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DEDICATED TO DISCOVERY

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN W.K. KELLOGG EYE CENTER 2009 ANNUAL REPORT


Annual Report Highlights Research Kellogg primed to become international Graves’ eye disease leader .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Research 4–7

Patient Care 8–11

Understanding why cells decide to die can help us save vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Patient Care Young tumor patient cured when three departments work together .. . . . . . . . . . 10 Two departments team up to manage intricacies of uveitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Outreach 18–19

Education Rising star completes residency and decides to stay at Kellogg .. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 New Residents Center outfitted for 21st century teaching .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Outreach Young girl travels from Guatemala to Ann Arbor for rare surgery .. . . . . . . . . . 18 Beijing hospital recruits Kellogg scientist to oversee clinical trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Giving Meaders’ warmth and generosity inspire Kellogg’s growth .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 “Favorite son” of department honored with professorship .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

We are pleased to be ranked among the top hospitals in the nation for Ophthalmology in the 2009 U.S.News & World Report survey.

Education 12–17

Giving 20–29

2009 Annual Report • University of Michigan • W.K. Kellogg Eye Center This report covers the period July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009


The Department is part of a world-class academic

medical center and we frequently call on colleagues

from other departments — and in return they

call on us — to provide our patients with the

level of care they just can’t get anywhere else.

Dear Friends, We have so much to celebrate this year: the upcoming dedication of the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center expansion, the arrival of new faculty, including two of the foremost experts in Graves’ eye disease, and the unflagging and continued generosity of friends of the Eye Center. Then too, we celebrate a faculty 60-strong who contribute every day to the health and well-being of our patients battling eye disease. It is a pleasure, after many years of planning and a few more for construction, to invite you to the Dedication of the expanded W.K. Kellogg Eye Center on April 23, 2010. It will be a grand celebration, not just for a new building, but for the many new programs and services it will enable us to provide. The theme, “Dedicated to Discovery,” reflects our goal to accelerate achievements in our core areas of vision research, education, and patient care. If you are a physician, please add April 23–24 to your calendar for a two-day symposium featuring leading ophthalmologists who will join the celebration. New space gives us room — at last — to expand programs and faculty. The Department’s strength in Graves’ eye disease will grow significantly with the arrival of two highly-regarded Graves’ disease specialists from UCLA. Dr. Terry Smith and Dr. Raymond Douglas will work with their new colleagues

here to develop the leading treatment and research center in the country for Graves’ eye disease and related autoimmune disorders. Read about them, and the new program, in this report. We often talk about collaboration in research, but it is equally vital to our clinical programs. The Department is part of a worldclass academic medical center and we frequently call on colleagues from other departments — and in return they call on us — to provide patients with the level of care they just can’t get anywhere else. Several stories in this report demonstrate the multidisciplinary care available at the University of Michigan. So many individuals and organizations have helped us achieve this spectacular expansion of the Eye Center. I am deeply grateful for your support. I hope to have the chance to thank you in person during the Dedication ceremonies in April.

Paul R. Lichter, M.D. F. Bruce Fralick Professor Chair, University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Director, W.K. Kellogg Eye Center


It is the culmination of nearly ten years of planning for a state-of-the-art facility designed to help the Eye Center achieve new levels of excellence in vision research, education, and patient care. This new building will be the site of expanded research initiatives to propel discoveries for understanding and treating eye disease. It will be equipped with new technology to enhance training and patient care. And the new building will help us achieve our foremost goal: improving the lives of our patients who come to us for the most advanced eye care available anywhere.

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In March 2010 the highly anticipated expansion of the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center will open its doors.


A New Building Dedicated to Discovery A Few Facts 230,000-square-foot 8-story building, connected to the current W.K. Kellogg

Gifts toward the New Building Construction

Research Tower

50% more space for patient care, education, and research

$3.6 million to goal

76 examination rooms, compared to 50 in our current clinics

$20 Million Goal

What’s inside? $16.4 million raised

7 subspecialty clinics and a comprehensive ophthalmology clinic

9 supporting services, including genetic counseling, diagnostic electrophysical testing, ophthalmic

Gifts toward Research and Endowment

photography, and ocular prosthetics

6 operating rooms equipped with integrated communications technology

1 floor dedicated to vision research 2 floors dedicated to diabetes

$3.2 million to goal

$20 Million Goal

research in the new Delores S. and William K. Brehm Center for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Analysis

$16.8 million raised


Dr. Terry Smith and Dr. Raymond Douglas, specialists in Graves’ eye disease, are Kellogg’s newest faculty members.

New faculty join Kellogg colleagues in planning a unique research and treatment center Graves’ eye disease, also called thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, remains poorly understood, according to the two newest faculty members at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center. They are shedding new light on the disorder through their research and an initiative to standardize the evaluation of treatment. These advances should one day help patients, chiefly women, who experience its painful manifestations — bulging eyes, double vision, and, in severe cases, vision loss. Even before settling into their new laboratory, Terry J. Smith, M.D., and Raymond S. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D., are discussing several promising therapeutic agents that may soon be ready for clinical trials. And they are keen to join forces with other U-M specialists in developing a major research and treatment program for Graves’ eye disease and other autoimmune conditions. Dr. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, is a renowned endocrinologist who has studied Graves’ disease, its 4

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eye manifestations, and related autoimmune diseases for over 20 years. His laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves’ disease. The discovery came as he questioned why a systemic disease associated with thyroid overactivity would single out the orbit as a site of involvement. From these findings, Dr. Smith went on to identify a receptor that binds to antibodies and sets off a series of events resulting in inflammation and fibrosis — excessive scar-like tissue that pushes the eye outward and disrupts its function. Currently, he is mapping a signaling pathway where “cross talk” between cells and small molecules may provide a therapeutic target that allows interruption of the immune system’s assault on orbital tissue. As he notes these successes, Dr. Smith observes that the biggest impediment in understanding Graves’ disease is lack of access to tissue early in the process. “It is generally later, when surgery is indicated, that we can access and analyze the tissue. But by then we may be looking at secondary reactions that are entirely different from those initiating the pathology,” he says. “It’s like looking at a scar that has formed over a wound. The scar is the reaction to the injury, not the cause of it.”


Taking a New Look at Graves’ Eye Disease Developing treatments and a standard to measure their effectiveness

Dr. Douglas echoes these concerns, adding that he and Dr. Smith have taken a broad view of the disease process rather than searching for a “magic bullet.” Says Dr. Douglas, “As in other autoimmune diseases, there are multiple factors, no less than four or five things that go awry. If we can describe the factors affecting a particular patient—how much inflammation vs. fibrosis—we could design treatments to respond to specific characteristics.” In one very promising study, Dr. Douglas has shown that B-cells, the body’s normal antibody-producing cells, play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process in Graves’ eye disease. He found that patients with severe inflammation responded to a treatment that depleted the B-cells and, remarkably, reduced activity of the disease. Conventional treatment with steroids did not help these patients. Dr. Douglas was also instrumental in forming an international group to develop standard language and a scale for measuring the effectiveness of treatments. Through the International Thyroid Eye Disease Society (ITEDS), Dr. Douglas has collected data from ophthalmologists and endocrinologists worldwide to gain consensus regarding common indicators of disease activity and progression. The group now has recruited nearly 200 participants and Dr. Douglas believes a reliable rating index will soon be developed. While they search for novel therapies, these researchers do not dismiss therapies that have been effective in allied diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. “Some of these therapies have cleared safety hurdles and they address processes common to both diseases,” says Dr. Douglas. Similarly, discoveries concerning therapy for Graves’ disease may have implications for other diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and juvenile-onset diabetes. Establishing an international center for the treatment and investigation of Graves’ disease

Kellogg’s new clinician–scientists envision a comprehensive research and treatment program here, drawing on resources within the Eye Center and the U-M Health System. One of their chief collaborators is

Ravitz Foundation “It always comes back to the Professor Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., patients,” says Dr. Douglas. who served with Dr. Douglas on the ITEDS “Graves’ eye disease affects Steering Committee. them in the prime of their “The Department has had a strong emphasis lives, causes emotional and on Graves’ eye disease as well as a history of physical pain, and challenges significant research in the inflammatory their quality of life. We plan to mechanisms of ocular solve the mysteries of this disdisease in general,” says Dr. Elner, an ease with our new colleagues oculoplastic surgeon and pathologist. at the University of Michigan.” “We know that many other diseases causing blindness, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetes, have inflammatory components.” Then, too, there is the prospect of collaborating with scientists studying diabetes when the Eye Center expansion and Brehm Center — with laboratories on adjacent floors — open in early 2010. In Type 1 diabetes, the focus of the Brehm Center, autoimmune destruction of pancreatic cells occurs by processes similar to those in Graves’ disease. As Dr. Douglas sees it, the U-M is likely to become the “central proving ground” for research and treatment of Graves’ eye disease — a site for testing tissue and blood samples, for finalizing the Graves’ eye disease index, and for launching clinical trials. “It always comes back to the patients,” says Dr. Douglas. “Graves’ eye disease affects them in the prime of their lives, causes emotional and physical pain, and challenges their quality of life. We plan to solve the mysteries of this disease with our new colleagues at the University of Michigan.” Dr. Smith will see patients in the Department of Internal Medicine and he and Dr. Douglas will see patients in Kellogg’s Eye Plastic, Orbital and Facial Cosmetic Surgery Service. Dedicated to Research

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Can One Small Protein Stop Photoreceptor Cell Death? Kellogg scientist believes discovery will “buy time” to repair retinal detachments

One of the most common causes of vision loss is retinal detachment. Over the course of a lifetime, one person in 300 will experience a retinal detachment, usually from an event like a retinal tear or trauma, but also from diseases like diabetes or even macular degeneration. Retina specialist David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D., has “If there were a way been searching for a way to save vision in these people. to postpone the start of The retina’s photoreprogrammed cell death,” ceptors get their nourishment from the layers of says Dr. Zacks, “tens of cells beneath it. When they become separated from this thousands of patients nutritional source they begin to die through a process of would benefit.” programmed cell death that scientists call “apoptosis.” Since apoptosis begins within hours of a retinal detachment, the sooner the retina can be reattached, the better for the patient’s vision. Regrettably, it is not always possible to perform a reattachment quickly. “If there were a way to postpone the start of programmed cell death,” says Dr. Zacks, “tens of thousands of patients would benefit.” Dr. Zacks and his colleagues knew that a protein named XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis) had a strong protective effect for cells in other diseases. 6

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Dr. Zacks is studying a protein that is instrumental in protecting cells from programmed cell death in hopes that he can apply its protective properties to cells in the retina.

Under the right circumstances XIAP could suppress the “cascade” of cell death by blocking the molecules (called caspases) that are responsible for apoptosis. The research team theorized that introducing XIAP into the retina would reduce the level of caspase activity and thereby increase the number of surviving photoreceptors. Their theory turned out to be correct. In two groups of animals (one that received XIAP and one that did not) the scientists detached the retina. They found less caspase activity and fewer cells entering the apoptotic cascade in the XIAP group than in the control group. Most importantly, this resulted in more photoreceptor cells surviving long-term detachments in the XIAP-treated group. “XIAP is not a treatment for retinal detachment,” emphasizes Dr. Zacks. “It is simply a way to preserve photoreceptors while the underlying disease process is being addressed.” If XIAP is successful in humans, this treatment could buy precious time until surgeons can reattach the retina and provide nourishment to the cells once again.


Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D., Senior Scientific Investigator, 2009 Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D., Senior Scientific Investigator, 2006

RPB Awards

Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Scientific Investigator, 2005 Sophie Liao, Medical Student Eye Research Fellowship, 2005 Philip J. Gage, Ph.D., Special Scholar, 2004 Bret A. Hughes, Ph.D., Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award, 2003 Jonathan B. Demb, Ph.D., Career Development, 2003 David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D., Career Development, 2002 David M. Wu, Medical Student Fellowship, 2002 Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award, 2001 Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Scientific Investigator, 2001 John R. Heckenlively, M.D., Physician-Scientist Award, 2000 Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award, 2000 Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D., Career Development, 2000 Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D., Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award, 1999 Daniel G. Green, Ph.D., Senior Scientific Investigator, 1999 Selected RPB Awards over the last ten years

Dr. Thompson is using her knowledge of the vitamin A cycle to increase the action of a gene to compensate for defects that may be causing retinal degenerations.

Seeking new strategies to save vision With RPB support, scientists will study gene expression as a new approach to therapy for retinal degeneration Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D., has played a pivotal role in identifying genes associated with a severe eye disease affecting children and young adults. The disease, Leber congenital amaurosis, is inherited and often causes blindness. Now thanks to a generous award from Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB), Dr. Thompson is building on her earlier work to explore a novel approach to therapies for this and other inherited retinal diseases. Dr. Thompson received an RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award, one of several grants provided by the voluntary health organization to support eye research. RPB supports scientists at over 50 institutions across the country, providing awards at various stages in a researcher’s career. Kellogg scientists have benefited from the awards, receiving over $4 million in RPB funding since 1961. “RPB has provided critical support for basic research in ophthalmology,” says Paul R. Lichter, chair of the Department. “It has allowed our scientists to explore new strategies for preventing and treating eye disease. This current award will allow Dr. Thompson to advance the development of therapies for a disease that has a devastating impact on children’s vision.” Under the RBP grant, Dr. Thompson proposes a

novel therapeutic strategy based on the regulation of gene expression — that is, prompting an existing gene to compensate for a defective or malfunctioning gene. Simply stated it may be possible to “turn up” the output of a particular gene to bring about a desired effect. “The strategy is currently used in cancer research and other fields, but it hasn’t yet been applied to research on eye disease,” says Dr. Thompson. “An important advantage is that we are promoting naturally occurring mechanisms to bring about a therapeutic result.” Specifically, Dr. Thompson studies the metabolism of vitamin A in the retina and the genetic defects that interfere with its delivery to or removal from the rods and cones. She is interested in the gene RDH12 and its mutations, which are known to affect this essential process. She has also discovered an anomaly: a mutation in this gene causes severe retinal degeneration in humans, but surprisingly, not in mice. “Somehow the mice are compensating for the mutation. If we can identify that mechanism, it may be possible one day to replicate its action in humans,” says Dr. Thompson. She has already identified several genes — closely related to RDH12 — that she will investigate under the RPB grant. As she studies the role and function of these compensatory genes, she will also search for the mechanisms that regulate their expression. “We still have a great deal to learn about the role of RDH12 in the visual cycle and about the factors that control gene expression,” says Dr. Thompson. “Our long term goal is to move toward new therapeutic options for inherited retinal degenerations, and in directions not yet under development for this group of diseases.” Dedicated to Research

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Ophthalmologist Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D., and diabetes specialist Craig Jaffe, M.D., have developed a new program to detect eye disease in patients with diabetes.

Scanning for

Diabetes Eye Complications Ophthalmology and MEND team up on early detection of eye disease Two medical groups at the University of Michigan are joining forces to make sure that people with diabetes keep watch on their vision. At the University’s newest diabetes health center, many patients will be provided with a retina scan — essentially a photograph of the inside of the eye — to catch the earliest signs of eye disease. The scans will be sent electronically to the Kellogg Eye Center where they

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will be read by ophthalmologist Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D. If he sees any indication of disease, he will call the patient to Kellogg for a full eye examination. “The program will serve patients who have relatively good control of their diabetes and, as a result, may not feel an urgent need to schedule regular eye exams,” says ophthalmologist Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D., who directs the project for the Eye Center. He has worked with Craig Jaffe, M.D., professor, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes (MEND), to get the program up and running in MEND’s new clinic at Domino’s Farms, Ann Arbor.


Dr. Puro will evaluate retinal scans of patients with diabetes. His goal is to assure prompt treatment for patients who show early signs of diabetic eye disease.

Elevated blood sugar levels put people at risk for diabetic eye disease, most commonly diabetic retinopathy, which occurs when blood vessels in the retina are damaged. The disease can cause permanent vision loss. In the new program, patients with exceptionally high blood sugar levels will not have retinal scans; instead they will be urged to schedule eye exams — and quickly. Dr. Puro, who conducts a diabetes screening clinic at the Eye Center, hopes that the new program will alert patients to the damage diabetes can do to vision. “The ideal is that everyone with diabetes will see an ophthalmologist once a year. But as a practical matter, not everyone does,” he says. Dr. Puro notes that patients with diabetes are often at greater risk for cataract and glaucoma, making regular eye check-ups all the more important. Dr. Puro recalls that about five years ago the University Health System set a goal to increase the rate of eye examinations for its patients with diabetes. The results have been positive. In June 2004, only 49% of patients with diabetes had scheduled yearly

eye examinations; by December 2008, some “The program will serve 76% had done so. The patients who have relatively new retina scanning program is yet another good control of their diabetes effort to alert patients to signs of eye disease and, as a result, may not feel so they can receive the earliest possible an urgent need to schedule treatment. regular eye exams.” Drs. Puro and Smith-Wheelock agree — Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D. that patients today are better educated about diabetes and the need to monitor blood sugar levels. Still, many patients fail to appreciate the seriousness of diabetic retinopathy, observes Dr. Smith-Wheelock. “I have seen cases where a patient believes his vision is fine, but the exam clearly indicates diabetic retinopathy,” he says. “Fortunately, good visual screening can save their sight.”

Dedicated to Patients

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Three departments work together for the benefit of one child. Dr. Kahana (seated), ophthalmic plastic surgeon, relied on colleagues Dr. Maher (left), pediatric neurosurgeon, and Dr. Gemmete (right), interventional neuroradiologist, to help him remove a tumor to save Sean Kerr’s vision.

A Team Approach for a Young Patient Three surgeons perform a complex and delicate procedure to remove a visionthreatening tumor Sean Kerr was born with a mass near his temple that kept his left eyelid from opening and interfered with his ability to see. Over time, the mass grew and Sean’s mother, Kathleen Kerr, was referred to Steven M. Archer, M.D., pediatric ophthalmologist at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center. Dr. Archer was the first of several physicians from across the U-M Health System who provided Sean with the coordinated and highly specialized care he needed. While Dr. Archer knew that Sean had severe amblyopia, he realized that the tumor had to be treated first. Sean’s next visit was with Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D., an oculoplastic surgeon specializing in tumors of blood vessels around the eye. One of Dr. Kahana’s first steps was to order pictures of the mass using a dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance angiogram (CEMRA), which is a new and advanced imaging system. The CEMRA confirmed Dr. Kahana’s suspicion that Sean had a rare form of arteriovenous malformation — a tumor of abnormal blood vessels — which involved both the tissues around the eye (orbit) and the front part of the brain. Given the type and location of the tumor, along with the potential surgical complications, Dr. Kahana called on two collegues for help: Joseph J. Gemmete, M.D., an interventional neuroradiologist, 10

university of michigan kellogg eye center

and pediatric neurosurgeon Cormac O. Maher, M.D. During the first part of the 10-hour surgery, Dr. Gemmete performed an extremely delicate procedure to embolize, or block, the abnormal vessels so they would not bleed during the rest of surgery. Next, Dr. Maher performed a craniotomy — a procedure where part of the skull is temporarily removed in order to access the brain and the orbit behind the eye. This allowed Dr. Kahana to remove the majority of the tumor without any severe bleeding episodes or complications. Because the tumor involved most of the upper eyelid, Dr. Kahana also reconstructed the lid to allow Sean to open the eye. “Sean’s surgery highlights the strengths of the entire U-M Health System with three different departments coming together and using the latest technologies to save this child’s vision and protect his life,” says Dr. Kahana. Now 4, Sean is doing well. He can open his eye and is working with Dr. Archer to regain his vision. Every few months he sees Dr. Archer for patching — his strong eye is patched so his weak eye will develop — and Dr. Kahana to make sure the mass has not returned. “This is the first time in Sean’s life that his eye has looked normal,” says Mrs. Kerr. “We’re so thankful for Dr. Kahana. He is a wonderful doctor who even went so far as to give me his cell phone number so I could call him at any time with questions. It was a scary process but all the surgeons did a wonderful job. We’re so lucky to have ended up at the University of Michigan.”


Uveitis Patients Need Close Attention Specialists team up to deliver best care and keep watch on harsh medications At the age of 19, Helen Diponio found herself with a vision-threatening disease called uveitis. Her eyesight was blurry, filled with floaters, and getting worse. After several years of treatment elsewhere she undertook the research that led her to Susan G. Elner, M.D., Director of Kellogg’s Uveitis Service. Now 35 years old, Mrs. Diponio-Lamb has been coming to the Kellogg Eye Center for the past 11 years. She was fortunate to find the right doctor and the coordinated care needed to help her manage this complex and chronic autoimmune disease. Uveitis is an inflammation of the eye that may affect either the front or the back of the eye or both. It may be difficult to diagnose correctly and treat effectively. Because uveitis can result in significant vision loss it must be treated promptly. In some cases it is related to other systemic diseases. In many cases it is chronic and requires therapy with oral prednisone or immunosuppressant drugs. Dr. Elner sees many patients with this inflammatory eye disease. Along with her diagnostic expertise, she also understands the importance of coordinating care with a highly trained rheumatologist who helps monitor patients needing immunosuppressant drugs. After confirming the diagnosis, Dr. Elner started Mrs. Diponio-Lamb on steroids, the typical first line treatment. Because uveitis is often chronic, patients may be on steroids for long periods of time — a problem because side effects can be uncomfortable, even dangerous, if not watched carefully. Steroids can cause obesity, mood disturbances, diabetes, and osteoporosis, in addition to other ailments. “We try to reduce these risks by substituting steroid-sparing medicines if the patient requires long-term steroids,” says Dr. Elner. “That’s when we call on the expertise and experience of our colleagues in rheumatology. We also monitor our patients very carefully as we wean them off the steroids, looking for signs of reactivation.”

Helen Diponio-Lamb is pleased that uveitis expert Dr. Susan Elner has been able to manage her disease and maintain her vision for the past 11 years.

In Mrs. Diponio-Lamb’s case, Dr. Elner communicates regularly with University of Michigan rheumatologist, Dr. Vladimir Ognenovski, who administers and reads the monthly blood tests, discusses possible changes with Dr. Elner, and sees the patient twice a year. He and Dr. Elner collaborated closely when Mrs. Diponio-Lamb decided to become pregnant and knew her medications would have to change. “These collaborations are critical to the patient’s health,” says Dr. Elner. “They need both of us. I treat the eye disease, the rheumatologist helps us manage the medicines necessary to control the eye disease and watches for related autoimmune diseases.” Almost every other month, Mrs. Diponio-Lamb travels a couple of hours each way to the University of Michigan to see either Dr. Elner or Dr. Ognenovski. These visits are both for routine monitoring as well as for flare-ups of the uveitis, which reduce her vision. Dr. Elner has been able to treat these successfully with immunosuppressant drugs and steroid injections. “I can’t say enough good things about Dr. Elner,” declares Mrs. Diponio-Lamb. “She is professional, kind, and patient. She answers all my questions carefully. She is a good teacher and a good doctor. I know I’m getting cared for properly.” Dedicated to Patients

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Resident Completes

Accomplished Tenure at Kellogg David Wu has won major awards, completed a doctorate in vision science, and now will hold a retina fellowship — all at the Kellogg Eye Center Graduating Kellogg resident David M. Wu, M.D., Ph.D., recently was awarded a prestigious Heed Fellowship as well as the special designation as a Fellow of the Society of Heed Fellows. Both awards are given annually to the most promising graduating ophthalmologists from around the country who choose to pursue subspecialty training after residency. These honors are the most recent in a long list of accomplishments for

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this budding physician–scientist — almost all of them achieved during his tenure at Kellogg. “I was very honored to be awarded the Heed Fellowship because, more than anything, I think it represents how fortunate I am to have trained at Kellogg,” says Dr. Wu. Dr. Wu’s relationship with Kellogg dates to his undergraduate research on retinal regeneration, which piqued his interest in vision science. When it came time to choose a focus for his thesis, Dr. Wu received some pivotal advice from Paul A. Sieving, M.D., Ph.D., then on the Kellogg faculty and now Director of the National Eye Institute. “He said I should be in a vision environment for my training,” says Dr. Wu, “and that Kellogg was


Dr. Wu’s talents extend beyond medicine. A classically trained clarinetist, Dr. Wu is a co-founder of the U-M Life Sciences Orchestra.

one of the few places in the country where broad approaches to vision research were being applied at the highest level.” Because he was interested in electrophysiology, Dr. Wu chose Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D., an ophthalmologist and electrophysiologist, as his mentor when he began his doctoral studies in vision research. “Dr. Puro taught me that you can be both a great scientist and ophthalmologist,” Dr. Wu says. “It then became my goal to do what he does — see patients, ask scientific questions based on their problems, and then go back to the lab and try to answer those questions.” After completing both his doctorate and medical degree at Michigan, Dr. Wu explored several residency programs but, again, all roads led back to Kellogg. “I found very few places that had both a strong clinical program and a strong vision research program, so I wanted to stay and was very happy that I matched here,” he says.

Because of his “Dr. Sieving said I should be retina interest, Dr. Wu sought out Kellogg’s in a vision environment for retina faculty during his residency. Throughout my training and that Kellogg the past three years, was one of the few places he has worked with John R. Heckenlively, in the country where broad M.D., studying retinal dystrophies, and David approaches to vision research N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D., studying apoptosis — were being applied at the a type of cell death. highest level.” “There probably aren’t too many residents in the country who have had the opportunities I’ve had because there aren’t too many other Kelloggs — eye centers where you get top-notch clinical ophthalmology training plus get to work with and be mentored by top physician–scientists,” he says.

Dedicated to Education

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Cultivating the Next Generation of Vision Scientists As the Director of the Vision Research Training Program (VRTP) at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D., plays a key role in training the next generation of vision scientists. This is in addition to his extensive research program on injuryinduced regeneration of retina cells. Understanding this regeneration will allow scientists to design stem cellbased replacement therapies for retinal diseases. “Our fellows are highly The VRTP, which began in 2002, provides skilled and highly trained, financial support and covers tuition for trainand they can choose from ees who plan to pursue a number of career opporcareers in vision science. To date, 21 trainees (13 tunities, including academgraduate students and 8 postdoctoral scholars) ic research, biotechnology, have benefited from this program. Students who pharmaceutical research, are selected for the VRTP science writing, and work with outstanding vision scientists in their science policy.” laboratories and can take advantage of the multidisciplinary research environment at the U-M. Vision science trainees perform research in the fields of biological chemistry, molecular physiology, cell and developmental biology, genetics, molecular epidemiology, and neuroscience. “The VRTP really is the cooperative effort of vision scientists on campus to train the next generation,” Dr. Hitchcock says. The program is supported by the Institutional Training Grant, funded by the National Eye Institute.

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Dr. Hitchcock with Jing Luo, Ph.D., who received her doctorate in physiology from the University of Wisconsin and who now works in Dr. Hitchcock’s lab.

Dr. Hitchcock is Principal Investigator. Adding to his educational activities, Dr. Hitchcock serves as the first Director of the U-M Medical School’s Office of Postdoctoral Studies. This office serves, in part, to enhance the career development for postdoctoral fellows within the Medical School. “There are more than 500 research fellows within the Medical School who handle the bulk of the research performed in our labs. While this research is critical to the mission of the Medical School, career development is the fellows’ principal concern,” says Dr. Hitchcock. “Our fellows are highly skilled and highly trained, and they can choose from a number of career opportunities, including academic research, biotechnology, pharmaceutical research, science writing, and science policy. This office helps them identify their career goals.”


Dr. Hilary Grabe Talks about the New Residents Center

Plans have been drawn up for a new Resident Education Center that will be equipped with the latest communications technology. In addition to more spacious conference and study areas, the center will include an integrated video and communications system linked to Kellogg operating suites, as well as a surgical skills laboratory and surgery simulator. Here’s what Hilary M. Grabe, M.D., who is just completing her residency, has to say about it. “Having one central location where residents can study, catch up on work, and interact with each other will make the residency more productive. It will give the residents a base as they switch rotations from one service to the other, as well as make it easier to finish paperwork and call work and to dictate OR notes. The new center will also be more convenient for residents who are on standby for a new case or need to wait for a patient scheduled late in the day. “The new teaching tools will be a real plus, as well. Surgery simulators will allow residents to practice techniques using a system that displays surgical situations and allows the user to ‘operate’ with handheld instruments that have a realistic feel.

Next year Dr. Grabe will begin a fellowship on Kellogg’s Neuro-ophthalmology Service. She will complete the fellowship over two years, allowing her to devote a portion of her time as a comprehensive ophthalmologist at Kellogg’s Briarwood clinic.

This kind of system provides an alternative way for residents to practice surgery before entering the real OR. This will supplement the tools we already use, like our wet labs. “New technologies will also support residency training, including a video and communications system allowing residents to watch surgeries recorded from the new operating suites. The images are spectacular. Residents or anyone else looking on will have a three-dimensional view of the surgery — it’s as if you were right there in the OR. The system will provide additional useful information when you review a procedure that you or another physician has performed.”

Graduating Residents: Where Are They Now? Our residents completed their last rotations in June, after three years training with Department faculty and seeing patients in our clinics. Now they are in private practice or well into their subspecialty fellowships. Congratulations and all best wishes to our graduating residents. Omar R. Ahmad, M.D.

Retina fellowship, Cole Eye Institute Cleveland Clinic Hilary M. Grabe, M.D.

Combined neuro-ophthalmology fellowship and clinical faculty appointment, comprehensive ophthalmology U-M Kellogg Eye Center Roheena M. Kamyar, M.D.

Cornea fellowship U-M Kellogg Eye Center

Jonathan T. Pribila, M.D., Ph.D.

Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus fellowship University of Minnesota Christopher Rodarte, M.D.

Glaucoma fellowship University of California-San Diego Ron W. Slocumb, M.D.

Private practice Weston Eye Center, Roseburg, Oregon David M. Wu, M.D., Ph.D.

Combined medical retina/research fellowship U-M Kellogg Eye Center

Dedicated to Education

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Gary D. Haynie, M.D.

Retina Associates Fargo, North Dakota Completed residency in 1991 Dr. Haynie is at his best “when a patient presents with something a little unusual, and I get the time and opportunity to learn something new,” he says. His residency at the Kellogg Eye Center fueled his appreciation for learning. And because it was his second residency — the first was in internal medicine — he had a good perspective on what made for a good experience. “It was very comprehensive,” he says. “Not only did we have good coverage in departments such as cornea, glaucoma, and retina, but we also had instructors in disciplines not always available elsewhere, such as pathology and plastics.” Best of all, he says, was the good will that emanated from faculty. “I always looked forward to going to work.”

As Retina Specialists, Alums Have National Impact Residencies and fellowships at U-M create a strong foundation for the pursuit of excellence, an effect that is multiplied as alumni mentor and train others.

Odette M. Houghton, M.D.

Assistant Professor University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Completed residency in 2004 Dr. Houghton’s proudest moment in her residency came when her first phacoemulsification patient had 20/20 vision the first day after surgery — and as a clinician, teacher and researcher, she continues to reach for excellence. A faculty member at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, she specializes in vitreoretinal surgery. “My patients come from a variety of backgrounds, and I appreciate the opportunity to manage and treat the challenging pathology that academic institutions attract,” she says. Her residency at the Kellogg Eye Center laid the foundation for her career and opened doors for her because of its strong reputation. “I have had the right education to be able to take good care of my patients in the most professional and ethical manner,” she says. “I strive to be as good a teacher and physician as those who trained me.”


Justin L. Gottlieb, M.D.

Associate Professor University of Wisconsin Completed residency in 1994 Training vitreoretinal fellows is a highlight of Dr. Gottlieb’s career at the University of Wisconsin, where he works with his wife, Barbara Blodi. “Our section has trained six fellows since I arrived, and I would gladly refer family and friends to each one of them for excellent care,” he says. He is also involved in clinical trials for the treatment of vitreoretinal disease. Working with a full-time academic faculty devoted to patient care, resident education, and research at the Kellogg Eye Center made an impression on him, he says. “Their dedication to academic medicine inspired me to pursue the same.”

Barbara A. Blodi, M.D.

Associate Professor University of Wisconsin Completed fellowship in 1993 Dr. Blodi completed her retina fellowship at the Kellogg Eye Center and spent two years on the faculty. Today, she practices at the University of Wisconsin and pursues research interests at the University’s Fundus Photograph Reading Center. She enjoys participating in clinical trials. “In this way, we can offer patients the latest in patient care and can answer clinical questions regarding which treatments are most effective,” she says. Her mentors at U-M helped her grow as a teacher, clinician, and clinical researcher, she adds. “My years at Kellogg provided me with the confidence and competence to be successful in my career. And I met my husband (Justin Gottlieb) in the process, too!”

Gary S. Gutow, M.D.

Retina-Vitreous Associates, P.C. Nashville, Tennessee Completed residency in 1973 Nurturing the growth of one of the premier retina practices in Tennessee has been a labor of love for Dr. Gutow, who was the first fully trained retina specialist in Nashville when he arrived in the mid-1970s. The practice he founded now has seven retina specialists. “What’s really wonderful is that we are able to help people today we could not have helped before,” he says. Dr. Gutow has seen many advancements in care over the years and regularly participates in clinical trials. His training at U-M prepared him well, he says. “The faculty members were accessible, and my fellow residents were first rate. The residency had a good mix of practical experience and didactic learning.”


All Roads Lead to Kellogg Pediatric Ophthalmology Clinic Though they live in Guatemala City, it seems the Morales family was destined to find pediatric ophthalmologist Monte Del Monte, M.D., almost 2000 miles away. When Sergio Morales learned that his daughter had inherited a rare eye disorder, he began to search for a surgeon who could help. There was no such specialist in his country, so he turned to Washington D.C., where, as it turned out, one of Dr. Del Monte’s mentors had treated Mr. Morales for the same disorder in 1985. When the Washington hospital was not able to help, Mr. Morales continued his search and learned that an American physician had come to Guatemala in 2007 as part of a medical mission trip. The physician, Dr. Del Monte, had helped a little boy by performing the very same rare surgical procedure that his daughter now needed. Both Mr. Morales and his daughter, Carmen, have congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, a syndrome that affects ocular motor nerves as well as muscles surrounding the eyes. As a result, those affected have very limited eye movement, their eyes pulled into far downgaze while the head is positioned straight ahead. These patients tend to develop strabismus (misaligned eyes). Before their surgeries, Mr. Morales and Carmen could achieve partial vision only by tilting their heads far backward to peer through a narrow slit. “The position is abnormal and very uncomfortable,” said Mr. Morales, who had two surgeries when he 18

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was 6 and 7 years of age, performed by Marshall M. Parks, M.D., the mentor to Dr. Del Monte. Mr. Morales sent photos of Carmen, not quite two years old, to Dr. Del Monte, the Skillman Professor of Pediatric Ophthalmology, who generously waived his surgical fee. In May 2009, the family came to the Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, where Dr. Del Monte performed surgery to release and loosen the fibrotic and severely restricted inferior eye muscles on both eyes. This allowed Carmen’s eyes, for the first time, to look straight ahead. Two days after the procedure, Dr. Del Monte was pleased with the results. “Carmen’s head position is much straighter, and so her motor skills are much better, and more natural, too,” he told Mr. and Mrs. Morales. “Her right eye is wandering a bit, so Carmen will need patching to force that eye to work by itself.” He gave the Morales family instructions that they could share with their Guatemalan ophthalmologist back home. Dr. Del Monte also suggested that Carmen return for a second procedure to further tighten the upper eye muscles and further elevate her eyes, “something new” since her father had his surgery. As they said good-by, Mr. and Mrs. Morales expressed their gratitude for Dr. Del Monte’s medical care and his kindness. Said Mrs. Morales, “We thank you and tell you in our heart how happy we feel.”


Kellogg Scientist Helps Beijing Ophthalmologist Design Large-scale Clinical Trial CIGTS is model for a new glaucoma study Two years ago at a meeting sponsored by the National Eye Institute, epidemiologist David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H., was introduced to a Chinese ophthalmologist by a mutual colleague who said, “You two have got to talk.” This past spring Dr. Musch flew to Beijing to meet with Yuanbo Liang, M.D., Ph.D., and his professor, Dr. Ningli Wang. As Dr. Musch found out in that first conversation, Dr. Liang was in the early stages of constructing a large clinical trial that was much like the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CIGTS), for which Dr. Musch was co-principal investigator and coordinating center director for 11 years. The Chinese trial, however, would focus on angle-closure glaucoma, the most common form of glaucoma in China. After several rounds of discussions, it became clear that this complicated trial needed a co-investigator with Dr. Musch’s background and he has recently been asked to join the study group, now named the Initial Treatment Study of Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma. “I never imagined that I would be in China developing a major clinical study. It’s a fascinating opportunity.” In May, Dr. Musch met with Dr. Liang and colleagues at the Beijing Tongren Eye Hospital. During his stay, Dr. Musch presented lectures, discussed the principles of statistical approaches used in clinical

Dr. Musch will continue to travel to Beijing to collaborate on a clinical trial with his new Chinese colleagues.

trials, and provided guidance and hands-on assistance in their efforts to plan for a large multi-center collaborative trial. Like CIGTS, this trial will use many cen“I never imagined that I would ters, possibly even 15, in and around Beijing. be in China developing a major Unlike trials in the U.S., clinical study. It’s a fascinating the recruitment goal should be fairly easy opportunity.” to achieve; the Beijing Tongren Eye Hospital alone sees thousands of patients each day. Patient visits are not scheduled; prospective patients line up with their families in the corridors outside of the Eye Hospital’s many clinics. Dr. Musch will travel to Beijing again this fall after the trial has been launched. Until then, as the team’s study design expert, he will be advising his new colleagues on protocols, recruitment efforts, community center oversight, and the myriad other details necessary to run a large-scale clinical trial.


A Legacy of Giving Edwin and Mary Meader played leading role in growth of Eye Center Like the support Edwin and Mary Meader offered during their lifetimes, a bequest realized this year from the Edwin E. Meader estate was quiet but profound. The allocation in his will was a simple indication that a percentage of his trust should be used for the benefit of the Kellogg Eye Center, but the gift’s impact will be broad and significant. “We are very grateful for Mr. Meader’s bequest, which will be used to build new laboratories, to purchase important equipment for our researchers and clinicians, to launch new initiatives, and more,” says Paul R. Lichter, M.D., F. Bruce Fralick Professor and Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and

Visual Sciences. “This support will help us begin to realize the full potential of our new building and will set the stage for years of continued scientific discovery.” Mr. Meader (1909-2007), a military intelligence professional with a passion for archaeology and geography, and Mrs. Meader (1916-2008), an adventurer who took the first aerial photos of Africa and the granddaughter of William E. Upjohn, had a strong commitment to helping others. As stewards of the Upjohn legacy, they sought opportunities to make a difference. When they recognized a need for funds to expand the vision research program at the University of Michigan, they responded.


As a young woman, Mary Upjohn Meader was a pioneering aerial photographer who took the earliest aerial photographs of Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Their gifts were made at key points in the growth of the program. They established the Paul R. Lichter Professorship in Ophthalmic Genetics in 1990 as the research program was expanding. The professorship initially supported the work of Dr. Paul A. Sieving, who is currently Director of the National Eye Institute. It then helped recruit Dr. John R. Heckenlively, one of the top specialists in inherited retinal diseases, who holds the professorship today. The couple also created the Edwin E. and Mary U. Meader Vision Research Fund in 1993 to help fund faculty projects. Dr. Sieving worked with other vision scientists in the Department, for example, to identify specific eye disease genes in nearly 30 different families. “We began by identifying individual patients who had medical conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt’s juvenile macular degeneration and then studied their families in Michigan and across the country,” Dr. Sieving explains. “Clearly genes are a major determinant of our medical destinies, and finding a gene is something

that stands for all time,” he says. “That’s what the Meaders’ endowments made possible. This work is now the basis for developing strategies to treat patients, including gene therapy. The Meaders’ contributions are benefiting many people.” When it became clear to Mr. and Mrs. Meader that the program they had nourished could do even more, they gave a major gift to launch the Kellogg Eye Center’s current building campaign. To celebrate their commitment to vision, they agreed to allow the University to name the lobby of the new building in honor of Mrs. Meader and her grandmother. The lobby will bear the name Mrs. Meader shared with her grandmother: Rachel Mary Upjohn. “The confidence Mr. and Mrs. Meader displayed in us allowed our research program to flourish,” Dr. Lichter says. “It is a wonderful time to celebrate all that has been accomplished and the advancements that will continue to be made through their goodness and generosity.”


Alumni Join Forces

to Complete Professorship Honoring a favorite professor is goal of campaign Children of physicians often become physicians themselves. In Dr. Terry J. Bergstrom’s family, however, it is the love of teaching that has been passed down. Two of his four children are educators. That’s fitting, as teaching is where many say Dr. Bergstrom has made his most enduring contributions. He has helped to train more than 200 ophthalmology residents and fellows and has taught thousands of medical students. Today a professor emeritus, he continues to teach and to see patients in the comprehensive and glaucoma clinics. “He made me the ophthalmologist I am today,” says Jay Burgett, M.D., who completed his ophthalmology residency at the Kellogg Eye Center in 1997. “I hear his voice in my head during every surgery I 22

university of michigan kellogg eye center

perform. He was always available during my training at Michigan. He cared for his students and for our education. He would have done anything for us.” To thank and honor Dr. Bergstrom, alumni of the Department recently renewed a campaign to create the Terry J. Bergstrom Collegiate Professorship. The fundraising endeavor has been energized by several leadership gifts this year. Major gifts from Kenneth and Pat Musson, Michael and Karen Pachtman, Jay and Cynthia Burgett, and Scott Corin and Nina Blumenthal are just some of the contributions that have brought the campaign over the halfway mark. “We hope to raise the remaining funds and inaugurate the professorship as quickly as possible,” says Dr. Musson, who has known Dr. Bergstrom since their residency days at Michigan. “Terry is an exemplary leader and role model, and the respect that so many residents have for him is impressive. He has both a


great sense of humor and has had tremendous life experiences. He is able to connect with people in terms they readily understand, and he gives his students a confidence that they can carry over into their own practice.” Dr. Bergstrom joined the Department’s faculty in 1980. He had completed medical school, his residency, and a glaucoma fellowship at the University and had spent 25 years as a pilot and later an ophthalmologist and flight surgeon in the United States Air Force. The University of Michigan had a small ophthalmology faculty 29 years ago, and at various times Dr. Bergstrom was called on to serve as chief of the glaucoma service, chief of the low vision service, chief of ophthalmology at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and chief of comprehensive ophthalmology. He also served as director of resident education from 1991 to 1998. “I came here during a growth phase and was always happy to help out where I was needed,” he says. The residency director assignment was particularly

appealing because he enjoyed working closely with residents. He had planned to become a high school teacher before deciding on medicine. Teaching suited Dr. Bergstrom, and he won so many of the Department’s teaching awards that residents finally named the annual prize the Terry J. Bergstrom Resident Teaching Award — on the condition that someone else would have to win it. A professorship in his name that would live on in perpetuity would be a great honor, he says. “The people in this Department have been a second family to me, especially the residents, who were like my children — and are now like my grandchildren. I get a kick out of watching residents learn and grow. They are so smart. They soak up knowledge and techniques like a sponge. “I’m lucky,” he adds, “I have always been able to do what I love.” The residents who have trained with him, Dr. Burgett says, have been lucky, too.

Dr. Terry Smith Named Huetwell Professor

Dr. Julia Richards Chosen Falls Professor

On the shoulders of giants is how Terry J. Smith, M.D., sees the work he pursues in Graves’ eye disease. Discoveries in his laboratory build on decades of advances achieved by researchers around the world, and his efforts to develop therapies to interrupt the disease process would not be possible without their enormous contributions. The same is true when it comes to philanthropist Frederick G.L. Huetwell, says Dr. Smith, who is the first Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. “It is a gift to be able to probe a particular question in great depth, and that is what an endowed professorship allows,” he says. “Mr. Huetwell’s contribution to medical research is inspiring and very humbling.” Mr. Huetwell, a U-M alumnus and Detroit businessman who passed away in 1995, made gifts to several areas of medical research in his estate, including visual science. This new professorship has been established through the Kellogg Eye Center’s Frederick G.L. Huetwell Ophthalmic Research Endowment.

Harold F. Falls, M.D. (1909-2006), is known as the founder of ophthalmic genetics in the U.S. He spent his career at the University of Michigan, serving on the faculty for four decades after completing his medical degree and his residency at the University. To celebrate his contributions to the field, family, friends, colleagues, and alumni established the Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professorship in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences in 2003. Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., has been named the Falls Professor and will ensure that Dr. Falls’ commitment to defining the role heredity plays in eye disease continues. Her work centers on the identification of genes related to glaucoma. “Dr. Falls has served as a role model for me since the beginning of my career,” Dr. Richards says. “His groundbreaking work has taught me how much can be learned if we go beyond the patient to view ophthalmic traits in the context of whole families. I am honored by this opportunity to follow in his footsteps.”


Kellogg Eye Center Expansion Honor Roll We thank the following individuals, foundations, and corporations for making gifts, including multi-year pledges, in support of the Kellogg Eye Center expansion project. $2 million and up Carls Foundation Edwin E. and Mary U. Meader Larry G. Miller

$1,000,000 to $1,999,999 Lynn H. and Robert W. Browne, D.D.S. Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation Harold A. and Marian L. Poling Helmut Stern Robert and Ellen Thompson The Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation

$500,000 to $999,999 John F. and Casilda Daly

$250,000 to $499,999 Mickey and Karen Shapiro Timothy and Laurie G. Wadhams

$100,000 to $249,999 Frank J. and Helga Arnold Charles and Rita Gelman Johnson Controls Foundation Carolyn and Paul Lichter Keith and Della McKenzie Dr. Charles L. and Kathleen K. Smith David and Jayne VerLee Mary June and William Wilkinson

$50,000 to $99,999 Steven and Constance Benz Anne and Terry J. Bergstrom Dave and Yvette Bing Thomas C. Brown The Campbell Fund James and Martha Conrad William and Carol Cutler Gloria P. and William E. Dean, Jr. Ruth B. Dixon 24

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Robert and Cassandra Estes Douglas P. and Shelley Felt Richard and Lisa Garfinkel Vincent R. and Joyce McLean James and Nancy Ravin Rennie and Michael Roth Alan and Gail Sugar

$25,000 to $49,999 Anonymous Donor James and Kathryn Adams Herbert and Carol Amster Harry and Patricia Bash Robert G. Fante, M.D. Joe and Beth Fitzsimmons Larry and Mary Gerbens Dr. Judy Gordon and Dr. Roger Meyer Orpha Irwin Helen and Richard Kerr Kim Lindenmuth and Matthew Bueche John and Phyllis Napley Michael Petersen and Elizabeth Binasio Helen and Earl Schaper

$10,000 to $24,999 Alfred Berkowitz Foundation Seth Bonder George and Connie Cress Ann and Joseph W. Edwards David Gavrin Harry C. Gibson, M.D. E. Paul and Lillian Gieser James T. and Charlene L. Glerum Richard F. Gutow John R. Heckenlively Virginia Hickman Robert and Joan Hughes KALSEC Corporation W.R. Kenley Robert and Mary Kiess

James G. and Carolyn Knaggs Carol L. Makielski and Charles D. Lake Donald and Jacqueline McCulloch Dean and Lynn Mitchell Andrew and Cathryn Moyes Stanley and June Oleksy U.E. Patrick Sally J. Pryce James R. Quinn, M.D. Michael and Debra Raizman James D. and Helene C. Reader Franklin and Marilyn Sassaman Perry and Faith Schechtman Michael and Linda Smith-Wheelock Susan and David Thoms Alfred and Carol Wick W. Scott and Jill Wilkinson

$5,000 to $9,999 Everton and Saundrett Arrindell Nancy Bender Donald and Christine Beser Robert D. and Jennie P. Biggs Garry and Gretchen Binegar Fred and Miriam Blum Ralph and Kay Crew Andrew and Margaret Hanzlik Dr. and Mrs. John W. Henderson Peter and Karla Hitchcock Mark and Linda Johnson New England Eye Center Venkat and Alvira Reddy H. Kaz Soong and Barbara Nevins-Soong Danny D. Wang and Yili Wang

$1,000 to $4,999 Steven and Carol Archer James and Martha Barnett Edward and Martha Boggs William and Julie Bromley Bruce Cameron Bill and Janet Cassebaum Mark and Judith Cohen Theresa M. Cooney, M.D. Barb and Wayne Cornblath Deborah M. Cox Monte A. and Kristen G. Del Monte Gayle D. Dickerson Thomas and Susan Essman Francis Falck Judith FitzGerald and Robert Glinert


Philip J. Gage and Wendy Rampson-Gage Dasa and Nalini Gangadhar Carol and Edward George Jon and Sarah Gieser Robert Goldsmith Daniel and Norma Green Robert and Teresa Grosserode Robert O. and Carolyn S. Hoffman Bret and Laura Alvarez Hughes David and Patricia Johnson Robert Keil Key Foundation Kirk and Constance Lignell Bernard L. Maas Foundation James Albert Maraldo Marvin J. and Beverly McKenney Shahzad Mian and Uzma Ahmad Corey A. Miller, M.D., and Nancy J. Miller Sayoko Moroi and Mike Fetters Christine Nelson and Willis Lillard Betsy and Ken Nisbet Mohammad and J. Elizabeth Othman Michael and Karen Pachtman Mark and Kimberly Phelan Sheryl and Douglas Podlewski Donald and Debra Puro Julia Richards and Carl Marrs Gary and Dianna Sandall Stephen and Kim Saxe Marcia and David Schmidt Tara Schmitt and Christopher Palumbo Carol and Irving Smokler Carol L. Standardi James B. Thompson and Mary Ann Brandt Richard and Joyce Toner Peter and Adele Vaculik Margaret Vezina Richard L. Wacksman Randall S. and William K. Wallach Richard and Kay Watnick Adrienne West and Mark Hemmila

$500 to $999 Anonymous Donor Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation William and Elizabeth Arendshorst Eric Arnold Elizabeth A. Bertz Frederick and Jean Birkhill Steven and Jacqueline Boskovich

James and Jacqueline Bowen Christina Bruno MargaretAnn Cross and James Van Fleteren Mr. and Mrs. David L. Diles Gregory and Dottie Dootz Jerome and Polly Finkelstein Martin and Elaine Goode June and R. James Harvey William Hawkins Richard Alan Lewis and Patricia N. Lewis Richard Rodman and Patrice Bouzan Rodman Warren and Nancy Scherer Barney and Geraldine Schwartz Atta Rae and Gabriel Sitrin Dr. Newel and Rosemary Smith Becky and Doug Spaly Thomas and Jane Stratford Debra Thompson and William Strong Jeanne T. Walters Ronald E. Warwar, M.D. Margaret B. White Beverly Yashar and John Mesberg David Zacks and Susan Harris

$250 to $499 Michael Bergiel Anne M. Chase James R. Devine Hal and Donna Estry Bruce and Susan Furr Theodore and Naomi Harrison Robert and Joan Jampel Victor and Kendra Monroe Diana and Robert Nast Jeanne F. Smith Scott E. Szalay Pat and John Tongusi Jonathan Trobe and Joan Lowenstein

Up to $249 Cynthia Abejuro Katherine Augustaitis Samir and Mona Binno Renee Blosser Carolyn and Leonard Bohm Nancy S. Boutell Marcia J. Boynton Lisa Burkhart and Frank Hunt James W. and Nola Cavett

Shirley Coe-Beck and David Beck Beverly A. Conkle Marlene and Paul Dodge Donna M. Duffy Darlene C. Fero Elena Filippova Jacqueline A. Forrest Chad and Courtney Godfrey Helene and Nikolaus Gugenheimer Dr. and Mrs. Edward F. Hall Margaret Hartz Joseph and Lori Hymes Walter Ingram Laura E. Kakuk-Atkins Athanasios J. Karoukis Roberta and Kenneth Kerste Adabelle Knief Judith Knitter Piyush and Sarla Kothary Susan L. Lichter Michael and Judy Lipson Susan Ludwig Steven Manikas James and Gay McGuckin Midwest Transmission, Inc. Donald and Barbara Mitrzyk David and Benita Murrel Dr. David and Janice Musch Ajay Natarajan and Ritu Khanna Olga Nelson Gale and Yehuda Oren Hemant Pawar Rebecca and Paul Pazkowski Carol J. Pollack-Rundle and Family Judith and Michael Preville Barbara and Art Rocco Frank Rozsa and Szonja Puskas-Rozsa Ross and Shannan Saltz Grace and C. M. Schwind Cindy Shaffran Susan and Gary Simpson Camille S. Smith Amy Steele Norma and Gene Stohler Anand and Manju Swaroop Mary Waldo Molly and Robert Wheaton Alyce Whipp Kim Wisniewski Anthony Wojciechowski Jennifer Ziehm-Scott Dedicated to Discovery

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Annual Honor Roll of Donors Alum Stays Connected, Offers Support

are contributors whose donations are part of multi-year pledges.

ties remain strong. He earned his medical degree, obtained a master of science degree, and completed his residency in ophthalmology here, and he has always stayed connected. Dr. Ravin, who is a clinical associ-

ate professor at the University of Toledo College of Medicine, visits often to attend conferences and other events. He and his wife, Nancy, support the University through gifts that include annual contributions to the Kellogg Eye Center’s Alumni Annual Fund and the expansion campaign. “We appreciate all the good things

that are happening at Kellogg,” Dr. Ravin says. “It’s easy to be optimistic about the future of eye research when you consider all the work that is being accomplished there. I hope that others feel the same.”

Dr. Ravin also serves on the Eye

Center’s Alumni Advisory Board and last year presented the Distinguished Alumnus Lecture during fall reunion.

June 30, 2009. Included in this listing

may have left the 35 years ago, but his

made gifts from July 1, 2008, through

James G. Ravin, M.D., University of Michigan

With heartfelt thanks to donors who

“I have an emotional attachment,” he

says. “I like to interact with former classmates and faculty and to learn about the new projects in vision research. It’s exciting to be a part of it.”

$500,000 to $999,999 Edwin E. Meader Estate Larry G. Miller The Ravitz Foundation

$100,000 to $499,999 Edward P. and Kathryn M. Bellas Trust The Foundation Fighting Blindness Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation The Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation

$50,000 to $99,999 Anonymous Donors (2) The Campbell Fund Edward T. and Ellen K. Dryer Charitable Foundation Bartley and Cheryl Frueh Helmut Stern Michael A. Wainstock, M.D.

$10,000 to $49,999 BCBSM Foundation Birkhill Family Foundation Scott M. Corin and Nina Blumenthal Frederica Cornell Jean E. Craig Elaine Frick Muhieddine Ghandour and Hala Jaroudi James T. and Charlene L. Glerum Frances and David H. Grossman W.R. Kenley Danute Leveckis and Timothy VanEvery Carolyn and Paul Lichter Keith and Della McKenzie Vincent R. and Joyce McLean The Meijer Foundation Joel and Susan Mindel The Carla J. Pfuhl Estate Mickey and Karen Shapiro Mildred E. Swanson Foundation Timothy and Laurie G. Wadhams

$5,000 to $9,999 Anonymous Donors Harry and Patricia Bash Frank and Barbara Batsch

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Michael and Joanne Bisson Thomas W. Breakey Eleanor E. Brownell Ann and Joseph W. Edwards Maurine Ehrlich Estate Robert G. Fante, M.D. Richard and Lisa Garfinkel Andrew and Margaret Hanzlik Helen and Richard Kerr Susan J. Lane John and Ginger Myers Bruce L. and Roberta Oliver Michael and Karen Pachtman Michael Petersen and Elizabeth Binasio Sally J. Pryce Alan and Gail Sugar

$1,000 to $4,999 James and Kathryn Adams Steven and Carol Archer Everton and Saundrett Arrindell Joaquin Barraquer Anne and Terry J. Bergstrom Fred and Miriam Blum Henry A. Boldt, Jr., M.D. Keith D. and Cheryl D. Carter Bill and Janet Cassebaum Mark and Janet Cichowski Mark and Judith Cohen Claude M. Coleman James and Martha Conrad Theresa M. Cooney, M.D. William and Carol Cutler Gloria P. and William E. Dean, Jr. Monte A. and Kristen G. Del Monte Rosemarie DeLand Delta Gamma Fraternity Ann Arbor J. McGregor and Christine Dodds Magdalen Skuba Edwards Douglas P. and Shelley Felt Margaret E. Gallup Larry and Mary Gerbens Marian L. Gotshall Joanne R. Gradowski Robert and Teresa Grosserode Richard F. Gutow Geza L. and Elizabeth F. Gyorey Kenneth Alan Haller Myron Hepner Barry and Mary Ann Hoffman Robert O. and Carolyn S. Hoffman Bret and Laura Alvarez Hughes Walter and Barbara Hungerford Keith and Susan Kobet William W. Love Dr. Marvin and Sue Lubeck


James Albert Maraldo Corey A. Miller, M.D., and Nancy J. Miller Dean and Lynn Mitchell Kenneth H. Musson and Patricia Musson Dr. Patrick J. and Bonnie K. Parden Mark and Kimberly Phelan Scott M. Pinter, M.D. James R. Quinn, M.D. James and Nancy Ravin Venkat and Alvira Reddy Susan and Frederic Rowe Marcia and David Schmidt Ms. Virginia L. Sivacek Dr. Charles L. and Kathleen K. Smith Michael and Linda Smith-Wheelock Peter K. Speert James P. and Dorothy Symons Brian and Lee Talbot James B. Thompson and Mary Ann Brandt Triford Foundation David and Jayne VerLee Genevieve E. Walinski Drs. Adrienne West and Mark Hemmila Herbert E. Weston George C. Whitaker Marina V.N. and Robert F. Whitman Alfred and Carol Wick W. Scott and Jill Wilkinson Dr. and Mrs. Fuxiang Zhang

$500 to $999 Anonymous Donor Roger D. Arnett Steven and Constance Benz Rhoda L. and Roger M. Berkowitz Elizabeth A. Bertz James and Jacqueline Bowen Carl A. Brauer, Jr. Robert and Susan Brown Christine R. Buse Richard and Enid Carlin Morton S. Cox Damon’s Grill Roland and Louise W. DeMartin John S. Dunn Robert and Cassandra Estes Hal and Donna Estry Janet and L. Scott Feiler, M.D. Jacqueline A. Forrest Ralph M. Fox Philip J. Gage and Wendy Rampson-Gage Harry C. Gibson, M.D. Virginia M. Gillette Henry E. and Kathryn G. Gray Froncie Gutman

Theodore and Naomi Harrison David S. Hemmings, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. John W. Henderson Gerald and Mignon Heppler James A. Johnson Prof. Judy M. Judd James G. and Carolyn Knaggs C. Byron Landis, M.D. Katherine Lee, M.D., Ph.D. Richard Alan Lewis and Patricia N. Lewis Sherry L. Lindahl Donald and Jacqueline McCulloch Marvin J. and Beverly McKenney Carolyn E. Mesara Mary Ann and P. Anthony Meza Elaine J. Mickelson Betsy and Ken Nisbet Allen R. Pearce Pfizer Foundation Donald and Debra Puro Gary S. Sandall Beatriz Sanz-Bustillo Stephen and Kim Saxe Helen and Earl Schaper Perry and Faith Schechtman Don and Jane Schriver Charles Sherman Jean E. Simpson Estate William Louis Traxel, M.D. Thomas G. Varbedian, M.D. Andrew Vine and Caroline Blane Ronald E. Warwar, M.D. Carol and Jack Weigel

$100 to $499 Anonymous Donors (15) Mowafak H. Albayya Olga Alber Ann T. Alexander Dr. Krista Anderson Maureen S. Babcock Deane and Marilyn Baker I. Josephine Ballert Nancy L. Barker Lawrence A. Barnes Philip Barrons Anne and Donald F. Baty, Jr. Roy W. Beck Joan and Charles Becker Betty and David Beckner Nancy Bender Lois Bereza Lana and David Berry Thomas A. Bersani and Joan Christy Big Boy Restaurants

Dentist Grateful for Care Excellent eyesight was crucial to Dr. Herbert E. Weston’s profession as a dentist, yet he has battled eye conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts from the time he was in his 40s. Ophthalmologists at the Kellogg Eye Center, including former chair F. Bruce Fralick, helped preserve his vision, and he is grateful, Dr. Weston says. He has been contributing to the Annual Fund for more than 10 years.

“The Kellogg Eye Center is helping

people like me see properly in order to do their work and carry on their lives productively,” he says. “We need to support a place that is working to that end.”

Vision Important to Mom When Carla J. Pfuhl decided to include the Kellogg Eye Center in her estate plans, she was thinking about her children. “My mother was legally blind, and she wanted to make sure that my eyesight could be saved,” says daughter Darlene M. Smith. Several members of the Pfuhl family have vision difficulties, and Mrs. Pfuhl’s son had graduated from the University of the Michigan, so Kellogg was a good fit for her generosity, her daughter says. The Eye Center received a gift for research to cure macular degeneration when Mrs. Pfuhl passed away earlier this year. Mrs. Pfuhl, who lived in Milford and loved to play bridge, raised three children and had a “wonderful life,” Mrs. Smith says. “She was the most wonderful woman. She cared about other people.”


Garry N. Binegar, M.D. Samir and Mona Binno Edward and Martha Boggs Stephen Boorstein, M.D. Paulajean and Nicholas Bosch Nancy S. Boutell Daniel L. Braden William and Julie Bromley Brian P. Brooks, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Margaret C. Brown Marion and Fred Burgett Wilbur and Carolyn Burkett Irving F. Burton Donald V. Calamia Norman and Maureen Campbell James and Geraldine Chaffers Sherry and David Chang Anne M. Chase Lillian V. Choate Hideki and Tomomi Chuman Shirley Coe-Beck and David Beck Donald L. Cole Carl and Maria Constant Patrick and Laura Coppens Sharilyn E. and Barry D. Coulson Ellen L. Coulthard Shannon and Chadwick Crane MargaretAnn Cross and James Van Fleteren Speers M. Crumrine Victoria and Michael Curley Dolores and Michael Czerniak Lyubica Dabich, M.D. Dart Bank James E. Davies Prof. William and Virginia Dawson Judi and Daniel DeMartin Margaret and George DeMuth James R. Devine Gayle D. Dickerson Dr. M. Kenneth and Arvene Dickstein Marlene and Paul Dodge Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Dornbrook John and Vicki Dubnicka Mrs. Lois A. Dyer Bita Esmaeli, M.D. Blaine and Jean Evans Michael J. Fanola Mrs. M.J. Feener Stacia and Andrew Feinberg Bryn A. and Suzanne M. Fick Jerome and Polly Finkelstein Esther M. Floyd Dennis and Christine Fornal Ralph N. Funk

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university of michigan kellogg eye center

Charles A. Gallup Carol and Edward George Mr. Waleed K. Gosaynie Great Lakes Eye Care Norman Grigsby Adele Gudes Besondy and Margaret Hagen Charlotte Hanson Laurelynne and George Harris Brian, Jennifer and Charlotte Heaton Ruth Heyn, M.D. Frederick J. Heyner Jeanne and Conrad Heyner Richard and Jane Hiss Charles F. Hoitash Janet Woods Hoobler Margaret M. and James E. Hughes Richard and Anne Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Johnson S. Preston and Betty B. Jones Althea R. Kabak Daniel and Rose Kachnowski Carol L. Karp Jill Taft Kaufman Robert B. Kaufman, M.D. Rosemary S. Kaye Levi Kimball Michael A. Kipp, M.D. Robert and Toby Kleinberg William L. and Betty G. Knapp Frank J. Konkel J. David and Grace Kotre Drs. Teresa and Norman Krieger Susan and James Krucki Gerald and Dorothy Kurtz Marie Lane Louis and Gail LaRiche Kurt K. Lark, M.D. Lucille Lefler Gloria A. Lehman Gary Lelli and Kelly Bottger Cheryl L. and J. Paul Lemieux Bobbie and Myron Levine Jean and Edward Lewis Robertson A. Lewis Kim Lindenmuth and Matthew Bueche Thomas Longworth and Carol Cramer Gisela I. Loveless Konrads V. Lubavs Helen Price Luckham Angelo Maeso Joseph L. Maggini Marvin and Shirley Markgraff John Martich Mrs. Catherine Masters

Christopher McFarland Donald and Diane Meitz Professor George E. Mendenhall Robert and Margery Mesler William and Joan Mikkelsen Roberta L. Misko Helen Mitchell Margaret and Richard Moehl Ms. Marlene M. Moleski Richard G. Mosteller John and Patricia Mott Dr. Patrick J. and Mrs. Jacquelyn P. Mulrow William J. Mundus Alphonsus and Ann Murphy Dr. David and Janice Musch Dr. Michel and Alice Nasif Diana and Robert Nast Christine Nelson and Willis Lillard Jonathon P. Niemczak Mr. and Mrs. Harry Nistel Kenneth E. Oettle John Orr Kelley Collins Osborne Mohammad and J. Elizabeth Othman Howard E. Parker Harriet Parsons and John Brundage Joseph F. Pavka Gordon E. Peckham, Sr. Keith and Janet Lee Perkins Maureen and Thomas Phelps Joy and Luke Pinkerton Marcy H. Plant Sheryl and Douglas Podlewski Mrs. Nancy L. Pohly Judith and Michael Preville Rebecca and Eric Priebe Drs. Douglas J. and Leslie E. Quint Drs. Penporn and Stephen Reck Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Redmond Ann M. Reed Charles S. Remenar Rita and Robert Reske Dr. Thomas R. Riggs John Wallace Risk Walter and Marjorie Rizzi Barbara and Art Rocco Horace and Yvonne Rodgers Iva Jean Roe David and Ann Rogers Robert Roosenberg, M.D. Rennie and Michael Roth Jonathan A. and Robin L. Rowe Clifton D. Rowland Walter Z. Rundles, Jr.


Loretta D. Sammet Larry and Barbara Scherer Leonard T. Schmidt Judith A. Schneider Eileen Schott John and Karen Schultz Stephen W. Sedlar Ruth I. Segura David and Elvera Shappirio Mrs. Lorraine M. Sheppard Joseph and Nancy Shore James and Doris Sisson Kenneth S. Smith Sue-Ellen Smith Margie and Vaughn Snook Stuart B. Snyder Becky and Doug Spaly Carol L. Standardi Kathryn and Veryl Steinaway Thomas and Jane Stratford Joel Sugar and Anita Gerber M. Diane Sullivan Terry Talley, M.D. John and Joan Tedford Alek Tempski Edward and Karen Tenner Roger C. Thibault Susan and David Thoms C. Wayne Tiller A. Richard Tischler Pat and John Tongusi Charmaine and Thomas Uphaus Claudia M. Wagner David R. Wagner Mary Waldo A. Phyllis Wallace Randall S. and William K. Wallach Danny D. Wang and Yili Wang Washtenaw United Way Christian A. Weber Mr. Ira Weisman Dr. and Mrs. William W. Wells Avis L. White Margaret B. White Dr. Patrick T. and Mary White Mr. Howard L. Wikel Carolyn and John Willoughby James and Maggie Woodruff Eckert Wordell Ford L. Wright Michael and Kathleen Yang Dr. Wen-Jei Yang Allan C. and Marie A. Zander Henry and Dorothy Zelisse Jeff and Kate Zink Thomas and Delle ZurSchmiede

In Memory of The Kellogg Eye Center is honored to have received gifts in memory of the following individuals. Jennie Ardagna Mary Argyle Robert Becker Sandra Bessert Idelle Binder Eleanor Brotemarkle Edith Brown Paul Curtis Chaffee Margaret Beacom Chapin Wanda Christian Ruth F. Clarke Birdie Cooper Louise DeMartin Harold Falls, M.D. F. Bruce Fralick, M.D. Louise Jacobson Albert Kabak Steve Kaufman Alfred Kurowski Susan L. Lichter Joseph Masters Marvin J. McKenney, M.D. Margaret Mershon Lillian Moore Vincent Mroz Anna Nalepka Madeline Pellerin Carla Pfuhl Carl D. Roe Dr. Frank Sassaman George R. Scougale Mary H. Sedlar John J. Sidor Lillian R. Uphaus Madeline L. Vantine Thomas Harden Willcockson, M.D.

In Honor of

Michael W. Smith-Wheelock, M.D. H. Kaz Soong, M.D. Carol L. Standardi, R.N. Alan Sugar, M.D. Susan S. Thoms, M.D. Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D. Clare Van Fleteren Andrew Vine, M.D.

Bequests and Other Planned Gifts It is with deep gratitude that we recognize the following individuals for making the Kellogg Eye Center a part of their estate plans. Frank J. and Helga Arnold Nancy Bender Anne S. Benninghoff Rhoda L. and Roger M. Berkowitz Robert D. Biggs, M.D. Ruth F. Clarke Gloria P. and William E. Dean, Jr. Ralph M. Fox Helen A. (Poorbaugh) Freedman Larry and Mary Gerbens Ed and Sue Gorney Ida Lucy Iacobucci Mrs. Harry Krashen Harry and Eva McGee Marvin J. and Beverly McKenney Bruce L. and Roberta Oliver Mrs. Shirley M. Schaible William Selezinka, M.D. Dr. Newel and Rosemary Smith Russell A. Stephens and Phyllis A. Capogna David and Jayne VerLee Michael A. Wainstock, M.D. Jean A. and Richard C. Wilson

Only those who gave their permission are included above.

The following individuals were

Special Thanks

honored through gifts.

With appreciation to Myron Hepner

Anthony P. Adamis, M.D. Najat Y. Binno Claudia Deschaine Jane Griffith Elliott Jerome I. Finkelstein, M.D. Mark W. Johnson, M.D. Paul R. Lichter, M.D. Shahzad I. Mian, M.D. Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Stephen J. Saxe, M.D.

and Delta Gamma Fraternity for their volunteer fundraising activities. We make every effort to ensure the honor roll is accurate. Please call us at 734-615-0243 if you note any errors.

Dedicated to Discovery

29


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications James L. Adams, M.D.

Wayne T. Cornblath, M.D.

Publications Smith LB, Pynnonen MA, Flint A, Adams JL, Elner VM. Progressive eyelid and facial swelling due to follicular lymphoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Grants See grants, page 38

Steven M. Archer, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Visiting professor, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio Publications Archer SM. Brown syndrome – operate or observe? [editorial] J AAPOS 2009;13:115. Archer SM. The effect of medial versus lateral rectus muscle surgery on distance-near incomitance. J AAPOS 2009 13:20-26. Iacobucci IL, Furr BA, Archer SA. Management of binocular diplopia due to maculopathy with combined Bangerter filter and Fresnel prism. Am Orthoptic J 2009 [in press].

Terry J. Bergstrom, M.D. Grants See grants, page 38

Grant M. Comer, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Reviewer, American Journal of Ophthalmology • Reviewer, Retina • Reviewer, Survey of Ophthalmology Publications Chong DY, Johnson MW, Huynh TH, Hall EF, Comer GM, Fish DN. Vitreous penetration of orally administered famciclovir. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;148:38-42. Comer GM, Ciulla TA. Corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema. Rev Ophthalmol 2009;Feb:64-68.

Theresa M. Cooney, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Representative of the Michigan Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons to the Michigan State Medical Society Publications Mian S, Cooney TM, Sugar A. Cornea. In: Gold DH, Lewis RA, eds. Clinical Eye Atlas. Chicago:AMA Press, 2009, chap. 3 [in press].

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • American Academy of Ophthalmology Achievement Award, 2008 • Director, Now You See It, Now You Know It: Pathognomonic Neuro ophthalmology Findings. American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting, 2009 Publications Nelson C, Cornblath WT, Cho R. Optic disc: elevated optic disc, optic atrophy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. In: Gold DH, Lewis RA, eds. Clinical Eye Atlas. Chicago:AMA Press, 2009, pp. 1157-1199. Cornblath WT. How do you manage postoperative visual loss after spinal surgery. In: Lee AG, Brazis PW, eds. Curbside Consultation in Neuro-Ophthalmology: 49 Clinical Questions. SLACK, 2009. Ghandi D, Ansari SA, Cornblath WT. Successful transarterial embolization of a Barrow type D dural carotid-cavernous fistula with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (onyx). J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009;29:9-12. Pribila J, Cornblath W, Ramocki J, Marentette L, Flint A, Elner VM. Glomus cell tumor of the orbit. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Monte A. Del Monte, M.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Chairman, International Affairs Committee, American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Publications Kemper AR, Del Monte MA. Vision screening and interpretation. In: Weitzman M, Tanski S, Garfunkel L, eds. Bright Futures in Practice: Pediatric Preventive Services Manual. San Francisco:American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009 [in press]. Kothary PC, Paauw JD, Bansal AK, Grace CC, Del Monte MA. Inhibition of growth factor stimulated STAT3 by AG490 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Proc Ocular Pharmacol Therapeutics (ISOPT) 38th Meeting, 2009 [in press].

Jonathan B. Demb, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Associate Editor, Journal of Neuroscience

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university of michigan kellogg eye center

Publications Demb JB. Functional circuitry of visual adaptation in the retina. J Physiol 2008;586.18:4377-4384. Beaudoin DL, Manookin MB, Demb JB. Distinct expressions of contrast gain control in parallel synaptic pathways converging on a retinal ganglion cell. J Physiol 2008;586.22:5487-5502. Demb JB. Retina: microcircuits for daylight, twilight and starlight. In: Shepherd G, Grillner S, eds. Handbook of Brain Microcircuits. Oxford University Press, 2009 [in press]. Manookin M, Demb JB. Information processing: contrast sensitivity. In: Bok D, Besharse JC, eds, Encyclopedia of the Eye. New York:Elsevier, 2009 [in press].

Susan G. Elner, M.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Chair, Thesis Review Committee, American Ophthalmological Society • Section Editor, Eye • Executive Editor, American Journal of Ophthalmology • Director, Vitreoretinal fellowship program, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center Publications Bian ZM, Elner SG, Elner VM. Regulated expression of caspase-12 gene in human retinal pigment epithelial cells suggests its immunomodulating role. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2008;49:5593-5601. Yang D, Elner SG, Lin L-R, Reddy VN, Petty HR, Elner VM. Association of superoxide anions with retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis induced by mononuclear phagocytes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009 [in press]. Field MG, Elner VM, Park S, Hackel R, Heckenlively JR, Elner SG, Petty HR. Detection of retinal metabolic stress due to central serous retinopathy. Retina 2009 [in press].

Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery • Senior Achievement Award, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Member, Committee for Ocular Tumors, Pathology and Orbit, Lacrimal Plastic Surgery


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications • Member, Awards Committee, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery • Board of Directors: International Thyroid Eye Disease Society Publications Elner VM. Ocular manifestations of child abuse [editorial]. Arch Ophthalmol 2008;126:1141-2.

Pribila J, Cornblath W, Ramocki J, Marentette L, Flint A, Elner VM. Glomus cell tumor of the orbit. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Elner VM, Newman-Casey PA, Patil AJ, Flint A, Moroi SE, Edward DP. Aberrant wound healing response in mitomycin C-treated blebs: a histopathologic study. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Bian ZM, Elner SG, Elner VM. Regulated expression of caspase-12 gene in human retinal pigment epithelial cells suggests its immunomodulating role. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2008;49:5593-5601.

Cho RI, Choe CH, Elner VM. Ultrasonic bone removal versus high speed burring for lateral orbital decompression: comparison of surgical outcomes for the treatment of thyroid eye disease. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 [in press].

Patel SV, Malta JB, Bannit MR, Mian SI, Sugar A, Elner VM, Tester RA, Farjo QA, Soong HK. Recurrent ectasia in corneal grafts and outcomes of repeat keratoplasty for keratoconus. Br J Ophthalmol 2009;93:191-197.

Kahana A, Pribila JT, Nelson CC, Elner VM. Sebaceous cell carcinoma. In: Albert DM, Levin LA, eds. Ocular Disease: Mechanisms and Management. New York:Elsevier, 2009 [in press].

Koreen IV, Cho RI, Frueh BR, Elner VM. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the medial canthus and orbit. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:6365. Koreen IV, Kahana A, Gausas RE, Potter HD, Lemke BN, Elner VM. Tarsal dermoid cyst: clinical presentation and treatment. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:146-147. Koreen IV, Taich A, Elner VM. Anterior lamellar recession with buccal mucous membrane grafting for cicatricial entropion. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:180-184. Shtein RM, Garcia DD, Musch DC, Elner VM. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: histopathologic inflammation and corneal allograft rejection. Ophthalmology 2009;116:1301-1305. Yang D, Elner SG, Lin L-R, Reddy VN, Petty HR, Elner VM. Association of superoxide anions with retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis induced by mononuclear phagocytes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009 [in press]. Field MG, Elner VM, Park S, Hackel R, Heckenlively JR, Elner SG, Petty HR. Detection of retinal metabolic stress due to central serous retinopathy. Retina 2009 [in press]. Garcia DD, Shtein RM, Musch DC, Elner VM. HSV Keratitis: histopathologic neovascularization and corneal allograft failure. Cornea 2009 [in press]. Smith LB, Pynnonen MA, Flint A, Adams JL, Elner VM. Progressive eyelid and facial swelling due to follicular lymphoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Koreen IV, Flint A, Nelson CC, Frueh BR, Elner VM. Non-diagnostic conjunctival map biopsies for sebaceous carcinoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Bartley R. Frueh, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Publications Koreen IV, Cho RI, Frueh BR, Elner VM. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the medial canthus and orbit. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:6365. Lelli GJ, Musch DC, Frueh BR, Nelson CC. Outcomes in silicone rod frontalis suspension surgery for higher risk (non-congenital) subjects with blepharoptosis. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 [in press]. Koreen IV, Flint A, Nelson CC, Frueh BR, Elner V. Non-diagnostic conjunctival map biopsies for sebaceous carcinoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Bruce A. Furr, C.O., M.S.P.H. Awards/Honors/Leadership • President, American Association of Certified Orthoptists Publications Iacobucci IL, Furr BA, Archer SA. Management of binocular diplopia due to maculopathy with combined Bangerter filter and Fresnel prism. Am Orthoptic J 2009 [in press].

Philip J. Gage, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Publications Gage PJ, Zacharias AL. Signaling “cross-talk” is integrated by transcription factors in the development of the anterior segment in the eye. Dev Dynamics 2009 [in press].

Richard E. Hackel, C.R.A. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editorial Board, Journal of Ophthalmic Photography • Editorial Board, Journal of Neuro Ophthalmology Publications Huynh TH, Johnson MW, Hackel RE. Subretinal Candida albicans abscesses responsive to oral voriconazole. Ret Cases Brief Rep 2008;2:213-215. Field MG, Elner VM, Park S, Hackel R, Heckenlively JR, Elner SG, Petty HR. Detection of retinal metabolic stress due to central serous retinopathy. Retina 2009 [in press].

John R. Heckenlively, M.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Editorial Board, Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics • Associate Editor, Eye • Silver Fellow, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Publications Reuter P, Koeppen K, Ladewig T, Kohl S, Baumann B, Wissinger B; Achromatopsia Clinical Study Group. Mutations in CNGA3 impair trafficking or function of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, resulting in achromatopsia. Hum Mutat 2008;29:1228-1236. Chang B, Mandal MNA, Chavali VRM, Hawes NL, Khan NW, Hurd RE, Smith RS, Davisson ML, Kopplin L, Klein BEK, Klein R, Iyengar SK, Heckenlively JR, Ayyagari R. Age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2) in a novel mouse model due to a nonsense mutation in the Mdm1 gene. Hum Mol Genet 2008;17:3929-3941. Forooghian F, Macdonald IM, Heckenlively JR, Héon E, Gordon LK, Hooks JJ, Detrick B, Nussenblatt RB. The need for standardization of antiretinal antibody detection and measurement. Am J Ophthalmol 2008;146:489495. Ferreyra HA, Jayasundera T, Khan NW, He S, Lu Y, Heckenlively JR. Management of autoimmune retinopathies with immunosuppression. Arch Ophthalmol 2009;127:390-397. Dorrell MI, Aguilar E, Jacobson R, Yanes O, Gariano R, Heckenlively J, Banin E, Ramirez GA, Gasmi M, Bird A, Siuzdak G, Friedlander M. Antioxidant or neurotrophic factor treatment preserves function in a mouse model of neovascularization-associated oxidative stress. J Clin Invest 2009;119:611-623.

Dedicated to Discovery

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Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Friedman JS, Ray JW, Waseem N, Johnson K, Brooks MJ, Hugosson T, Breuer D, Branham KE, Krauth DS, Bowne SJ, Sullivan LS, Ponjavic V, Gränse L, Khanna R, Trager EH, Gieser LM, Hughbanks-Wheaton D, Cojocaru RI, Ghiasvand NM, Chakarova CF, Abrahamson M, Göring HH, Webster AR, Birch DG, Abecasis GR, Fann Y, Bhattacharya SS, Daiger SP, Heckenlively JR, Andréasson S, Swaroop A. Mutations in a BTB-Kelch protein, KLHL7, cause autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Am J Hum Genet 2009;84:792800. Field MG, Elner VM, Park S, Hackel R, Heckenlively JR, Elner SG, Petty HR. Detection of retinal metabolic stress due to central serous retinopathy. Retina 2009 [in press]. Kitiratschky VB, Behnen P, Kellner U, Heckenlively JR, Zrenner E, Jägle H, Kohl S, Wissinger B, Koch KW. Mutations in the GUCA1A gene involved in hereditary cone dystrophies impair calcium-mediated regulation of guanylate cyclase. Hum Mutat 2009 [in press].

Bret A. Hughes, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Silver Fellow, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology • Member, Special Emphasis Panel, National Eye Institute, NIH • Director, University of Michigan Core Center for Vision Research Publications Yang D, Zhang X, Hughes BA. Expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits in native human retinal pigment epithelium. Exp Eye Res 2008;87:176-183.

Ida L. Iacobucci, C.O. Publications Iacobucci IL, Furr BA, Archer SA. Management of binocular diplopia due to maculopathy with combined Bangerter filter and Fresnel prism. Am Orthoptic J 2009 [in press].

Peter F. Hitchcock, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 38 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Director (founding), University of Michigan Medical School Office of Postdoctoral Studies • Member, Executive Board of the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan • Editorial Board, Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases and Informatics • Chair (ad hoc), Cell Biology Review Panel, NIH • Chair (ad hoc), Molecular, Developmental, Cellular Neuroscience Review Panel, NIH Publications Craig SEL, Calinescu A-A, Hitchcock PF. Identification of the molecular signatures integral to regenerating photoreceptors in the retina of the zebrafish. J Ocular Biol Disease Informatics 2008;1:73-83. Ochocinska M, Hitchcock PF. NeuroD regulates proliferation of photoreceptor progenitors in the retina of the zebrafish. Mech Dev 2009;126:128-141. Calinescu A-A, Vihtelic T, Hyde D, Hitchcock PF. The cellular expression of Midkine-a and -b during retinal development and photoreceptor regeneration. J Comp Neurol 2009;514:1-10 (Photograph selected for journal cover).

Mark W. Johnson, M.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Guide to America’s Top Ophthalmologists • Member, Periodic Ophthalmic Review Tests (PORT) Panel, American Board of Ophthalmology • Chairperson, Nominating Committee, Macula Society • Member, Data and Safety Monitoring Committee: Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT), National Eye Institute, NIH • Editorial Board, American Journal of Ophthalmology • Editorial Board, Retina • Editorial Board, Retinal Physician • Member, Committee on Programs, American Ophthalmological Society • Secretary, The Retina Society Publications Huynh TH, Johnson MW, Hackel RE. Subretinal Candida albicans abscesses responsive to oral voriconazole. Ret Cases Brief Rep 2008;2:213-215. Johnson MW. Etiology and treatment of macular edema [perspective]. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;147:11-21.

Hitchcock PF. [Book Review] Chalupa, Williams, eds., Eye, Retina, and Visual System of the Mouse, Boston:MIT Press. J Neuro Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

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university of michigan kellogg eye center

Scott IU, VanVeldhuisen PC, Oden NL, et al, and the SCORE Study Investigator Group. SCORE study report 1: Baseline associations between central retinal thickness and visual acuity in patients with retinal vein occlusion. Ophthalmology 2009;116:504-512. Scott IU, Blodi BA, Ip MS, et al, and the SCORE Study Investigator Group. SCORE study report 2: Interobserver agreement between investigator and reading center classification of retina vein occlusion type. Ophthalmology 2009;116:756-761. Regillo C, Holekamp N, Johnson MW, Kaiser PK, Schubert H, Schmidt-Efurth U, Spaide R. Retina and Vitreous (Section 12). Basic and Clinical Science Course. American Academy of Ophthalmology, 2008-2009. Chong DY, Johnson MW, Huynh TH, Hall EF, Comer GM, Fish DN. Vitreous penetration of orally administered famciclovir. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;148:38-42. Taich A, Johnson MW. A syndrome resembling acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy in older adults. Retina 2009 [in press]. Besirli CG, Johnson MW. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Mayo Clin Proc 2009 [in press]. Slocumb R, Johnson MW. Premature closure of inner retinal fenestration in the treatment of optic disc pit maculopathy. Ret Cases Brief Rep 2009 [in press]. Stein JD, Zacks DN, Grossman D, Grabe H, Johnson MW, Sloan FA. Trends in rates of adverse events after pars plana vitrectomy among medicare beneficiaries. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Johnson TM, Johnson MW. Epiretinal membrane. In:Yanoff M, Duker J, eds., Ophthalmology, 3rd ed. St. Louis:CV Mosby, 2009 [in press]. Johnson TM, Johnson MW. Macular Diseases. In: Quillen DA, Blodi BA, eds., Clinical Retina. Chicago:AMA Press, 2009 [in press].

Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Anthony Adamis Prize for Outstanding Research in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, 2009 • Member, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery • Member, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, International Thyroid Eye Disease Society • Invited speaker, ARVO Ocular Oncology Course


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Publications Cho RI, Kahana A, Patel B, Sivak-Callcott J, Buerger DE, Durairaj VD, Vidor I, Mawn LA. Intraoperative fluoroscopy-guided removal of orbital foreign bodies. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2009:25:215-218. Koreen IV, Kahana A, Gausas RE, Potter HD, Lemke BN, Elner VM. Tarsal dermoid cyst: clinical presentation and treatment. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:146-147. Kahana A, Lucarelli MJ. Adjunctive transcanthotomy lateral suborbicularis fat lift and orbitomalar ligament resuspension in lower eyelid ectropion repair. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009;25:1-6. Kahana A, Burkat CN, Lucarelli MJ, Dortzbach RK. Diagnosis and management of orbital fractures. In: Mallajosyula S, ed., Atlas of the Orbit, New Delhi:Jaypee Brothers 2008. Kahana A, Lucarelli MJ. Corneal protective procedures: tarsorrhaphy and lacrimal occlusion. In: Brightbill FS, McDonnell PJ, McGhee CNJ, Farjo AA, Serdarevic O, eds., Corneal Surgery, 4th ed., St. Louis:Mosby, 2009. Kahana A, Pribila JT, Nelson CC, Elner VM. Sebaceous cell carcinoma. In: Albert DM, Levin LA, eds, Ocular Disease: Mechanisms and Management. New York:Elsevier, 2009 [in press].

Naheed W. Khan, Ph.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Reviewer, British Journal of Ophthalmology • Reviewer, American Institute of Biological Sciences Publications Chang B, Mandal MNA, Chavali VRM, Hawes NL, Khan NW, Hurd RE, Smith RS, Davisson ML, Kopplin L, Klein BEK, Klein R, Iyengar SK, Heckenlively JR, Ayyagari R. Age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2) in a novel mouse model due to a nonsense mutation in the Mdm1 gene. Hum Mol Genet 2008;17:3929-3941. Tuntivanich N, Pittler SJ, Fischer AJ, Omar G, Kiupel M, Weber A, Yao S, Steibel JP, Khan NW, Petersen-Jones SM. Characterization of a canine model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa due to a PDE6A mutation. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009;50:801-813. Ferreyra HA, Jayasundera T, Khan NW, He S, Lu Y, Heckenlively JR. Management of autoimmune retinopathies with immunosuppression. Arch Ophthalmol 2009;127:390-397.

Hemant Khanna, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Young Investigator Award: XIII International Symposium on Retinal Degenerations, Emeishan, Sichuan, China • Reviewer, Fight for Sight • Reviewer, Italian Telethon Foundation for Curing Genetic Diseases • Member, Proposal Review Committee, University of Michigan Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program • Member, Professional Development and Education Committee, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology • Editorial Board, Molecular Vision Publications Tsang WY, Bossard C, Khanna H, Peranen J, Swaroop A, Malhotra V, Dynlacht BD. CP110 suppresses primary cilia formation through its interaction with CEP290, a protein deficient in human ciliary disease. Dev Cell 2008;15:187-197. Khanna H, Davis EA, Murga-Zamalloa CA, et al. A common allele in RPGRIP1L is a modifier of retinal degeneration in ciliopathies. Nat Genet 2009;41:739-745. Murga-Zamalloa C, Swaroop A, Khanna H. Multiprotein complexes of retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), a ciliary protein mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). In: Anderson RD, LaVail M, Hollyfield J, eds., Retinal Degenerative Diseases: Laboratory and Therapeutic Investigations: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer, 2009 [in press].

Sarah S. Levy, M.D. Outreach • Guest Speaker, University of Michigan Turner Senior Resource Center

Paul R. Lichter, M.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Associate Editor, American Journal of Ophthalmology • Secretary-General, Academia Ophthalmologica Internationalis • President, Society of Heed Fellows • Trustee, Heed Ophthalmic Foundation • Glover-Lisman Lecturer, New York University • Mansour F. Armaly Lecturer, University of Iowa

Publications Musch DC, Gillespie BW, Lichter PR, Niziol LM, Janz NK, CIGTS Study Investigators. Visual field progression in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study: the impact of treatment and other baseline factors. Ophthalmology 2009; 116:200-207. Parrish RK II, Feuer WJ, Schiffman JC, Lichter PR, Musch DC. Five-year follow-up optic disc findings of the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;147:717-724.

Michael J. Lipson, O.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Invited speaker, Global Specialty Lens Symposium Publications Lipson MJ. Contact lenses, UpToDate 2009 [in press].

Shahzad I. Mian, M.D. Grants See grants, page 39 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Achievement Award, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Board of Directors, Midwest Eye Bank • Editor, “Cornea,” Ophthalmic News and Education Network, American Academy of Ophthalmology Publications Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein RM, Banitt MR, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty: laboratory studies in eye bank eyes. Curr Eye Res 2009;34(1):19-25. Patel SV, Malta JB, Banitt, M, Mian S, Sugar A, Elner VM, Tester RA, Farjo QA, Soong HK. Recurrent ectasia in corneal grafts and outcomes of repeat keratoplasty for keratoconus. Br J Ophthalmol 2009;93:191-197. Banitt M, Malta JB, Mian SI, Soong HK. Rupture of anterior lens capsule from blunt ocular injury. J Cataract Refract Surg 2009;35:943945. Malta JB, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian S, Soong HK. Long-term outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty combined with scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Cornea 2009 [in press]. Mian SI, Sullivan T, Millican W, Uhler T, Gedde S, Lee A, Golnik KC. Development of a tool for assessment of resident cataract surgery instrument knowledge. Acad J Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Dedicated to Discovery

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Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Sullivan T, Millican W, Uhler T, Gedde S, Lee A, Golnik KC, Mian SI. Assessment of resident cataract surgery instrument knowledge. Acad J Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Mian S, Sugar A. Corneal complications after intraocular surgery. In: Krachmer J, Mannis M, Holland E, eds. Cornea, 3rd ed, Philadelphia:Elsevier Mosby 2009 [in press]. Mian SI, Cooney T, Sugar A. Cornea. In: Gold DH, Lewis RA, eds. Clinical Eye Atlas, 2nd ed, Chicago:AMA Press 2009, chap. 3 [in press]. Banitt M, Malta JB, Soong HK, Musch DC, Mian SI. Wound integrity of clear corneal incisions closed with fibrin and n-butyl-2cyanoacrylate adhesives. Curr Eye Res 2009 [in press].

Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Alpha Omega Alpha, Gamma Chapter of Ohio • Study section, Glaucoma Research Foundation • Study section, American Glaucoma Society Publications Moroi SE, Raoof DA, Reed DM, Zöllner S, Qin Z, Richards JE. Progress toward personalized medicine for glaucoma. Exp Rev Ophthalmol 2009;4:145-161. Elner VM, Newman-Casey PA, Patil AJ, Flint A, Moroi SE, Edward DP. Aberrant wound healing response in mitomycin C-treated blebs: a histopathologic study. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editorial Board, Ophthalmology • Editorial Board, Retina • Consulting Editorial Board, Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology • Scientific Advisory Board, Clinical and Translational Science Award, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research • Chair, Special Emphasis Grant Review Panel, National Eye Institute, NIH • Reviewer, National Medical Research Council, Singapore • Methodologist, Cornea and External Disease Preferred Practice Pattern Panel, American Academy of Ophthalmology

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• Member, Advisory Group, Cochrane Collaboration Eyes and Vision Group US Project • Expert group core member, Vision and Hearing Loss Expert Group, Noncommunicable Diseases Cluster, Global Burden of Diseases Study • Invited faculty, Design, Conduct and Management of Clinical Trials in Eye Research, ARVO Foundation for Eye Research Clinical Trials Education, Portoroz, Slovenia • Key note address, Fifth Annual ARVO/Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Institute • Invited guest professor, Beijing Tongren Eye Hospital, Beijing, PRC • Silver Fellow, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Publications Van Meter WS, Musch DC, Jacobs DS, Kaufman SC, Reinhart WJ, Udell IJ. Safety of overnight orthokeratology for myopia. A report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2008;115:23012313. Janz NK, Musch DC, Gillespie BW, Wren PA, Niziol LM. Evaluating clinical change and visual function concerns in drivers and nondrivers with glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009;50:1718-1725. Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein R, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty: laboratory studies in eye bank eyes. Curr Eye Res 2009;34(1):18-25. Musch DC, Gillespie BW, Lichter PR, Niziol LM, Janz NK, CIGTS Study Investigators. Visual field progression in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study: the impact of treatment and other baseline factors. Ophthalmology 2009; 116:200-207. Parrish RK II, Feuer WJ, Schiffman JC, Lichter PR, Musch DC. Five-year follow-up optic disc findings of the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;147:717-724. Shtein RM, Garcia DD, Musch DC, Elner VM. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: histopathologic inflammation and corneal allograft rejection. Ophthalmology 2009;116:1301-1305. Wren PA, Musch DC, Janz NK, Niziol LM, Guire KE, Gillespie BW. Contrasting the use of two vision-specific quality of life questionnaires in subjects with open-angle glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2009 [in press]. Malta JB, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian S, Soong HK. Long-term outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty combined with scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Cornea 2009 [in press].

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Lelli GJ, Musch DC, Frueh BR, Nelson CC. Outcomes in silicone rod frontalis suspension surgery for higher risk (non-congenital) subjects with blepharoptosis. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 [in press]. Garcia DD, Shtein RM, Musch DC, Elner VM. Herpes simples virus keratitis: histopathologic neovascularization and corneal allograft failure. Cornea 2009 [in press]. Banitt M, Malta JB, Soong HK, Musch DC, Mian SI. Wound integrity of clear corneal incisions closed with fibrin and n-butyl-2cyanoacrylate adhesives. Curr Eye Res 2009 [in press].

Christine C. Nelson, M.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Top Doctor, Hour Detroit • Guide to America’s Top Ophthalmologists Publications Lelli GJ, Musch DC, Frueh BR, Nelson CC. Outcomes in silicone rod frontalis suspension surgery for higher risk (non-congenital) subjects with blepharoptosis. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 [in press]. Koreen IV, Flint A, Nelson CC, Frueh BR, Elner V. Non-diagnostic conjunctival map biopsies for sebaceous carcinoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Nelson C, Cornblath W, Cho R. Optic disc: elevated optic disc, optic atrophy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. In: Gold DH, Lewis RA, eds. Clinical Eye Atlas. Chicago:AMA Press, 2009, pp. 1157-1199. Kahana A, Pribila JT, Nelson CC, Elner VM. Sebaceous cell carcinoma. In: Albert DM, Levin LA, eds. Ocular Disease: Mechanisms and Management. New York:Elsevier, 2009 [in press].

Howard R. Petty, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Publications Petty HR, Clark AJ. Methods to improve the kinetic evaluation of fluorescence intensities and locations of chemical signals within single living cells. In: Amar P, Kepes F, Norris V, Vandenbunder B, eds., Modeling Complex Biological Systems in the Context of Genomics, 7th ed. France:Barniauz, EDP Science, 2008, pp. 77-85. Zhu A, Romero R, Petty HR. An enzymatic fluorimetric assay for glucose-6-phosphate: application in an in vitro Warburg-like effect. Anal Biochem 2009;388:97-101.


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Field MG, Elner VM, Park S, Hackel R, Heckenlively JR, Elner SG, Petty HR. Detection of retinal metabolic stress due to from central serous retinopathy. Retina 2009 [in press]. Yang D, Elner SG, Lin L-R, Reddy VN, Petty HR, Elner VM. Association of superoxide anions with retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis induced by mononuclear phagocytes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009 [in press]. Clark AJ, Diamond M, Elfline M, Petty HR. Calicum microdomains form within neutrophils at the neutrophil-tumor cell synapse: role in antibody-dependent target cell apoptosis. Cancer Immunol Immunother 2009 [in press].

Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Editorial Board, Microcirculation • Silver Fellow, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology • Ad hoc member, Biology and Diseases of the Posterior Eye Study Section, Center for Scientific Review, NIH Publications Ishizaki E, Fukumoto M, Puro DG. Functional KATP channels in the rat retinal microvasculature: topographical distribution, redox regulation, spermine modulation and diabetic alteration. J Physiol 2009;587:2233-2253.

Julia E. Richards, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Director, Glaucoma Research Center, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, The Glaucoma Foundation • Member, Steering Committee, Multi-center Study to Map Novel Genes for Fuchs Corneal Endothelial Dystrophy, Case Western Reserve University • Member, Glaucoma Research Society, International Congress of Ophthalmology • Grant Review Panel, The Glaucoma Foundation • Ad hoc reviewer, AED Study Section, National Eye Institute, NIH • Ad hoc reviewer, BDCN Special Emphasis Panel, National Eye Institute, NIH • Ad hoc reviewer, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ottawa, Canada Publications Moroi SE, Raoof DA, Reed DM, Zöllner S, Qin Z, Richards JE. Progress toward personalized medicine for glaucoma. Exp Rev Ophthalmol 2009;4:145-161.

Stephen J. Saxe, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Invited guest speaker, Center for Retinal and Macular Degenerations, Department of Ophthalmology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

Roni M. Shtein, M.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Anthony Adamis Prize for Outstanding Research in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, 2008 • Member, Cornea/Anterior Segment Panel, Ophthalmic Technology Assessment Committee, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Member, Vision Research Training Program, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center • Member, Unified Curriculum Committee, University of Michigan Publications Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein RM, Banitt MR, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty: laboratory studies in eye bank eyes. Curr Eye Res 2009;34(1);18-25. Shtein RM, Garcia DD, Musch DC, Elner VM. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: histopathologic inflammation and corneal allograft rejection. Ophthalmology 2009;116:1301-1305. Garcia DD, Shtein RM, Musch DC, Elner VM. HSV keratitis: histopathologic neovascularization and corneal allograft failure. Cornea 2009 [in press]. Sugar A, Shtein RM. Lens. In: Gold GH, Lewis RA, eds., Clinical Eye Atlas, 2nd ed., Chicago:AMA Press, 2009 [in press].

H. Kaz Soong, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Senior Honor Award, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Program Co-Director, Cornea and External Disease Symposium, Pan-American Association of Ophthalmology, Joint Meeting of the PAAO and AAO • Invited International Professor, Kaohsiung Medical College, Department of Ophthalmology, Annual Meeting of the Ophthalmological Society of Taiwan • Visiting Professor, National Taiwan University Medical School

Publications Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein RM, Banitt MR, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty: laboratory studies in eye bank eyes. Curr Eye Res 2008;34(1):18-25. Soong HK, Malta JB. Femtosecond lasers in ophthalmology [perspective]. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;147:189-197. Patel S, Soong H: Indications and contraindications for anterior lamellar keratoplasty. In: Brightbill F, ed., Corneal Surgery, Theory, Technique, and Tissue, 4th ed. Philadelphia/ St. Louis:Mosby-Elsevier 2009, pp. 337-342. Banitt M, Malta JB, Mian SI, Soong HK. Rupture of anterior lens capsule from blunt ocular injury. J Cataract Refract Surg 2009;35:943945. Patel SV, Malta JB, Bannit MR, Mian SI, Sugar A, Elner VM, Tester RA, Farjo QA, Soong HK. Recurrent ectasia in corneal grafts and outcomes of repeat keratoplasty for keratoconus. Br J Ophthalmol 2009;93:191-197. Banitt M, Malta JB, Soong HK, Musch DC, Mian SI. Wound integrity of clear corneal incisions closed with fibrin and n-butyl-2cyanoacrylate adhesives. Curr Eye Res 2009 [in press]. Malta JB, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI, Soong HK. Long-term outcome of combined penetrating keratoplasty with scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Cornea 2009 [in press].

Joshua D. Stein, M.D. Grants See grants, page 40 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Editorial Board, Evidence-Based Ophthalmology Publications Stein JD, Zacks DN, Grossman D, Grabe H, Johnson MW, Sloan FA. Trends in rates of adverse events after pars plana vitrectomy among medicare beneficiaries. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Weizer JS, Stein JD. Complete Eye Care. New York:Readers Digest 2009 [in press].

Alan Sugar, M.D. Grants See grants, page 41 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Best Original Paper Award, Cornea free papers, American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting • Founders Award, Midwest Eye-Banks • Associate Editor, Cornea Dedicated to Discovery

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Faculty honors, recognition, and publications • Editorial Board, Ophthalmology • Board of Directors, Midwest Eye Banks • Board of Directors, World Eye Mission • Medical Advisory Board, Eye Bank Association of America • Chair, Research Committee, Eye Bank Association of America • Chair, Ophthalmic Technology Assessment Committee, American Academy of Ophthalmology • Vice-Chair, IRBMED, University of Michigan Medical School Publications Patel SV, Malta JB, Banitt M, Mian SI, Sugar A, Elner VM, Tester RA, Farjo QA, Soong HK. Recurrent ectasia in corneal grafts and outcomes of repeat keratoplasty for keratoconus. Br J Ophthalmol 2009;93:191-197. Malta JB, Soong HK, Shtein R, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty: laboratory studies in eye bank eyes. Curr Eye Res 200;34(1):1825. Sugar A, Tanner JP, Dontchev M, Tennant B, Schultze RL, Dunn SP, Lindquist TD, Gal RL, Beck RW, Kollman C, Mannis MJ, Holland EJ for the Cornea Donor Study Investigator Group. Recipient risk factors for graft failure in the Cornea Donor Study. Ophthalmology 2009;116:1023-1028. Dunn SP, Stark WJ, Stulting RD, Lass JH, Sugar A, Pavilack M, Smith P, Tanner JP, Dontchev M, Gal RL, Beck RW, Kollman C, for the Cornea Donor Study Investigator Group. The effect of ABO blood incompatibility on corneal graft failure in the Cornea Donor Study. Am J Ophthalmol 2009;147:432438. Wilhelmus KR, Mitchell BM, Dawson CR, et al, for the Herpetic Eye Disease Study Group. Slitlamp biomicroscopy and photographic image analysis of herpes simplex virus stromal keratitis. Arch Ophthalmol 2009;127:161166. Lindquist T, Miller T, Elsen J, Lignoski P, for the Policy and Position Research Subcommittee of the EBAA Medical Advisory Board. Minimizing the risk of disease transmission during corneal tissue processing. Cornea 2009;28:481-484.

Farjo QA, Sugar A. Corneal degenerations. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS. Ophthalmology, New York:Mosby/Elsevier, 2009, pp. 318-323. Mian S, Sugar A. Corneal complications after intraocular surgery. In: Krachmer J, Mannis M, Holland E, eds. Cornea, 3rd ed, Phila:Elsevier Mosby 2009 [in press]. Sugar A. Herpes simplex keratitis. UpToDate 2009 [in press]. Mian SI, Cooney T, Sugar A. Cornea. In: Gold DH, Lewis RA, eds. Clinical Eye Atlas, 2nd ed, Chicago:AMA Press 2009, chap. 3 [in press]. Sugar A, Shtein RM. Lens. In: Gold GH, Lewis RA, eds., Clinical Eye Atlas, 2nd ed., Chicago:AMA Press, 2009 [in press]. Malta JB, Banitt M, Musch DC, Sugar A, Mian SI, Soong HK. Long-term outcome of combined penetrating keratoplasty with scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Cornea 2009 [in press]. Lass JH, Sugar A, Benetz BA, Beck RW, Dontchev M, Gal RL, Kollman C, Gross R, Heck E, Holland EJ, Mannis MJ, Raber I, Stark W, Stulting RD. Endothelial cell density predictive of endothelial failure after penetrating keratoplasty. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Debra A. Thompson, Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 41 Publications Huang X, Finerty P Jr, Walker JR, Butler-Cole C, Vedadi M, Schapira M, Parker SA, Turk BE, Thompson DA, Dhe-Paganon S. Structural insights into the inhibited states of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase. J Struct Biol 2009:165;88-96. Chrispell JD, Feathers KL, Kane M, Brooks M, Khanna R, Kurth I, Hübner C, Gal A, Mears A, Swaroop A, Napoli JL, Thompson DA. RDH12 activity and effects on retinoid processing in the murine retina. J Biol Chem 2009 [in press].

Susan S. Thoms, M.D.

Sugar A. Preoperative considerations: aphakic and pseudophakic eyes. In: Brightbill F, McDonnell PJ, McGhee C, Farjo A, Serdarevic O, eds. Corneal Surgery, New York:Mosby/Elsevier, 2009, pp. 273-276.

Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Vice Chair, Board of Trustees for the Greater Detroit Agency for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Farjo QA, Sugar A. Pterygium and conjunctival degenerations. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS. Ophthalmology, New York:Mosby/Elsevier, 2009, pp. 248-250.

Outreach • Invited speaker, Salvation Army camp for the visually impaired

36

university of michigan kellogg eye center

Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D. Grants See grants, page 41 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America • Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Neuro Ophthalmology Publications Jacob M, Gujar S, Trobe JD, Gandhi D. Spontaneous resolution of a Meckel’s cave arachnoid cyst causing sixth cranial nerve palsy. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2008;28:186-191. Margolin E, Hanifan D, Berger MK, Ahmad OR, Trobe JD, Gebarski SS. Skew deviation as the initial manifestation of left paramedian thalamic infarction. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2008;28:283-286. Parmar H, Gandhi D, Mukherji SK, Trobe JD. Restricted diffusion in the superior ophthalmic vein and cavernous sinus in a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009;29:16-20. Kamyar R, Trobe JD. Bilateral mesial occipital lobe infarction after cardiogenic hypotension induced by electrical shock. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009;29:107-110. Momont AC, Trobe JD. Transient corneal edema and left hemisphere dysfunction in Pearson Syndrome. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009;29:158. Warden KF, Parmar H, Trobe JD. A trigeminal trifecta: cases illustrating perineural spread of cancer along the three divisions. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Trobe JD. Searching for brain aneurysm in third cranial nerve palsy. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009 [in press]. Trobe JD. Robert B. Daroff, MD: Pioneer of ocular motor research. J Neuro-Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Andrew K. Vine, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Best Doctors in America Publications Vine AK. Recent advances in haemostasis and thrombosis. Retina 2009;29:1-7.

Jennifer S. Weizer, M.D. Awards/Honors/Leadership • Director, Glaucoma fellowship program, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center • Director, Quality assurance committee, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center Publications Weizer JS, Stein JD. Complete Eye Care. New York:Readers Digest 2009 [in press].


Faculty honors, recognition, and publications Dongli Yang, M.D., Ph.D. Publications Yang D, Zhang X, Hughes BA. Expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits in native human retinal pigment epithelium. Exp Eye Res 2008;87:176-183. Yang D, Elner SG, Lin L-R, Reddy VN, Petty HR, Elner VM. Association of superoxide anions with retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis induced by mononuclear phagocytes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009 [in press].

David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. Grants See grants, page 41 Awards/Honors/Leadership • Election to American Ophthalmological Society • Writing committee, Basic and Clinical Science Course, Retina, Vol 12. American Academy of Ophthalmology

Outreach • Guest Speaker, University of Michigan Turner Senior Resource Center, Low Vision Support Group • Honorary Co-Chair, Foundation Fighting Blindness Eastern Michigan Vision-Walk Publications Zadro-Lamoureux LA, Zacks DN, Baker AN, Zheng QD, Hauswirth WW, Tsilfidis C. XIAP protects photoreceptors from retinal detachment-induced death. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009;50:1448-1453. Stein JD, Zacks DN, Grossman D, Grabe H, Johnson MW, Sloan FA. Trends in rates of adverse events after pars plana vitrectomy among medicare beneficiaries. Arch Ophthalmol 2009 [in press].

Chong DY, Boehlke CS, Zheng QD, Zhang L, Han Y, Zacks DN. Interleukin-6 as a photoreceptor neuroprotectant in an experimental model of retinal detachment. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2008;49:3193-3200. Grabe H, Zacks DN. Seat belt retinopathy: a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy following a motor vehicle accident. Retinal Cases and Brief Reports 2008 [in press]. Conrad PW, Zacks DN, Johnson MW. Intravitreal bevacizumab has initial clinical benefit lasting eight weeks in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Clinical Ophthalmol 2008 [in press].

Zacks DN. Gene transcription profile of the detached retina. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 2009 [in press].

Resident Awards Cagri Besirli, M.D., Ph.D.

Irina V. Koreen, M.D., Ph.D.

Jonathan Pribila, M.D., Ph.D.

George Slocum Research Award,

George Slocum Research Award,

George Slocum Research Award,

Second Place, 2008-2009

Brenda Bohnsack, M.D., Ph.D.

George Slocum Research Award,

First Place, 2008-2009

Walter Parker Teaching Award,

First Place, 2008-2009

Hilary M. Grabe, M.D.

George Slocum Research Award,

Third Place, 2007-2008

Co-Chief Resident, 2008-2009 Roheena Kamyar, M.D.

Co-Chief Resident, 2008-2009

Third Place, 2008-2009

Second Place, 2007-2008

James L. Laberge Award for

Walter Parker Teaching Award,

Excellence in Research, 2008

Midwest Eye-Banks Eye and

Vision Research Program

Stipend Award, 2008-2009

National Eye Institute Travel Grant

Award, 2009 ARVO meeting

Second Place, 2007-2008

David M. Wu, M.D., Ph.D.

George Slocum Research Award,

First Place 2007-2008

George Slocum Research Award,

Third Place, 2006-2007

Larry Koreen, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

Heed Fellowship

Midwest Eye-Banks Eye and

James L. Laberge Award for

Vision Research Program

Stipend Award, 2008-2009

Knights Templar Eye Foundation Award

Excellence in Research, 2007

Walter Parker Teaching Award,

Walter Parker Teaching Award,

2008-2009

Second Place, 2008-2009

Walter Parker Teaching Award,

First Place, 2007-2008

Dedicated to Discovery

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grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

T. Bergstrom, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY010439-15 Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) Coordinating Center: Washington University W. Cornblath, M.D. ICON Clinical Research/Pfizer Case-Crossover Study of PDE5 Inhibitor Exposure as a Potential “Trigger Factor” for Acute NAION M. Del Monte, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY011751 Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group Multiple Projects, Coordinating Center: Jaeb Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Phase I Open Label Study of Latanoprost in Pediatric and Adult Glaucoma Patients J. Demb, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY014454-05 Functional Circuitry of Visual Adaptation RPB Career Development Award Sloan Foundation Sloan Research Fellowship S. Elner, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY014660 Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial Coordinating Center: Johns Hopkins University V. Elner, M.D., Ph.D. NIH R01-EY009441-13 RPE-MΦ Binding: Ca++ & O2- Dependent AMD Responses RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award Michigan Universities Prototype Development ETCF Grant Commercialization Initiative U-M Medical School Translational Research Initiatives Program Grant P. Gage, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY014126-06 Pitx 2: Molecular Mechanisms in Eye Development and Disease J. Heckenlively, M.D. NIH R01-EY007758-20 Mouse Models of Human Hereditary Eye Diseases NIH R01-EY016862-04 Genetic Variations in Age-related Macular Degenerations FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Assessment of Therapies FFB Resource Facility for X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age-related Macular Degeneration Neurotech USA Phase II/III Study of Encapsulated Human Cell Implants Releasing CNTF for Participants with Retinitis Pigmentosa Sramek Foundation Interactive and Integrated Genetic Databases for the Study of Age-related Macular Degeneration P. Hitchcock, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY007060-20 Neuronal Development, Injury and Regeneration in Retina NIH R01-EY011115-12 Molecular Mechanisms of Retina-specific Gene Expression NIH T32-EY013934-07 Vision Research Training Program FFB – Canada Identification and Function of Molecular Cues for Photoreceptor Regeneration in the Vertebrate Retina RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award

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university of michigan kellogg eye center


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

B. Hughes, Ph.D. NIH P30-EY007003-23 Core Center for Vision Research (five core modules) NIH R01-EY008850-18 Ion Conductances in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium RPB Lew R. Wasserman Award M. Johnson, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY014351 Standard Care Versus Corticosteroid for Retinal Vein Occlusion (SCORE) Study, Coordinating Center: University of Wisconsin Chiltern International/ThromboGenics Inc. A Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Double-masked, Multicenter Trial of Microplasmin Intravitreal Injection for Non-surgical Treatment of Focal Vitreomacular Adhesion GlaxoSmithKline/Clinical Trial Study to Investigate Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib Eye Drops LMRI/Clinical Trial A Natural History Study of Macular Telangiectasia — The MacTel Study Regeneron Pharmaceutical/Clinical Trial Phase III Study of Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Repeated Doses of Intravitreal VEGF Trap in Subjects with Neovascular AMD A. Kahana, M.D., Ph.D. NIH K08-EY018689-02 Zebrafish Model for Studying Orbital Development and Disease H. Khanna, Ph.D. NIH R01-EY007961-21 X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa NIH R01-DC009606-01 Olfactory Signaling, Cilia, and Sensory Disorders Subcontract with Jeffrey Martens, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases Midwest Eye-Banks Phenotypic Signature Associated with Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator and Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 - Student Stipend Award U-M Center for Rare Disease Ciliary Signaling Cascades in Retinal and Syndromic Ciliopathies P. Lichter, M.D. RPB Unrestricted Grant VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies/ VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies Implantable Clinical Trial Miniature Telescope for Central Vision Impairment Associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration and Other Maculopathies M. Lipson, O.D. EyeVis L.L.C. Stabilizing Myopia by Accelerated Reshaping Technique S. Mian, M.D. NIH R01-EY14163-01 Femtosecond Laser Posterior Lamellar Keratoplasty Subcontract with Tibor Juhasz, Ph.D., University of California - Irvine Fight for Sight, MICHR, Midwest Eye-Banks Femtosecond Laser-assisted Keratoplasty

Dedicated to Discovery

39


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

S. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D. Merck and Company, Inc. Merck IISP #31911 Study: Effect of Myocilin Genetic Variants on Intraocular Pressure and Pressure Variation in Sitting and Supine Positions D. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H. NIH R21-EY118690-01 Clinical and Quality of Life Insights on Glaucoma from Analyses of CIGTS Data C. Nelson, M.D. Midwest Eye-Banks Clinicopathologic Correlation Study of Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Ocular Adnexa — Student Stipend Award Midwest Eye-Banks Medical Student Fellowship H. Petty, Ph.D. NIH N01-HD-2-3342 Services in Support of the Perinatology Research Branch Subcontract with Wayne State University NIH R01-CA074120-10 Signaling Dynamics of Leukocyte-Tumor Cell Interactions NIH R01-AI060983-03 Lipid Raft Microdomains in Neutrophil Function Subcontract, Robert Sitrin, M.D., U-M Medical School Midwest Eye-Banks Time-Gated Single Molecule Fluorescence Imaging U-M Medical School Translational Research Initiatives Program Grant D. Puro, M.D., Ph.D. NIH R01-EY012507-10 Physiology of Retinal Pericytes RPB Senior Scientific Investigator Award J. Richards, Ph.D. NIH R56-EY011671-09 Molecular Genetics of Glaucoma and Related Disorders AHAF Genetic Risk Factors and Glaucoma Outcomes Fight for Sight Sequence Variants in CLCN3 and the Associated Risk of Glaucoma — Student Fellowship OVPR Faculty Grants and Awards Shared Core Equipment R. Shtein, M.D. NIH K23-EY017885-02 Neovascularization Patterns in Corneal Graft Rejection MICHR Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Dry Eye OVPR Faculty Grants and Awards Evaluation of Growth Factors in Tears of Patients with HSV Keratitis U-M Medical School Clinical Sciences Scholars Program Award J. Stein, M.D. NIH K23-EY019511-01 Association between Cataract Surgery and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy American Glaucoma Society Mentoring for Advancement of Physician-Scientist Enabling Award Program American Glaucoma Society Racial Disparities in the Care of Elderly Americans with Glaucoma Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Longitudinal Rates of Postoperative Adverse Outcomes after Glaucoma Surgery among Medicare Beneficiaries 1994-2005 Midwest Eye-Banks Monitoring of Patients for Ocular Side Effects of Corticosteroids

40

university of michigan kellogg eye center


grants

Faculty Name

Source

ID

Project Title

A. Sugar, M.D. NIH/Clinical Trial U10-EY12358 Cornea Donor Study, Coordinating Center: Jaeb NIH/Clinical Trial R01-EY016482 A Multi-Center Study to Map Genes for Fuchs Dystrophy Coordinating Center: Case Western Reserve University Lux Biosciences, Inc. A Randomized Dose-Ranging Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of LX201 for Prevention of Corneal Allograft Rejection Episodes and Graft Failure following Penetrating Keratoplasty D. Thompson, Ph.D. FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Small Molecular Interventions Midwest Eye-Banks Mertk Signaling in RPE Phagocytosis — Student Stipend Award RPB Visual Cycle Defects in Inherited Retinal Degeneration — Senior Scientific Investigator Award J. Trobe, M.D. University of Utah American Geriatrics Society

Proteomics and Genomics of Giant Cell Arteritis

D. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D. NIH K08-EY14705-05 Apoptosis in Retinal Detachments FFB Center for the Study of Retinal Degenerative Diseases FFB Consortium Treatment Grant: Transplantation of Photoreceptor Precursors IRRF Control of Photoreceptor Apoptosis Midwest Eye-Banks Intravitreal Linezolid in Rabbits: an Electrophysiologic and Histopathologic Analysis Midwest Eye-Banks Small Molecule Inhibitors of Photoreceptor Apoptosis

Source Abbreviations AHAF – American Health Assistance Foundation

MICHR – Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research

FFB – Foundation Fighting Blindness

NIH – National Institutes of Health

IRRF – International Retinal Research Foundation

OVPR – Office of the Vice President for Research,

LMRI – Lowy Medical Research Institute

University of Michigan RPB – Research to Prevent Blindness

Dedicated to Discovery

41


A Tale of Two Towers

Building for a New Era of Discovery The W.K. Kellogg Eye Center opened its doors in 1985, beginning a period of rapid growth and discovery. Clinicians were able to see many more patients, and, with vision research scientists now in the same location, the faculty had many opportunities to exchange ideas that would bring advanced care and treatments to our patients. By the mid-1990s, it was apparent that the Kellogg Eye Center was about to enter another period of expansion. Several national studies indicated that the U.S. population was growing older and would need medical care for age-related diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration. In Michigan, the number of residents over the

1999 May The Department completes a study on the anticipated growth of our patient population and concludes that the Eye Center will outgrow its current space within 10 years.

1999 December 17 The first gift for the Kellogg Eye Center expansion is given by Mary June and the late Dr. William Wilkinson.

2005 July 21 The University Board of Regents

age of 65 was projected to increase by 52 percent

approves the construction of an ex-

by 2025. It was time to think about a new building.

pansion to the existing U-M Kellogg Eye Center, with two floors devoted to the new Delores S. and William K. Brehm Center for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Analysis.

2006 September 19 Groundbreaking Ceremony features President Mary Sue Coleman and other University and Health System leaders, as well as a “full house� of faculty, staff, and friends.

2007 November 6 Topping Out celebrates completion of the major structural steel work. Before the ceremony, faculty, staff, friends, and construction crew sign the last beam to be placed.

U-M President Mary Sue Coleman speaks at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.


Larry Gerbens, M.D., Dave VerLee, M.D., and John Leenhouts, M.D., take a tour of the expansion during Fall Reunion Weekend.

2008 July Construction continues and by July the building takes on a more finished look as brick, cast stone, and glass and metal panels are installed on the building exterior.

2008 October 3

The Kellogg Eye Center expansion and Research Tower as seen from the south.

Alumni tours of the building take place during Fall Reunion Weekend.

2010 March Clinics scheduled to make the move from the “old� to the new building, which will be named the Brehm Tower.

April 23-24 Celebratory symposium, Dedicated to

Kellogg faculty, friends, staff, and construction crew members stand by for Topping Out, when the last beam is placed on top of the building.

Discovery, features leading ophthalmologists on advances in eye care.

April 23 Save this date for the Dedication Ceremony, followed by a reception and tours of the Kellogg Eye Center Expansion and Brehm Center.

Paul R. Lichter, M.D., speaks to friends and supporters about the expansion.


Facult y of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

Row 1 Rebecca A. Wu, M.D., Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S., Alon Kahana, M.D., Ph.D., Paul R. Lichter, M.D., David N. Zacks, M.D., Ph.D., Jonathan B. Demb, Ph.D., H. Kaz Soong, M.D., Stephen J. Saxe, M.D. Row 2 Joshua P. Vrabec, M.D., Sarah S. Levy, M.D., Naheed W. Khan, Ph.D., Wayne T. Cornblath, M.D., Sayoko E. Moroi, M.D., Ph.D., Shahzad I. Mian, M.D., Helios T. Leung, Ph.D., O.D., Dongli Yang, M.D., Ph.D., Philip J. Gage, Ph.D. Row 3 Gale A. Oren, M.I.L.S., Frank W. Rozsa, Ph.D., Alan Sugar, M.D., Susan S. Thoms, M.D., Hemant Khanna, Ph.D., Grant M. Comer, M.D., Roni M. Shtein, M.D., Michael J. Lipson, O.D. Row 4 Gary S. Sandall, M.D., Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., Jerome I. Finkelstein, M.D., Jonathan D. Trobe, M.D., Theresa M. Cooney, M.D., Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., Terry J. Smith, M.D., Raymond S. Douglas, M.D., Ph.D. Row 5 Terry J. Bergstrom, M.D., Steven M. Archer, M.D., Donald S. Beser, M.D., Bradley W. Taylor, O.D., M.P.H., David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H., Denise A. John, M.D., Mark W. Johnson, M.D., Donald G. Puro, M.D., Ph.D.

Not Pictured: James Adams, M.D., Jill Bixler, M.D., Sherry Day, O.D., Monte Del Monte, M.D., Susan Elner, M.D., Carlton Foster, O.D., Bartley Frueh, M.D., Bruce Furr, MSPH, C.O., Daniel Green, Ph.D., Richard Hackel, M.A., C.R.A., John Heckenlively, M.D., Peter Hitchcock, Ph.D., Bret Hughes, Ph.D., Ida Iacobucci, C.O., Diane Jacobi, O.D., Harjeet Kaur, M.D., James Knaggs, M.D., Christine Nelson, M.D., Howard Petty, Ph.D., Michael Smith-Wheelock, M.D., Debra Thompson, Ph.D., Andrew Vine, M.D., Jennifer Weizer, M.D., Adrienne West, M.D., Donna Wicker, O.D.


Alumni in Ann Arbor Returning to reminisce and share what they’ve learned It is always an event when alumni return to the U-M Kellogg Eye Center, whether for Fall Reunion Weekend or one of our

William Bromley, M.D., R ’71, after touring the Kellogg expansion during Fall Reunion Weekend.

CME programs. Alumni form a community of colleagues who readily share their knowledge and experience with each other and with current trainees and recent graduates.

Our alumni have provided leadership on new program

initiatives, with a special focus and fondness for residency education. They stepped up to provide critical support for the Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professorship, inaugurated in 2003, and now they are turning their attention to creating the new Resident Education Center and establishing the Terry J. Bergstrom Collegiate Professorship to honor a longtime friend and colleague.

We have 450 members in our alumni group, and they

Michael Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., R ’90, and Everton Arrindell, M.D., R ’90, at the Alumni Dinner, 2008 AAO meeting.

are the best ambassadors that any Department could wish to have. And they always seem to have a good time when they return to Ann Arbor.

Our newest alumni Jessica Chen and Tony Huynh, M.D., R ’07, at the 2008 Alumni Dinner.

Ron Slocumb, M.D., Hilary Grabe, M.D., Jonathan Pribila, M.D., Ph.D., Roheena Kamyar, M.D., David Wu, M.D., Ph.D., Christopher Rodarte, M.D., Omar Ahmad, M.D.

Qais Farjo, M.D., R ’99, F ’00, Jay Burgett, M.D., R ’97, Stephen Boorstein, M.D., R ’96, and Stanley Feil, M.D., F ’98, at the 2008 Alumni Dinner.


our mission To solve the puzzles of blinding eye disease, to improve the quality of life for our patients, and to teach the next generation of vision scientists and clinicians

Executive Officers of the University of Michigan Health System Ora Hirsch Pescovitz, M.D. Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs Douglas L. Strong, M.B.A. Director and CEO, University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers James O. Woolliscroft, M.D. Dean, University of Michigan Medical School The Regents of the University of Michigan Julia Donovan Darlow, Ann Arbor; Laurence B. Deitch, Bingham Farms; Denise Ilitch, Bingham Farms; Olivia P. Maynard, Goodrich; Andrea Fischer Newman, Ann Arbor; Andrew C. Richner, Grosse Pointe Park; S. Martin Taylor, Grosse Pointe Farms; Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor; Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D., ex officio Editors: Betsy Nisbet, Randy Wallach Writers and Editorial Assistants: Aimee Bergquist, Lisa Burkhart, MargaretAnn Cross Design: David Murrel Photographers: Scott Galvin, Scott Soderberg, Austin Thomason, Martin Vloet: U-M Photo Services; Lin Goings, Robert Prusak: U-M Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

For additional copies of this report, please contact us at:

University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences W.K. Kellogg Eye Center 1000 Wall Street Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 734.647.5586 www.kellogg.umich.edu


2009 Annual Report - U-M Kellogg Eye Center