs. Penporn and Stephen Reck John Wallace Risk Raymond and Barbara Robins Iva Jean Roe

David and Ann Rogers Drs. Michael and Mary Ruddat Stephen J. and Kim R. Saxe James P. and Dorothy Symons Tina D. Turner, M.D. Andrew Vine and Caroline Blane Joshua Vrabec, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Keith M. Williams Xerox Corporation Xi Chapter Delta Gamma Fraternity Dr. Tetsuya Yamamoto

$100 to $499 Anonymous Donors (12) Howard and Nina Abrams Mowafak H. Albayya Ann T. Alexander Dr. Krista Anderson Lawrence A. Barnes Anne and Donald F. Baty, Jr. Brenda D. Bell Stanley and Joy Berent Lois Bereza Anita Lynn and Werner Bergen William and Patricia Berlin Lana and David Berry Michael and Clarita Bishel Jonathan and Jill Bixler Fred Blanck and Andree Joyaux Christopher S. Boehlke, M.D. Donald and Georgia Boerma Edward L. and Martha Boggs, Jr. Daniel L. Braden Shirley and Louie Broccardo William and Julie Bromley Brian P. Brooks, M.D., Ph.D. Patricia S. Brooks Henry J. and Jean L. Brown J. Michael Burke Wilbur and Carolyn Burkett Donald V. Calamia Pamela Carrico Elaine J. Carson William and Marilyn Chandler Anne M. Chase Hideki and Tomomi Chuman Marilyn Citron John and Carolyn Clark Martha and James Cleary Ms. Alice S. Cohen Dr. Claire R. Coles Mr. and Mrs. James D. Conover Carl and Maria Constant Michele Tameris Cook Frank L. Cooper Patrick and Laura Coppens Ellen L. Coulthard MargaretAnn Cross and James Van Fleteren

“The scientific community tends to be conservative, and new ideas for investigating diseases or their underlying mechanisms are often met with skepticism by governmental funding committees. Private philanthropy plays a major role in assisting innovative research projects to germinate and grow, which gives fresh evidence that these projects deserve funding and support.” — John R. Heckenlively, M.D.

Paul R. Lichter Professor of

Ophthalmic Genetics

Professor, Ophthalmology and

Visual Sciences

Director, Center for Retinal and

Macular Degeneration

Dedicated to Discovery

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With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011

“Support from donors is incredibly important for expanding research programs at the Kellogg Eye Center. NIH-funded grants are essential, but donor funds provide investigators the flexibility to move quickly into new areas. Critical support from a donor led directly to my lab receiving a 5-year, $2.72 million grant from the National Eye Institute.” — Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D.

James and Marylyn Cumming William and Carol Cutler Larisa and Arthur Czabaniuk Dolores and Michael Czerniak Lyubica Dabich, M.D. Dolores D. Daudt James E. Davies Professor William and Virginia Dawson Professor Norma Diamond Dr. M. Kenneth and Arvene Dickstein David J. Disser John A. Dodds Marlene and Paul Dodge Gregory and Dottie Dootz Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Dornbrook Dow Corning Corporation Deborah Drous Mrs. Joyce P. Duke Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Elkins, Jr. Dr. Francis Y. Falck Michael J. Fanola Michael Fetters and Sayoko Moroi-Fetters Bryn A. and Suzanne M. Fick Jerome and Polly Finkelstein Anne E. Ford Ilene H. Forsyth Randee Freedman Ralph N. Funk Russ Gardner Tom and Maureen Grace Gardner Pat and Jim Giftos Jacqueline and Richard Gilbert Anitra and Jesse Gordon Mr. Waleed K. Gosaynie Roy A. Gosselin Rev. and Mrs. French M. Gothard Julie Gothrup and John Phillips 32

Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology

Richard L. Greer Sylvia and Chester Grifka Norman Grigsby Terry A. Gromacki and Cassie Lyn Barnhardt Mrs. Adele Gudes Jinkyung Ha Steven and Iris Haak Margaret Hagen Jane Hakken Dr. and Mrs. Edward F. Hall William P. Haney, M.D. Charlotte Hanson Hugh and Janet Harness Laurelynne D. and George Harris, M.D. Theodore and Naomi Harrison Robert W. and Elizabeth A. Herbst Ruth Heyn, M.D. Frederick J. Heyner Jeanne and Conrad Heyner Tom S. Hill Peter J. Hirth Richard and Jane Hiss Professor Emeritus Gerald P. Hodge Odette M. Houghton, M.D. Bret Hughes and Laura Alvarez Hughes Margaret M. and James E. Hughes Steven and Shelley Hurt Sungmin Hyung, M.D., Ph.D. Illinois Tool Works Foundation Dr. and Mrs. James D. Izer Richard and Anne Jackson Jim and Valorie Jalsovsky Diane and Craig James Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Johnson Artie Jones and Kimberly Dulimba

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Joyce Heidi and Alon Kahana Leslie Kamil Sahar Kassab-Sitto Jill Taft Kaufman Robert B. Kaufman, M.D. Charlene and Leo Kay Rosemary S. Kaye Ralph and Priscilla Kinney Mrs. Alexandra Klos William L. and Betty G. Knapp Mary Jo Knight Frank J. Konkel Rev. and Mrs. Kurt J. Kremlick, Jr. Drs. Teresa and Norman Krieger Sam and Marilyn Krimm Susan and James Krucki Gerald and Dorothy Kurtz Dr. Stuart P. Landay and Ms. Susan L. Bathke Marie Lane Louis and Gail LaRiche Kurt K. Lark, M.D. Lucille Lefler Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Lehman Gary Lelli and Kelly Bottger Cheryl L. and J. Paul Lemieux Jeanne M. Lerchen Robertson A. Lewis Sherry L. Lindahl Michael and Judy Lipson Thomas Longworth and Carol Cramer A. Letitia Loveless Lonnie L. Loy Paula MacDonald Macy’s Foundation Michael W. Maddin Jane G. Maddox


With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011 Joseph L. Maggini Carol L. Makielski and Charles D. Lake Richard and Barbara Mannis Marvin and Shirley Markgraff Lloyd and Helen McKee Kathy A. McMenemy-Williams Sharon L. McNutt Donald and Diane Meitz Robert and Margery Mesler Mr. Somsak Metriyakool Laurie and Fredrick Metzger William M. Michaluk Elaine J. Mickelson Steven J. Miller Alan and Blanche Mindlin Helen L. Mitchell Ms. Marlene M. Moleski Richard G. Mosteller Alphonsus C. Murphy David C. and Janice E. Musch Donald and Anita Myers Dr. Michel and Alice Nasif National LTC Network Christine Nelson and Willis Lillard Catherine E. Nesbitt Vernie and Gordon Nethercut Jonathon P. Niemczak Harry and Leeta Nistel Kenneth E. Oettle Miguel Orozco Mark E. and Barbara C. Overland John Papajohn Dr. and Mrs. Jared Parker Morgan and Kathryn Parker Laura and Rex Patterson Joseph and Betty Pavka Donald and Dorothy Peterson Pfizer Foundation

James and Nancy Pflasterer Jeffrey A. Pike Sheryl and Douglas Podlewski William I. Post, Jr. Rebecca and Eric Priebe Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Redmond Ann M. Reed Terry C. Reetz Charles S. Remenar Rita and Robert Reske Ms. Ann M. Rice Julia Richards and Carl Marrs Doug and Marcia Richardson Barbara and Art Rocco Richard C. Rodman, M.D. William H. Root Jonathan A. and Robin L. Rowe Carol and Dave Rundle Linda and Thomas Schalek Larry and Barbara Scherer Charles R. Schmitter, Jr., M.D., and Allyn C. Ravitz Eileen Schott John and Karen Schultz Marc Alan Schwartz Marie E. Shaffer David and Elvera Shappirio Kathleen A. Silverman Melvin A. Simon Ted Simon Sandra R. Singer Jay and Mary Margaret Smith Rosemary Smith Sue-Ellen Smith Becky and Doug Spaly John and Alexandra Starr Professor and Mrs. Eric Stein Joel Sugar and Anita Gerber

Wesley Szpunar Dr. and Mrs. Amit Tandon Dewey Tennent Edward and Karen Tenner Elaine J. Thompson Edward Thornhill Irene E. Tiller A. Richard Tischler Karen and Arthur Tousignant Jonathan Trobe and Joan Lowenstein Dr. Gabriela Valdivia Ronald L. Vanderlugt Susan M. Vitous Arthur and Shirley Wade Claudia M. Wagner David R. Wagner Randall S. and William K. Wallach Carolyn Jean Weigle Cyrus R. Wellman Dr. and Mrs. William W. Wells Avis L. White Dr. Patrick T. and Mary White Katherine A. Whitney Dr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Wick Mr. Howard L. Wikel John J. and Janice A. Williams Lindsey Wills and Jonathan Disner Dr. and Mrs. W. Webb Wilson Jeneane Wise David and Phyllis Wittrock Ford L. Wright Rebecca Wu, M.D., and Michael Mendez Susan K. Yale Michael and Kathleen Yang Dr. York-Peng E. Yao Wanda E. Zissis W. Tom and Helen ZurSchmiede, Jr.

“Michigan is a great institution because of its great supporters. They’re the game-changers who make new things happen.” — Howard R. Petty, Ph.D.

Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Dedicated to Discovery

33


With gratitude for gifts made from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011 In Memory Of The Kellogg Eye Center is honored to have received gifts in memory of the following individuals. Margaret Baier Sandra Bessert E.R. Blou Gus Bremer Leona G. Brooks Nellie Brown William A. Bruff, Sr. Gertrude Callaway Kate and Paul Coleman Jodean Conover Bev Cygan Helen DeWolfe Harold F. Falls, M.D. Ann Flaherty Murphy Gerald Flemming F. Bruce Fralick, M.D. Bartley R. Frueh, M.D. Virginia Frueh David Gudes, M.D. Gerald Gudes Jean D. Harrison John W. Henderson, M.D., Ph.D. Frank D. Johnson, M.D. Don LaFlamboy David Laskey Susan Lichter Richard and Carol Lillo Lucille Maggin Alfred Mansfield Ernestina Parravano Charles and Ethel Schrock Sheila Schwartz Julianna Simon Nettie May VandyBogurt Michael A. Wainstock, M.D. Lillian Weigle

In Honor Of The following individuals were honored through gifts to the Kellogg Eye Center. Anthony P. Adamis, M.D. Trudy Callaway Birdie Cooper Jane Griffith Elliott Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D. David and Fran Grossman Brendon Hepner Ida L. Iacobucci, C.O. Mark W. Johnson, M.D. Joe and Bea Lattuca

34

Paul R. Lichter, M.D. Roger F. Meyer, M.D. Shahzad I. Mian, M.D. Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Stephen J. Saxe, M.D. Carol L. Standardi, R.N. Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S. Alan Sugar, M.D. Susan S. Thoms, M.D. Clare Van Fleteren Morris Van Houten Claire Viers

Bequests and Other Planned Gifts It is with deep gratitude that we recognize the following individuals for making the Kellogg Eye Center a part of their estate plans. Frank J. and Helga Arnold Nancy Bender Anne S. Benninghoff Rhoda L. and Roger M. Berkowitz Robert D. Biggs, M.D. Gloria P. and William E. Dean, Jr. Ralph M. Fox Helen A. (Poorbaugh) Freedman Larry and Mary Gerbens Conrad L. Giles Ed and Sue Gorney Ida Lucy Iacobucci Mrs. Harry Krashen Edward and Duffy Ladenberger Harry and Eva McGee Marvin Joe and Beverly McKenney Bruce L. and Roberta Oliver Alvin Perkiss Sally J. Pryce Mrs. Shirley M. Schaible Alice and Ronald Shankland E.H. Newel and Rosemary Smith Russell A. Stephens and Phyllis A. Capogna James B. Thompson and Mary Ann Brandt David and Jayne VerLee Michael A. Wainstock, M.D.

Only those who gave their

“Donor contributions that fund research in its earliest phases are one of the most important ways to advance innovative ideas and applications in biomedical research. Philanthropic support for our research program is allowing us to identify candidate genes that may prove useful for genereplacement therapy, a technology that has recently entered clinical trials and is showing promise for the treatment of inherited retinal degeneration.”

permission are included above. The Kellogg Eye Center greatly values our donors, and we make every effort to ensure the honor roll is accurate. Please call us at 734.615.0243 if you note any errors.

university of michigan kellogg eye center

— Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D.

Professor, Ophthalmology and

Visual Sciences

Professor, Biological Chemistry


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Steven F. Abcouwer, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Member, Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center • Research Grant Review Panel, American Diabetes Association • Editorial Board, American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism • Editorial Board, Journal of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology • Meeting Co-Chair, Ophthalmology-2012 OMICS Group Conference Diabetic Retinopathy Session Publications Aveleira CA, Lin CM, Abcouwer SF, Ambrósio AF, Antonetti DA. TNF-α signals through PKCζ/NF-κB to alter the tight junction complex and increase retinal endothelial cell permeability. Diabetes 2010;59:2872-2882 Abcouwer SF, Lin CM, Wolpert EB, Shanmugam S, Schaefer EW, Freeman WM, Barber AJ, Antonetti DA. Vascular permeability and apoptosis are separable processes in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury: effects of ischemic preconditioning, bevacizumab and etanercept. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:5920-5933 Barber AJ, Gardner TW, Abcouwer SF. The significance of vascular and neural apoptosis to the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1156-1163 Fort PE, Losiewicz MK, Reiter CEN, Singh RSJ, Nakamura M, Abcouwer SF, Barber AJ, Gardner TW. Selective roles of hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia in diabetes induced retinal cell death: evidence for retinal insulin resistance, PLoS ONE 2011 [in press]

David A. Antonetti, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Jules and Doris Stein Professorship in Ophthalmology • Presenter, Barriers of the CNS, Colby Sawyer College, New London, NH • Presenter, ARVO Summer Eye Research Conference, Bethesda, MD • Presenter, 15th Annual American Uveitis Society Winter Symposium, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida • Ad hoc grant reviewer, NIH Publications Schrufer TL, Antonetti DA, Sonenberg N, Kimball SR, Gardner TW, Jefferson LS. Ablation of 4E-BP1/2 prevents hyperglycemiamediated induction of VEGF expression in the rodent retina and in Müller cells in culture. Diabetes 2010;59:2107-2116

Abcouwer SF, Lin CM, Wolpert EB, Shanmugam S, Schaefer EW, Freemam WM, Barber AJ, Antonetti DA. Effects of ischemic preconditioning and bevacizumab on apoptosis and vascular permeability following retinal ischemia reperfusion injury. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:5920-5933 Aveleira CA, Lin CM, Abcouwer SF, Ambrósio AF, Antonetti DA. TNF-α signals through PKCζ/NF-κB to alter the tight junction complex and increase retinal endothelial cell permeability. Diabetes 2010;59:2872-2882 Lopez-Quintero SV, Ji XY, Antonetti DA,Tarbell JM. A three-pore model describes transport properties of bovine retinal endothelial cells in normal and elevated glucose. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1171-1180 Runkle EA, Antonetti DA. The blood-retinal barrier: structure and functional significance. Methods Mol Biol 2011;686:133-148 Cai J, Wu L, Qi X, Shaw L, Li Calzi S, Caballero S, Jiang WG, Binores SA, Antonetti DA, Ahmed A, Grant MB, Boulton ME. Placenta growth factor-1 exerts time-dependent stabilization of adherens junctions following VEGF-induced vascular permeability. PLoS One 2011;6:e18076 Runkle EA, Sundstrom JM, Runkle KB, Liu X, Antonetti DA. Occludin localizes to centrosomes and modifies mitotic entry. J Biol Chem 2011;286:30847-30858 Frey TA, Antonetti DA. Alterations to the blood-retinal barrier in diabetes: cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Antioxid Redox Signal 2011 [in press]

Steven M. Archer, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Associate Editor, Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Publications Bothun ED, Johnson CS, Archer SM, Del Monte MA. Evolution of postoperative astigmatism after large incision PMMA lens implantation in children. J AAPOS 2010;14:518-521 Archer SM. Management of paretic vertical deviations. Am Orthoptic J 2011;61:6-12

Jill E. Bixler, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Bartley Frueh Resident Surgical Teaching Award, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center

Grant M. Comer, M.D., M.S. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Reviewer, Digital Journal of Ophthalmology • Reviewer, Eye • Reviewer, Retina Publications Besirli CG, Comer GM. High-resolution OCT imaging of retinal pigment epithelial degeneration in bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2010;41:596-600 Riddell J, Comer GM, Kauffman CA. Treatment of endogenous fungal endophthalmitis: focus on new anti-fungal agents. Clin Infect Dis 2011;52:648-653 Wells JR, Aaberg TM Jr, Shields CL, Comer GM, Grossniklaus HE. Retinoblastoma in a 48-year-old woman. Retinal Cases and Brief Reports 2011;5:22-25 Comer GM, Miller JB, Schneider EW, Khan NW, Reed DM, Elner VM, Zacks DN. Intravitreal daptomycin: a safety and efficacy study. Retina 2011;31:1199-1206

Theresa M. Cooney, M.D. Publications Cooney TM, Wu A, Wilkes G, Finkelstein JI, Musch DC. The effects of systemic alpha 1-adrenoreceptor antagonists on pupil diameter. Br J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] Outreach and Public Service Delegate to the Michigan State Medical Society House of Delegates on behalf of the Michigan Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons

Wayne T. Cornblath, M.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Moderator, What Is Wrong with This Picture? Recognizing the Neuro-Ophthalmic Red Flags. American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting • Director, Top Ten Neuro-ophthalmic Diagnoses You Can’t Afford to Miss. American Academy of Neurology Meeting • Presenter, Cleveland Clinic and University of Michigan presents: Current and Emerging Uses of Botulinum Toxin in Neurology and Rehabilitation: A Practical Skills Workshop • Faculty, Neurology Skills Pavilion: Neuro ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam Lab. American Academy of Neurology Meeting

Dedicated to Discovery

35


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications • Faculty, Now You See It, Now You Know It: (Nearly) Pathognomonic Signs in Neuro ophthalmology Findings. American Academy of Neurology Meeting Publications Cornblath WT. Should most patients with optic neuritis be tested for neuromyelitis optica antibodies and should this affect their treatment? J Neuroophthalmol 2010;30:376-378 

Monte A. Del Monte, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Association for Research in Strabismus (Squint Club) • Keynote Speaker, Sino-Japan Ophthalmol ogy Symposium and Tianjin International Pediatric Ophthalmology Forum 2010, Tianjin, China • Program Chair, AAPOS Co-sponsored Symposium, Hot Topics in Pediatric Ophthalmology, 2011 Asia Pacific Association of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting, Sydney, Australia • Guest Speaker, Pediatric Ophthalmology LIX National Congress of Ophthalmology, Sociedad Venezolana de Oftalmologia, Caracas, Venezuela • North American Chair, Program Committee, Subspeciality Day in Pediatric Ophthalmology, Pan American Association of Ophthalmology, Buenos Aires, Argentina • Chair and Moderator, section on orbital tumors, Costenbader Society Annual Meeting, 2010, Augusta, Maine • Guest Lecturer, Sixth International Cystinosis Congress 2010, Lignano Sabbiadoro, Italy • Speaker, Pediatric Grand Rounds, Hurley Hospital, Flint, MI • Presenter, Asia Pacific Association of Ophthalmology Meeting, Sydney, Australia Publications Bothun ED, Johnson CS, Archer SM, Del Monte MA. Evolution of postoperative astigmatism after large incision PMMA lens implantation in children. J Amer Assoc Ped Ophthalmol Strab 2010;14:518-522 Kothary PC, Badhwar J, Weng C, Del Monte MA. Impaired intracellular signaling may allow up-regulation of CTGF-synthesis and secondary peri-retinal fibrosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells from patients with age-related macular degeneration. In: Hollyfield JG, Anderson RE, LaVail, MM, eds., Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology/Retinal Degenerative Diseases, New York:Springer 2010; pp 419-428 Kemper AR, Del Monte MA. Vision screening and interpretation. In: Tanski S, Garfunkel L, Duncan P, Weitzman M, eds., The Bright Futures Clinical Guide to Performing Preventive Services, 3rd edition, San Francisco:American Academy of Pediatrics 2010; pp 155-157 36

Del Monte MA. Surgical treatment of accommodative esotropia. Ocular Potpourri, AudioDigest Ophthalmology 2010;48:13 Del Monte MA. Ocular anatomy and physiology. In: Rudolph C, Lister G, Gershon A. First L, Rudolph A, eds., Rudolph’s Pediatrics, 22nd edition, New York:McGraw-Hill 2011; pp 2273-2275 Enzenauer R, Hoehn ME, Del Monte MA. Strabismus. In: Rudolph C, Lister G, Gershon A. First L, Rudolph A, eds., Rudolph’s Pediatrics, 22nd edition, New York:McGraw-Hill, 2011; pp 2293-2298 Lambert SR, Archer SM, Wilson ME, Trivedi RH, Del Monte MA, Lynn M. Long-term outcomes of under correction versus full correction after unilateral intraocular lens implantation in children. Am J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] 

Jonathan B. Demb, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editorial Board, Journal of Neuroscience • Ad hoc grant reviewer, NIH/NEI Publications Weick M, Demb JB. Delayed-rectifier K channels contribute to contrast adaptation in mammalian retinal ganglion cells. Neuron 2011;71:166-179 Wang YV, Weick M, Demb JB. Spectral and temporal sensitivity of cone-mediated responses in mouse retinal ganglion cells. J Neurosci 2011;31:7670-7681 Jarsky T, Cembrowksi M, Logan SM, et al. A synaptic mechanism for retinal adaptation to luminance and contrast. J Neurosci 2011;31:11003-11015

Hakan Demirci, M.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Presenter, ASOPRS 41st Annual Fall Scientific Symposium, Chicago, IL • Presenter, AAO-MEACO Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL • Presenter, American Association of Ophthalmic Pathologists, Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL Publications Demirci H, Elner SG, Elner VM. Rigid nylon foil-anchored polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) sheet stenting for conjunctival fornix reconstruction. Ophthalmology 2010;117:17361742

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Alzaga Fernandez AG, Demirci H, DarnleyFisch DA, Steen DW. Interstitial keratitis secondary to severe hidradenitis suppurativa: a case report and literature review. Cornea 2010;29:1189-1191 Demirci H, Frueh BR, Nelson CC. Marcus Gunn jaw-winking synkinesis: clinical features and management. Ophthalmology 2010;117:1447-1452 Demirci H, Christianson MD. Orbital and adnexal involvement in sarcoidosis: analysis of clinical features and systemic disease in 30 cases. Am J Ophthalmol 2011;151:1074-1080

Raymond S. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Endocrine Society International 2011 Award for Excellence in Published Clinical Research • Presenter, Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Sydney, Australia • Presenter, 2011 Master’s Symposium, Sydney, Australia • Presenter, 2011 ARVO Visionary Genomics, Fort Lauderdale, FL • Speaker, Kresge Eye Institute Grand Rounds, Detroit, MI • Speaker, Detroit Regional Ophthalmology Interchange, Detroit, MI Publications Hegedus L, Smith TJ, Douglas RS, Nielsen CH. Targeted biological therapies for Graves’ disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: focus on B-cell depletion with Rituximab. Clin Endocrinol 2011;74:1-8 Bhatt R, Nelson CC, Douglas RS. Thyroid-associated orbitopathy: current insights into the pathophysiology, immunology, and management. Saudi J Ophthal 2011;25:15-20 Change HS, Lee D, Taban M, Douglas RS, Goldberg RA. “En-Glove” lysis of lower eyelid retractors with AlloDerm and dermisfat grafts in lower eyelid retraction surgery. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011;27:137-141 Douglas RS, Gupta S. The pathophysiology of thyroid eye disease: implications for immunotherapy. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2011;22:385-390 Smith TJ, Douglas R. Does selenium supplementation improve Graves’ ophthalmopathy? Nat Rev Endocrinol 2011;7:505-506 Lee BJ, Elner SG, Douglas RS, Elner VM. Island pedicle and horizontal advancement cheek flaps for medial canthal reconstruction. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011;27:376-379


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Douglas RS, Goldberg RA, Hwang CJ. Evaluation and Spectrum of Orbital Diseases. In: Yen MT, ed., Surgery of the Eyelids, Lacrimal System, and Orbit, 2nd edition, New York:Oxford University Press, 2011; pp 227-245 Briceno C, Douglas RS. A commentary on resource utilization in patients with orbital and periorbital infections. Arch Opthalmol 2011 [in press] Douglas RS. Rituximab for thyroid eye disease [Reply to Letter to the Editor]. Ophthalmol 2011 [in press]  

Elizabeth Du, M.D. Publications Pokroy R, Desai U, Du E, Li Y, Edwards P. Bevacizumab prior to vitrectomy for diabetic traction retinal detachment. Eye 2011;25:989997

Susan G. Elner, M.D. Grants See grants, page 46 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Publications Yang D, Elner SG, Chen X, Field MG, Petty HR, Elner VM. MCP-1-activated monocytes induce apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:6026-6034 Yang D, Elner SG, Clark AJ, Hughes BA, Petty HR, Elner VM. Activation of P2X7 receptors induces apoptosis in human RPE. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1522-1530

Comer GM, Miller JB, Schneider EW, Khan NW, Reed DM, Elner VM, Zacks DN. Intravitreal daptomycin: a safety and efficacy study. Retina 2011;31:1199-1206

Publications Fort PE, Lampi KJ. New focus on alpha crystallins in neurodegenerative diseases. Review. Exp Eye Res 2011;92:98-103

Lee BJ, Elner SG, Douglas RS, Elner VM. Island pedicle and horizontal advancement cheek flaps for medial canthal reconstruction. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011;27:376-379

Losiewicz MK, Fort PE. Diabetes impairs the neuroprotective properties of retinal alpha-crystallins. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:5034-5042

Yang D, Elner SG, Chen X, Field MG, Petty HR, Elner VM. MCP-1-activated monocytes induce apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:6026-6034 Yang D, Elner SG, Clark AJ, Hughes BA, Petty HR, Elner VM. Activation of P2X7 receptors induces apoptosis in human RPE. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1522-1530 Field MG, Yang D, Bian ZM, Petty HR, Elner VM. Retinal flavoprotein fluorescence correlates with mitochondrial stress, apoptosis, and chemokine expression. Exp Eye Res 2011 [in press] Cho RI, Elner VM, Nelson CC, Frueh BR. The effect of orbital decompression surgery on lid retraction in thyroid eye disease. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Lee BJ, Gupta S, Flint A, Singer TR, Elner VM. Pigmented orbital mass due to remote pencil trauma. Ophthalmic Plas Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Dolman PJ, Cahill K, Czyz CN, et al. Reliability of estimating ductions in thyroid eye disease. International Thyroid Eye Disease Society Multicenter Study. Ophthalmology 2011 [in press] Bian ZM, Elner SG, Khanna H, Murga-Zamalloa CA, Patil S, Elner VM. Expression and functional roles of caspase-5 in inflammatory responses of human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press]

Bian ZM, Elner SG, Khanna H, Murga-Zamalloa CA, Patil S, Elner VM. Expression and functional roles of caspase-5 in inflammatory responses of human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press]

Jerome I. Finkelstein, M.D.

Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D.

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America

Grants See grants, page 47 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Publications Kawaji T, Elner VM, Yang DL, Clark A, Petty HR. Ischemia-induced nitrotyrosine formation and nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human retinal pigment epithelium in vivo. Redox Report 2011;16:24-26

Publications Cooney TM, Wu A, Wilkes G, Finkelstein JI, Musch DC. The effects of systemic alpha 1-adrenoreceptor antagonists on pupil diameter. Br J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press]

Patrice E. Fort, Ph.D., M.S. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editorial Board, Journal of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

Bruce A. Furr, C.O., M.S.P.H. Awards/Honors/Leadership • President, American Association of Certified Orthoptists • Chair, Executive Committee, American Association of Certified Orthoptists • Executive Committee, American Orthoptic Council • Member, Canadian Orthoptic Council • Co-host, American Academy of Ophthalmology/American Orthoptic Council/American Association of Certified Orthoptists Strabismus Symposium, AAO Annual Meeting • Editorial Board, American Orthoptic Journal Publications Furr BA. Editorial. Am Orthopt J 2011;61:vii Outreach and Public Service American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Outreach Week,Tianjin Eye Hospital, Tianjin, China

Philip J. Gage, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 47 Publications Plageman TF, Zacharias AL, Gage PJ, Lang RA. Shroom3 and a Pitx2-N-cadherin pathway function cooperatively to generate asymmetric cell shape changes during gut morphogenesis. Dev Biol 2011;357:227-234

Thomas W. Gardner, M.D., M.S. Grants See grants, page 47 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Invited Speaker, ARVO Summer Eye Research Conference, Bethesda, MD • Invited Speaker, University of Michigan Medical School Diabetes Complications Symposium • Invited Speaker, University of Pittsburgh Eye & Ear Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA • Invited Speaker, Metabolism and Endocri nology Grand Rounds, University of Michigan Medical School • Invited Speaker, Distinguished Lecture Series, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Dedicated to Discovery

37


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications • Invited Speaker, American Ophthalmo logical Society, Dana Point, CA • Invited Speaker, EURETINA meeting, London, England • Steering Committee, Lasker Foundation/ International Retina Research Foundation Initiative on Diabetic Retinopathy • Steering Committee, JDRF nPODc • Associate Editor, Diabetes and Acta Ophthalmologica Publications Gardner TW, Abcouwer SF, Barber AJ, Jackson GR. An integrated approach to diabetic retinopathy research. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:230-235 Fox TE, Young MM, Pedersen M, GiambuzziTussey S, Kester M, Gardner TW. Insulin signaling in retinal neurons is regulated within cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains. Am J Physiol – Endocrinol Metab 2011;300:E600-609 Barber AJ, Abcouwer SF, Gardner TW. The significance of vascular and neural apoptosis to the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1156-1163

Richard E. Hackel, M.A., C.R.A. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Member, Board of Education, Ophthalmic Photographers’ Society • Editorial Board, Journal of Ophthalmic Photography Publications Koreen L, He S, Johnson MW, Hackel R, Khan N, Heckenlively JR. Anti-retinal pigment epithelium antibodies in acute exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy: a new hypothesis about disease pathogenesis. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:23-29

John R. Heckenlively, M.D. Grants See grants, page 47 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Associate Editor and Editorial Board, Eye • Reviewer, Study Section R24, National Eye Institute, NIH Publications Heckenlively JR, Ferreyra HA, Jayasundera T. Controversies of diagnosing autoimmune retinopathy. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:147148 Chen W, Stambolian D, Edwards AO, et al. Genetic variants near TIMP3 and high-density lipoprotein-associated loci influence susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010;107:7401-7406

38

Daiger SP, Sullivan LS, Bowne SJ, et al. Targeted high-throughput DNA sequencing for gene discovery in retinitis pigmentosa. Adv Exp Med Biol 2010;664:325-331

Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D.

Friedman JS, Chang B, Krauth DS, et al. Loss of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 leads to photoreceptor degeneration in rd11 mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010;107:15523-15528

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Director, University of Michigan Medical School Office of Postdoctoral Studies • Advisory Committee, University of Michigan Medical School Biomedical Cores Research Facilities • Editorial Board, Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases and Informatics • Speaker, Oakland University Eye Research Institute, Rochester, MI • Speaker, Florida State University, Department of Biology, Tallahassee, FL • Speaker, AAMC GREAT Group Postdoctoral Leadership Workshop, New Orleans, LA • Speaker, Excellence in Midkine Research, Sydney, NSW • Speaker, 4th NIH Career Symposium, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD • Speaker, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Department of Ophthalmology/Neuro science Program, Syracuse, NY

Lu Y, He S, Heckenlively JR. Two mouse models for recoverin-associated autoimmune retinopathy. Mol Vis 2010;16:1936-1948 Baratz KH, Tosakulwong N, Ryu E, et al. E2-2 protein and Fuchs’s corneal dystrophy. N Engl J Med 2010;363:1016-1024 Chen W, Stambolian D, Edwards AO, et al. Genetic variants near TIMP3 and high-density lipoprotein-associated loci influence susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010;107:7401-7406 Bowne SJ, Sullivan LS, Koboldt DC, et al. Identification of disease-causing mutations in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) using next-generation DNA sequencing. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:494503 Collin RW, van den Born LI, Klevering BJ, et al. High-resolution homozygosity mapping is a powerful tool to detect novel mutations causative of autosomal recessive RP in the Dutch population. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:2227-2239 Koreen L, He S, Johnson MW, et al. Antiretinal pigment epitheliuim antibodies in acute exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy: A new hypothesis about disease pathogenesis. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:23-29 Yao J, Feathers KL, Khanna H, et al. XIAP therapy increases survival of transplanted rod precursors in a degenerating host retina. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1567-1572 Wissinger B, Schaich S, Baumann B, et al. Large deletions of the KCNV2 gene are common in patients with cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response. Hum Mutat 2011 [in press] Chaki M, Hoefele J, Allen SJ, et al. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 440 patients with NPHP-related ciliopathies. Kidney Int 2011 [in press] Ferreyra H, Heckenlively JR. Retinitis pigmentosa. In: Traboulsi EI, ed., Genetic Diseases of the Eye, New York:Oxford University Press, 2011 [in press]

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Grants See grants, page 47

Publications Craig SEL, Thummel R, Ahmed H, et al. The zebrafish galectin Drgal1-L2 is expressed by proliferating Müller glia and photoreceptor progenitors and regulates the regeneration of rod photoreceptors. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:3244-3252 Taylor SJ, Luo J, Chen L, Hitchcock, PF. Light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the retina of the zebrafish. In: Wang S-Z, ed., Methods in Molecular Biology. Retinal Development: Methods and Protocols, New York:Humana Press, Inc., 2011 [in press]

Bret A. Hughes, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 47 Publications Yang D, Elner SG, Clark AJ, Hughes BA, Petty HR, Elner VM. Activation of P2X receptors induces apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium: implications for age-related macular degeneration. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;52:1522-1530

Ida L. Iacobucci, C.O. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Lifetime Achievement Award, American Association of Certified Orthoptists


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications K. Thiran Jayasundera, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Ocular Physiology Board Examiner, Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists Publications Heckenlively JR, Ferreyra HA, Jayasundera T. Controversies of diagnosing autoimmune retinopathy. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:147148 Jayasundera T. Stargardt Disease: Advances and Obstacles. Retina Today 2011;Jul/ Aug:90-92 

Denise A. John, M.D. Publications Kamyar R, Weizer JS, Stein JD, John DA, Mian S. Glaucoma associated with Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis. Cornea [in press] John DA, Weizer JS. Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty. In: Kahook MY ed., Essentials of Glaucoma Surgery, Thorofare, NJ:SLACK, Inc. [in press]

Mark W. Johnson, M.D. Grants See grants, page 47 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Elected Treasurer, Retina Society • Chair, Committee on Programs, American Ophthalmological Society • Data and Safety Monitoring Committee, Trial of Pazopanib Eyedrops in Neovas cular AMD Publications Scott IU, VanVeldhuisen PC, Oden NL, et al., and the SCORE Study Investigator Group. SCORE study report 10: Baseline predictors of visual acuity and retinal thickness outcomes in patients with retinal vein occlusion. Ophthalmology 2011;118:345-352 Schneider EW, Johnson MW. Emerging nonsurgical methods for the treatment of vitreomacular adhesion. Clin Ophthalmol 2011;5:1151-1165 CATT Research Group. Ranibizumab and bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. N Engl J Med 2011;364:1897-1908 Zhang L, Sun Y, Johnson MW, Richards JE, Moroi SE. Simultaneous cilioretinal artery and central retinal vein occlusions in juvenile glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] Todorich B, Scott IU, Flynn HW, Johnson MW. Evolving strategies in the management of submacular hemorrhage associated with choroidal neovascularization in the anti-VEGF era. Retina 2011 [in press]

Johnson MW. Management of macular schisis. Retina 2011 [in press] Johnson MW. Bilateral, progressive, relentless choroidal lesions in a 14-year-old boy. Retina 2011 [in press] Goldman DR, Johnson MW, Sarraf D. Stellate neuroretinitis associated with posterior scleritis. Retinal Cases Brief Reports 2011 [in press] Schneider EW, Geraets RL, Johnson MW. Pars plana vitrectomy without adjuvant procedures for repair of primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Retina 2011 [in press] Bajenova NV, Vanderbeek BL, Johnson MW. Change in choroidal thickness after chemotherapy in leukemic choroidopathy. Retina 2011 [in press] Vanderbeek BL, Johnson MW. The diversity of traction mechanisms in myopic traction maculopathy. Am J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] Johnson TM, Johnson MW. Macular diseases. In: Quillen DA, Blodi BA, eds., Clinical Retina, 2nd edition, Atlanta:AMA Press, 2011 [in press] Besirli CG, Johnson MW. Uveal effusion syndrome and hypotony maculopathy. In: Ryan SG, ed., Retina, 5th edition, Philadelphia:Saunders [in press]

Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 47 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • ARVO/Alcon Early Career Clinician Scientist Research Award • International Thyroid Eye Disease Study Group • Member, Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center • Moderator, ARVO Annual Meeting • Instructor, AAO Skills Transfer Course, Anatomic Foundation of Oculoplastic Surgery • Visiting Professor, Hadassah Medical Center, Ein Kerem, Israel • Invited speaker, Oculoplastics Today, Israel Oculoplastics Congress, Tel-Aviv, Israel • Invited speaker, Craniofacial Morpho genesis and Tissue Regeneration, Gordon Research Conference, Il Ciocco, Barga, Italy • Presenter, 9th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics, Madison, WI • Presenter, Annual MiSEPS Winter Meeting, Thompsonville, MI • Invited Speaker, APAO Sydney Congress, Sydney, Australia • Speaker, Myogenesis Gordon Research Conference, Waterville Valley, NH

• Invited Speaker, University of Michigan Medical School Annual Alumni Reunion, Ann Arbor, MI Publications Kahana A, Dutton J. Evisceration is useful in certain situations. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:1496 Kahana A, Bohnsack BL, Cho RI, Maher C. Subtotal excision with adjunctive sclerosing therapy for the treatment of severe symptomatic orbital lymphangiomas. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1073-1076 Bohnsack BL, Gallina DD, Thompson H, Kasprick D, Lucarelli MJ, Dootz G, Nelson C, McGonnell IM, Kahana A. Development of extraocular muscles require early signals from periocular neural crest and the developing eye, revealing an important developmental window. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:10301041. Kish PE, Bohnsack BL, Gallina DD, Kasprick D, Kahana A. The eye as an organizer of craniofacial development. Genesis 2011;49:222230 Bohnsack BL, Gallina DD, Kahana A. Phenothiourea sensitizes zebrafish cranial neural crest and extraocular muscle development to changes in retinoic acid and IGF signaling. PLoS One 2011;6:e22991 Kahana A, Pribila JT, Nelson CC, Elner VM. Sebaceous cell carcinoma. In: Albert DM, Levin LA, eds., Ocular Disease: Mechanisms and Management, Philadelphia:Saunders, 2010; pp 396-407 Bohnsack BL, Bhatt R, Kahana A. Nonophthalmic symptoms secondary to ocular torticollis from severe blepharoptosis: an underappreciated but treatable condition. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Kasprick D, Kish PE, Junttila T, Ward LA, Bohnsack BL, Kahana A. Microanatomy of adult zebrafish extraocular muscles reveals significant morphologic similarities and differences with human extraocular muscles. PLoS One 2011 [in press] Bohnsack BL, Nelson CC, Kahana A. Evisceration. In: Albert DM, Lucarelli MJ, eds., The Clinical Atlas of Procedures in Ophthalmic Surgery, 2nd ed., Atlanta:AMA Press, 2011 [in press].

Naheed W. Khan, Ph.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Reviewer, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Publications Lu Y, He S, Jia L, Khan NW, Heckenlively JR. Two mouse models for recoverin-associated autoimmune retinopathy. Mol Vis 2010;16:1935-1947 Dedicated to Discovery

39


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Parapuram SK, Cojocaru RI, Chang JR, Khanna R, Brooks M, Othman M, Zareparsi S, Khan NW, Gotoh N, Cogliati T, Swaroop A. Distinct signature of altered homeostasis in aging rod photoreceptors: implications for retinal diseases PloS ONE 2010;5:e13885 Koreen L, He S, Johnson MW, Hackel R, Khan NW, Heckenlively JR. Anti-retinal pigment epithelium antibodies in acute exudative polymorphous vitelliform maculopathy: a new hypothesis about disease pathogenesis. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:23-29 Comer GM, Miller GB, Schneider EW, Khan NW, Reed DM, Elner VM, Zacks DN. Intravitreal daptomycin: a safety and efficacy study. Retina 2011;31:1199-1206 Chavali VR, Khan NW, Cukras C, Bartsch DU, Sieving P, Jablonski MM, Ayyagari R. Gene knock-in mouse model for lateonset retinal degeneration. Hu Mol Genet 2011;20:2000-2014 Cheng H, Khan NW, Roger JE, Swaroop A. Excess cones in the retinal degeneration rd7 mouse, caused by the loss of function of orphan nuclear receptor Nr2e3, originate from early-born photoreceptor precursors. Hum Mol Genet [in press]

Helios T. Leung, Ph.D., O.D. Outreach and Public Service Volunteer, Remote Area Medical Weekend Clinic, Knoxville, TN

Publications Musch DC, Gillespie BW, Niziol LM, Lichter PR, Varma R; CIGTS Study Group. Intraocular pressure control and long-term visual field loss in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1766-1773 Stein J, Talwar N, Nan B, Lichter P, Alejandra L. Trends in Utilization of Ancillary Glaucoma Tests for Patients with Open-Angle Glaucoma from 2001 to 2009. Ophthalmology 2011 [in press]

Cheng-mao Lin, Ph.D. Publications Freeman WM, Bixler GV, Brucklacher RM, Lin CM, Patel KM, Vanguilder HD, Lanoue KF, Kimball SR, Barber AJ, Antonetti DA, Gardner TW, Bronson SK. A multistep validation process of biomarkers for preclinical drug development. Pharmacogenomics J 2010;10:385-395 Abcouwer SF, Lin CM, Wolpert EB, Shanmugam S, Schaefer EW, Freeman WM, Barber AJ, Antonetti DA. Vascular permeability and apoptosis are separable processes in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury: effects of ischemic preconditioning, bevacizumab and etanercept. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:5920-5933

Paul R. Lichter, M.D.

Aveleira CA, Lin CM, Abcouwer SF, Ambrosio AF, Antonetti DA. TNF-α signals through PKCζ/NF-κB to alter the tight junction complex and increase retinal endothelial cell permeability. Diabetes 2010;59:2872-2882

Grants See grants, page 48

Michael J. Lipson, O.D.

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • President, Academia Ophthalmologica Internationalis • Board of Trustees, International Council of Ophthalmology • Associate Editor, American Journal of Ophthalmology • Chair, Clinical and Educational Conflict of Interest Committee, University of Michigan Medical School • Invited Speaker, John R. Lynn, MD Lecture ship, UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX • Keynote speaker, XXXIX Nordic Congress of Ophthalmology • Invited speaker, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Invited speaker, Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology • Invited speaker, Singapore Eye Research Institute • Invited speaker, Singapore National Eye Center • Invited speaker, Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology 40

Grants See grants, page 48 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Invited Speaker, Michigan College of Optometry • Invited Speaker, San Diego Specialty Contact Lens Symposium Publications Lipson M. Myopia Control. Optometric Management June 2011

Shahzad I. Mian, M.D. Grants See grants, page 48 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Terry J. Bergstrom Collegiate Professor in Resident Education • Councilor, Deputy Section Leader • Ophthalmology Leadership Advocacy Group • Program Committee, Cornea

university of michigan kellogg eye center

• Cornea Editor, Ophthalmic News and Education Network • Board of Directors, Cornea Society Publications Parker J, Tandon A, Shtein RM, Cooney TN, Musch DC, Soong KH, Sugar A, Mian SI. Management of pain with diclofenac after LASIK with femtosecond laser. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;37:569-573 Kamyar R, Weizer JS, Stein JD, Moroi SE, John D, Musch DC, Mian SI. Glaucoma associated with Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis. Cornea 2011 [in press] Heitor de Paula F, Kamyar R, Shtein RM, Sugar A, Mian SI. Endothelial keratoplasty without descemet’s stripping after failed penetrating keratoplasty. Cornea 2011 [in press]

Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 48 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Publications Allingham RR, Damji KF, Freedman S, Moroi SE, Rhee DJ, eds. Shields’ Textbook of Glaucoma, 6th edition, Philadelphia:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2010. Zhang L, Yang S, Johnson MW, Richards JE, Moroi, SE. Combined cilioretinal artery and central vein occlusions in juvenile glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1231-1234 Kamyar R, Weizer JS, Heitor de Paula F, et al. Glaucoma associated with Boston type I keratoprosthesis. Cornea [in press]

David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H. Grants See grants, page 48 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award, Research to Prevent Blindness • Editorial Board, Ophthalmology • Editorial Board, Retina • Faculty Associate, Center for Global Health, University of Michigan NIH Grant Review Panels: NIAID, NEI • Methodologist, Cornea and External Disease Preferred Practice Pattern Panel, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Advisory Group, Cochrane Collaboration • Eyes and Vision Group US Project • Corneal Disease Planning Panel, NEI • ARVO Foundation for Eye Research Clinical Trials Education series: 1) Course Faculty: Ft. Lauderdale, FL, Shanghai, China; and 2) Course Director: Mexico City, Mexico


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications • Monitoring Boards for NIH/NEI Studies: Telemedicine Approaches to Evaluating Acute-phase ROP (eROP); Corneal Preser vation Time Study (CPTS); Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA); Corneal Donor Study (CDS) • Monitoring Boards for Foundation & Industry Studies: MacTel CNTF Safety Study (Macular telangiectasis treatment); NeoVista trial (AMD treatment); Oraya Therapeutics trial (AMD treatment); Abbott Laboratories trial (uveitis treatment) • Visiting Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong • Visiting Professor, Tongren Eye Center, Beijing, China Publications Newman-Casey PA, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Stein JD. The relationship between components of metabolic syndrome and open-angle glaucoma. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1319-1326 Scott GR, Weizer JS, Moroi SE, Bruno CA, Musch DC, Niziol LM, Lee PP, Stein JD. Can topical ketorolac 0.5% improve the function of Ahmed glaucoma drainage devices? Ophthal Surg Lasers Imaging 2011;42:190-195 Vanderbeek BL, Zacks DN, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Stein JD. Racial differences in age-related macular degeneration rates in the United States: a longitudinal analysis of a managed care network. Am J Ophthalmol 2011;152:273-282 Musch DC, Gillespie BW, Niziol LM, Lichter PR, Varma R. Intraocular pressure control and long-term visual field loss in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1766-1773 Koreen L, Yoshida N, Escariao P, Niziol L, Koreen I, Musch D, Chang S. Incidence of, risk factors for, and combined mechanism of late-onset open angle glaucoma following vitrectomy. Retina 2011 [in press] Stein JD, Vanderbeek BL. Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC. Rates of non-exudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration among individuals of Asian-American ethnic groups. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press] Musch DC, Niziol LM, Stein JD, Kamyar RM, Sugar A. Prevalence of corneal dystrophies in the United States: estimates from claims data. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press] Cooney TM, Wu A, Wilkes G, Finkelstein JI, Musch DC. The effects of systemic alpha 1-adrenoreceptor antagonists on pupil diameter. Br J Ophthalmol [in press]

Luttrull JK, Sramek C, Palanker D, Spink CJ, Musch DC. Long-term safety, high-resolution imaging, and tissue temperature modeling of sub-visible diode micropulse photocoagulation for retinovascular macular edema. Retina 2011 [in press] Stein JD, Kim DS, Mundy KM, Talwar N, Nan B, Chervin RD, Musch DC. The association between glaucomatous and other causes of optic neuropathy and sleep apnea. Am J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] Kamyar R, Weizer JS, Heitor de Paula F, Stein JD, Moroi SE, John D, Musch DC, Mian SI. Glaucoma associated with Boston type I keratoprosthesis. Ophthalmology 2011 [in press]

Sudha Nallasamy, M.D. Publications Nallasamy S, Lesniak S, Volpe NJ, Tamhankar MA. Unusual presentations of cavernous carotid aneurysms: further evidence for topographic organization of the oculomotor nerve. J Neurol Sci 2010;295:82-86 Nallasamy S, Ramasubramanian A, Shields CL, Tipperman R, Shields JA. Chemoreduction for non-visualized retinoblastoma hidden behind dense cataract. Can J Ophthalmol 2010;45:1-2 Nallasamy S, Colby K. Keratoprosthesis: procedure of choice for corneal opacities in children? Semin Ophthalmol 2010;25:244248. [Review Article] Nallasamy S, Eagle RC, Rorke-Adams L, Nichols KE, Brucker AJ. Eye findings in Xlinked lymphoproliferative disorder: clinicopathologic correlation. Retina 2011;31:790797 Nallasamy S, Anninger WV, Quinn GE, Kroener B, Zetola NM, Nkomazana O. Survey of childhood blindness and visual impairment in Botswana. Br J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press]

Christine C. Nelson, M.D. Grants See grants, page 48 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Top Doctor in Hour Detroit • 25th Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Congress Joint Meeting of APAO/AAO, Beijing, China • American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery • 41st Annual Scientific Symposium, “In Memoriam Bartley R. Frueh, M.D.” Chicago, IL • Presenter, American Academy of Ophthal mology Meeting, Chicago, IL

• Presenter, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery • Presenter, Spring Symposium, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstruc tive Surgery, Amelia Island, FL Publications Bohnsack BL, Gallina DD, Thompson H, Kasprick D, Lucarelli MJ, Dootz G, Nelson CC, McGonnell IM, Kahana A. Development of extraocular muscles require early signals from periocular neural crest and the developing eye, revealing an important developmental window. Arch Ophthal 2011;129:10301041 Lee BJ, Nelson CC. Intralesional interferon for extensive squamous papilloma of the eyelid margin. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Cho RI, Elner VM, Nelson CC. The effect of orbital decompression surgery on lid retraction in thyroid eye disease. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Lee BJ, Nelson CC, Lewis CD, Perry JD. External dacryocystorhinostomy outcomes in sarcoidosis patients. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2011 [in press] Douglas R, Bhatt R, Nelson CC. Thyroid-associated orbitopathy: Current insights into the pathophysiology, immunology and management. Saudi J Ophthal [in press] Spector ME, Dewyer N, McHugh JB, Pynnonen MA, Akbari S, Nelson CC. Pathology Case Quiz. Arch Otolaryngol [in press]

Gale A. Oren, M.I.L.S. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Chair, Association of Vision Science Librarians Publications Oren GA, Piorunski M. Ophthalmology. In: Thompson LL, Carrigan E, Higa ML, Tobia R, eds., The Medical Library Association’s Master Guide to Authoritative Information Resources in the Health Sciences. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2011; pp 316-320 Oren GA, Piorunski M. Orthoptics. In: Thompson LL, Carrigan E, Higa ML, Tobia R, eds., The Medical Library Association’s Master Guide to Authoritative Information Resources in the Health Sciences. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2011; pp 421-422

Hemant S. Pawar, Ph.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Presenter, 12th International Congress of Human Genetics, Montreal, Canada Marrs C, Scott K, Rozsa F, Othman MI, Richards JE, Pawar H.  

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Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Howard R. Petty, Ph.D.

Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D.

Stephen J. Saxe, M.D.

Grants See grants, page 49

Grants See grants, page 49

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America

Publications Elfline MA, Clark A, Petty HR, Romero R. Bi-directional calcium signaling between adjacent leukocytes and trophoblast-like cells. Am J Reprod Immunol 2010;64:339-346

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America

Publications Besirli CG, Saxe, SJ. Case study: Coats’ Disease. ATPO Viewpoints Magazine 2011;Winter:18-19

Zhu A, Romero R, Petty HR. Amplex ultra red enhances the sensitivity of fluorimetric pyruvate detection. Anal Biochem 2010;430:123125 Zhu A, Romero R, Huang JB, Clark A, Petty HR. Maltooligosaccharides from JEG-3 trophoblast-like cells exhibit immunoregulatory properties. Am J Reprod Immunol 2010;65:54-64 Petty HR, Elner VM, Kawaji TA, Clark A, Yang D. A facile method for imaging human retinal sections with minimal interference from endogenous fluorescent molecules. J Neurosci Meth 2010;191:222-226 Sitrin RG, Sassamella TM, Petty HR. An obligate role for membrane-associated neutral spingomyelinase activity in orienting chemotactic migration of human neutrophils. Amer J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2011;44:205-212 Kawaji T, Elner VM, Yang D, Clark A, Petty HR. Ischemia-induced nitrotyrosine formation and nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human retinal pigment epithelium in vivo. Redox Reports 2011;16:24-26 Yang D, Elner SG, Clark AJ, Hughes BA, Petty H, Elner VM. Activation of P2X receptors induces apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1522-1530 Yang D, Elner SG, Chen X, Field MG, Petty HR, Elner VM. MCP-1-activated monocytes induce apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press] Field MG, Yang D, Bian Z, Petty HR, Elner VM. Retinal flavoprotein fluorescence correlates with mitochondrial stress, apoptosis, and chemokine expression. Exp Eye Res 2011 [in press] Zhu A, Romero R, Huang JB, Clark A, Petty HR. An enzymatic colorimetric assay for glucose-6-phosphate. Anal Biochem 2011 [in press] Clark AJ, Zhu A, Petty HR. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-mediated apoptosis. J Nanopart Res 2011 [in press]

42

Publications Matsushita K, Fukumoto M, Kobayashi T, Kobayashi M, Minami M, Katsumura K, Liao SD, Wu DM, Zhang T, Puro DG. Diabetes-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels in the retinal microvasculature: role of spermine. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:5879-5990 Zhang T, Wu DM, Xu GZ, Puro DG. The electronic architecture of the retinal microvasculature: modulation by angiotensin ll. J Physiol 2011;589:2383-2399

Julia E. Richards, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 49 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Member, League of Research Excellence, University of Michigan Medical School • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, the Glaucoma Foundation, New York, NY • Editorial Board, G3: Genes/Genomics/ Genetics • Reviewer, Glaucoma Foundation • Reviewer, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science • Invited Presenter, Glaucoma Foundation’s 17th Annual Think Tanks Complex Genetics and Genomics of Glaucoma: Methods for Breakthroughs. New York, NY. • Invited Speaker, The Stowers Institute, Kansas City, MO Publications Stein JD, Kim DS, Niziol LM, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Richards JE. Differences in rates of glaucoma among Asian Americans and other racial groups, and among various Asian ethnic groups. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1031-7 Zhang L, Sun Y, Johnson MW, Richards JE, Moroi SE. Combined cilioretinal artery and central vein occlusions in juvenile glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1231-4 Stein JD, Pasquale LR, Talwar N, Kim DS, Reed DM, Nan B, Kang JH, Wiggs JL, Richards JE. Geographic and climatic factors associated with exfoliation syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1053-60 Richards JE, Hawley RS. The Human Genome: A User’s Guide, 3rd ed., San Diego:Elsevier, 2011

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Roni M. Shtein, M.D. Grants See grants, page 49 Publications Choe CH , Guss C, Musch DC, Niziol LM, Shtein RM. Incidence of diffuse lamellar keratitis after LASIK with 15 KHz, 30 KHz and 60 KHz IntraLase femtosecond laser flap creation. J Cataract Refract Surg 2010;36:19121918 Reinhart WJ, Musch DC, Jacobs DS, Lee WB, Kaufman SC, Shtein RM. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty as an alternative to penetrating keratoplasty, a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2011;118:209-218 Shtein RM, Newton DW, Elner VM. Actinomyces infectious crystalline keratopathy. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:515-517 Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein RM, Musch DC, Rhoades W, Sugar A, Mian SI. Treatment of ocular graft-versus-host disease with topical cyclosporine 0.05%. Cornea 2010;29:13921396 Parker J, Tandon A, Shtein RM, Cooney TM, Musch DC, Soong KH, Sugar A, Mian SI. Management of pain with diclofenac after LASIK with femtosecond laser. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;3:569-573

Terry J. Smith, M.D. Grants See grants, page 49 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Endocrine Society-Pfizer International Award for Excellence in Published Clinical Research in Journal of Clinical Endocri nology and Metabolism • League of Research Excellence, University of Michigan Medical School • Presenter, Henry Ford Grand Rounds, Detroit, MI • Presenter, Asia Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology, Sydney, Australia • Presenter, ARVO Visionary Genomics, Fort Lauderdale, FL


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Publications Hegedus L, Smith TJ, Douglas RS, Nielsen CH. Targeted biological therapies for Graves’ disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. Focus on B-cell depletion with Rituximab. Clin Endocrinol 2011;74:1-8 Tsui S, Fernando R, Chen B, Smith TJ. Divergent Sp1 levels may underlie differential expression of UDP glucose dehydrogenase by fibroblasts: role in susceptibility to orbital Graves’ disease. J Biol Chem 2011;286:24487-24499 Smith TJ. Other potential targets in thyroid orbitopathy. Immunol Endocr Metabol Agents Med Chem 2011;11:112-117 Smith TJ, Douglas, RS. Does selenium supplementation improve Graves ophthalmopathy? Nat Rev Endocrinol 2011;7:505-506 Tsui S, Fernand R, Chen B, Smith TJ. Divergent Sp1 protein levels may underlie differential expression of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase by fibroblasts: role in susceptibility to orbital Graves’ disease. J Biol Chem 2011;285:31806-31818

Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Department Compliance Officer, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center • Medical Director, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center

H. Kaz Soong, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Secretariat Award, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Haiti Relief Task Force, American Academy of Ophthalmology  Publications Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein RM, Musch DC, Rhoades W, Sugar A, Mian SI. Treatment of ocular graft-versus-host disease with topical cyclosporine 0.05%. Cornea 2010;29:13921396 Parker J, Tandon A, Shtein RM, Cooney TM, Musch DC, Soong KH, Sugar A, Mian SI. Management of pain with diclofenac after LASIK with femtosecond laser. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;3:569-573

Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S.

Alan Sugar, M.D.

Grants See grants, page 49

Grants See grants, page 49

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Evidence-Based Ophthalmology • Associate Editor, Essentials of Glaucoma Surgery • Health Care Policy and Reimbursement Policy Subcommittee, American Glaucoma Society • Secretariat Award, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Associate Editor, Cornea • Editorial Board, Ophthalmology • Board of Directors, World Eye Mission • Medical Advisory Board, Eye Bank Association of America • Chair, Policy and Position Research Committee, Eye Bank Association of America • Chair, Research Committee, Midwest Eye Banks • Chair, Ophthalmic Technology Assessment Committee, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Interim Co-Chair, IRBMED, University of Michigan Medical School • Chair, Privacy Board, University of Michigan Medical School • 16th Annual H. Saul Sugar Lectureship in Glaucoma, Henry Ford Hospital Depart ment of Ophthalmology • 10th Annual David S. Hull Lectureship, Georgia Health Sciences University

Publications Stein JD, Kim DS, Niziol LM, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Richards JE. Differences in rates of glaucoma among Asian Americans compared with other races and among individuals of different Asian ethnicities. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1031-1037 Newman-Casey PA, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Stein JD. The relationship between components of metabolic syndrome and open angle-glaucoma. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1318-1326 Stein JD, Pasquale LR, Talwar N, Kim DS, Reed DM, Nan B, Kang J, Wiggs JL, Richards JE. Geographic and climate factors associated with the exfoliation syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1053-1060 Scott GR, Weizer JS, Moroi SE, Bruno CA, Musch DC, Niziol LM, Lee PP, Stein JD. Can topical ketorolac, 0.5%, improve the function of Ahmed glaucoma drainage devices? Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2011;42:190195 Vanderbeek BL, Zacks DN, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Stein JD. Racial differences in rates of nonexudative and exudative agerelated macular degeneration throughout the United States: a longitudinal analysis of claims data from a large managed care network. Am J Ophthalmol 2011;152:273-282 Stein JD. Diurnal intraocular pressure patterns are not repeatable in the short term in healthy individuals (Comment). EvidenceBased Ophthalmology 2011;12:44–45 Rumery TC, Stein JD. Low intraocular pressure resulting from ciliary body detachment in patients with myotonic dystrophy (Comment). Evidence-Based Ophthalmology 2011;12:158159 Stein JD, Grossman DS, Mundy KM, Sugar A, Sloan FA. Severe adverse events following cataract surgery among Medicare beneficiaries. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1716-1723 Newman-Casey PA, Stein JD. YAG laser peripheral iridotomy for the prevention of pigment dispersion glaucoma: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Evidence-Based Ophthalmology 2011 [in press]

Publications Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein R, Musch DC, Rhoades W, Sugar A, Mian SI. Treatment of ocular graft-versus-host disease with topical cyclosporine 0.05%. Cornea 2010;29:13921396 Weiss JS and the Fifth ARVO/Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Institute Conference Working Group. Corneal dystrophies: Molecular genetics to therapeutic intervention – Fifth ARVO/Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Institute Conference. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2010;51:5391-5402 Stein JD, Grossman DS, Mundy KM, Sugar A, Sloan FA. Severe adverse events after cataract surgery among Medicare beneficiaries. Ophthalmology 2011;118:1716-1723 Zhang F, Sugar A, Jacobsen G, Collins M. Visual function and patient satisfaction comparison between bilateral restor and monovision pseudophaki: a prospective cohort study. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;37:446-453 Zhang F, Sugar A, Jacobsen G, Collins M. Cataract surgery and visual functions/spectacle independence improvement, bilateral restor versus monovision pseudophakia: a prospective cohort study. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;37:853-858 Lass JH, Beck RW, Benetz BA, Dontchev M, Gal RL, Holland EJ, Kollman C, Mannis MJ, Price F, Raber I, Stark W, Stulting RD, Sugar A. Baseline factors related to endothelial cell loss following penetrating keratoplasty. Arch Ophthalmol 2011;129:1149-1154

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Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Musch DM, Niziol LM, Stein JD, Kamyar RM, Sugar A. Prevalence of corneal dystrophies in the United States: estimates from claims data. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:69596963 Louttit MD, Kopplin LJ, Igo RP, Fondran JR, Tagliaferri A, Bardenstein D, Aldave AJ, Croasdale CR, Price M, Rosenwasser GO, Lass JH, Iyengar SK for the FECD Genetics Multi-Center Study Group. A multi-center study to map genes for Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy: Baseline characteristics and heritability. Cornea [in press] Stulting RD, Sugar A, Beck R, Belin M, et al. for the Cornea Donor Study Investigator Group. Effect of donor and recipient factors on corneal graft rejection. Cornea [in press] Heitor de Paula F, Kamyar R, Shtein RM, Sugar A, Mian SI. Endothelial keratoplasty without descemet’s stripping after failed penetrating keratoplasty. Cornea [in press]

Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 49 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Executive Editor, Experimental Eye Research • Grant Review Committee, Midwest Eye-Banks • Faculty Grants and Awards Panel, Office of the Vice President for Research • Co-chair, Graduate Admissions Committee, Biological Chemistry • Operating Committee, Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Michigan Medical School • Fellow, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Publications Petty HR, Elner VM, Kawaji T, Clark A, Thompson D, Yang DL. Facile method for immunofluorescence microscopy of highly autofluorescent human retinal sections using nanoparticles with large Stokes shifts. J Neurosci Methods 2010;191:222-226. Friedman JS, Chang B, Krauth DS, et al. Loss of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 leads to photoreceptor degeneration in rd11 mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010;107:15523-15528. Yao J, Feathers KL, Khanna H, Thompson D, Tsilfidis C, Hauswirth WW, Heckenlively JR, Swaroop A, Zacks DN. XIAP therapy increases survival of transplanted rod precursors in a degenerating host retina. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1567-1572

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Gal A, Rau I, El Matri L, Kreienkamp HJ, Fehr S, Baklouti K, Chouchane I, Li Y, Rehbein M, Fuchs J, Fledelius HC, Vilhelmsen K, Schorderet DF, Munier FL, Ostergaard E, Thompson DA, Rosenberg T. Autosomalrecessive posterior microphthalmos is caused by mutations in PRSS56, a gene encoding a trypsin-like serine protease. Am J Hum Genet 2011;11;88:382-390 Saadi A, Ash JD, Ngansop TN, Thompson DA, Kasus-Jacobi A. Role of photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenases in detoxification of lipid oxidation products. In: Stratton R, Hauswirth WW, Gardner, TW, eds., Oxidative Stress in Applied Basic Research and Clinical Practice, New York:Humana Press, Inc., 2011 [in press] 

Susan S. Thoms, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Outreach and Public Service MISEPS Sponsored Free Vision Exams at Focus HOPE

Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D. Grants See grants, page 50 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Carol F. Zimmerman Lectureship, Depart ment of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas • William F. Hoyt Lecture, American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois • Keynote Lecture, European Society of Ophthalmology, Geneva, Switzerland • Presenter, Southeast Eye Association, Destin, Florida • Presenter, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland • Presenter, Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky • Presenter, Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University • Presenter, Department of Ophthalmology, Spring Conference, Ohio State University • Presenter, American College of Physicians Annual Meeting, San Diego, California • Course Director, American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting, Neuro Ophthalmology Course, Honolulu, Hawaii • Course Director, Practical Neuro-Ophthal mology, Tongren Hospital, Beijing, China Publications Parmar H, Trobe JD. A “first cut” at interpreting brain MRI signal intensities: what’s white, what’s black, and what’s gray. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2010;1:91-93

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Garton HJ, Gebarski SS, Ahmad O, Trobe, JD. Clival epidural hematoma in traumatic sixth cranial nerve palsies combined with cervical injuries. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2010;1:18-25 Trobe JD. The evaluation of Horner syndrome. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2010;1:1-2 Margolin EA, Dev LS, Trobe JD. Prevalence of retinal hemorrhages in perpetrator-confessed cases of abusive head trauma. Arch Ophthalmol 2010;128:795 Warden KF, Alizai AM, Trobe JD, Hoff JT. Short-term continuous intraparenchymal intracranial pressure monitoring in presumed idiopathic intracranial pressure. J NeuroOphthalmol 2011;31:202-205 Bujak M, Margolin E, Thompson A, Trobe JD. Spontaneous resolution of two dural carotid-cavernous fistulas presenting with optic neuropathy and marked congestive ophthalmopathy. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2011 [in press]

Joshua P. Vrabec, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Director, Medical Student Clerkship Program, University of Michigan Depart ment of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Jennifer S. Weizer, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Presentation, American Glaucoma Society National Meeting, Dana Point, CA Publications Scott GR, Weizer JS, Moroi SE, Bruno CA, Musch DC, Niziol LM, Lee PP, Stein JD. Can topical ketorolac 0.5% improve the function of Ahmed glaucoma drainage devices? Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2011;42:190195

Kwoon Y. Wong, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 50 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Research to Prevent Blindness, Scientific Career Development Award Publications Wong KY, Berson DM. Ganglion-cell photoreceptors and non-image-forming vision. In: Kaufman PL, Alm A, eds., Adler’s Physiology of the Eye, Amsterdam:Elsevier, 2011; pp 526-544


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Maria A. Woodward, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Anthony P. Adamis Scholar Award for investigations in ultra-thin DSAEK develop ment • Fellowship Director, University of Michigan, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences • Early Career Development Committee, Eye Bank Association of America Publications Woodward MA, Edelhauser HF. Review: The corneal endothelium after refractive surgery. J Cataract Refract Surg 2011;37:767-777 Sood P, Woodward MA. Review: Patient acceptability of the tecnis multifocal intraocular lens. Clinical Ophthalmology 2011;5:403-410 Khandelwal SS, Woodward MA, Hall T, Grossniklaus HE, Stulting RD. Treatment of microsporidia keratitis with topical voriconazolemonotherapy. Arch Ophthal 2011;129:509510 Woodward MA, Mavin K, Titus M, Shtein R. Corneal donor tissue preparation for endothelial keratoplasty. Journal of Visualize Experiments [in press]

Dongli Yang, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 50 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Reviewer, Molecular Vision • Reviewer, BMC Ophthalmology • Reviewer, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science

Publications Yang D, Elner SG, Clark AJ, Hughes BA, Petty HR, Elner VM. Activation of P2X receptors induces apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:1522-1530 Yang D, Elner SG, Chen X, Field MG, Petty HR, Elner VM. MCP-1-activated monocytes induce apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelium. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011;52:6026-6034 Kawaji T, Elner VM, Yang D, Clark A, Petty HR. Ischemia-induced nitrotyrosine formation and nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human retinal pigment epithelium in vivo. Redox Report 2011;16:24-26 Field MG, Yang D, Bian ZM, Petty HR, Elner VM. Retinal flavoprotein fluorescence correlates with mitochondrial stress, apoptosis, and chemokine expression. Exp Eye Res 2011 [in press] Zhang X, Yang D, Hughes BA. KCNQ5/Kv5 potassium channel expression and subcellular localization in primate retinal pigment epithelium and neural retina. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2011 [in press]

David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 50 Awards/Honors/Leadership

• 10th Annual Jeffrey W. Berger Memorial Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Depart ment of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, Philadelphia, PA • Terry J. Bergstrom Faculty Teaching Award, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center • Editorial Board, Current Eye Research • Writing Committee, Basic and Clinical Science Course, Retina, Vol. 12, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Co-organizer, Great Lakes Vision Research Conference • Honorary co-chair, Foundation Fighting Blindness Eastern Michigan Vision Walk Publications Comer GM, Miller JB, Schneider EW, Khan NW, Reed DM, Elner VM, Zacks DN. Intravitreal daptomycin: a safety and efficacy study. Retina 2011 [in press] Besirli CG, Chinskey ND, Zheng QD, Zacks DN. Authophagy activation in injured photoreceptors inhibits fas-mediated apoptosis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011 [in press] Vanderbeek BL, Zacks DN, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Stein JD. Racial differences in age-related macular degeneration rates in the United States: a longitudinal analysis of a managed care network. Am J Ophthalmol 2011 [in press] Stein JD, Vanderbeek BL, Talwar N, Nan B, Musch DC, Zacks DN. Rates of nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration among Asian-American ethnic groups. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci [in press]

• Best Doctors in America • W. Richard Green Award and Lecture, Macula Society

Dr. Alon Kahana’s lab uses zebrafish as a model for studying complex and vision-threatening disorders of the eye. Research conducted by Dr. Brenda Bohnsack (left) and medical student Daniel Kasprick (center) while working in Dr. Kahana’s lab revealed that a mutation that causes Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome, a blinding disorder in children, can lead to a similar disease in zebrafish. This model can now be used to develop targeted therapies. Dedicated to Discovery

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grants

Faculty Name

Source

S. Abcouwer, Ph.D. NIH

ID

Project Title

R01-EY020582-03

Regulation of Retinal Cell Death in Diabetes; co-PI

JDRF

JDRF Center for Mechanisms and Intervention

of Diabetic Retinopathy; Project 2 co-PI D. Antonetti, Ph.D. NIH

R21-EY-019392-03

Induction of the Blood-Retinal Barrier

NIH

R01-EY-012021-14

Mechanisms of Retinal Vascular Permeability in Diabetes

JDRF

JDRF Center for Mechanisms and Intervention

of Diabetic Retinopathy; Project 2 co-PI

JDRF

Developing Atypical PKC Inhibitors to Treat

Diabetic Retinopathy

JDRF

PolyChromatic Angiography for Grading Retinal

Vascular Leakage

RPB

Jules and Doris Stein RPB Professorship

G. Comer, M.D.

Lowy Medical Research Institute/ A Natural History Study of Macular Telangiectasia — Clinical Trial The MacTel Study

W. Cornblath, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY017281 Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial; Subcontract with St. Lukes-Roosevelt Institute for Health Sciences/NORDIC Network ICON Clinical Research/Pfizer Case-Crossover Study of PDE5 Inhibitor Exposure as a Potential “Trigger Factor” for Acute NAION J. Demb, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY014454-07 Neural Circuits and Synapses for Early Visual Processing R01-EY014454-06-S1 NIH R01-EY021372-01 Biophysical Properties of Parallel Neural Circuits Serving Night Vision; Subcontract with Northwestern University NIH F32-EY021063-01 Role of NMDA Receptors in the Development of Retinal Circuits; Award for Benjamin Stafford, Ph.D. H. Demirci, M.D. Midwest Eye-Banks Roles of Inflammation and Angiogenesis in Conjunctival Melanoma: Progression and Metastasis R. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D. NIH K23-EY016339-06 Immune Activation of Fibroblasts NIH R01-EY211197-01 Role of CD40+ Fibrocytes in Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy Cosmetic Surgery Foundation Role of Fibrocytes in Wound Healing after Cosmetic Surgery

RPB

Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award

S. Elner, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY014660 Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial Coordinating Center: Johns Hopkins University

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university of michigan kellogg eye center


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

V. Elner, M.D., Ph.D. NIH R01-EY009441-13 RPE-MÎŚ Binding: Ca++ & O2- Dependent AMD Responses RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award P. Gage, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY014126-08 Pitx2: Molecular Mechanisms in Eye Development and Disease NIH G20-RR025860-01 Improvements for Decentralized Animal Facilities Midwest Eye-Banks Testing Post-Natal Models of Pitx2-Related Glaucoma T. Gardner, M.D., M.S. NIH R01-EY020582-03 Regulation of Retinal Cell Death in Diabetes NIH R01-EY018336-02 The Role of Glycosphingolipids in Diabetic Retinopathy; Subcontract with Pennsylvania State University American Diabetes Association Regulation of Akt Activity in Diabetic Retinopathy JDRF JDRF Center for Mechanisms and Intervention of Diabetic Retinopathy J. Heckenlively, M.D. NIH R01-DC009606-03 Olfactory Signaling, Cilia, and Sensory Disorders Subcontract with Jeffrey Martens, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan NIH R01-EY016862-05 Genetic Variations in Age-Related Macular Degenerations FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Assessment of Therapies Sramek Foundation Interactive and Integrated Genetic Databases for the Study of Age-Related Macular Degeneration P. Hitchcock, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY007060-22 Neuronal Development, Injury and Regeneration in Retina NIH T32-EY013934-09 Vision Research Training Program Midwest Eye-Banks Regulation of Retina-Specific Gene Expression RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award B. Hughes, Ph.D. NIH NIH

P30-EY007003-25 R01-EY008850-20

Core Center for Vision Research (five core modules) Ion Conductances in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

M. Johnson, M.D. GlaxoSmithKline/Clinical Trial Study to Investigate Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib Eye Drops Regeneron Pharmaceutical/Clinical Trial Phase III Study of Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Repeated Doses of Intravitreal VEGF Trap in Subjects with Neovascular AMD A. Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. NIH K08-EY018689-04 Zebrafish Model for Studying Orbital Development and Disease Alliance for Vision Research Biological Signals Controlling Extraocular Muscle Regeneration Fight for Sight Development and Regeneration of Extraocular Muscles in Zebrafish; Student Stipend Award

Dedicated to Discovery

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grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

A. Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. Fight for Sight Developing Genomic Technologies to Study (cont.) Extraocular Muscle Organization and Strabismus Using a Zebrafish Model; Award for Brenda Bohnsack, M.D., Ph.D. Knights Templar Eye Foundation The Role of IGF Signaling in Zebrafish Orbital Development and Extraocular Muscle Organization; Award for Brenda Bohnsack, M.D., Ph.D. Midwest Eye-Banks Zebrafish and EOM; Student Stipend Award RPB Career Development Award Sigma Xi Society Development and Regeneration of Extraocular Muscles in Zebrafish - Student Fellowship P. Lichter, M.D. RPB Unrestricted Grant VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies/ VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies Implantable Clinical Trial Miniature Telescope for Central Vision Impairment Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Other Maculopathies M. Lipson, O.D. EyeVis, L.L.C. Stabilizing Myopia by Accelerated Reshaping Technique SynergEyes, Inc. Duette Versus Biofinity Toric: Visual Acuity and Vision-Related Quality of Life S. Mian, M.D. Alliance for Vision Research Cost-Effectiveness of Endothelial Keratoplasty Compared with Penetrating Keratoplasty Midwest Eye-Banks Outcomes of Refractive Surgery Performed by Trainees S. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Merck and Company, Inc. Merck IISP #31911 Study: Effect of Myocilin Genetic Variants on Intraocular Pressure and Pressure Variation in Sitting and Supine Positions D. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H. NIH R21-EY118690-02 Clinical and Quality of Life Insights on Glaucoma from Analyses of CIGTS Data NIH RC1-EY020140-01 Comparative Effectiveness and Medical Interventions for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma; Subcontract with Johns Hopkins University M-CASTL A Survey of Vision Care Providers for Older Drivers Pfizer Value Estimation Project in Glaucoma (Phase III) RPB Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award Pfizer Value Estimation Project in Glaucoma (Phase II); Subcontract with Washington University C. Nelson, M.D. NIH R01 EY019497-03 Genetic Basis of Congenital Anophthalmia; Subcontract with Thomas Glaser, Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics, University of Michigan

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university of michigan kellogg eye center


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

H. Petty, Ph.D. NIH R01-AI060983-05 Lipid Raft Microdomains in Neutrophil Function; Subcontract with Robert Sitrin, M.D., Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan NIH R21 EY019986-01A1 Novel Immunofluorescence Methods for Retinal Research D. Puro, M.D., Ph.D. NIH

R01-EY012507-12

Retinovascular Physiology and Pathobiology

J. Richards, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY011671-10 Molecular Genetics of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma NIH R01-EY019126-02-S1 Admixture Mapping of Glaucoma Genes in African Americans; Subcontract with Duke University NIH 5 R21 EY021000-02 Ocular Effects of Metformin RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award R. Shtein, M.D. NIH K23-EY017885-03 Neovascularization Patterns in Corneal Graft Rejection NIH P60 DK020572-34 In Vivo Corneal Confocal Microscopy for Non-invasive Assessment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy; Subcontract with Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center, University of Michigan Midwest Eye-Banks Diagnostic Imaging for Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome U-M Medical School Clinical Sciences Scholars Program Award T. Smith, M.D. NIH R01-EY008976-17 Regulation of Retroocular Connective Tissue NIH R01-EY011708-16 Functional Diversity of Orbital Fibroblasts NIH R01-DK063121-08 Immunoglobulin Activation of Fibroblasts RPB Physician Scientist Award Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fibrocytes as a Potential Biomarker for Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy; Research Training Fellowship for U-M medical student Erin Gillespie J. Stein, M.D. NIH K23-EY019511-03 Association between Cataract Surgery and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy American Glaucoma Society Mentoring for Advancement of Physician-Scientist Enabling Award Program American Glaucoma Society Racial Disparities in the Care of Elderly Americans with Glaucoma Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Longitudinal Rates of Postoperative Adverse Outcomes after Glaucoma Surgery among Medicare Beneficiaries 1994–2005 A. Sugar, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY12358

Cornea Donor Study, Coordinating Center: Jaeb

D. Thompson, Ph.D. NIH 1 R21 EY020967-01 Chromophore Effects in Genetically Diverse Forms of Retinal Dystrophy FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Small Moleculer Interventions

Dedicated to Discovery

49


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

D. Thompson, Ph.D. MICHR Gene Therapy for X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa; co-PI (cont.) Midwest Eye-Banks Chromophore Therapy in Retinal Degeneration Midwest Eye-Banks MERTK Signaling Pathways in RPE Phagocytosis; Student Stipend Award RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award J. Trobe, M.D. University of Utah

Proteomics and Genomics of Giant Cell Arteritis

K. Wong, Ph.D. NIH R00-EY018863-04 Cross-Talk between Ganglion-Cell Photoreceptors and Other Neurons in the Retina RPB Career Development Award D. Yang, M.D., Ph.D. NIH 5 P30 AG024824-07 P2X7 Receptors in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium: Effect of Aging; Pilot funding from Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, University of Michigan D. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. NIH R01 EY020823-02 Autophagy and Control of Photoreceptor Apoptosis FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Transplantation of Photoreceptor Precursors Lincy Foundation Preventing Photoreceptor Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration MICHR Gene Therapy for X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa; co-PI Midwest Eye-Banks Activation of Autophagy During Retinal Detachment Midwest Eye-Banks Student Stipend Award RPB Sybil B. Harrington Special Scholar Award for Macular Degeneration

Source Abbreviations

FFB..................... Foundation Fighting Blindness JDRF.................. Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International M-CASTL......... Michigan Center for Advancing Safe Transportation throughout the Lifespan MICHR............. Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research NIH.................... National Institutes of Health RPB..................... Research to Prevent Blindness

50

university of michigan kellogg eye center


K. Thiran Jayasundera, M.D., FRCSC Retina and Uveitis

Frank W. Rozsa, Ph.D. Research Investigator

Denise A. John, M.D., FRCSC Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease

Gary S. Sandall, M.D., FACS Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus

Mark W. Johnson, M.D. Retina and Uveitis

Stephen J. Saxe, M.D., FACS Retina and Uveitis

Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Roni M. Shtein, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Elizabeth Du, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology

Ariane D. Kaplan, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology

Susan G. Elner, M.D. Retina and Uveitis

Harjeet Kaur, M.D., FRCS(I) Comprehensive Ophthalmology

Terry J. Smith, M.D. Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery Endocrinology

Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D. Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Naheed W. Khan, Ph.D. Vision Research

Faculty of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Paul R. Lichter, M.D., FACS Chair Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease Steven F. Abcouwer, Ph.D. Vision Research James L. Adams, M.D. Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery David A. Antonetti, Ph.D. Vision Research Steven M. Archer, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Terry J. Bergstrom, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Donald S. Beser, M.D., FACS Comprehensive Ophthalmology Jill E. Bixler, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology

Jerome I. Finkelstein, M.D., FACS Comprehensive Ophthalmology Patrice E. Fort, Ph.D. Vision Research Carlton J. Foster, O.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Bruce A. Furr, C.O., M.S.P.H. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Philip J. Gage, Ph.D. Vision Research

Kari Branham, M.S., C.G.C. Genetic Counseling

Christopher Gappy, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus

Grant M. Comer, M.D. Retina and Uveitis

Thomas W. Gardner, M.D., M.S. Retina and Uveitis

Theresa M. Cooney, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Hilary M. Grabe, M.D. Neuro-Ophthalmology

Wayne T. Cornblath, M.D. Neuro-Ophthalmology Sherry H. Day, O.D. Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation Monte A. Del Monte, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Karen S. DeLoss, O.D. Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation

Daniel G. Green, Ph.D. Vision Research Paul J. Grenier, O.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Richard E. Hackel, M.A., C.R.A. Ophthalmic Photography John R. Heckenlively, M.D. Retina and Uveitis Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D. Vision Research

Jennifer A. Kozak, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Amy L. Lagina, O.D. Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation Helios T. Leung, Ph.D., O.D., FAAO Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation

Michael W. Smith-Wheelock, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology H. Kaz Soong, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S. Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease Alan Sugar, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Cheng-mao Lin, Ph.D. Vision Research

Tiffany N. Szymarek, M.D. Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease

Michael J. Lipson, O.D., FAAO Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation

Bradley W. Taylor, O.D., M.P.H. Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation

Xuwen Liu, M.D., Ph.D. Research Investigator

Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D. Vision Research

Shahzad I. Mian, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Susan S. Thoms, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology

Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H. Vision Research Arivalagan Muthusamy, Ph.D. Research Investigator Sudha Nallasamy, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Christine C. Nelson, M.D., FACS Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Jonathan B. Demb, Ph.D. Vision Research

Christopher T. Hood, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Hakan Demirci, M.D. Orbital and Ocular Oncology

Bret A. Hughes, Ph.D. Vision Research

Hemant Pawar, Ph.D. Vision Research

Courtney A. Dewey, O.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus

Ida L. Iacobucci, C.O. Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus

Howard R. Petty, Ph.D. Vision Research

Raymond S. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D. Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Diane M. Jacobi, O.D. Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation

Gale A. Oren, M.I.L.S. Library

Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Julia E. Richards, Ph.D. Vision Research

Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D. Neuro-Ophthalmology Joshua P. Vrabec, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Jennifer S. Weizer, M.D. Glaucoma, Cataract and Anterior Segment Disease Adrienne L. West, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Donna M. Wicker, O.D., FAAO Contact Lens, Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation Kwoon Y. Wong, Ph.D. Vision Research Maria A. Woodward, M.D. Cornea and External Disease, Cataract and Refractive Surgery Rebecca A. Wu, M.D. Comprehensive Ophthalmology Dongli Yang, M.D., Ph.D. Research Investigator David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. Retina and Uveitis


OUR MISSION TO SOLVE THE PUZZLES OF BLINDING EYE DISEASE, TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR OUR PATIENTS, AND TO TEACH THE NEXT GENERATION OF VISION SCIENTISTS AND CLINICIANS

Faculty of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Those present for the November 2011 photograph

Row 1 Jennifer S. Weizer, M.D., Terry J. Bergstrom, M.D., Paul R. Lichter, M.D., Alan Sugar, M.D., Susan S. Thoms, M.D.

Executive Officers of the University of Michigan Health System Ora Hirsch Pescovitz, M.D. Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs Douglas L. Strong, M.B.A. Chief Executive Officer, U-M Hospitals and Health Centers

Row 2 Rebecca A. Wu, M.D., Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D., Gary S. Sandall, M.D., Monte A. Del Monte, M.D., Steven M. Archer, M.D.

James O. Woolliscroft, M.D. Dean, U-M Medical School

Row 3 Maria A. Woodward, M.D., Denise A. John, M.D., Terry J. Smith, M.D., Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D.

The Regents of the University of Michigan Julia Donovan Darlow, Laurence B. Deitch, Denise Ilitch, Olivia P. Maynard, Andrea Fischer Newman, Andrew C. Richner, S. Martin Taylor, Katherine E. White, Mary Sue Coleman (ex officio)

Row 4 Wayne T. Cornblath, M.D., Ariane D. Kaplan, M.D., Thomas W. Gardner, M.D., M.S., Christine C. Nelson, M.D., Hakan Demirci, M.D. Row 5 Sudha Nallasamy, M.D., Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S., Paul J. Grenier, O.D., Carlton J. Foster, O.D., Bradley W. Taylor, O.D., M.P.H.

Editor: Betsy Nisbet

Row 6 H. Kaz Soong, M.D., David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H., Joshua P. Vrabec, M.D., Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D., Cheng-mao Lin, Ph.D.

Editorial Assistant: Lisa Burkhart

Row 7 Shahzad I. Mian, M.D., Tiffany N. Szymarek, M.D., Donald S. Beser, M.D., Kwoon Y. Wong, Ph.D., Patrice E. Fort, Ph.D.

Photographers: Scott Soderberg, Austin Thomason, Martin Vloet, U-M Photo Services; Lin Goings, U-M Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Writers: Aimee Bergquist, MargaretAnn Cross, Barbara Sefton

Design and Art Direction: David Murrel

Row 8 Howard R. Petty, Ph.D., Richard E. Hackel, M.A., C.R.A., Michael J. Lipson, O.D., Jill E. Bixler, M.D., Christopher T. Hood, M.D. Row 9 Mark W. Johnson, M.D., Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D., Stephen J. Saxe, M.D., David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D., Frank W. Rozsa, Ph.D.

FOR ADDITIONAL COPIES, PLEASE CONTACT US:

Row 10 Bruce A. Furr, C.O., M.S.P.H., Theresa M. Cooney, M.D., Bret A. Hughes, Ph.D., Susan G. Elner, M.D., K. Thiran Jayasundera, M.D.

W.K. Kellogg Eye Center

Row 11 Michael W. Smith-Wheelock, M.D., Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D., Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D., Grant M. Comer, M.D., Roni M. Shtein, M.D. © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan

University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences 1000 Wall Street Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 734.763.4660 • www.kellogg.umich.edu FOR PATIENT QUERIES, please call 734.763.8122


2011 Annual Report - U-M Kellogg Eye Center  

University of Michigan W.K. Kellogg Eye Center 2011 Annual Report