Page 1

MASSAGE

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY RETIREMENT DIRECTORY

SPORTS

What’s Dartball all about?

The healing power of touch

page 10A

page 1B

page 18A

Milwaukee County Senior Citizen Hall of Fame

May 2014 Vol 27 No. 5

COMPLIMENTARY

POMMER:

EDITORIALS

Looking for cheaters page 3A

NEMOVITZ:

Never buy pickles in a hardware store page 16B

ELLENBECKER:

Jean Haase

Established in 1997, the Milwaukee County Senior CitCompare your portfolio izen Hall of Fame honors five outstanding seniors in Milwauto a baseball team kee County each year who have page 5A served the community as volunteers to improve the lives of people as advocates on behalf of older adults. By KarenMilwaukee Ellenbecker County and the Milwaukee County Commission & Julie Ellenbecker Travel to Roanoke centered on-Lipsky Aging have made a comin a beautiful valley mitment to affirm the dignity and value of older adults of this page 16A county by supporting their choic-

TRAVEL:

MONEY SENSE

Fred Knuepple

Lennie Mosley

es for living in and giving to our community. The Senior Citizen Hall of Fame awards are an integral part of Milwaukee County’s celebration of Older American’s Month. We will honor and celebrate all senior citizens and the five to be inducted into the Milwaukee County Senior Citizen Hall of Fame on Friday, May 23, 2014. This day is in recognition of the significant volunteer contributions of these outstanding individuals, who give their time and

talents to our community and in celebration and recognition of National Older American’s Month. The following will be inducted: Jean Haase, Greenfield; Fred Knueppel, Franklin; Lennie Mosley, Milwaukee; Robert Pietrykowski, Milwaukee; and Dorothy Smith, Milwaukee.

TRAV

JEAN HAASE As a volunteer for the past 20 years, Jean Haase, retired HALL OF FAME continued on page 14A


2A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

T Doctors look at Dry Eye Disease causes & treatment immune alteration) in order to prevent later disability, scientists recognized the need to develop an eye drop that goes beyond providing temporary relief for dry eye symptoms to one that aggressively treats the inflammatory process that causes the condition.

Dry eye is more than just a nuisance; it's a disease that affects millions of Americans. Until recently, treatment focused on alleviating symptoms by using artificial teardrop products (like Refresh and Tears Naturale) as often as every hour. Now, however, a prescription medication is available that goes beyond treating symptoms to actually attacking the underlying cause of dry eye disease. We asked the doctors at one of Wisconsin’s leading ophthalmology practices to answer the following questions about this common concern.

■ What is dry eye disease? Mark Freedman, MD: The tear film on your cornea is more than just salt water. It is made up of layers of mucous, water and oil that, when present in the right amounts, help your eyes feel comfortable, see properly and stay healthy. Dry eye disease is a painful and irritating condition involving a lack of or an imbalance in these tear film layers.

Do you have symptoms? n Redness

n Itching

n Light sensitivity

n Burning

n Mucous strands

n Crusty eyelids

n Fluctuating vision

n “Tired” eyes

n A “gritty” or “filmy” sensation n Irritation from smoke, fumes, air-

conditioning, drafts & low humidity

n Less tolerance for contact lenses n Watery eyes (you’re producing even

more tears to try to soothe your eyes)

■ What causes dry eyes? Brett Rhode, MD: The most frequent cause is the natural decrease in tear production that occurs with aging, which can cut tear volume by up to 80% by the time a person is 70 years old. This condition is called "keratoconjunctivitis sicca" and most often occurs in women over age 40. Dry eye disease may also be caused by hormonal changes (pregnancy, menopause); environmental factors (smoke, allergens, heating, air conditioning); various diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, Parkinson's, etc.); or medications (like antihistamines that dry out the eye's surface).

■ How serious is it? Daniel Ferguson, MD: Dry, scratchy, irritated eyes are a very common problem, affecting people of all ages, especially older adults. For most people, dry eyes are uncomfortable but not visionthreatening. In some cases, however, a faulty or diminished tear film can affect the cornea’s focusing ability and increase the risk of infection.

■ Why do women

■ Can you explain this

Daniel Paskowitz, MD: There is a substantial link between hormones and dry eye disease. For example, estrogen can inhibit the function of oil-producing glands, including one in the eyelid needed for maintaining a normal tear film. In a Harvard study, of the 25,000 participants age 49 and older, those taking estrogen were about 70% more likely to have dry eyes than women not taking the hormone. And, women taking both estrogen and progesterone had a 30% increased risk of dry eyes.

Freedman: Dry eye disease occurs when the eye’s surface becomes irritated by any of a number of environmental or physical factors, including aging, diseases, contact lenses, computer work, allergens, smoke and medications. In a normal functioning eye, there is an anti-inflammatory component that keeps the disruptive effect of this irritation to a minimum. However, if this component is lacking and the irritation is not controlled, the eye does not produce adequate tears. This irritation causes the body's immune system to activate its troops of inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes. Thinking that the eye is under attack, these T-cells

suffer more often?

■ What treatment

options are available?

Michael Raciti, MD: Dry eyes are usually a life-long condition that can be controlled, but rarely cured. The most common treatment has been to alleviate symptoms with artificial tear drop products (like Refresh, Thera Tears and Tears Naturale) used as often as every hour. If frequent use of artificial tears doesn't provide relief, some patients undergo a simple, five-minute office procedure that places tiny silicone "punctal" plugs into the drain openings in the corner of the eyes to eliminate tear loss and retain natural moisture. And, another option is Restasis.

release special proteins called 'cytokines.' This starts the inflammatory cycle, whereby inflammation of both the eye's surface and tear-producing glands results in "abnormal" tears and symptoms of dry eye. Since the tears are abnormal, the irritated eye is not properly nourished or lubricated. This causes the cycle of inflammation and symptoms to repeat again and again.

■ How does Restasis work? Rhode: It regulates the immune reaction to dry eye stimuli by reducing the number of inflammatory cells that are activated and blocking the production of destructive inflammatory chemicals.

■ Who can use Restasis?

inflammatory process?

Ferguson: Anyone who suffers from dry eyes or uses artificial tears without relief may be a candidate for Restasis. Your eye care specialist can conduct tests to make an accurate diagnosis and determine if Restasis is right for you. Beneficial effects (like decreased artifical tear use) take about three months to occur.

For a FREE booklet on dry eyes, cataracts, glaucoma, diabetes or macular degeneration or to schedule a comprehensive examination of the inner and outer components of your eye, call 414-321-7035 or one of the offices listed below.

See the best you can see . . . See an Eye Care Specialist Trusted by more than 125,000 doctors & patients since 1985 “TOP DOCTORS” - M Magazine - Milwaukee Magazine Mark Freedman, MD Brett Rhode, MD Daniel Ferguson, MD Daniel Paskowitz, MD Michael Raciti, MD David Scheidt, OD

■ Why is RestasisTM

"revolutionary?"

David Scheidt, OD: Because it views dry eye not as a nuisance, but as a disease. Just as researchers shifted from treating the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis to aggressively attacking the cause (a related

Most of us are born with near-perfect vision. But, that sometimes changes with disease or age. As state leaders in eye care, we help countless people each week to see the best they can see with Comprehensive Eye Exams; Diagnostic Laser Scans;

and State-of-the-Art Cataract, Glaucoma, Diabetes, Macular Degeneration, Pediatric, & Laser Vision Correction Care. And, we’re affordable—accepting

Medicare and most insurances. Call today to schedule an appointment or to request a free “Focus” newsletter and “When to Have Your Family’s Eyes Checked” guide. www.eyecarespecialists.net

T EYE CARE SPECIALISTS West Allis

10150 W. National Av.

414-321-7520

Wauwatosa

Milwaukee

2323 N. Mayfair Rd.

735 W. Wisconsin Av.

414-258-4550

414-298-0099


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 3A

Looking for (voting) cheaters If I did not know better, I would think that the governor and the state legislature were trying to erect an obstacle course for the voters of Wisconsin. First, they passed a strict voter photo ID law that would have created a hardship for thousands of voters, including about 18% of older voters who do not possess photo IDs, to obtain a photo ID or be denied the right to vote. Fortunately, in my opinion, that law has been challenged in both state and federal courts on the grounds of violating the Wisconsin Constitution, or the Federal Voting Rights Act. Decisions are expected in these cases sometime this summer. Now, before the State Legislature recently adjourned, it passed three more laws to add to the obstacle course. The first law, Act 146 (Senate Bill 324), restricts the time for in-person absentee voting. This law limits in-person absentee voting only to weekdays between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. It prohibits such voting on weekends and holidays. In vetoing a provision that would have further limited in-person absentee voting to no more than 45 hours a week, Governor Walker

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT By Matt Pommer

said that the new law “will help ensure consistency of the voting process throughout the state.” According to the Wisconsin Blue Book, the voting age population in Milwaukee County is over 708,000 people while in Florence County it totals a little over 4,000 MOVING IN indicate THE persons. Logic would seem to RIGHT DIRECTION that it might take aBy little longer for evBruce Nemovitz eryone in Milwaukee to vote, but the STATE CAPITOL COMMENT words “consistency” and “uniformity” sound reasonable. By Matt Pommer The second law, Act 177 (Assembly Bill 202), allows election observers to stand “not less than 3 feet from or more than 8 feet from” the table where voters announce their name and AGING ISSUES address to be issued a voter number or Tom Frazier the table where votersByregister to vote. Whether this will improve the election MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

process or provide a means to intimidate some voters is not obvious to me. The third law, Act 182 (SB 267), requires all voters, except a military or an overseas voter, to provide proof of residence when registering to vote. Under prior law, a voter who registered before the close of registration (third Wednesday preceding an election) was not required to provide proof of residence when registering to vote. In addition, this law requires the muMONEY nicipal clerk or clerk’s agent,SENSE and the By Karen Ellenbecker Government Accountability Board, & Julie Ellenbecker to -Lipsky maintain a record of the type of document submitted by the elector as proof of residence. In regard to the legal challenges of the photo ID law, Jay Heck, DirecAPRON tor of Emma Common Cause in Wisconsin, said that he expects STRINGS either the federal Aunt EmmaCourt court and/or the StateBySupreme to overturn the ID law, and, in that circumstance, the governor will call a special session of the legislature to MONEY SENSE pass an ID law thatByitKaren believes will Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker meet the courts’ concerns. -Lipsky In the Governor’s veto message mentioned earlier, he also stated that “We should all be focused on mak-

ing it easier to vote, but also ensuring the integrity of the voting process by making it harder to cheat, and I fully support all efforts to do so.” But recently, State Senator Dale Schultz, R-Richland Center, took exception to his colleagues’ obsession with finding cheaters. “It’s all based on some belief there is a massive fraud or irregularities, something my colleagues have been hot on the trail for three years and have failed miserably at demonstrating,” Schultz said. Although he voted for the voter ID bill passed in 2011, he said he now believes that a lack of access to the polls poses a far greater threat to the integrity of state elections than voter fraud. Recently, a PEW Foundation study indicated that Wisconsin was the third best state in the country at administering elections, and we have consistently been number two in voter turnout. We should be aiming for number one, not creating more obstacles to voting by looking for cheaters that we can’t seem to find.

EDITORIALS

TRAVEL

EDITORIALS

SENIOR Answer Man

IT MAKES ME

CRABBY TRAVEL

UW System swims near political APRON waters SENIOR By Bruce Nemovitz

The University of Wisconsin System has moved closer to the edge of political waters with hiring a lobbyist with links to Gov. Scott Walker to be vice president for university relations. Jim Villa had been chief of staff to Walker when he was Milwaukee County Executive. Villa listed Walker as his first reference for the System Administration job. He is expected to begin the university job early in May. A university screening committee forwarded Villa’s name along with four others as finalists. The appointment clearly pleases the Walker administration. The governor likes friendly faces in jobs that deal with the Legislature and the press. Shortly after he took office, the governor asked, and the Republican-controlled Legislature quickly approved, removing civil service status for persons who lead legislative liaison and public information efforts at other state agencies but that move wouldn’t affect Villa’s executive-level hiring.

HERMAN WHITE WRITES Answer Man Emma

PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

AGING ISSUES

By Tom Frazier

The university vice-presidency was created in 1984 but all previous holders of the job had experience in working with higher education. SPORTS But Villa’s lack By ofJack experience Pearson in working in higher education didn’t bother UW System PLANTING President Ray TOMORROW’S Cross. UW-Oshkosh DREAMSChancellor TODAY Richard Wells, who chaired search By Bradthe Olson committee, said: “We were very impressed with Jim’s vision and his track record of success. I’m pleased that the UW System will have a new leader who can strengthen the University’s connections to the broader community and widen support for higher education in the state.” SPORTS

Cross said Villa STRINGS stood out for legAunt Emma comislative ties and “goodBystrategic munications.” Villa had served for five years as chief of staff for State Sen. Alberta Darling, R-River Hills, who is co-chair of the Legislature’s budget writing Joint Finance Committee. Villa’s name appeared repeatedly in the 28,000 pages of emails and other documents released in the criminal investigation of former Walker aide Kelly Rindfleisch. Villa was not charged in the investigation. The governor has repeatedly refused to discuss the email, telling reporters that it was “old news.” A spokesperson for the governor’s office said Walker is Wright looking forward By Enis to working with the university staff. The university drew sharp legislative criticism after reports surfaced showing the system had accumulated surpluses in excess of $650 million. Villa, 42, holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Marquette University. The expected size

of the university salary and his close ties to the governor indicates Villa will be a powerful figure within the university system across the state. Democrats criticized the university decision to hire Villa, with a party spokesperson calling Villa a “henchman” of the governor. Scott Ross, executive director of One Wisconsin Now, labeled it “cronyism.” But having a person with Villa’s ties could help the university in the next decade. In 2011 the Republican-controlled government drew legislative boundaries to assure themselves the GOP would have legislative majorities through 2022. President Cross suggested Villa’s role will be in providing “proactive” communications with legislators. That means Villa’s role will be to head off criticism from the State Capitol. Cross also defended Villa’s lack of previous experience in higher education. There are enough other people with that exFRAZIER continued on page 11A

IT MAKESENTERTAINMENT ME CRABBY ARTS

calendar HERMAN WHITE WRITES the WRIGHT SIDE of

60 ENTERTAINMENT

ARTS Jim McLoone KILLING TIME with calendar

By Jack Pearson

the WRIGHT


EDITORIALS 4A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

By Matt Pommer MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

EDITORIALS Contributions to society

unt Emma

SENIOR

SENIOR Nuts to youSENIOR Answer AnswerMan Man Emma Emma

ES ME

By Aunt Emma MONEY SENSE

CRABBY CRABBY

SENIOR

Answer Man HERMAN HERMAN WHITE WHITE WRITES WRITES APRON

CRABBY

STRINGS

EDITORIALS AN WHITE WRITES

ENTERTAINMENT SENIOR

60CRABBY

PRON RINGS

Answer Man

unt Emma

I recently have heard much conversation about our schools and the I.Q.’s of their students. Shouldn’t they be talking about learning achievements and not about what they are capable of? The I.Q is what the person “has upstairs” to work with and not what he or she really accomplishes. What’s your take on these and other things about today’s classrooms? QUESTIONLY, Lionel Liebelsingere

KES ME

ME

with Jim McLoone

AN WHITE WRITES

ENTERTAINMENT

calendar

TRAVEL

ITIT MAKES MAKES ME ME

CRABBY

calendar

APRON APRON STRINGS STRINGS By Aunt Emma

While we like the idea of chewing Peanuts, popped and CrackBy Karencorn Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker MONEY SENS We hope that God won’t have you erjacks may fill you up, but it requires a hand full of almonds on occasion, -Lipsky By Karen Ellenbec stuttering a bit when He asks: What AGING the mighty almond to ward off Alz- we might suggest that the vitamin & Julie Ellenbeck AGING ISSUES have you given to MOVING others?INHow heimer’s disease. An almond-rich diet B-12 is said to be central player in the-Lipsky THE Byhave ISSUES Tom Frazier DIRECTION you served poor RIGHT people? How have By Tom Frazier helps accomplish the task as it con- defensive line against Alzheimer’s. It By Bruce Nemovitz you worked to enrich the lives of oth- tains some of the same drugs utilized works as a central player in the nerAPRON MOVING INdeTHE vous system and brain. ers? Have you ever tried to positively by doctors of the Emma in the treatment STRINGS RIGHT DIRECTION influence other people? bilitating disease.By Aunt Emma We may be over the hill, but let’s By Bruce Nemovitz continue to realize it. Show your love for others. Give generously of your time and talents to PLANTING TOMORROW’S PLANTING Emma others. Don’t always wait to be asked. DREAMS TODAY TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson Don’t waste these days in selfishness. By Brad Olson By Aunt Emma AGING Save time and trouble ISSUES at the pearly gates. By Tom Frazier I am not at all crabby today, but a found. Would my next shopping trip bit dismally dejected. You see, I went have to be to the Mobil Station in to my favorite super store to stock up North Lake? As I moped towards the the exit empty-handed, I was told they had AGING SPORTS on certain liquids and I thought too great speeds, we’re right behind SPORTS modern day Carrie Mason’s temperBy Jack Pearson ISSUES been moved to larger and more easily the teen-age and early 20’s drivers in Pearson By Jack ance ladies had descended on By TomPiggly Frazier found shelving. I guess what they say the WRIGHT crashes causing fatalities. Ouch! the WRIGHT The Scotch, bour- is true; it is tough for old dogs to learn PLANTING Still, auto accident fatality rates Wiggly in Hartland. SIDE of TOMORROW’S bons and whiskies no SIDE of could be new tricks. By Enislonger Wright TODAY are dropping almost DREAMS as fast as our hair By Enis Wright By Brad is falling out. Air bags, frontOlson and side, are great life saving aids. So are the with other new gadgets in vehicles. Plus, withJim JimMcLoone McLoone seniors are more likely not to be disSome of our After spending some time in Flortracted by cell phones and twittering. ida, I called to restart home delivery of Congressional repToday’s big question is if addi- the Milwaukee J-S. After a wait of 15 resentatives have PLANTING tional screening is warranted for over- minutes, I almost called TOMORROW’S The Wauke- been in office in Washington, D.C. for SPORTS 80 drivers when applying for a driv- sha Freeman. DREAMS TODAYso many years that we know they arBy Jack er’s license renewal? We Pearson are certain * * * * * By Brad Olson en’t practicing age discrimination. the 79-year-old man who just got his If Marquette had hired Howland ***** eight year Wisconsin renewal doesn’t as basketball coach, would we be When you step through a door believe so. howling instead of cheering? frame, we’re told that the average By Enis Wright What do you honestly think about person enters another world of oppor***** this? A well dressed man – perhaps a tunity or disappointment. As for the

Answer live Man older drivers Long

While older people today definitely are out and about more than those of previous generations, who could ever have dreamed even 30 to 40 years ago that today’s aging Americans would be driving their motor vehicles more safely and doing so more often in greater vehicular traffic than those persons whom they considered as the old folks to their generation? Before you pat yourselves on the back or tighten your seat belt, know that statistics still indicate that over age 80 drivers are five times more likely to be in an auto accident than drivers in the 35-54 range. Shocking as it may seem to older NEY SENSE TRAVEL ren Ellenbecker drivers who regularly witness young lie Ellenbecker -Lipsky drivers seemingly recklessly weave in and out of traffic at what we consider

By Matt Pommer

ByRIGHT Bruce DIRECTION Nemovitz By Bruce Nemovitz

TRAVEL

RINGS

ht

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT MOVING IN THE

When you knock on the gates of Heaven, will the admitting angel just open them widely or will you be put to a test? We suspect that God really doesn’t care how successful you NEY SENSEare in business, how many expenen Ellenbecker sive cars you have in that three stall e Ellenbecker -Lipsky garage, if you shined your shoes that day or even if you tipped your hat to that pretty lady or said a gruff greeting to the man who walks by your office every day and always seems to be so RON happy.

T of

TRAVEL TRAVEL

MONEY SENSE

MONEY SENSE By Karen Ellenbecker &ByJulie Ellenbecker Karen Ellenbecker -Lipsky & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

IT MAKES ME ARTS ARTS ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT calendar calendar

IT MAKES HERMAN WHITE WRITES

60

ARTS ENTERTAINMENT KILLING KILLING TIME TIME

HERMAN calendar

the WRIGHT SIDE of

60

ARTS

E

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone

business person – ordered a pizza the world of work, aptitude and skills are other day while I was standing in line important, but nothing compares with DEAR LIONEL: behind him. He was asked: Do you the correct attitude like believing in If you were a carpenter, I’d say wish it cut into four or six pieces? achieving. Too many losers are said SPORTS that you hit the nail right on the head. Without hesitation, “do itByinto four as I to concentrate on what they should Jack Pearson Intelligence Quotient is an indicouldn’t eat six pieces.” cation that the particular person with KILLING TIME continued on page 7A an average or better one should succeed at tasks undertaken. I believe that WRITER/PROOFREADER their A.Q. (attitude quotient) also is of Jill Slattery By Enis Wright utmost importance. There are many ADVERTISING DIRECTOR whose I.Q. is high, but actual work Hartland, WI 53029 Saran Piehl performance is below average or poor. 262-367-5303 ADVERTISING The difference often between success PUBLISHERS Margo Lehmann and mediocre activity is attitude. AtTom and Maureen Slattery ART DIRECTOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER titude often is the key to success or EDITOR Nicole Hesse failure. Jim McLoone GRAPHIC DESIGNER Thanks for your question. I hope WWW.MYMILWAUKEELIFE.COM Peggy Duffy you will agree with my answer. OFFICE MANAGER find us on facebook at SENIOR ANSWER MAN 50 Plus News Magazine Paula Koeppen

the WRIGHT SIDE of

6

KILLING TIME


EDITORIALS

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

Compare your investments to a baseball team STATE CAPITOL Spring is on its way, and so is COMMENT baseball season. What doesPommer baseball By Matt have to do with investing? There are many similarities between America’s favorite pastime and your investment portfolio. The Milwaukee Brewers don’t wait until March to start developing their team for the season. It’s important to choose the right players and poIN THE sitions well before MOVING the season begins. RIGHT DIRECTION At Ellenbecker Investment Group, we By Bruce Nemovitz understand the importance of choosing the right investments before a new market climate. It takes preparation, vision and patience to cultivate a team of winning investments. It takes discipline to actively monitor each player and cut a holding when it is not in alignment with the overall plan. AGING Once you have a healthy roster of ISSUES talented players, it isBytime to master Tom Frazier the fundamentals of the game. Determining a game plan prior to the first pitch results in a more successful day at the ballpark. It is not enough to hit the ball. There is a tactical approach to consider. What have players done in the past? What are the current field PLANTING conditions? How willTOMORROW’S the current cliDREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

They have the ability to outperform at any moment but they also play a solid game in almost any condition. We trust these players and our confidence doesn’t waiver when they come up to the plate. The bench warmers are most closely aligned with the fixed income part of the investment portfolio. They are always there to assist when other players are in need or struggling. Without the bench warmers, the team would be at risk. The fixed income part of an investment portfolio is where the downside protection and stability is established. An important step in maintaining a competitive edge and a healthy investment portfolio is rebalancing. Some players are traded, some don’t perform as expected, and some get injured. Monitoring the situation closely and the willingness to modify the team is key to building a successful ball club. Start with a solid coaching staff. One head coach making all the decisions doesn’t provide enough experience, insight or ability to manage the whole team. At EIG, we have a team

• 5A

of specialists, each with their own strengths and specialties, to assist you with your financial plan. You are the umpire. You get the final say on how the game is played, but you don’t have to worry about calling the plays, hitting the balls or saving the day. Watching and understanding is key to being comfortable with the decisions going forward. Understanding the plan is more important than playing the game. Every year is different. We are often surprised by the outcome, but you have to play the game if you want a chance to win. Play ball!

TRAVEL

MONEY SENSE By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

mate affect the landscape of the plan in place? These are all questions we discuss with our investment strategists continually. APRON Emma How do we set STRINGS our lineups and what do we expect from ourEmma players? By Aunt Each batter has a specific job to do. Each investment has been incorporated into the portfolio for a very specific reason. The home run hitters in an investment portfolio tend to be the most aggressive. They give us the growth potential, but there is also the risk of striking out. Consider the growth part of our asset allocation to be our sluggers. The moderate or balanced part of our portfolio are our base hitters. They sometimes lack the luster of a home run slugger, but without them it would be tough to win.

SENIOR Answer Man

IT MAKES ME

Ellenbecker Investment Group, located in Pewaukee, provides comprehensive financial planning services. EIG has an A+ rating with the BBB and has twice been awarded the Wisconsin BBB Torch Award for Business Ethics and Integrity. Learn more at ellenbecker.com or call 262.691.3200 to schedule a complimentary consultation. Securities and advisory services offered through SII Investments, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC & Registered Investment Advisor. Ellenbecker Investment Group, Inc. & SII Investments are separate companies. SII does not provide tax or legal advice. Diversification and asset allocation do not guarantee positive results; loss of principal may still occur.

CRABBY

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

ARTS

ENTERTAINMENT

Advisors who Call 60

calendar

SPORTS

By Jack Pearson

the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

Ellenbecker

Investment Group with Jim McLoone KILLING TIME Invest with us ®

N35W23877 Highfield Court, Suite 200, Pewaukee WI 53072 | ellenbecker.com | (262) 691-3200 Securities and advisory services offered through SII Investments, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC & Registered Investment Advisor. Ellenbecker Investment Group and SII Investments are separate companies.

(,*:KLWHÓVK%D\2IÓFH2SHQLQJ6RRQ more details to follow

50+ ad®.MAY2014.indd 1

3/18/14 6:16 PM


6A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Interfaith Older Adult programs 2014 “Pearls of Wisdom� winners MILWAUKEE--Did you know that there are more than 153,000 adults over the age of 60 in Milwaukee County? Interfaith Older Adult Programs provides endless amounts of support, care and resources to help older adults remain in their homes while staying active and connected to our communities. Which is why we take time each year to honor extraordinary volunteers with our annual Pearls of Wisdom Awards. This year’s winners will be honored at our annual Pearls of Wisdom Benefit Dinner on May 8 at Discovery World in Milwaukee.

“Interfaith is so grateful to have the opportunity each year at our Pearls of Wisdom event to recognize volunteers who so proudly demonstrate and support our mission of linking older adults with a caring community,� said Felice Green, spokesperson for Interfaith Older Adult Programs. 2014 “Making the World More Beautiful� Award WINNER: RUTHEIA RENFRO Rutheia Renfro, 67, has always been busy helping her community. She worked as a nurse for 35 years and then faced a significant life change: in 2008, Ruthia became legally blind. When Rutheia went into the hospital,

Attention Wisconsin Seniors!! • Paying too much for your health insurance? • Disenrolled or receiving reduced health coverage by your insurance company or employer?

• Losing health care coverage? • Turning 65?

:HXQGHUVWDQGWKDWÀQGLQJWKHEHVWDIIRUGDEOH+HDOWKRU/LIHLQVXUDQFH SURWHFWLRQSODQFDQEHFRQIXVLQJIUXVWUDWLQJDQGH[SHQVLYH7KDW¡VZK\ ZH¡YHGRQHWKH´KRPHZRUN¾IRU\RX

Midwest Senior Select, Inc.

&DOOWRGD\IRUD)5((TXRWH 12&267RU2%/,*$7,21

262-241-3662

11518 N. Port Washington Rd. • Suite 4 Mequon • WI 53092

Representing Selected Major Insurance Companies For:

• Medicare Prescription Drug Plans • Medicare Supplements • Medicare Advantage • Dental Insurance • Long Term Care • Annuities • Final Expense Life Insurance • Under 65 Major Medical Plans Neither Midwest Select, Inc. or it’s agents are affiliated with Medicare, Social Security, or any government agency. This is 2011-3MWSS-NP an advertisement for insurance. An agent may contact you in an attempt to provide insurance.

Allied Senior Services Insurance & Investments LTD INC

Se n i o r s • Long Term Care Insurance •Health Insurance • Life Insurance • Annuities • Auto • Homeowners • Free Quotes • Immediate SR22 Filings

414-545-7878 We are not limited to representing one company, so we can give you unbiased advice.

7421 W. Becher St. West Allis, WI

she heard about Interfaith’s Telephone Reassurance Program and decided to volunteer. Five years later, Rutheia still loves making her calls and encourages others to volunteer. “I believe someone should volunteer with Telephone Reassurance simply because of the fulfillment and enjoyment you get from making someone’s day,� Renfro said. “That is the most beautiful thing in the world. I truly believe giving back to the community is one of the most important things you can do.“ Nominees in the “Making the World More Beautiful� category are individuals 50 and better who willingly share gifts and talents to enrich the lives of others. 2014 “Living Life to the Fullest� Award WINNER: RUTH GARBER Ruth Garber, 90, leads a full and active life, which includes a drive to be a volunteer for her hometown of Milwaukee. She started volunteering with Interfaith’s Telephone Reassurance Program in 2004 because she believed in our mission. “I think Interfaith is the best organization because it accepts all of us, no matter who we are or where we come from,� Garber said. She believes the Telephone Reassurance Program helps provide more security to older adults, especially to seniors who may not be able to afford a more expensive program, but want a reliable daily check-in. Nominees in the “Living Life to the Fullest� category are individuals 50 and better who are living life to the fullest and having a positive impact on the community and others. 2014 “Courage to Change the World� Award WINNERS: DEBORAH LEWIS AND PAT DUNN Deborah and Pat had the same outlook: they were committed to serve their local community and wanted to advocate for older adults. So, they decided to volunteer as Senior Ambassadors through Interfaith’s RSVP program. They met in April 2013 at a training session and have since formed a close relationship. Both women now

volunteer at our Clinton Rose Senior Center in Milwaukee, and help older adults find services and resources available to them throughout their community. They enjoy their Ambassador role due to the reciprocal relationship between themselves and older adults. “We’re there to reach out and be available and to do so openly and honestly. ... The clients appreciate our help and we appreciate their time,� Lewis said. Nominees in the “Courage to Change the World� category are our volunteers of any age who have discovered new ways to use their acquired skill sets to be vibrant change agents within our community. The volunteers with whom we interact, on a regular basis here at Interfaith, so often show amazing courage in who they are and what they do for others. Pearls of Wisdom Benefit Dinner The Ninth Annual Pearls of Wisdom Benefit Dinner being held on Thursday, May 8, at Pier Wisconsin at Discovery World, 500 N. Harbor Dr., from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. This event is vital to our ability to continue providing the services and support our senior neighbors and their caregivers need. Older adults’ needs range from a daily safety “check-in� phone calls, rides to a doctor’s appointments, help with snow removal or yard work, to caregivers visiting them at home. This year guests will enjoy Emcee and Auctioneer Thelma Sias, VP of Local Affairs for We Energies, great entertainment and lots of fun. Sponsors for this event include: UnitedHealth Care Medicare Solutions, US Bank, Milwaukee County Department of Family Care, Milwaukee County Department on Aging, 50 Plus Publications, Helen Bader Foundation, BMO Harris Bank, AARP, Independence First, Alzheimer’s Association, Renouard Family Trust, Wegner CPAs and Cleary Gull. Tickets are still available for this year’s event. Purchase online at www. interfaithmilw.org/pearls or call 414220-8644.


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

EDITORIALS

KILLING TIME continued from page 4A have done, not on what they did accomplish. ***** I like the Ole and Lena story about their finding out after a land survey that their farm really is not in Minnesota, but is in Wisconsin. A relieved NEY SENSE Ole said, “What a wonderful find. I en Ellenbecker just don’t believe I could have stood e Ellenbecker -Lipsky another of those Minnesota winters. ***** I read that scientists have discovered a couple more small planets beyond Pluto. Please stop. We really can’t afford to be giving more foreign aid. ***** unt Emma I’m glad there’s no upper age at which persons are determined to be too old to work. Some companies just think they are too old to be gainfully employed. *****

RON RINGS

Answer Man

ES ME

continued from 4

Before telephone lines, the family news was passed around in neighborhoods from one clothesline to another. ***** As more ways to keep us healthy are found, we suspect that those nearing or over 100 years of age may qualify as just simply semi-senile seniors. ***** A daughter is prone to exaggeration. She claims she told me about such and such at least 1,000 times. I know it was not even over 100 times. ***** It seems like only yesterday that when you answered the ringing telephone call, it was someone who you were happy to talk to, not some wouldbe scam artist or supposed charity pitch-maker. ***** If you really don’t believe that Guinness Beer is good for your health, stop to realize that there are just under 35 million Irish people in the United States who might disagree.

TRAVEL

SENIOR

CRABBY

***** A man at the golf course told me that he hadn’t seen me in a coon’s age and wondered how I was? I checked the average life of a raccoon. It is 3 1/2 years. I do believe I saw him just last year. ***** They knew back in the days of the early Greek poets that real leaders do good deeds and not just speak of them. ***** The future is bright for the dreamer. Just think of the great inventors of this modern time, who dreamed of their inventions before realizing them.

Advertise

HERE

THIS COULD BE YOUR AD!

Call Saran Piehl,

262-367-5303 xt12

If you are selling in 2014...NOW AN WHITE WRITES

T of

ht

• 7A

IS THE TIME

This new year may offer the best chance in years to achieve a great price on your home!

Timing is everything. ENTERTAINMENT 2014

Bruce will stop over at no charge, to help put together a game plan from downsizing to preparing your home for market. He will let you know which improvements will bring you back the best return when selling. He will do a market estimate so you know the value of your home.

2014

Bruce and Jeanne will hold your hand throughout the entire process. They have their own “Angie’s List” of local trusted contractors, inspectors, and handymen.

calendar

60

ME

2014

2014

Get on our list for monthly reports as to the homes selling in your specific neighborhood! This is the perfect time to call, so you can take advantage of a year where interest rates for buyers are about to go up. Don’t wait....

Call Bruce and Jeanne at 262.242.6177

with412Jim McLoone E. Silver Spring Dr. • Whitefish Bay, WI

Mention this ad for a free book written by Bruce for seniors and their families facing a move

www.movingintherightdirection.com

Jeanne and Bruce Nemovitz


8A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

How do I know if I have hearing loss?

SEE YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU: • Have trouble hearing over the telephone • Find it hard to follow conversations when two or more people are talking • Often ask people to repeat what they are saying • Need to turn up the TV volume so loud that others complain • Have a problem hearing because of background noise • Think that others seem to mumble • Can’t understand when women and children speak to you • Types of Hearing Loss Hearing loss can have many different causes. Here are two kinds of hearing loss common in older people: Presbycusis (prez-bee-KYOO-sis) is a common type of hearing loss that comes on slowly as a person gets older. It seems to run in families and affects hearing in both ears. The degree of hearing loss varies from person to person. Are you starting to have trouble hearing someone on the phone? That could be an early sign of this type of hearing loss. Tinnitus (tin-NY-tus or TIN-u-tus) causes a ringing, roaring, or hissing noise in your ear. Tinnitus can go hand-in-hand with many types of hearing loss. It can also be a sign of other health problems, such as high blood pressure or allergies. Often it is unclear what causes tinnitus, which may come and go, disappear quickly, or be permanent. Other Hearing Loss Problems Loud noise is one of the most common causes of hearing loss. Noise from lawn mowers, snow blowers, or loud music can damage the inner ear. This can result in permanent hearing loss. You can prevent most noise-related hearing loss. Protect yourself by turning down the sound on your stereo, television, or headphones; move away from loud noise; or use earplugs or other ear protection.

Q

How does your product work or help people with hearing loss?

A

Ideal for people with some degree of hearing loss, the CapTel® Captioned Telephone, works like any other telephone with one important addition: It displays captions of every word the caller says throughout the conversation. CapTel phone users can listen to the caller, and can also read the written captions in the CapTel’s bright display window. With CapTel, you dial the other person’s number, exactly the same way as with any other telephone. While you dial, the CapTel phone can connect to the captioning service with the push of a button. When the other party answers, you hear everything they say, just like a traditional call. At the same time, the captioning service transcribes everything they say into captions, which appear on the CapTel display window. You hear what you can, and read what you need to. CapTel gives telephone user’s confidence that they won’t miss a word throughout the conversation. Answered by Amy Mueller Ultratec Marketing Communications Specialist

It’s Your Call!

Enjoy phone conversations confident you’ll catch every word! The CapTel® Captioned Telephone shows you captions of everything the caller says. s Built-in answering machine s Extra large display screen with variable font sizes & colors s Includes free captioning service (no monthly fees or contracts required)

CapTel® 840i

Don’t miss another word!

www.CapTel.com 1-800-233-9130

CapTel Captioned Telephone service is designed exclusively for individuals with hearing loss. It’s funding is regulated by the FCC.


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 9A

How often will I need to get a new hearing aid? Will my hearing continue to decline and at what rate does this happen?

Q

A

First and quite obviously the higher quality the hearing aid the longer it will last. Quality is not determined by price as much as it is by the technology in the hearing aid and the range of amplification. Beyond that, one of the most detrimental activities for a hearing aid, which will shorten its life is leaving it on a bedside table with the battery door open. People do this to save battery life, but it exposes the inner components of the aids to dust and other things floating in the air. Zounds hearing aids are completely sealed keeping the aids free from dust. That is why typical aids will have a life of 3-5 years, but with Zounds hearing aids we are comfortable estimating 5-7 years. Most individuals hearing will continue to decline, but not always. The best way to determine if your hearing is declining and at what rate is to monitor it with frequent hearing tests. That could be every 3 months or simply once a year. Your hearing professional that you work with should be able to put you on a proactive schedule to make sure everything that can be done is. This information was provided by: Zounds Hearing Aids Matthew T. Schultz, Owner

Q

5-31-14

In Home Hearing Aid Service I don’t want anyone to know I wear a hearing aid. What products hide/ conceal the device?

A

Aesthetics is a concern that many people have when they are thinking about the possibility of being fit with hearing aids. The open fit behind the ear style is very popular and many dispensers have them in stock in their offices. Often patients can be fit within the same day with this style. Another style that is gaining popularity is an ITC (invisible in the canal). This is a small custom fit device that requires an impression of the ear canal to be taken and will take a little more time to be fit. The severity of the patient’s hearing loss will determine what style is appropriate. Patients should choose an experienced hearing professional who will explain the real expectations of hearing aids and will address the patient’s hearing loss appropriately. Wearing hearing aids has become more acceptable in today’s society. Aesthetics should not get in the way of properly addressing a hearing loss. Answered by Andy Cmeyla, owner Home Hearing.

provide FREE tests • We repair all makes • We custom fit all earmolds • We

PROMPT • EFFICIENT COURTEOUS SERVICE Forward Health Accepted 12 manufacturers to choose from with the latest digital technology

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR 100% MONEY BACK HOME HEARING AID SERVICES 1-262-253-2151


10A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Do you appreciate the healing power of touch By: Dr. David Lipschitz One of my best friends gave me a gift certificate for a massage as a birthday present. It took me about three months to finally schedule it. I never realized what I was missing. I just loved it. I felt relaxed, calm and

found it a wonderfully nurturing experience. Since then, I have pampered myself by frequently getting massages. The best-known benefits of massage are that it reduces stress, eases tension and clears the mind. It pro-

Quality In-Home Care Serving Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee & Washington Counties

Our Personal Care & Home Support Services • Bathing • Grooming • Personal Hygiene • Dressing • Transferring • Positioning & Mobility • Food Preparation • Therapy Assistance • Medication Reminders • Dementia Care

Waukesha 262.369.8000

• Respite Care • RN Home Support • Client Check-in • Light House Cleaning • Laundry • Pet Care • Grocery Shopping • Incidental Transportation • Companionship • Appointment Escort

Milwaukee 414.751.7090

www.lhhomecare.com

Licensed, Insured & Experienced Staff

Hometown Pharmacy is proud to serve 25 Wisconsin locations...now including Sussex! Hometown Pharmacies are family owned and family run, dedicated to building strong communities with personalized patient care. Now at Hometown Pharmacy: Premier Value Vitamins are Buy One, Get One Free*, All Day-Everyday! *equal or lesser value Like us on Facebook for special deals and a variety of Health Care Information. Stop in to discover the Hometown difference!

motes relaxation and tranquility. Massage helps relieve back pain, neck pain from injuries, and strained and painful muscles. It can even improve athletic performance. Massage is soothing and sensual. It can help depression, anxiety and actually enhance your immune system. Touch is an essential emotional need. In a calm, safe setting, the benefits are substantial. Massage is beneficial for many chronic problems that are in part caused by or aggravated by stress. Massage reduces pain, stiffness and fatigue, and improves sleep. There is also evidence that massage can improve the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, presumably by alleviating stress. It is also helpful as a component of therapy for chronic back pain. Research has shown that when administered by a well-trained masseuse, and in combination with physical therapy and pain medications, therapeutic massage is of great value and more effective than acupuncture. Touch is one of the most important ways of communication, and lack of touch has a negative effect, causing loneliness and isolation. Americans virtually never touch each other. An interesting study done in coffee shops in various countries showed that in Puerto Rico couples touched each other 180 times an hour, and in Paris, it was 110. By contrast, in the United States, the average couple touched each other twice hourly, and in London, couples almost never touched. Public displays of affection, or “PDA,” as some of my best friends call it, is considered a cardinal sin. What a tragedy. Perhaps this is the reason massage is not more popular in the United States. We are resistant to massage therapy because of reluctance to be undressed and touched by strangers, and by viewing it quite erroneously as an erotic rather than therapeutic experience. Touch by itself is very important and beneficial for individuals of any age. For example, premature babies given three 10-minute loving massages daily gain weight 47 percent more rapidly and leave the hospital earlier than those who are not massaged.

In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, therapeutic massage and touch induce calm and reduce agitation and disruptive behavior. Nursing home residents who are frequently and therapeutically touched by trained staff remain healthier, lose less weight and are hospitalized less than those who are not. One of the greatest benefits of owning a pet is the ability to touch and stroke it, and both give and receive unconditional love. These days, many nursing homes allow pets in their facilities and have outdoor farm animals and periods of actual pet therapy when residents are able to love and stroke cats or dogs. As a new massage addict, I would recommend it to all who can afford it. Cost, in my view, is the only good excuse not to have a massage. Being too busy, too tired or too lazy are good reasons to have one. And if you cannot afford one, remember the important roles that touch plays in fostering happiness and health. Sit and hold hands in the movie theater and in restaurants. Never, ever leave the house without a hug and kiss, and sit together on the same couch at night while relaxing and watching TV. And consider back and foot rubs. Who does not like them? We must always remember that many older people are isolated and deprived. Make sure you visit them frequently, and always touch and hug them, and hold their hands. Don’t discourage older persons from having a pet just because of difficulties with upkeep. Choose an apartment building or assisted-living center that allows pets. Physical contact is an essential element of the way we interact with each other and promotes lifelong health and happiness. Dr. David Lipschitz is the author of the book “Breaking the Rules of Aging.” To find out more about Dr. David Lipschitz and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

89%of our rehab patients return home*

May Poem My late mother was called Helen Mae by name. But this month’s May definitely is another game. Spring daze honestly, really and finally is here. The days are becoming longer as summer is near. Time always is such that it moves forward. With it, there’s brief garden time for little Howard. Seed packages arrived; to be opened so hasty. But will the products therein really be tasty? There are tomatoes, beans, peas, carrots and corn. This means there’s soil to turn; seeds to plant in morn.

• 11A

* Company-wide average

After surgery, illness or injury, you want to get home and back to your life as quickly as possible. Come tour ManorCare, see our staff in action and receive a complimentary tour package. We will also show you our outcomes that are targeted to getting patients back home.

ManorCare Health Services – Pewaukee 262.523.0933ÊÊUÊÊÜÜÜ°“>˜œÀV>Ài°Vœ“

Bare-limbed trees everywhere quickly turn to shade. Of course, this happens yearly as it is nature made. Birds everywhere above us on wings do flutter. Gardeners look upward and of scavengers do mutter.

Frustrated by frequent or difficult urination,

Do take time to survey the Lord’s wondrous creation. It is always way ahead of any man-made nation.

or other symptoms of an enlarged

May is captivating as these 31 days will pass by. Do plant the vegetable crops right next to the rye. Soon lazy students for good test grades will pray. Studying they should have done before exam day.

prostate, and unsatisfied with

your current drug

therapy?

At graduation, Grandma and Gramps will be so proud. You’ll hear the old folks cheering embarrassingly loud. Now, we sort of look ahead to the month of June. Perhaps wedding bells will ring before the full moon. But this month won’t disappear until May the 31st. Looking ahead, for nice summer days we do thirst. FRAZIER continued from page 3A perience, he said. Walker undoubtedly hopes Villa will be able to sooth any flaps involving the university as the governor bids for a second term and then seeks either the Republican nomination for president or vice president in 2016. Walker has been speaking to conservative groups across America to strengthen his national opportunities. Being a high profile university official doesn’t mean he’ll only deal with big issues. Constituents may ask

the legislators to see why their child didn’t get admitted to a particular campus or some of the university’s highly competitive educational programs. Legislators like to please their friends and enlisting Villa’s help to get explanations could fulfill that role, especially for Republicans.

Discover an outpatient GreenLight laser treatment that has helped hundreds of thousands of men with BPH similar to you. ™

As with all medical procedures there are risks. Learn whether the GreenLight™ laser treatment may be right for you.

Call 877-314-3406 www.EasyPee.info

™ The denoted marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of American Medical Systems, Inc. AMSUS/BPH-00771a/JANUARY 2014


12A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Mister Baseball? That title could go to Dan “The Beer Man” McKinney By Jack Pearon When it comes to loving the game of baseball and longevity in being involved, there are few in these parts who can compare with Dan McKinney, who is now 77, and with the Sports Service Co. at Miller Park. Perhaps there are some who are as fond of the game; that aspect is impossible to measure. But in longevity? No one. Not Bud Selig, now Commissioner of Major League Baseball and the man who brought the Brewers here in 1979; not Robin Yount, the Hall of Famer who patrolled short and center for the Brew Crew for 20 years, the most ever for the team; nor Bob Uecker in the radio booth. All three have had long careers here in baseball, but Dan “The Beer Man” McKinney has them all beat in tenure. When Dan was a young fellow of 17 back in 1954, he applied for a job with the old Milwaukee Braves in their home in County Stadium. It was the Braves’ second year in existence here. Like other Major League teams then, they handled their own beer sales and other concessions. So if your math abilities are still intact, you may have already deduced that from ’54 to now is a whopping 61 years, and the meter is still running. If you know of anyone in a sports facility who has been working in a truly tough job such as hawking beer and other merchandise up and down steps for more than six decades, please let me know about it. I’m not aware of any.

Dan was with the Milwaukee Braves from the start of ’54 on through to the end of the ’65 seasons, 12 years. He worked every game he could, and missed only the day games during the week, as his regular fulltime job was as a high school teacher and he couldn’t be in two places at once. Back then the Major League season was 154 games long, making the home portion 77 games. Dan estimated that he worked an average of about 70 games every summer. I’ll do the math this time: 12 seasons times 70 games, or a total of about 840 games. Then in the ’66 through ’69 seasons, when there was no Major League franchise in Milwaukee, there were 20 games the Chicago White Sox were nice enough to play here. Over more than 40 years, he also worked about 160 Green Bay Packers’ games, and at least 10 rock concerts. From 1970, when the Brewers began playing here, Dan was with them from day one. The home seasons became 81 games long, and Dan worked roughly 75 a season. More math. Add up all the Braves games, then the White Sox, the Packers, the concerts and all the Brewers games, 45 seasons at about 75 games each summer, and you get a grand total of almost 4,000 games, at County Stadium and then at Miller Park. And the total is just an estimate. It is mind boggling. We are not talking here about a soft desk job or something similar over those thousands of games and more than six

decades. Being a beer vendor is one of the most strenuous, the most taxing jobs in the business of baseball. Try to imagine it - carrying one and often two cases of beer, with two that’s more than 70 pounds, up and down those steep steps, nonstop, for three and four hours straight, twice

McKinney in action. “Beer here, nice and cold. Get your beer here and moments later, “Will you please pass that down to the man with the blue cap.”

Silverado communities enrich the lives of individuals and families affected by memory loss through exceptional care, a highly skilled staff and unmatched service.

Conveniently located in Brookfield and Menomonee Falls.

Memory loss... shouldn’t take away purpose and passion in life

(866) 522-8125

memory care | communities

silveradocare.com/50plus


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

When Dan initially came to the Braves back in ’54 looking for a job, he wanted to be a beer vendor. In those days the team handled their own vending work. (Today the Brewers and all Major League teams job the work out to organizations like Sports Service.) But since Dan was still in his teens, the Braves told him that by law he was too young to sell beer. They then told him that they could give him a job selling popcorn, peanuts and soda, and he happily accepted. To give you an idea of how long ago that was and the changes in costs, Dan told me that

Left to Right. Jake McKinney, Laine McKinney Schmitt, Lisa McKinney, Luann McKinney, Dan McKinney, Vince Cupertino, Laura Larson, Jim Cupertino, Linda Cupertino, Erik Larson, Michael Cupertino, Elaine McKinney, Ed Schmitt, Sarah Larson, DJ Cupertino (kneeling ) Mariel McKinney Schmitt-all in the family. that when they had double headers. That’s just the carrying portion of the job. There’s also opening every bottle and pouring it into cup, no spills and with minimal foam, making change and doing it correctly, staying jolly and cheerful throughout, remembering faces and names and everything else. Dan usually worked in the upper deck, and up there the rows and steps are even steeper than they are in the lower stands. There’s more. I‘ve just told you about Dan’s work at County Stadium and Miller Park. He also worked 15 or more races over 40 years at State Fair Park; worked many Wisconsin Badger football, basketball and boxing events every year in Madison. And since Sports Service also worked for the Chicago White Sox, he worked many games for them at Comiskey Park during the times when the Brewers were on the road. All this while

working full time at his teaching positions at Washington and Vincent High Schools in Milwaukee. “If I had been married to any woman other than my wonderful wife Elaine, none of all that would have been possible,” he said. “No other wife would have put up with it. I was gone all day at my teaching job, then gone almost every night selling beer. Elaine never complained. She even volunteered to cook hot dogs for the players and coaches during doubleheaders. I’ll tell you, she really deserves some kind of an award.” Baseball, the Braves and the Brewers were an integral part of the family at the McKinney home. Three of Dan and Elaine’s daughters, Linda, Lisa and Luann worked as stand managers in concession stands at County Stadium when they were younger (They also have another daughter, Laura).

• 13A

the prices for those products were 15 cents each. “Beer was only 30 cents a bottle,” he laughed, “and one year, I think it was Gettleman’s, they had a special on for only 26 cents a bottle. Only four cents, but back in those days a penny made a difference.” I asked Dan if beer vendors were paid a salary, or were paid a commission on their sales. “Very definitely commission,” he answered. “In the early years with the Braves I was paid 90 cents a case. Since I was one of the tops in sales and sold about nine MCKINNEY continued on page 22A


14A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014 HALL OF FAME continued from page 14A English teacher, continues to demonstrate her tireless dedication to the literacy education for both children and adults. Centered on her love for teaching reading and helping others experience the joy of learning, Jean has continued her commitment to education throughout her retirement. Jean offers the community countless volunteer hours in a variety of critical roles, at area public schools, Milwaukee’s Literacy Center, the Greenfield Public Library, summer camps for children with special needs and driving older adults to Washington Park for Monthly OWL (Older Women’s League) meetings. Jean actually organized this local OWL branch and continues to lend herself to its mission. Her volunteer efforts reflect her passion for edu-

cation, advocacy and action. For the last 10 years, Jean sets aside each Tuesday morning to tutor adults who are working on passing their GED. When working with her students, Jean provides more than instruction in reading, writing and math; she provides them with the gift of self-esteem. Jean teaches with kindness, a sense of humor and limitless patience. Jean’s generous contribution of volunteer time and aptitude for teaching both young children and adults to learn can define Jean as a treasure who makes our community a better place. She provides all of us with an example of how to live life – by voluntarily engaging with the community where there is a need

DRUG

STRENGTH

SIZE

US COST

CANADA

GENERIC

SAVINGS

Aciphex

20mg

100 tabs

$555

$160

$27

95%

Actonel

35mg

4 tabs

$105

$60

$18

82%

Albuterol inhaler

90mg

200 dose

$52

$15.45

$11.68

45%

Actos

30mg

100 tabs

$658

$334

$109

83%

Advair

250/50

60 doses

$175

$110

N/A

39%

Plavix

75mg

28 tabs

$142

$86

$25

83%

Synthroid

100mcg

100 tabs

$55

$15

N/A

74%

Viagra

100mg

4 tabs

$68

$50

$32

45%

Diovan

320mg

28 tabs

$113

$42

$18

85%

Celebrex

200mg

100 caps

$396

$158

N/A

60%

Flomax

0.4mg

30 tabs

$109

$26

$8

92%

Crestor

40mg

100 tabs

$550

$218

$47

91%

THRIFTYMEDSNOW .COM

Our name says it all!

Call Us Today! 1-866-999-7928

www.thriftymeds.com

*You don’t have to pay full price for your prescription drugs. Fill your prescriptions with ThriftyMedsNow, a licensed Canadian pharmacy. It’s easy! Get your free price quote today.

FRED KNUEPPEL “Fred Knueppel is admired for his volunteer efforts and concern for his community. He has spent thousands of hours volunteering in many different capacities.” Fred is the President of Franklin Senior Citizens Inc., giving of his time with an unselfish attitude. He has also been appointed to the City of Franklin’s Planning Commission by two mayors because of the valuable insight he has on zoning and planning topics, as well as his familiarity with the needs and wants of the large senior population. Fred is a long-time member and officer of the Lions Club. He championed the creation of a technology center for the senior citizens of the City of Franklin’s meal site where they become acquainted with computers. They use the devices to network and communicate with other seniors in their communities and throughout the world. Fred received the 2009 “Inspire by Example” award from the Volunteer Center of Milwaukee for his development of a computer repair program at Independence First. The used computers are solicited, repaired and refurbished, then donated to low-income people and people with disabilities who, otherwise, would not have been able to acquire one. He also volunteers his time consulting with seniors and maintaining the technology for the Brenwood Senior Apartments complex. Among of the most giving features about Fred and his wife, Cindy, is the fact that they have taken in a couple of homeless friends who had no place to go except for the streets. These people lived, free of charge, in Fred and Cindy’s home until they could get back on their feet. A very kind neighbor to many, a friend to all. LENNIE MOSLEY “To know Lennie Mosley is to love her!” A statement summarizing descriptions offered by almost everyone you talk with about her. Lennie is a devoted wife and mother, but she is also considered a “Community Activist.” Some of her outstanding qualities and community service have been expressed by community leaders, friends, and associates. “Outstand-

ing leadership in community service and tireless efforts in humanitarian services for the benefit of Wisconsin citizens - especially the elderly.” “She is an eager and valuable member of the Halyard Park Association for 30 years. She is selfless!” A member of Cream City (WI) Chapter The Links, incorporated for the past twelve years. “Hard in-depth work with a follow through, follow up attitude in completing tasks.” “The quality of life of residents in the 6th District and City of Milwaukee is enhanced by her work and deeds.” Lennie served as a “working” member of numerous boards throughout the city, and has received recognition and honors for her outstanding and invaluable service to the community, but especially, the help she gives to an elderly church member, lovingly called “Mother” Shakespeare. As a member of St. Francis of Assisi church, she devoted 500 plus hours of volunteer time throughout the years helping organize successful church fundraising events and many other activities. Lennie Mosley’s level of service to her family, friends and community is phenomenal.

ROBERT PIETRYKOWSKI Leader, planner and developer, humble gracious and dedicated; these are the words used to describe Bob Pietrykowski. Mr. Pietrykowski has demonstrated his strong commitment to Milwaukee County through his passionate work with various groups and organizations. He currently serves as the Chairperson of the Milwaukee County Department on Aging Disability Resource Center Governing Board, as well as CORE/


24B • 50plus • BEST of S.E. WI SENIoR houSINg • SEPTEMBER 2013 EI Centro Individual Donor Development Committee. He is a member of the Milwaukee County Commission on Aging Wellness Council and the South Shore Connecting Caring Communities, which is an initiative of the Milwaukee County Department on Aging. Additionally, Bob has been active in many community organizations serving older adults in Milwaukee County. A few of these include; Lafarge Lifelong Learning Center, Transitional Living Services, Kiwanis Club of Milwaukee, Future Milwaukee, MOSAIC Milwaukee, Villa St. Francis Board, Policy Institute for Family Impact Seminars and the Milwaukee County Long Term Care Council. Mr. Pietrykowski has been recognized for his dedicated efforts by receiving the Anita Jansson Inspiration Award, Giving Heart Award from St. Vincent de Paul Society, Distinguished Leadership Award from the National Association for Community Leadership, and the Community Service Award from Future Milwaukee. Milwaukee County is fortunate to be the beneficiary of Bob’s leadership, talents, and skills; he is truly a well-respected role model and a deserving recipient of this prestigious honor.

of organizations and agencies. They include, Social Development Commission, Next Door Foundation, Milwaukee College Prep, Walnut Way Conservation Corp, Uniting Garden Homes, National Hookup of Black Women Organization, Black Health Coalition, New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, Medical College of Wisconsin, and Interfaith Older Adult Neighborhood Outreach Program. She received an award for being among the Top 100 Black women by Holy Redeemer, who recognized her efforts in community service in Milwaukee County. As a single parent, Dorothy was a foster parent to over twenty children, adopting three and raising two more with five of her own to raise along the way. She provided much love and care to all of her children, all while volunteering her time and energy to so many organizations. Dorothy comes packaged and ready with a warm smile and hearty laugh every day. She makes everyone feel at ease and is genuine through and through.

DOROTHY SMITH Dorothy has given her time and energy over the course of many years to the community in various capacities, educating young parents, advocating for those less fortunate and providing a strong voice, fundraising and mentoring. Her strong commitment to help others comes from somewhere deep inside her as she has dedicated many years of service to a number

Milwa u Best K kee’s e Secret pt !

25% Off for Seniors, Veterans & College Students w/ID

THRIFT STORE Milwaukee’s Best Kept Secret!

6731 W. Greenfield Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53214 (414) 302-5123

Store Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-9pm & Sun 11 am-6pm

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 15A


16A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Roanoke: Serving as an attractive destination for centuries The number one place for a celebration of early exploring inhabitants who came to America in sailing ships from Western Europe some 500 years ago may not have seen Roanoke as their primary destination. However, the locale of the James River figures in early history as we know of it now as it meanders through the Virginia Blue Ridge Mountains. There’s a certain flavor to Roanoke that beckons tourists as they travel the Blue Ridge Parkway and observe the vibrant Vir-

Foot Specialist Medical, Surgical & Orthopedic treatment of foot & ankle disorders. 1626 S. Main St. West Bend

Call: 262-334-5137

ginia vistas that center on Roanoke and the valley around it. Roanoke – some claim its name came from a husky early inhabitant (perhaps Native American), who traveled the nearby waters while paddling an oaken log with a trimmed limb. Roanoke is reachable via several different major highways, but the visually pleasing Blue Ridge Parkway runs along the western side of the city. Highway 220 goes directly into the city center at milepost 121. There you will find 13 galleries, studios and museums plus the home of the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra. To accommodate daytime-busy people, the galleries are open on First Mondays until 9 p.m. This area is near to the Hotel Roanoke, which also has a large convention center. The Taubman Museum of Art is an architectural wonder as well as home to 2,050 pieces in its permanent collection. You may contact the Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitors’ Bureau, 1-800-635-5535, for details as

Blue Ridge Mountains - credit Bruce Henderson to current events and specialized activities. Right now, while most popular seasonal events are past or forward into the future, we do know that they celebrate Independence Day in grand style. In addition to the Roanoke Convention and Visitors’ Center, the large and beautiful Hotel Roanoke has an events’ calendar that is available to all-comers at Hotel Roanoke.com. Taking a journalists’ tour of Roanoke and environs means a quick, but still thorough tour of what makes Roanoke a popular vacation or convention destination. We’ll take a brief tour of the sights and sites thought to be of more than just passing interest. First of all, we will write that it is steeped in history of our country and its peoples from the earliest of times. Actually, the first white settlers arrived in what is now Roanoke in the 1740s. The original town was called Old Lick, later Big Lick and later Roanoke, which really was derived from an Indian word, Ra-re-nock. This last was the name for shell beads worn by the Native Americans and often used as trade goods. We’ll first take a dive into summer as there is endless excitement and adventure exploring along the rivers, streams and lakes that meander through the valleys and mountain passes. The views are next to breathtaking. There also are 22 miles of greenways where visitors can walk, run,

bike, picnic or just view the scenery. The Roanoke Star and Overlook provide a bird’s eye view of the city. The star there is said to be the largest such to be man-made. Convenient to Interstate Highway 80 is Carvin’s Cove Natural Preserve,

an area of family fun. Nearby Smith Mountain Lake has over 500 miles of shoreline and many activities including cruises aboard the Virgin Dare


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

The view from Star attracts tourists. sidewinder boat that is a 19th century replica ship. There’s also the Appalachian Trail to explore, the James River, Eagle Landing, the Upper Blackwater River Blueway and Green Hill Park. The treasures to be found in the Virginia Blue Ridge country go far beyond the adventuresome outside to the Historic Roanoke City Market, and if you tire here, there’s the Blue Ridge Antique Center in nearby Rocky Mount. While it was not visited, we’re told that the Salem Farmers Market and the Vinton Farmers Market are worthwhile stops. The entire valley has a population of just over 300,000; city itself about 10,000. The Booker T. Washington National Monument commemorates the birthplace of America’s most prominent African American educator and orator of the late 19th and early 20th

centuries. The Eleanor D. Wilson Museum at Hollins University in Roanoke is a premier art destination. Renew your senses this spring or enjoy the summer in vibrant surroundings as your eyes capture the vibrant landscape. If you happen to be a retiree, you might treat yourself next fall or winter to Roanoke on your way to or from Florida. The fall season in the valley is said to be spectacular from about mid-October to early November as nature paints the mountainous landscapes in colors of red, orange and yellow. But right now, you could be reveling in the best of the season along Virginia’s portion of the Blue Ridge Parkway. At any time of year, you’ll enjoy small-town southern hospitality, great restaurants, big city amenities and the proud heritage that makes Roanoke the nice city to visit.

Taubman Museum of Art- a must for everyone

Hotel Roanoke towers over downtown.

• 17A


18A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

Bob Leskovar, his pals and the amazing sport of dartball By Jack Pearson In any sport there are players who eventually become stars, some even superstars. That rather obvious maxim thus applies to dartball, the sport featured in this column. Dartball is somewhat of an enigma to most people, so perhaps what follows will clear the air. To begin with, throwing darts is nothing new. There have been games played with darts in a somewhat baseball oriented manner, and this is called dartball. So here is a brief rundown of the game as well as a bit about some of the people who play in it, and especially one of them, whose accomplishments in the sport are quite incredible. His name is Bob Leskovar, and he is past 71 now and lives in the south side of Milwaukee. At that advanced age he’s not merely hanging on; he’s the best dartball player in Wisconsin, quite possibly the best in the whole country. This is part of the very special magic and uniqueness of dartball; in a highly competitive, physical sport played by all ages, it is a grandpa in his 70s who is the best player. Up front I must point out that Bob did not request this story and especially not the commentary about himself. The topic was my choice, not only because the game of dartball is such an interesting sport, but also because it is all but ignored by the media today. Over the years, Leskovar regularly sent in the results of local dartball tournaments to the 50 Plus office, so I surmised that he’d be a good source of information. I called him, and he was most obliging, sending a pile of background material, internet sites and names of people to interview. He never mentioned his own input or his mind boggling array of accomplishments. I came up with those on my own. If you read on, you’ll learn of them and perhaps agree with my assessment. One wouldn’t think an activity that was conducted primarily in taverns and church basements could be considered a legitimate sport. Yet that’s exactly where the game of dartball is played. Over the long and cold winter months, there are few places any-

ARTS

SPORTS By Jack Pearson

where in the world where as much dartball activity exists – league competition and tournaments as well as simply social gatherings – than here and throughout Wisconsin. It has been that way for some time. More than 70 years ago, on March 31, 1941, Life magazine ran a feature citing Philadelphia, where the sport originated, as well as Milwaukee and Kansas City, as being strongholds of the game in America. Today there are more than 40,000 who play the game in Wisconsin, and more than 2,000 teams. It was noted earlier that dartball could be described as a form of baseball. It is, and is played inside with darts and a dartboard instead of outside on a playing field with bats and balls. As in baseball, there are usually nine innings to a game, but teams can be two person, four person or nine-person, and there are coaches, umpires and scorekeepers, with far fewer fans and media coverage and infinitesimally less dollar involvement. Darts are thrown underhanded from a line on the floor exactly 20 feet from the target, which is a four-foot square that contains a diamond-shaped hit zone. Sounds simple to do, but then so does hitting a golf ball. It seems easy… until you try it. Dartball has grown steadily over the years since it was introduced back in the early 1920s by a dartboard company in Pennsylvania. It soon became very popular there, and for some reason here in this area soon after. Perhaps it was because of Milwaukee’s plethora of bars and churches that had large meeting rooms where games could be played that was the attraction. Or maybe there was an enterprising dartboard salesman ala Professor Harold Hill and his band uniforms who alighted from a train one year and converted the Milwaukee Buerg-

the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

ENTERTAINMEN

calendar

60

Six of Dartball’s star players, from the left, Jim Hickle, Bud Bolling, Archie Dadian, Mike Studer, Bob Leskovar and Jerry Mathwig.

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone

Bob Leskovar and the tools of his sport, darts and a dartboard. Bob is considered the top Dartball player in Wisconsin, and although he denies it, he is just that. ers. The first major dartball tournament in Wisconsin was held in 1939. Today there are nine such events; one in November, one in December, three in January, one in February, two in March, all culminated by the annual State Championship in April. Two of those tourneys, one in January and the other in February, are held in Pat’s Oak Manor in South Milwaukee, and both, by way, are conducted by Leskovar. By 1951, the Wisconsin Dartball Committee was formed, a body created specifically to govern and to promote the sport. It was the first such dartball authority of its kind in the country. One of the initial things the committee did was to draft an official dartball rules book. Prior to then, all the leagues in the state had been op-

erating under their own set of rules, a real hodgepodge. Afterwards everyone was on the same page. In 2009, the committee began the Wisconsin Dartball Hall of Fame. Both the rules book and the Hall of Fame were the first in the nation. It’s curious to note that in order to be voted into the Hall, the bylaws call for all inductees to be at least 50 years old and have played the game competitively for at least 25 years. Why its advocates love it is easy to understand. There is a warm camaraderie that prevails during matches, not only among teammates, but between opposing teams as well. Competing teams’ benches are within a few feet of one another during play, and chattering and laughing, kidding and jibing, yet also words of encour-


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

agement when a shot is missed and praise when a difficult one is made, are always there, too. Every player tries his best to win, of course, but good sportsmanship and having an enjoyable time are equally important. This is what sport really should be all about but, often, this has been all but forgotten in too many other sporting venues. There are other reasons for its popularity. The costs for dartball are surprisingly low, both for equipment needed and in fees to play. A player’s outlay for an entire season can be less than he’d pay for one round of golf. It’s also a game for everyone: women as well as men, and all ages, from the teens on up to seniors in their ‘90s. One does not have to be a super athlete to play, either. Many dartball players have never been proficient in any other sport. That’s enough on background of the sport. Now for more on Leskovar. Baseball fans know that two of the greatest hitters in the history of the game were Ty Cobb and Ted Williams. Cobb had a lifetime average of .367, and Williams was the last major League player to top .400 in a single season, .406 in 1941. Now remember, it was noted earlier that dartball was a form of baseball, using darts, but with hits and runs and batting averages. Leskovar has been active as a player for 55 years; it would have been 57 but he was in the Army for two years. In every one of those 55 seasons, he hit over .500! In 35 of them he hit over .600; and in three of them he hit over .700. No dartball player in Wisconsin, and I never heard of one anywhere, has ever come anywhere close to those accomplishments. His .717 average over the 1983 season is the highest ever attained in Wisconsin. Most dartball players are thrilled if they manage to be on the championship team in just one state tourney. Bob has been on 11, an unprecedented feat. “When I think back on how it all began I have to laugh,” Bob said. “I was such a skinny, scrawny kid, not tall or strong enough for any of the major sports. My dad was in a church dartball league, and one day took me along with him. I was about 15 then, and as I recall, I became hooked right away. I finally found a sport I could

• 19A

More Dartball icons, this group from nearly a half century ago, the 1965 Wisconsin State Champions, Vans’s Shop Rite of West Allis. That’s team manager Jerry Mathwig just left of the trophy, the late Jack Willison, lower left, and Jim Hinckle, upper right. All three are now in the Wisconsin Dartball Hall of Fame. play. Four or five days a week I’d go down into the basement and practice shooting darts at my dad’s dartboard. Hundreds and hundreds of practice throws, until I couldn’t lift my arm. But I thrived on it.” Besides all his hitting feats, awards and championships in dartball, Bob has been an active member of the State Dartball Committee for 26 years, and has served as the secretary treasurer of the South Milwaukee Dartball League for 34 years. He has also run those two tournaments in South Milwaukee for the past several years. All of the above hitting feats and other accomplishments by Leskovar I learned of through the Internet or from newspaper records. The man just does not blow his own horn. “That’s Bob, the way he’s always been,” said Pancho Palesse, another of his long time buddies and an area sport legend himself. “I’ll bet he didn’t tell you he was the pitcher for the Schaff Funeral Home team in our Monday Senior VMP Softball League, either. Well, with him pitching, they’ve won the championship of the league for the

past three years.” By the way, Bob and his wife, Lucille, have three children and two grandchildren. Considering the similarities between dartball and other sports, one that comes to mind is the existence of dedicated individuals who have been and are responsible for the game’s growth and well being. For example, here in Wisconsin, people such as Curly Lambeau, and what he meant to football, and Bud Selig, and likewise what he meant to baseball fit that bill. Had Lambeau not been around, there wouldn’t be any Green Bay Packers or Lambeau Field, and had Selig not been on the scene, there wouldn’t be any Milwaukee Brewers or Miller Park Stadium either. It has been the same in dartball. Back in the early years, men such as Harold “Zip” Morgan, Ernie Dorrow Sr. and Jack Willison Sr. were the hard working honchos in charge. Fast forward to the present day. Besides Leskovar, there are a good number of individuals in this area who have and still are doing much to keep the sport healthy. Some include Jim

Hinckle of St. Francis, Jerry Mathwig of West Allis, Archie Dadian of South Milwaukee, Bud Bolling of Milwaukee, Mike Studer of Franklin, and Cliff Mengert, formerly of Milwaukee but who now lives in Alabama, to name just a few. JIM HINCKLE - It’s easy to spot Jim, now going on 70, at any dartball event. He’s the one with the long, white beard and looks like Santa Claus. Considering all Jim has done and continues to do in the sport, this column could have been written just about him. To begin with, he’s been one of the game’s top players since 1959. He is also the founder and current editor of the online Dartball News, a newsletter sent to players in eight states. In another journalistic effort, he is busily at work putting together a history of the sport. (Since he keeps adding to it, he many never finish it, but when and if he does, I’ve promised to feature it in this column.) “Most Dartball players got started in the game by watching their dads play,” Jim said. “In my case, would you believe, it was my wife, actually DARTBALL continued to page 22A


G W’S DAY on

son

HERMAN WHITE WRITES 20A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

ARTS

ENTERTAINMENT

calendar

May 1 Free First Thursday Milwaukee Art Museum 700 N. Art Museum Dr. Admission isByfree individuals and Enis for Wright families (excluding groups) on the first Thursday of each month, thanks to Target, from 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

the WRIGHT SIDE of

May 3 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer® Veterans Park 1010 N. Lincoln Memorial Dr. Milwaukee Join the American Cancer Society and Kohl’s Cares in the fight to end breast cancer by joining the 5K walk. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Visit www.stridesmilwaukee.com/ to register and more information.

60

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone May 1 2014 Senior Conference Washington County Washington County Fair Park, 3000 Hwy PV, West Bend For adults of all ages. Pre-registration is required. Contact the Aging and Disability Resource Center, 262335-4497. Door prizes with grand prize being a flat screen TV. May 2 9th Annual Milwaukee/NARI Foundation Rummage Sale Milwaukee Millwork 11712 W. Dixon St., Milwaukee A large variety of merchandise will be available for sale to the public from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Appliances, bathroom and ceiling tiles, bathtubs, cabinets, carpeting, doors, flooring, furniture, lumber, roof shingles and much more. Any rummage sale purchase gets two tickets for the 2014 Milwaukee/NARI Tour of Remodeled Homes in May. May 2 – June 1 Nancy Drew and her Biggest Case Ever First Stage, Todd Wehr Theater, Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water Milwaukee First Stage debut in this world premiere adventure! In the small town of River Heights, Nancy Drew will face her greatest challenge. Make sure you see this one it’s not to be missed. Call 414-267-2961 or visit www.firststage.org.

May 3 – 4 Civil War Live Encampment Dousman Stagecoach Museum, 1075 Pilgrim Parkway, Brookfield Civil War demonstration, fashion show, food and much more from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Visit elmbrookhistoricalsociety.org for more info and fee to attend. May 11 All Mothers have a wonderful day! May 11 Wehr’s Annual Plant Sale Wehr Nature Center 9701 W College Ave, Franklin Come early for the sale of native plants suitable for sun or shade and wet or dry areas of your yard. Certain selections sell out fast. Open from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. May 17 – 18 15th Annual Milwaukee / NARI Tour of Remodeled Homes Tour includes 15 recently completed remodeling and home improvement projects from Brookfield, Greenfield, Mequon, Waukesha and Whitefish Bay. For details, visit www.milwaukeenari.org or call 414-771-4071. May 25 Maxwell Street Days Firemen’s Park W65 N796 Washington Ave., Cedarburg

Vendors represented with a varied selection of antiques, collectibles, crafts, fine arts, pottery fresh produce, seasonal items and so much more. www.cedarburgfiredepot.com May 26 Memorial Day Downtown Milwaukee Parade starts at 2 p.m. at 4th and Wisconsin, heads East on Wisconsin Ave. to the War Memorial Center. Visit www.war-veterans.org/Parade. htm May 28 Bill Engvall Potawatomi Bingo Casino 1721 Canal St., Milwaukee A true Hollywood story, Bill’s career is centered on his marriage (to the same woman) for over 30 years and fatherhood. As he returns to stand up, Bill Engvall has plenty to say! Visit paysbig.com/entertainment/box-office or call 414-847-7922 for tickets. FUTURE EVENTS June 5 - 12 9th Annual Downtown Dining Week This eight day smorgasbord will highlight forty restaurants, each with a special menu of three-course favorites at 12.50 for lunch and $25 - $35 for dinner. Visit www.milwaukeedowntown.com/diningweek for a list of restaurants. July 23 – August 3 Phantom of the Opera Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St., Milwaukee Critics are raving that this breathtaking production is “bigger and better than ever before.” This PHANTOM features a brilliant new scenic design by Paul Brown, Tony Award®-winning original costume design by Maria Björnson, lighting design by Tony Award®-winner Paule Constable, new choreography by Scott Ambler, and a new staging by director Laurence Connor. Visit marcuscenter.org or call 414-273-7206. Great mother’s day gift!

ON-GOING Alzheimer’s Support Group Cedar Bay West, Fellowship Hall, 5595 County Road Z, West Bend. Meets the second Wednesday of each month from 1 - 3 p.m. For details, call (262) 306-4230. Alzheimer’s Support Group Jackson Crossing Lakeshore Building N168 W22026 Main St., Jackson Support group held the third Wednesday of each month; 6 p.m. Respite care is available. Please call for reservations at (262) 993-2838. Afternoon Dance American Legion Post #449 3245 N. 124th St., Brookfield Everyone Welcome! Second Monday of every month, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m., Big Band dance, $3. • • • • • Charles Horwitz Planetarium S14 W28167 Madison St., Waukesha For more information on upcoming programs visit - www.waukeshaschools.com/planet. • • • • • Milwaukee Art Museum 700 N. Art Museum Dr. Open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday Sunday. Call (414) 224-3200 or go to www.mam.org. • • • • • Milwaukee County RSVP – Interfaith Older Adult Programs, Inc. Contact Eddie at (414) 220-8655 to be a volunteer. • • • • • Milwaukee Dancing Grannies Interested in becoming one of Milwaukee’s dancing grannies? Contact us at (414) 630-4493. • • • • • Museum of Wisconsin Art 300 South Sixth Ave., West Bend Public hours, Wednesday – Saturday 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. and Sunday 1 - 4:30 p.m. (262) 334-9638/ www. wisconsinart.org. • • • • •  O.A.S.I.S. 2414 West Mitchell Street For seniors Fifty-Five Plus Travel Club meets monthly, second Friday of the month 8:30 a.m. Website: milwaukeerecreation.net/travel. • • • • • 


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

Potawatomi Bingo Casino Senior Day is every Tuesday of the month. That means more chances for you to win! • • • • •  Schlitz Audubon Nature Center 1111 E. Brown Deer Rd., Milwaukee Call for information at (414) 3522880 Ext. 0.

• • • • • SC Johnson Tours Golden Rondelle Theater 1525 Howe St., Racine Reservations are required; admission is free, open all year on Fridays only. Offering three tour programs that run from 1 to 3.5 hours. Visit website to schedule a tour at scjohnson.com and

for tours of 20 or more, call (262) 260-2154. • • • • • Square Benders Club Modern square dance lessons for singles and couples. Call for details at (414) 355-9424 or (414) 964-5443. • • • • •

• 21A

Stillwaters Cancer Support Services 2607 N, Grandview Blvd. Ste 110, Waukesha For all the support groups available and answers to questions, visit www. stillwaterscenter.org or (262) 5489148. • • • • •

For Men and Women age 50 and older COMPETE FOR GOLD OR JUST FUN IN YOUR AGE GROUP

EVENTS TO BE HELD THIS FALL Archery Badminton Basketball Shuffleboard Bowling Cycling Horseshoes Track & Field Golf Swimming Racquetball Race Walking Pickleball Tennis Volleyball Lawn Bowling Softball Powerlifting Triathlon Table Tennis 5K Run or Walk Basketball Free-Throw FOR DATES AND LOCATIONS OF EVENTS AND TO REGISTER GO TO WWWW.WISENIOROLYMPICS.COM OR CALL (262) 424-2149 FREE WELLNESS ExPO SEPTEMBER 3rd, 4:00-5:30pm at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 1800 S. 92nd St., West Allis sponsored by MILWAUKEE COUNTY DEPARTMENT ON AGING


22A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014 DARTBALL continued from page 19A my wife-to-be, that I was watching as she threw the darts. It was in a CYO league, and she, Bonnie is her name, and her brother were competing on a team. We were all about 15 years old, and, of course, I thought she looked pretty good. I reasoned that the best way to get to know her was to join into the dartball action, too. I was successful in my plan, obviously, as we have been married for a half century, have five kids and three granddaughters. So all in all, Dartball has been very, very good to me.” JERRY MATHWIG. - You’ve heard of the super long careers of sports stars such as George Blanda in football and Minnie Minoso and Milwaukee’s own Warren Spahn in baseball, all between 25 and 30 years, which is quite commendable. But in reality they’re all pikers in the longevity area in comparison with dartball’s Jerry Mathwig. Jerry began playing Dartball in 1943 when he was 14 years old (Roosevelt was still President, you could buy a glass of beer for a dime and the only one with a cell phone device was Dick Tracy). Anyhow, Jerry took to the game with such enthusiasm that he never stopped and is still competing 71 years later (and still counting). Even at his age, he can still hold his own with all the young MCKINNEY continued from page 13A cases a game, my take was a little over eight dollars a game,” he said. “That sounds ridiculous today, but keep things in perspective. As noted, beer sold for 30 cents a bottle back in the ‘50s, and with 24 bottles to a case I was getting about three and a half cents a bottle. That’s better than 10 percent, which was and is quite re-

“whippersnappers.” Longevity actually runs in Jerry’s family. His uncle, Elmer Mathwig, was reportedly still playing dartball on a competitive basis at age 96, and stopped only because they took his driver’s license away and he couldn’t get to the matches. Elmer lived on until he was 101. Jerry was one of those first three gentlemen to be inducted into the Wisconsin Dartball Hall of Fame. His high season average was a .575 in 1946; he’s competed in 60 state championship tournaments; and has been on the State Committee for 44 years. Jerry and his wife, Janice, have three sons, 12 grandchildren and 13 great grandkids, proving that he does find time for a few things other than dartball. ARCHIE DADIAN - Besides his athletic achievements, Archie is one of the nicest guys you’d ever meet. He’ll chat with you for as long as you choose, and is wonderfully gregarious for being such a superstar. Aside from that, how many guys have been inducted into the Halls of Fame of two different sports? One of Wisconsin’s all-time great golfers, he was named to the WSGA Hall of Fame in 1980, and to the Wisconsin Dartball Hall soon after its creation in 2009. He won an almost unbelievable

total of 117 golf tournaments in Wisconsin and elsewhere, including 11 Billy Sixty Bestball events and 10 WSGA Senior Bestballs, both with several different partners. Besides golf and dartball, he was a top basketball player in high school and college, and won the conference scoring title when he was at the old Spencerian College. His first sport? You’d never guess: marbles. “Hey, I was pretty good,” he said, laughing. “My brother won the state championship one year, and I could beat him.” That Archie has been so active and successful athletically is a wonder. He’s had several major operations over the years including three complete hip replacements, the most recent just this past month. Get this: Archie’s dartball team consists of him and Vern Kappes, both 81, Bud Bolling, 85, and Marty Guadian, 89. That totals 256 years, and they’ll take on anyone in the world, of any age. Archie, Bud and Marty are all in the Dartball Hall of Fame, and Vern is a world champion speed skater. A word of advice: Don’t bet against them. He and his wife ‘Shirley’ have four children and eight grandkids, all of which has led to a new career for both of them—babysitting. “Every day, too,” Archie said, “from ear-

ly morning to late afternoon.” How much do you get paid?, I asked. “Hah! he replied. “You have to be kidding.” In addition to those players, others whom Leskovar listed as men who have not only been top notch players over the years, but who have done much to help the game include Bud Bolling, Mike Studer and Cliff Mengert, as well as Marty Gaudian, Chuck Spahn, Mark “Doc” Drow, Mike “Wimpy” Wendorf and Rick “The Bay View Bomber” Fare, “to name just a handful,” Bob said. “You could list dozens more.” So our apologies, but we’ve already exceeded our space limit. Something Leskovar emphasized was the need to bring new, younger players into the game. “You must have noticed that all the players you’ve written about are getting up there in age,” he said, “in their 60s, 70s and 80s. The only way that the sport is going to be able to continue is if young people come along to replace us old-timers. Dartball is a great game, anyone can play, and the costs are minimal. I know 50 Plus is read by seniors, but seniors have kids and grandkids that they can talk to. If anyone is interested they can call me at 414-321-5916 or E-mail www.wisdartball.com.”

spectable. Also, since I worked about four hours a game, I was making better than two bucks an hour. A lot of hourly workers then were making only a dollar or a dollar and a half an hour.” By way of comparison, today beer vendors at Miller Park are paid $18 a case.

“But making a commission was only one of the reasons we worked as beer vendors,” Dan pointed out. “I can’t speak for everyone, but for me, being out there in a Major League Baseball stadium with all those great players (Dan was a track man in school and one year broke the Big Ten Conference record in the 880 dash) and being part of it all was a thrill every day I worked. And equally important was the interaction with the fans. My customers all became friends, good friends, as did all the other vendors and concession workers. You might think it’s a tough job; I never did. I always loved it.” You may have noticed that in those last comments Dan was speaking in the past tense. About seven years ago, after three knee replacements, Sports Service management talked Dan into taking an inside administrative type job. One, obviously, with less walking

and carrying of heavy cases. “One of these days I guess I’ll have to pack it in,” he said, looking out over the field. “I have to start spending more time at home with Elaine, and with the grandkids, too.” Dan and Elaine have nine grandchildren, and all are active in one sport or another. “The Brewers have asked me to toss out the opening pitch at an upcoming game, I guess to sort of honor all my years of service, and I’m really looking forward to that.” “So does that mean you’re finally going to retire,” I asked him, giving him a jab on the shoulder. He punched me back. “Why do you ask that?” he replied, looking as if I’d called him a name. “I’m still in pretty good shape. What’s 61 years? How can one or two more matter?” I did not attempt to argue with that logic.

NEED A CD?

3.24

%

APY*

Cash Gift

Limited Time Offer

When you purchase a 6 month FDIC Insured CD from

Asset Management Alliance, LLC. Ask us About 401K + IRA ROLLOVER BONUSES!

BROOKFIELD (262) 784-4001 FDIC insured to $250,000 per institution. *Annual Percentage Yield. $10,000 minimum deposit. AMA cash gift based on amount of CD or Money Market & limited to one gift per household. Certain restrictions apply. AMA is a CD deposit broker that offers FDIC insured CD’s & other products. CD’s are issued by participating banks. Advertised rates subjected to availability. New clients only.


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 23A

We Saw You At

the 90th Annual Realtors Home & Garden Show

By Margaret Pearson Always a most welcome harbinger of spring, the event has been called the nation’s largest long running home and garden show. Again conducted in the Exposition Center of the Wisconsin State Fair Park, the show included more than 10,000 square feet of garden promenade and exhibits by more than 350 companies. Some of the smiling faces belonged to:

Thomas Freimund and Sandy Ostrowski of West Allis.

Roger and Lois Knutson of Wales.

Joy Newlund of Cottage Grove and John Woodrum of Oconomowoc.

Jeff Hart and Jutta Kennedy of Racine.

Sharon and Warren Hatch of Elkhorn.

Vanessa Tyska of Sharon and her sister, Theresa Tyska of Marengo.

Nancy and Ron Williams of Burlington.


24A • 50PLUS • MAY 2014


SECTION B • May 2014

Independent

RETIREMENT COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

Whats INSIDE . . . . . . Be Wary of Potential Scams. . . . . . . . .19B

Prepare for Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . 22B Attend Golden Idol Learn and View Marasco Art . . . . . . . 20B Competition June 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24B


2B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

e-Free

Smok

e-Free

Smok

Smoking Limited

BERKSHIRE AT KENSINGTON

1800 Kensington Dr., Waukesha

262-548-1449 • FREE Utilities • Spacious Floor Plans • Free Indoor Parking • Pets Welcome (limited) • Social Activities • On-Site Bank, Chapel,

Beauty Salon, Fitness Center • Convenient Elevators • Transportation to Shopping • Located on City Bus Line • Pergola and Gazebo w/BBQ grills

BERKSHIRE AT WEST ALLIS

BERKSHIRE OCONOMOWOC

414-258-2720

262-567-9001

1414 S. 65th St., West Allis • FREE Heat, Hot Water • FREE Underground Parking • Elevator • Courtyard with Gazebo, BBQ Grill • Social Activities for Everyone • Near Historic West Allis Shops

BERKSHIRE Communities Smoke-Free

BERKSHIRE GREENDALE 7010 W. Grange Avenue, 53129

414-421-4900

• Near Historic Downtown • Laundry rooms on each Greendale & Southridge Mall floor • Spacious floor plans with • Free underground/surface walk-in closets parking • Balcony or patio with all • Business & fitness centers, homes community room & BBQ • Heat and hot water included patio • Pets cherished • Select homes with washers • Alive with daily social & dryers activities! Professionally Managed by OAKBROOK CORPORATION

• On-Site Exercise Room & Classes • Beauty Salon & Library • Near Senior Center, Walgreens, Banks • Located on Bus Line

210 S. Main St., Oconomowoc

• Pet friendly with some • Spacious floor plans restrictions • Ceiling fans • Walking distance to the • Elevator service to all floors downtown area and two lakes • Laundry room on each floor • Activities w/Oconomowoc • Free heated underground parking Area Senior Center on site • Free heat and water

Two bedroom apartment homes currently available. Call for our rent specials!!

ACTIVE ADULT COMMUNITIES (55+)*

Smoke-Free 2014

BERKSHIRE SUNSET

S30 W24890 Sunset Drive, Waukesha, 53189 (Corner of Prairie Ave. & Sunset Drive)

262-548-0131

• Full-size balcony/patio with every home • Spacious open floor plans with walk-in closets • Free underground/surface parking • Heat & water INCLUDED • Laundry rooms & storage

Smoke-Free

BERKSHIRE GRAFTON 1004 Beech St., Grafton

262-376-9661

Set up a personalized tour today!

units on each floor • Convenient shopping at the New Shoppes on the Fox River • Pet friendly (restrictions apply) community, library, computer & fitness areas • Social Activities for every one!

Join our carefree style of living!

• Convenient location in the heart of Downtown Grafton • Heat & water included • Free underground/surface parking • Same floor storage units

• Patio or balcony for each unit • Media center, fitness room, community room & patio for everyone’s enjoyment

Affordable Living In The Heart of Grafton!

*Income Limits May Apply


rsta te

• 3B

s to

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

BERKSHIRE – GREENDALE 7010 W. Grange Ave., 3 Greendale Contact Person: Joann Cizel 414-421-4900 BERKSHIRE AT KENSINGTON 1800 Kensington Dr., Waukesha 262-548-1449

3

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

ent

Independent

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3

Berkshire-Greendale.com There is a deck or patio from every unit, walk-in closet. Income limits apply.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Quiet-residential setting, all utilities included in rent, lobby and library with fireplaces, guest suite, lots of activities, store, bank and beauty salon! www. berkshire-kensington.com We offer spacious open floor plans with a balcony/patio in every home, located by the new shoppes on the Fox River. Complimentary parking, heat and water included & great social activities! Income restrictions apply.

3 3 3 3

3

www.berkshire-kensington.com

BERKSHIRE AT SUNSET S30 W24890 Sunset Dr., Waukesha 53189 Contact Person: Rhea Whiteley 3 262-548-0131 www.berkshire-sunset.com

3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 www.berkshire–oconomowoc.com Located in a city setting.

BERKSHIRE – OCONOMOWOC

210 South Main St., 3 Oconomowoc, WI 53066 Contact Person Sandy Griesemer

3

262-567-9001

Welcome home. Luther Manor offers retirement housing options to suit the unique personal preferences and lifestyles of those who call the community their home. With amenities ranging from a pharmacy and bank to an onsite grocery store, as well as a variety of health and wellness opportunities, everything you need is here. For more information or to schedule a tour, contact our Client Relations team at (414) 464-3880 or live@luthermanor.org.

1QG6WUHHW‡:DXZDWRVD:,  ‡ZZZOXWKHUPDQRURUJ

ARE YOU?

• 62+ • Make less than $25,350 a year? • Enjoy Bingo, Movies, Parties? • Want to spend your day playing cards or going on day trips? PLUS, ON SITE HAIR SALON & GARDEN PLOT FOR THE “GREEN THUMBâ€?

If these sound like things you enjoy then your new home is waiting...

Rents Start at $679

C a ll fot r Ren S p e c ia ls

Call today for more information: GREENBROOK APTS 414.282.5044 4955 S. Greenbrook Terrace Greenfield, WI 53220

1 month FREE rent with signed appication & approval


rsta te

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

4B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

BERKSHIRE SENIOR APTS 1004 Beech St., Grafton, WI Contact Person: Jill Recore 262-376-9661 www.berkshire-grafton.com BERKSHIRE WEST ALLIS 1414 S 65th St., West Allis Contact Person: Chris Sorensen 414-258-2720 berkshire-westallis.com

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

ent

s to

Independent

3

3 3 3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Berkshire Senior Apartments is located in a quiet-residential city setting and is non-smoking.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Free heat, storage, community room, outdoor courtyard with gazebo and BBQ grill, computer center, beauty salon, social activities, across from West Allis Farmer’s Market, in a city setting.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Breezewood Village is located in a park-like setting with a meal site next door.

3 3 3 3

Washer and dryer in some apartments, washer and dryer hook-ups in rest of the apartments. Amenity rich community, free transportation to shopping, convenient, lovely location.

BREEZEWOOD VILLAGE

450 Sunnyslope Dr., Hartland Contact Person: Cathrine Boerschinger

3

3 3 3

3

3

262-367-2868 Breezewood-village.com

BRENWOOD PARK

9501 W. Loomis Rd., Franklin 414-427-8499

3

Contact Person: Ariane Dawson

3 3

3 3

3

3 3

Brenwood-park.com

BROOKFIELD HIGHLANDS 20825 George Hunt Circle, Brookfield Contact Person: Trish Driver 262-798-9898

3

3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3

HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious, remodeled one and two bedroom apartments, no entrance or endowment fee. Fireside Community Room, Guest suite, Hair Salon, Garden, Social activities and more!

Independent

RETIREMENT COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY Burnham Village

Gonzaga Village Sunset Heights West Allis

Waukesha

Cifaldi Square

Oak West

Valentino Square

West Milwaukee Cudahy

West Allis

West Allis

Capri SENIOR

COMMUNITIES

It’s not just my apartment, it’s my home! Capri Senior Communities was recently rated one of the TOP 5 Senior Living Companies in the nation!

Independent Living, Assisted Living & Memory Care Germantown Thiensville Milwaukee Waukesha West Allis Whitewater Sun Prairie Sturtevant Kenosha

I. capricommunities.com E. info@capricommunities.com T. (262) 798-1224


rsta te

• 5B

s to

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

BURNHAM VILLAGE 5202 W. Burnham Street, West Milwaukee Contact Person: Ken Becker 262-240-9406

3

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

ent

Independent

3

3

3 3

3 3

Tenants pay 30% of income for rent. Gas heat and hot water included. On-site management. Building also includes community room. Cable TV available, but not included. City setting.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

City and quiet residential park-like setting. Capri Senior Communities provides exceptional independent, assisted living and memory care communities with an array of unique amenities and services. Our beautiful communities are located in Germantown, Thiensville, Milwaukee, Waukesha, West Allis, Whitewater, Sun Prairie, Sturtevant, and Kenosha.

3 3

www.beckerpropertyservices.com CAPRI SENIOR COMMUNITIES 7011 Watertown Rd., Suite A, Waukesha, WI 3 262-798-1224 CapriCommunities.com

3 3

CEDAR LAKE VILLAGE HOMES 5595 County Road Z, West Bend Contact Person: Jill Pink 262-338-4626 CEDAR LANDING AT ELKHART LAKE 101 Cedar Lane, Elkhart Lake Contact Person: Monica Smith 920-876-4050

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3

Looking for Value?

You will find it here! Williamstown Bay Senior Apartments

starting at

RENTS

$625 1BR $730 2BR

AFFORDABLE APARTMENTS FOR THOSE 55+ • Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Units • All Appliances • Elevators • Intercom, Entrys • Community Kitchen & Living Rooms • Walking Distance to Shopping, Parks & Entertainment • WIFI Available in Community Areas

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

www.cedarcommunity.org Spacious homes nestled on 245 acres on Big Cedar Lake. Clubhouse, activities, access to Cedar Ridge restaurant, pool and more!

3 3

www.cedarlanding.org Part of Cedar Community. Side-by-side homes with center park, gazebo, pond, clubhouse and assisted living on site. In the heart of Elkhart lake resort community.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Stoney Creek Senior Independent Living

Our One- and Two-Bedroom Apartments Feature:

* Patio or Balcony * Full Kitchen with Appliances * Laundry Appliances * Cable TV * Heated Underground Parking Other Amenities Include: * Library * Craft Room * Wood Workshop * Chapel * 24-Hour Security Located on 10 Beautiful Acres

414-481-8580 3400 E. Ramsey Ave. • Cudahy Professionally Managed by Oakbrook Corporation Income Limits May Apply

414-422-4686 • www.stoneycreekadultcommunity.com S69W14142 Tess Corners Dr. • Muskego, WI 53150


CEDAR RIDGE APARTMENTS

113 Cedar Ridge Drive, 3 West Bend Contact Person: Nicole Pretre 262-338-2811

3 3 3 3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COTTONWOOD TRAILS APARTMENTS

4600 S. Nicholson Avenue, Cudahy 414-483-9969 Contact Person: Andrea FORESTHILL HIGHLANDS 8930 West Highland Park Ave., Franklin Contact Person: Lori Woodie 414-425-6611

3

3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

FOREST RIDGE, A WIMMER COMMUNITY SENIOR RESIDENCE

11077 W. Forest Home Ave., Hales Corners Contact Person: Mary Zurowski 414-425-1148

rsta te

Inte

ent

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

s to

Independent

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

6B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

3

3 3

3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

www.cedarcommunity.org Restaurant, market, activities, wellness nurse, woodwork shop, 2-hole golf course, college courses, business & shipping center all available on site. Cottonwoodabearproperty.com Cottonwood Trails is located in a quiet-residential community setting and also has a beauty shop, library, podiatrist, community room with social activities, elevator and massages are available. HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments and townhomes. No entrance or endowment fee. Fireside Community Room, Hair Salon, Library, Social Activities and more! www.WimmerCommunities.com Quiet-residential community. Senior & Assisted Living, dining, in-house MD clinic, transportation to shopping & activities, bank, fitness center, chapel, store, beauty salon, computer center, bank.


rsta te

• 7B

s to

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

GONZAGA VILLAGE 1415 S. 92nd St., West Allis 3 Contact Person: Ken Becker 262-240-9406 www.beckerpropertyservices.com

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

ent

Independent

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3

Tenants pay 30% of income for rent. Gas heat and hot water included. On-site management. Building also includes community room. Cable TV available, but not included. City setting.

GREENBROOK

4955 S. Greenbrook Terrace Contact Person: Karin Strubel 3 414-282-5020 HERITAGE LAKE APARTMENTS 5020 South 55th Street, Greenfield Contact Person: Ruby Thiel 414-282-0506 HIGHLANDS AT RIVERWALK

10954 N. Cedarburg Rd., Mequon 262-243-8888

HIGHLANDS AT WILDWOOD LAKE N77 W17700 Lake Park Dr., Menomonee Falls Contact Person: Kelly Duncan 262-251-9999

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3

3

3 3 3

3

3

3

3 3 3

3 3 3

3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3

Contact Person: Maureen Robinson

414-464-3880 ext 747 www.luthermanor.org

PARKWOOD HIGHLANDS 13800 Park Central Blvd., New Berlin Contact Person: Julie Mattes 262-821-5106

3

3

3

3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3

3 3 3

Phase 2 Opening Summer 2015 Kitchens w/granite countertops, stainless steel appliances and plank flooring. Guest Suite, Theater, Social Activities and more!

3 3 3 3 3

HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments. No entrance or endowment fee. Fireside Community Room, Guest Suite, Hair Salon, Theater, Social Activities and more!

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Apartments with Lake View Balconies, 24 hr. staff, housekeeping, linen service, recreation and professional entertainment, meal service, assisted living also available. Park-like setting.

3 3

www.shorehavenliving.org Lake Terrace is located in a quiet-residential and park-like setting. Gracious independent living on the shores of Lac La Belle. Private Clubhouse, library, woodworking shop, art studio, game room and wellness clinic. Six floor plans to choose from.

3 3

LAKE TERRACE APARTMENTS

LUTHER MANOR 4545 N. 92nd St., Wauwatosa

Heritage Lake Apartments are located in a park-like setting. Hospitality Suite available.

www.HighlandsCommunities.com

JACKSON CROSSINGS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY N168 W22022 Main St., Jackson 3 Contact Person: Amy Lloyd 262-993-2838

1380 W. Wisconsin Ave., Oconomowoc 262-567-8341 Contact Person: Lisa Recht, Housing Manager

Greenbrook is located in a park-like setting.

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Trust Luther Manor when selecting housing or healthcare services for yourself or someone you love. To schedule a tour, please call 414-464-3880 ext 747.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments and townhomes, no entrance or endowment fee. Fireside Community Room, Walking Path, Library Social Activities and more!


rsta te

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

8B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

PRAIRIE MEADOWS W168 N11278 Western Avenue, Germantown 262-255-9533 Contact Person: Brian & Angela Graham

ent

3

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

s to

Independent

3 3

3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com

REGENCY BROOKFIELD, SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY

Contact Person: Terry Sommers 3 262-780-0321 777 N. Brookfield Road, Brookfield

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

REGENCY NEW BERLIN SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY Contact Person: Eric Gustafson 262-789-1699 13750 W. National Ave., New Berlin REILLY JOSEPH COMPANY Milwaukee, Wauwatosa, Butler, Racine 414-271-4116

Regency-Brookfield, situated on a 23 acre conservancy, (park-like setting) offers a range of health and lifestyle activities for today’s senior. Nine different floor plans, included underground parking, scheduled transportation and an optional Dining Program make Regency a great place to live! For information, contact: Terry.Sommers@phci.org

www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com

REGENCY MUSKEGO SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY

Contact Person: Judy Sorce 262-679-0888 W181 S8540 Lodge Blvd., Muskego

prairie.meadows@yahoo.com Prairie Meadows is located in a parklike setting with walking trails, 2 ponds, on-site management, elevator, library, community room, heat & hot water included, close to senior center & shopping.

3

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

55 and above community with continuum of care located in a beautiful park-like setting. Private lake with patios and balconies. Clubhouse with many extras. Close to shopping with free transportation.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com Located in the city with a park-like setting. Regency-New Berlin offers expansive recreational and leisure programming, chef-prepared dining, health/fitness classes, a computer lab, a sports pub and gaming room, along with select health and housekeeping services. Come tour today!

3 3 3 3

Several different locations in quiet, residential city settings. Affordable 1-BR for 55+ and 62+. Rent based on 30% of gross income. Laundry & on-site management. Ask about immediate openings.

3

RIDGEDALE APARTMENTS

7740 West Grange Ave., Greendale, WI 53129

Contact Person: Sarah Timmerman

3

3

3

3 3

3 3 3

Ridgedale Apartments is located in a park-like setting.

414-421-9314

RIVERSHORES REGENCY LLC

555 Veterans Ave., West Bend 3 262-483-9150 Contact Person: Dave SAN CAMILLO 10200 W. Blue Mound Rd. Wauwatosa, WI 53226 Contact Person: Catrina Keane 414-259-6310 www.stcam.com

3

3 3

3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

SIENA ON THE LAKE

5635 Erie Street, Racine 3 262-898-9100 Contact Person: Stuart Hicks

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

www.RiverShoresRegency.com Rivershores Regency is in a quietresidential setting. Beautiful community room, w/full kitchen and planned activities, laundry in each unit, salon, library, game room, 2br/2 bath available.

San Camillo is located across the street from the Milwaukee County Zoo in a quiet-residential city setting. Residents have the security of continuum of care St. Camillus offers.

www.sienaonthelake.org Siena on the Lake is in a quiet-residential setting. Onsite chapel services, retreat center, assisted living & future health and memory care, 47-acre campus.


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

Affordable Housing for 62+

✓ Pay only 30% of gross income in rent! ✓ One-bedroom Apartments Located in

Milwaukee, Wauwatosa, Butler and Racine ✓ Call Reilly-Joseph Company Today 50 Plus for an Application!

May  2014 4.75  x  7.3 Run  Date:  May  2014 Deadline:    4-14-14 Ask About Immediate Openings

Ten years ago I said I’d never move to a senior community.

I lied. “They say when you get older you get wiser and, well, I guess I wised up. Between the lawn, the repairs, my friends and neighbors moving away … the idea of staying in that house the rest of my life lost its appeal. I decided Cedar Ridge might be worth checking out. I got to choose my own décor, have plenty of room, met so many interesting people who share my interests. Now I’m free to enjoy my retirement years. “It’s OK to change your mind! I’m glad I did.”

414-271-4116

Tudor Oaks Resident

Tudor Oaks

• 9B

Call 262.338.8377 to schedule a visit or receive VIP event invitations. Independent living for adults age 55 and better.

cedarcommunity.org

Prepare to be impressed this Spring... Live the Highlands Life Today!

Retirement Community

Senior Living Designed by You! • Independent Living

Luxury apartments with attached heated garages

• Assisted Living Brand New Wing is Open

• Skilled Nursing 24/7 Quality Care

Some amenities/unit styles only available at select locations.

TWO MONTHS  FREE*  

Private Rooms, 40-inch TVs & WiFi

• Memory Care

Private apartment with private bathroom

Franklin location  only

ONE MONTH  FREE*                                                                            

Brookfield location  only

Six convenient Milwaukee area locations:

• Respite

Private Room, up to 28-day stay

414-525-6500

Spacious one & two bedroom apartments & townhomes • Community Room • Fitness Center • Library • Hair Salon • Guest Suite • Media Room • Computer/ Business Center • Heated Underground Parking • Social Activities and more! For a  limited  time  only,  take  advantage  of

• Rehab Stays

Call for a tour

Amenities Beyond Compare

S77 W12929 McShane Drive, Muskego, WI 53150 www.TudorOaks.net

Tudor Oaks is owned and operated by American Baptist Homes of the Midwest, a not-for-profit provider of senior health care since 1930.

Franklin: 414-425-6611 | Brookfield: 262-798-9898 New Berlin: 262-821-5106 | Mequon: 262-243-8888 Menomonee Falls: 262-251-9000 and 262-251-9999 *Some restrictions apply. On select units. Some apartments reserved for moderate income seniors.

HighlandsCommunities.com


STEEPLE VIEW 12455 W. Janesville Rd., Muskego Contact Person: Ron Spear 414-525-5500 www.steepleview.org

rsta te

Inte

ent

3

STONEY CREEK ADULT COMMUNITY S69 W14142 Tess Corners, Muskego 3 Contact Person: Cindy Thiel 414-422-4686 Stoneycreekadultcommunity.com

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

s to

Independent

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

10B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

3 3 3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3

On site chapel, beauty/ barbershop, bank, car wash, all appliances included, heated underground parking, building security.

3 3

3

3 3

3 3 3 3 3

Stoney Creek Adult Community is located in a quiet-residential country setting.

THE CENTENNIAL SENIOR APARTMENTS 400 E. Centennial Dr., Oak Creek Contact Person: Teri Zeise 414-762-7762 www.wimmercommunities.com

3

3 3

THE REGENCY 200 Southtowne Dr., South Milwaukee Contact Person: Ruby Thiel 414-764-5335

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3

3

3 3 3

3

Quiet-Residential. Your rent includes underground parking & laundry. Other amenities: transportation for shopping, salon, chapel, on-site bank, country store and many activities & wellness programs.

The Regency is located in a park-like setting. Hospitality Suite available.

DistinguisheD inDepenDent living in a continuum of care setting

Lake Terrace Apartments on beautiful Lac La Belle now has apartments available

A lake at your doorstep. A private clubhouse for dining and activities. Friends to meet and frontiers to explore. Lake Terrace has:

• Library, billiards, game room, art studio, • Wellness clinic and fitness center woodworking shop • 24-hour secured building • Access to the Center for Life Enrichment • Underground heated parking and public Café LaBelle • Housecleaning • Priority admission to Shorehaven and • Transportation Shorehaven Tower

Lake Terrace Apartments, part of the Shorehaven Campus, at 1380 W. Wisconsin Ave., Oconomowoc

262-560-6919 or go to www.shorehavenliving.org to learn more.

Experience Secure Carefree Living!

Schedule your tour of Steeple View Christian Senior Community and see how wonderful carefree independent retirement living for active seniors can be! Spacious 1, 2 and 2 bedroom plus den apartments homes  Heated Parking/Car Wash  Individual Heat & A/C  In-Unit Washer/Dryer  Generous Closet Space  Pet-Free Facility  Units under $800/mo* *Entrance Fee Required

RIDGEDALE Quiet Senior Community 7740 W. Grange Ave. Greendale, WI

Open House

62 & Older Don’t Delay, Call Today

Please call 414.525.5500 or email info@steepleview.org to reserve your tour time 12455 W. Janesville Rd  New Berlin, WI  www.steepleview.org

(414) 421-9314

May15th & 16th (10:00 am – 3:00 pm)

• Affordable Income Based Rent • Great Floor Plans • Attractive 1 Bedroom • Heat Included • Picturesque Setting • Appliances/Microwave • Elevator & Laundry Facilities • Convenient to Shopping


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

Independent

RETIREMENT

Regency Senior Communities:

More Life. More Style.

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

Reserve your new home and enjoy the spirit of Siena on the Lake every day. t  t t t t

*OEFQFOEFOUMJWJOHXJUIQSJPSJUZBDDFTTUP IFBMUIDBSF 0QQPSUVOJUJFTGPSTQJSJUVBMFOSJDINFOU -BLFGSPOUBQBSUNFOUTTUBSUJOHBU  /PUGPSQSPĂŤUDPNNVOJUZ 1FBDFPGNJOEGPSZPVBOEZPVSGBNJMZ

Continuing Choice Living Community for those 55+ on the shore of Lake Michigan A collaboration between the Racine Dominicans and Lincoln Lutheran of Racine

(ULH6W5DFLQH:,‡ www.sienaonthelake.org  ."( Siena 50 Plus Magazine Quarter pageMarch ad.indd 1

• 11B

3/5/2014 3:57:54 PM

Regency creates a gracious retirement rich with life, style and luxury. Immerse yourself in cultural, educational and social opportunities or choose to relax and pursue your own private passions. The choice is always yours at Regency. sÂŹ4HREEDESIRABLELOCATIONSCLOSETOEVERYWHEREYOUWANTTOBE sÂŹ)NNOVATIVEARCHITECTURALDETAILSTHROUGHOUT INYOUROWNSUPERBLY CRAFTEDPRIVATERESIDENCEANDOURBEAUTIFULLYCONCEIVEDCOMMON ˆBUTOHSOUNCOMMON ˆAREAS sÂŹ4RANQUIL PROFESSIONALLYLANDSCAPEDANDCAREFULLYTENDEDGROUNDS sÂŹ$INEANDUNWINDWITHCHEF PREPAREDMEALS sÂŹ/N SITEMEDICALCENTERS lTNESSCENTER BANK BEAUTYSALONAND INTERNETCAFĂ?ALLDESIGNEDAROUNDYOU sÂŹ,UXURYLIVING GOODFRIENDSANDGREATTIMES

REGENCY BROOKFIELD

777 N. Brookfield Rd.

262-780-0321

REGENCY MUSKEGO

3.5 mi. S of I-43 on Racine Ave.

262-679-0888

REGENCY NEW BERLIN

13750 W. National Ave.

262-789-1699

We highly recommend a private tour of our campuses and our website:

RegencySeniorCommunities.com


rsta te

Inte

do Stu miniu m dio On e-B Two edroo m -B Two edroo Units mU -Be Off droom nits -St Pl r Un eet Pa us der rkin g On round g Bus Pa Sha Line rking red Lau Lau ndr ndr yH yF ook aci -Up Pri litie vat in P s eG riva te U ara Poo nit ge l Exe rcis Air e Roo m Co Pet nditio s nin g Sec ure Cab d Entr anc le T e Clo V se t Han o Sho ppi dic n ap Co Acc g nve nie ess nt A ible cce s

12B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

THE SILVERNAIL SENIOR APARTMENTS 2451 Silvernail Rd., Pewaukee Contact Person: Lisa Lechner 262-896-2100 www.wimmercommunitiies.com

ent

3

Con

Ap

artm

RETIREMENT

COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

s to

Independent

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Quiet residential setting. Your rent includes underground parking & laundry. Other amenities: transportation for shopping, salon, chapel, on-site bank, country store & many activities & wellness programs.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Quiet-residential setting. Community room, library, game room, garden area, 24 hour maintenance, elevator, resident activities.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Tudoroaks.net Quiet-residential, country and park-like setting on 110 acres. Art gallery, bistro, theater, Laurel Pine gym, green house, gardens, man cave, fishing, and walking trails, golf carts, lake, bus and car transportation also available.

3 3 3 3

THOMPSON MEADOWS

3120 E. Norwich Ave. St. Francis, WI 53235 3 Contact Person: Sheila Crabb 414-769-9240

3 3

TUDOR OAKS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY S77 W12929 McShane Dr., Muskego Contact Person: Judy Radish 414-525-6500

3

3 3

VILLAS AT THE STATION 8935 S. Wood Creek Dr. Oak Creek, WI 53154 Contact Person: Audrey Miller 414-788-0242

3

3 3 3

VMP MANOR PARK WESLEY PARK 8621 W. Beloit Road, Milwaukee 3 Contact Person: Tamara 414-607-4322 www.vmpcares.com

3

3 3

3

3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

On-site senior center, medical clinic, rehab center, chapel, bank, beauty shop/barber, transportation, wellness center, library, emergency response system, on-site store, and gardening. Quiet-residential city setting.

3 3 3 3 3

Activity room, bank, beauty shop & barber, on-site senior center, emergency response, library, on-site store, medical clinic, rehab center, chapel, transportation, wellness center, housekeeping. Quite-residential park-like setting.

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments and townhomes, no entrance or endowment fee. Fireside Community Room, Library, Hair Salon, Social Activities and more!

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Williamstown Bay is located in a quiet-residential setting. Controlled, secured entrance, resource room, community kitchens and living rooms, WIFI in community room.

3 3

VMP TRINITY

7300 W. Dean Road, Milwaukee Contact Person: Peggy 414-371-7316 www.vmpcares.com WILDWOOD HIGHLANDS N78 W17445 Wildwood Dr., Menomonee Falls Contact Person: Joyce Block 262-251-9000 HighlandsCommunities.com

3

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3

3 3 3

3 3

WILLIAMSTOWN BAY

3400 E. Ramsey Ave., Apt 111 Office Cudahy, WI 53110 Contact Person: Maria 414-481-8580

3

3 3

3

3 3

CHECK US OUT AT:

Villas at the Station is located in a quiet-residential setting.

mymilwaukeelife.com


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

BERKSHIRE AT KENSINGTON

BERKSHIRE OCONOMOWOC

BERKSHIRE AT WEST ALLIS

BERKSHIRE AT GREENDALE

BROOKFIELD HIGHLANDS LLC

CAPRI SENIOR COMMUNITIES

BERKSHIRE AT SUNSET

• 13B

COTTONWOOD TRAILS

BERKSHIRE GRAFTON CEDAR LANDING AT ELKHART LAKE

BREEZEWOOD VILLAGE CLEMENT MANOR RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

BRENWOOD PARK FOREST RIDGE SENIOR RESIDENCES, A WIMMER COMMUNITY SENIOR RESIDENCE


14B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

RETIREMENT COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

Independent

HERITAGE LAKE

THE HIGHLANDS AT WILDWOOD LAKE

JACKSON CROSSINGS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

REGENCY SENIOR COMMUNITIES - NEW BERLIN

PRAIRIE MEADOWS

REGENCY SENIOR COMMUNITIES BROOKFIELD

LAKE TERRACE APARTMENTS

THE REGENCY

LUTHER MANOR TERRACE APARTMENTS

REGENCY SENIOR COMMUNITIES - MUSKEGO


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

RIVERSHORES

• 15B

STONEY CREEK ADULT COMMUNITY STEEPLE VIEW

THE CENTENNIAL THE SILVERNAIL SAN CAMILLO

TUDOR OAKS THOMPSON MEADOWS WILLIAMSTOWN BAY

VMP MANOR PARK

VILLAS AT THE STATION

RETIREMENT COMMUNIT Y DIRECTORY

Independent VMP TRINITY


16B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT By Matt Pommer

Never buy pickles in a hardware store! The other day I stopped at a local hardware store to find the exact nuts and bolt for a broken cabinet. While perusing the store, I noticed several jars of pickles strategically placed at the checkout. That is where logic goes out the window and compulsive behavior takes charge. Those pickles must be good, I thought, as they have made it all the way to the front of the store! As it turned out, the pickles were the bulk of my purchase dollars and I couldn’t wait to get home and let my wife know that I had found the ‘golden fleece’ of pickles! I called my wife’s name with excitement, waiting for her to be the test case and forever crown me as the ultimate guy shopper! I opened the jar with great excitement and you could feel the tension in the air. The cover came off, and out of that jar came an explosion of aroma - a very different

MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION By Bruce Nemovitz

smell. It was a pungent odor that defies an explanation with the limited space for this article. Although our senses were putting up warning signs, we moved forward to taste one of these beauties. I talked my wife into taking AGING that first bite to see where it would ISSUES lead us next. She reluctantly pursued By Tom Frazier this uncharted food territory. I can tell you where that test pickle took us… straight to the garbage can! Oh, this was a very bad idea. Buying this jar of seasonings and garnishes seemed like

PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Now Available*

a wonderful idea at the time, but in MONEY SENSE hindsight my instincts and gut told me By Karen Ellenbecker differently. That little voice told me & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky to stop at the nut and bolt, but no…I couldn’t resist the possibility that this pickle could be ‘the one’! My questionable decision only involved a few dollars and having to admit to my wife I’d made a mistake. But whenEmma it comes to seniors making housing choices the implications of a By Aunt Emma bad decision are much greater. How often do we tell ourselves a story that we know has very little basis in reality but seems to feel right at the time? We have told ourselves repeatedly to just listen to our gut and follow our instincts when making a major decision. The intelligent part of our brain knows that we should search for referrals from those who we rely on for practicality but we just have to do it our way! We have to open that

APRON STRINGS

jar and move in a direction that defies logic. I am talking about treating your housing situation the way you would treat your investments for retirement. We have a financial plan intact, we have our insurance policies ready when needed, but we leave where we live to chance. We wait for that sign that lets us know it is time to make a change. Think about your home and the time you spend in your current surroundings. Take a moment to assess your physical and mental needs in real time. We tend to look back at our lives 20 years ago when our home’s floor plan, location, proximity to schools meant everything to us. But today, in many cases, our children are out of the nest and you are left with space, maintenance and a whole lot of stuff. We avoid change as a survival mechanism. Change in years past may

TRAVE

SENIOR Answer Man

IT MAKES ME

CRABB

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

ARTS

• 1 bedroom $585 • 2 bedroom $675 • 24 hr. maintenance • same floor laundry • elevator

ENTERTAINMEN • library • community room • game room & garden • sm. pets welcome • professionally managed

calendar Income restrictions apply

For Independent Seniors 55 & Better

SPORTS By Jack Pearson

414.769.9240

60

3120 E. Norwich Avenue • St. Francis, WI 53235 • thompsonmeadows@aol.com

the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

have meant danger. Our adrenaline responses to perceived threats still kick in when asked to give a speech or facing a new and uncomfortable situation. So it is natural to keep on with the status quo as we will move towards familiarity and away from new surroundings which are unfamiliar to us. Like the pickle at the hardware store, we look to the wrong places when making such an important decision as to where we will live for the next chapter of our lives. We venture out to look at the housing options and find the ‘taste’ of those choices as a negative experience and move back to the same situation, whether it works for us or not. We tend to look in the wrong places trying to find the closest match to what we already possess and then decide to stay where we are. We wait for that sign from above that will let us know when to make a change. Many times that sign comes quickly and harshly in the form of a fall, a health change, or fear of leaving your home that you have cherished so deeply.

My point is to look in the right places. When searching for housing, go where there are healthy choices which match your current needs. Just as shopping for a jar of pickles, go to the place where others have already tested the market and are enjoying their choice. A store with many different brands offers the best chance of satisfaction as others have already tasted the products offered. The winners remain and the losers end up in the garbage so that in most cases you won’t have to endure the wrong choice and wasted dollars. There are so many wonderful housing options available today. There are senior apartments, 50 plus condominium complexes, independent and assisted apartments as well as total life care options. The key is to match who you are today, what your needs are today, and how you live today. How close do you want to be to your children and grandchildren? What do you want to do with the money tied up in your home? Could that equity work to free you from worry and maintenance? Would a different NEMOVITZ continued on page 18B

$AVE SOME GREEN

Extra Storage Units Onsite Management Elevator Fitness Center In-Unit Washer & Dryer Hookups Cable Ready Balcony, Deck or Patio Card Night Miniature Golf Free Coffee Bar Dart Baseball Bingo Exercise Class Billiards Wii Bowling Birthday of the Month FREE Friday Continental Breakfast On-Site Bank

ON YOUR NEW HOME

Includes heat and hot water! 1 bedroom $764 2 BEDROOM $800 + 1 MONTH FREE RENT Lock in these great rates with 1yr signed lease

Call to schedule your appointment or personal tour today!

Brenwood Park Senior Apts. 9501 W. Loomis Rd., Franklin 414-427-8499

HERITAGE LAKE

Exceptional Living For those 55 and better

• 17B

Professionally managed by Oakbrook Corp. *Income restrictions apply

THE REGENCY

Affordable independent living with amenities to enhance a comfortable & enjoyable lifestyle. L Prime Locations L Free Transportation to Grocery Stores L Free Underground Parking L Free Laundry L Social & Recreational Activities L On-Site Banking L Salon L Chapel L Craft Center L Fitness Center L Pet Friendly L Smoke-Free

HERITAGE LAKE

one month free

on select units! Ask for details.

wimmercommunities.com

Live Independently Together. *Income restrictions may apply

5020 South 55th Street • Greenfield • Call 414-282-0506 Beautiful serene country setting overlooking a private lake. Close to shopping, churches and medical facilities. Heated underground parking, blinds and ceiling fan. Beautiful community room. • Heat & Water Included • Air Conditioned • Intercom Access • Appliances • Community Room with Kitchen • On Bus Line starting at • Laundry on each Floor

2 Bedroom, 2 Bath 930 Sq. Ft. $880 / month

THE REGENCY

200 Southtowne Dr. • South Milwaukee • Call 414-764-5335 Quiet spacious apartments, elevator, underground parking, community room, library and exercise room. Friendly atmosphere. Larger units available. • Heat & Water Included 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath • Air Conditioned • Fitness Center 930 Sq. Ft. • Resident Library • Laundry on each floor starting at $880 / month • Quality Appliances • On Bus Line


18B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014 NEMOVITZ continued from page 17B

Retirement Community

• Spacious Independent Apartments • Assisted Living • Memory Care

Enjoy Lake Resort Living Only Minutes From Milwaukee

Stop and see why Jackson Crossings is your best choice for senior living in the area

N168 W22022 Main Street Jackson, WI 53037 On Hwy 60 just East of Hwy 45

(262) 993-2838

www.jacksoncrossings.com

Your kids are moving to college this fall ... where will your parents be? CLEMENT MANOR INDEPENDENT APARTMENTS

housing option offer safety and comfort and a healthier lifestyle? These are all questions you should ponder as well as discuss with your significant other and trusted advisors. Just as the grocery store may be the better option for your food purchases, the many home options out there which conform to who you are today is that store where you will find the best options and the right purchase. Looking for a home that mimics your current surroundings will be the pickle in the hardware store. You’ll look in the wrong places for your possible new home and find it distasteful and decide to stay right where you are. Getting the right information, opening your mind to new possibilities

will take you to your favorite store where you will make the right purchase and will enjoy the fruits of getting the right information. The result will be satisfying, healthy and will provide comfort and less worry about the future. The next time you are in that hardware store, be practical and walk out with a Weber Grill or light bulbs! Bruce Nemovitz is a Senior Real Estate Specialist, as well as Certified Senior Advisor. Bruce has sold residential homes in the four county Milwaukee-Metro areas for 35 years. Bruce is a featured speaker at several senior communities in the Milwaukee-Metro area. He works with his wife Jeanne at Realty Executives Integrity.

Welcome

to the

new

Senior Lifestyle in Hales Corners

Discover our enriching community with plenty of amenities for those 62 and better: • Beautiful studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments with walk-in showers • Access to daily activities and church services, cafe, library, bank, hair salon and convenience store • Restaurant-style dining and special-occasion parties

Clement Manor has been helping families transition for more than 30 years!

• Enriching, lifelong learning courses and presentations • 24-hour security system • Free heat, water and electricity • Direct access to emergency nursing staff • Surface parking/indoor parking optional

WE’RE READY FOR YOU AT CLEMENT MANOR!

Let us show you our beautiful community and private residences enriched with fun social activities, new friendships, fitness and wellness programs, delicious dining and so much more! Personal Tours Daily œ˜`>ÞʇÊÀˆ`>Þ n\ääÊ>°“°ÊqÊ{\ääÊ«°“° ->ÌÕÀ`>ÞÊEÊ-՘`>Þ ££\ääÊ>°“°ÊqÊ{\ääÊ«°“°

UÊiiÌʜÕÀÊÀiÈ`i˜ÌÃÊEÊÃÌ>vv UÊ Àˆ˜}ÊޜÕÀÊv>“ˆÞÊEÊvÀˆi˜`à UÊ œ˜Ûi˜ˆi˜ÌÊ>˜`Êyi݈LiÊ«Àœ}À>“à UÊ-i˜ˆœÀʏˆÛˆ˜}ÊÃÌ>À̈˜}Ê>ÌÊf™Ó{ɓœ° UÊÃÈÃÌi`ʏˆÛˆ˜}ÊvÀœ“ÊfÓ]{™{ɓœ°

For more information, contact Kim at 414.546.7000 or e-mail info@clementmanor.com. Sponsored by the School Sisters of St. Francis

9405 W. Howard Ave • Greenfield, Wis. clementmanor.com

11077 W. Forest Home Ave., Hales Corners (414) 425-1148 www.WimmerCommunities.com


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 19B

Seniors especially are targets of scams The Better Business Bureau warns seniors and their adult children to be on the lookout for scams and to report them. There is a prevalence of scams targeting those individuals over the age of sixty, so extra vigilance is very important. While everyone must be alert to scams, senior citizens are typically more vulnerable. Seniors are the target of fraud and financial crimes because they’re easy to reach at home, are often too polite to hang up on calls from strangers, and are more likely to have nest eggs. They also are more apt to be isolated, trusting, and vulnerable. THE THREE MOST COMMON SCAMS THAT SPECIFICALLY TARGET SENIORS ARE: • Scams about Medicare, medical insurance and discount prescription drug plans - Someone will call or e-mail misrepresenting themselves as being associated with Medicare or insurance companies and ask for personal information or payments. In 2012, WI BBB launched an investigation against a company in rural WI with a “boiler roomâ€? of telemarketers scamming seniors nationwide in a discount prescription drug plan that didn’t deliver any discounts at all. The investigation began due to the volume of complaints from across the country, being reported at WI BBB. The BBB investigator assisted law enforcement agencies and ultimately this company was closed down. But many more of these companies open

them to send money immediately to them. Reported cases of this scam have reached over 40,000 and thousands of dollars have been stolen. It’s believed that many more have gone unreported. This scam is particularly disturbing because scammers prey on the heartstrings; fraudsters usually impersonate a grandchild in distress and beg for cash. The con artist will call and generally say, “Hi Grandma (or Grandpa), it’s me.� When the senior responds with a name, they’re hooked. The caller will then say they are stranded, in jail, hospitalized, or in a car accident, and ask for money. They’ll ask that cash be sent immediately because the situation is urgent. They will instruct the senior to wire transfer money and beg for the senior to not report it to their parents. Once the money is wired, it is gone. every day, and all seniors should be skeptical of telemarketing calls asking for financial information over the phone.

GENERAL TIPS: • Be suspicious of anyone calling unexpectedly and then asking for money or personal information.

• Cemetery and Funeral arrangement scams – Scammers retrieve information from obituaries and call a grieving widow or widower claiming that the deceased had an outstanding debt or bill with them and try to get them to settle these fake debts.

• Never give out personal or financial information to any unknown caller.

• Grandparents Scam - A common scam, typically occurring when students are on spring break. Scammers impersonate a family member and make calls to seniors urging

• Adult children of elderly parents should have this conversation regularly to determine if their parents have been targeted or are receiving calls.

• Set up a password with family members that only you and the family member would know.

NEMOVITZ BOOK GUIDES SENIORS TO HAPPINESS Bruce and Jeanne Nemovitz, a team of realtors, have dedicated the last 20 years of a 30-year real estate sales career to assisting senior clients through the challenges of moving from a longtime owned single family home into a senior community. As Bruce Nemovitz says, “Our goal is to make this process simple and easy and do this with a beginning competitive marketplace analysis all the way through staging, downsizing, packing, sorting and moving. “Guiding Our Parents in the Right Direction� is a newly published, 129 page book that offers practical advice about “Seniors Moving from the Home They Love.� Nemovitz, in the book, offers suggestions on how to help

a person’s parents see possibilities beyond their current arrangements. Nemovitz has been active in the Milwaukee real estate market for 35 years. He consistently is recognized as being in the top one percent of realtors. He is said to be a blessing to persons needing to sell their homes during aging problems. His first book, “Moving in the Right Direction: A Senior’s Guide to Moving and /downsizing has had a second printing due to its popularity. Persons wanting copies of the recently published book should go to GuidingOurParents.com. The Nemovitzs can also be reached at 262-242-6177.

• Remember that parents often are unlikely to report fraud due to embarrassment. • Parents are also fearful that they may lose financial independence if their family discovers the scam. The BBB and other agencies are here to help. BBB issues alerts through local media, and our social media networks on Facebook and Twitter. They investigate unscrupulous companies and work with law enforcement agencies to expose and shut them down. Reporting this type of crime can prevent others from losing money or their personally identifiable information. At BBB you can report scams on our “scam stopperâ€? website at bbb. org, or call our consumer specialist line at 414-847-6000.

Cottonwood Trails Apartments 4600 S. Nicholson Ave, Cudahy, WI

Cottonwood Trails SPECIAL Apartments is a Will pay $400 senior complex of your movin g which offers income costs! eligible 1 & 2 bedroom units for adults 55 plus. This is a non-smoking environment with heated underground parking, elevator service, laundry rooms on HDFKĂ€RRUFRQWUROOHGHQWU\DFFHVV with private intercom, and a community room for social activities. Heat and water are included in the rent.

Please contact Andrea at

414-483-9969 to schedule a showing.

cottonwood@bearproperty.com


20B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Sports cartoonist Frank Marasco did more than just draw pictures By Jack Pearson In the decades before World War II, during the war and for a short time after, sport pages in newspapers regularly made use of cartoon artwork. The most famous of the artists who created them was Willard Mullin of the New York World Telegram and also the Sporting News. The cartoons were considered as a highly important part of newspapers then, and virtually every major daily in the country had their own sports cartoonist. Here in Milwaukee, in the days when we had two daily papers, both of them had their own; the Milwaukee Journal had Al Rainovic, and Milwaukee Sentinel had Frank Marasco. Those cartoon works were terrific; they told a complete story in themselves, all in a nutshell and often in ways that news copy or photographs couldn’t. But unfortunately, times and customs change. About the only places you can view the creations of men such as Rainovic and Marasco today are in special collections in colleges and universities. Rainovic and many of his drawings were featured in 50 Plus last year. The current story about Marasco is presented here as a result of a suggestion to do so by one of his grandsons, Thomas Scanlon of Whitefish Bay. Tom, who is the Associate Vice President of Investments for the Berg Group of Milwaukee, has maintained an assortment of many of Marasco’s works and provided the ones used here. Marquette University also has a large collection of Marasco’s art in its archives.

In the late 1950s, when I was a reporter for the Journal, most of my friends, oddly enough, were reporters for the Sentinel - writers such as Verne Hohl, Ron Krysiek, Gordy Brehm, to name but a few. I also knew Sentinel Sports Editor Lloyd Larson and a number of others, including Marasco. As I recall, I didn’t think Frank fit the mold of a newspaperman. They were, I felt, always brash know-it-alls in every conceivable subject, were also always full of themselves and were never above stepping on anyone’s toes to get or write a story. I can make all those accusations without a qualm since they also applied to myself. In any case, I didn’t think any of them fit Frank. He was just too nice; soft spoken and reserved, he was considerate of everyone, and despite his significant talent, was the epitome of modesty. I can recall one evening, when a bunch of us writing hacks were wasting time in a cellar pool hall across the street from the old Sentinel building on Michigan, and I was talking with Frank. I had asked him what he thought of a controversial cartoon that Rainovic had drawn the day earlier. But Frank wouldn’t get lured into any dispute concerning his rival. Just the opposite. “I don’t care what you characters say,” he said, in that soft voice of his. “Al is a very good artist and a very competent journalist. I wish I could draw half as well as he does. And he’s a nice guy, besides. So stop trying to stir up something and behave yourselves.” With that, he got up and went home. He was always the first to leave. You could never get him to say anything detrimental about any-

one, which is one of the reasons why he was so well-liked. Frank served as President of the Milwaukee Press Club longer than anyone as he was elected to the position five times. No one, in the long history of the club, has ever done that. That might have been because he was the only person all the divergent writers could agree with. He was also a long time member of the Club’s Board of Governors.

“Well, he liked to go fishing. And he had this small hotplate there in his office, and he’d make chili for himself or for anyone else who was hungry. From what I was told, everyone really liked it.” -Daughter, Rosemary

One year he was awarded the Club’s Knight of the Golden Quill, the highest honor the Press Club bestows on anyone in the news business. Yet he could have been a cop. Frank was originally from Des Moines, Iowa, where he was born way back in 1894. His father was a policeman, and would have appreciated it if Frank had followed him into that worthy profession. But Frank always liked to draw, and that just didn’t jibe with police work. After serving in the Navy during World War I, he went to journalism school at the University of Iowa. After graduation he began his career at the Des Moines Register. He moved to Milwaukee in 1920 and took a job with the Milwaukee Journal as a writer-illustrator. He moved over to the old Milwaukee News a year later, heading up its art department. When that paper folded he signed on with the Sentinel as its art department director, a position he held until his retirement in 1962. Frank loved sports, especially baseball. He became secretary-trea-


MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

surer of the Milwaukee Chapter of the Baseball Writers of America, and served for 17 years. He also ran the old diamond dinner for 26 years, and that was no easy job. In 1971, he was the recipient of the prestigious Sportswriter of the Year Award. Despite his many accomplishments and honors, one that was reportedly his favorite was the Milwaukee Aerie Civic Service Award presented to his wife, Mary, for her many years of volunteer service at the Milwaukee USO and at the Veteran’s Hospital at Wood. Of their five children, only one is still alive, daughter Rosemary, who is 93 and lives in Whitefish Bay. I called her recently. “I’m so happy you’re writing about my father,” she said. “There aren’t too many around who still remember him, and what a good man he was. I’m not talking just about his work as a sports cartoonist, either. He was a fine family man, a wonderful father, and was active in his church, too. Did you know his brother, Paul, was a priest?” Rosemary also told me about her five chil-

dren. “There’s Tom, whom you met,” she said, “and another brother, David, and three daughters, Mary Miller, Monica Stillwell and Sheila Anderson, with their married names, of course. Would you believe all three of them are nurses, and I’m not quite sure how that all came about.” “So, Rosemary,” I asked, “tell me something else about your dad, something we haven’t talked about thus far, that he really enjoyed doing.” (That’s the kind of a question those squirrelly investigative reporters on television always ask, hoping to get a startling revelation.) She thought for a moment, then smiled, and replied, “Well, he liked to go fishing. And he had this small hotplate there in his office, and he’d make chili for himself or for anyone else who was hungry. From what I was told, everyone really liked it.” And with those affectionate disclosures ends this tale of a man who loved to draw, and occasionally, to go off fishing, and sometimes to cook a little chili for his pals.

• 21B


22B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Now View Compare Select

from over 325 local facilities IN MINUTES

Are you prepared for an emergency? By: Doug Mayberry : Perhaps my wife and I are becoming overly paranoid, but with so many natural disasters and unstable individuals causing trouble, we believe we should create a safety and survival plan for ourselves. Being in our 60s, we understand we may experience fires, earthquakes, tornadoes, auto accidents and other unanticipated events. We know having a family plan to cope with whatever might happen to us could prove to be a lifesaver, but we’ve procrastinated in creating one. What should it include?

Q

A

: First, list your priorities. Where would your family most likely physically be if something happens? Are cellphones with work and emergency numbers available? Many seniors

A cost-free service provided on behalf of Wisconsin’s largest network for retirement and assisted living. Title 19 & Pre-Arrangements

Simple Cremation $595.00 (Excluding Cremation Permit & Fee)

Traditional Funerals 1, 395.00

414-325-3400

at your Church or Cemetery Chapel of your choice Call for more details

414.453.1562

SERVING ALL OF WISCONSIN

have landlines, which are more likely to work during emergencies. Your immediate concerns will be focused on who may have been injured, grabbing your emergency kit, and hoping you can take care of yourselves for the next 72 hours. Are your billfolds with credit and medical cards, purses, car keys, cash, food, water, shelter, clothing, medicines, first aid kit, important papers, dentures, glasses, blankets and other necessary items readily available? Remember to also always maintain a half tank of gas in your car. Other than yourselves, who else may need your help? Parents, grandchildren, pets, neighbors or others? Select a contact point where you and your family can find each other and regroup. Shelters, such as fire and police stations and religious facilities, are good providers. On a yearly basis, perhaps on your birthday, recheck and update your documents and survival kits to update and refresh your supplies. Although it takes effort and time to put your survival kit together, just knowing you’re prepared in the face of danger will relieve you of some stress. Make copies of your documents and distribute them to your loved ones. Lastly, practice your procedures with your family every other month so that everyone knows how to re-

spond and react should something unexpectedly happen! : As I grow older, my sleep patterns are changing. I used to sleep about seven or eight hours straight. Now, I usually wake up a couple of times during the night. I go to the bathroom and frequently read for a while. I am 73 and do not know what is normal. Do you think I should be concerned?

Q

A

: Probably not, but if this change bothers you, you should speak to your doctor about it. According to the National Sleep Foundation, changes in our sleep patterns are a part of the normal aging process, and seniors do not spend as much time in deep sleep as younger people do. Sleeping problems can occur if you’re experiencing personal stress, health issues, side effects from medications or chronic pain caused by arthritis or other factors, including genetics. Discuss your concerns with your peers and friends. In sharing information, you may discover some additional helpful techniques.


TRAVEL

MONEY SENSE By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

MAY 2014 • 50PLUS

• 23B

Emma travels from the stadium to Ukraine, Israel MOVING IN THE By golly, that sure was a good beRIGHT DIRECTION ginning to the 2014 baseball season By Bruce Nemovitz for the Brewers. We hope they keep winning. I was not at the game, but I did pass by Miller Park and the odor of smoke from the frying sausages was really something to behold and smell. I rolled down my windows (pushed the buttons) and thought AGINGI’d just passed Sausage Heaven.ISSUES By Tomgoody Frazier I do wonder when some two shoes environmentalist will have fits about this smoke drifting upward into the atmosphere. I just could not ever imagine a brat-less baseball day. Henry says those Milwaukee pitchers are not like trap shooters PLANTING shooting at flying pieces of clay. The TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY fact that home plate does not move By Brad Olson must make it easier for the pitchers to zero in on it. They did a good job on opening day. That Atlanta pitcher must still be asking himself why he ever laid that one pitch right over the middle that produced the winning run. I do suspect that electronic gizmo SPORTS that they utilized for the first time in By Jack umpire decision making may Pearson make

APRON STRINGS

Emma

By Aunt Emma

the game for advancing toward the mound with bat in hand. Well, that’s about enough about this. . Henry just reminded me of his aging farmer uncle, who was known as “Model T” as a baseball player as he made almost as much noise huffing and puffing around the bases when he’d hit a homer as those early cars made. You perhaps would not realize it, but I am really not into baseball. But I do like the stories about some of the greats of the sport like Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jackie Robinson, Warren Spahn, Willie Mays and even old Joe Dimaggio. Speaking of Joe, I loved to watch him when he was in that 50 plus games hitting streak. But I scratched him from my list when he married that glitzy Marilyn Monroe. Why couldn’t he have picked up with a real Hollywood talent like Kathy Bates? Well, possibly she would have known better. He might have struck out there or walked. We girls had some interesting and sometimes kind of verbal dart throw-

SENIOR Answer Man

decisions more acceptable, but I can surely see it slowing down the game even more so than does changing pitchers so often. I doubt this is true, but my Henry says that in the time some pitchers take between tosses toward the plate that a busy spider might weave a web across home plate. My Henry once was a ballplayer well, many more times than once. He played in the Milwaukee Recreation League until it got to be a problem to bend down at first base for errant throws from third or shortstop. He claims he finally quit after one game in which the screwball on the mound kept almost dusting off Henry’s uniform with way-inside fast balls. After the ninth time, Henry, who has good temper control, was thrown out of

IT MAKES ME

CRABBY

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

ARTS

ENTERTAINMENT

calendar

60

the WRIGHT SERVICES OFFERED SIDE of

A single space can be purchased for as little as $43 per month or double $86 per month.

By Enis Wright

Cash Paid

Junk C ars

United Seniors of Wisconsin

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone

Call Saran Piehl, 262-367-5303 EXT 12 Wanted to Buy

Antiques & Collectibles

Anything old from attic to basement. Old advertising signs including automotive & gas station signs, clocks & thermometers. Old toys-tin & steel cars, trucks & trains. Old woodworking tools & Stanley Planes. Old crocks, coffee grinders & kitchen items. Cash paid please.

Call Frank 262-251-6545

We Buy

Entire Estates Old Toys Bronze Statues Cameras Advertising Pottery Glass Fishing Hunting Swords/Knives

Friendly Honest Professional No Pressure

414-416-3431

We Buy

Silverware Gold Jewelry Watches Coins Old Photos Paintings Military All Antiques

9955 W. Forest Home Ave. • Hales Corners, WI 53130

www.milwaukeeantiquedealer.com

ing the other morning over coffee. We got into a heated argument about the Russians marching into the Ukraine and snatching away Crimea. Naturally, Olga and Flossie were the most verbal participants. I got my dander up – yes, I did flunk anger management in high school – when the argument turned to the Germans invading all those countries in World War II and further when Flossie got on Israel for moving into Palestinian neighborhoods on the edge of Jerusalem. Flossie did smile, wave a white flag (really only a napkin) as we were all heading home and said, “Admit it, girl, this could have been a very boring morning.” It certainly was not boring. Here is hoping that the Brewers are still playing well the next time we chat, otherwise my next coffee meeting could be even more heated as some of those gals really enjoy their baseball.

Running or Not 7-day Service

FREE pickup

414-394-3116 Are You Happy With The Return On Your Savings Plan?

Harold L Hebbe, Agent 262.853.9047

Top Cash Paid!! If you don’t wear it. . . . We buy it.

• Antique Jewelry • Pocket & Wrist Watches • Plastic Pins • Costume Jewelry • Diamonds • Scrap Gold • Cameo’s • Rhinestones • Stick Pins • Estate Jewelry • Cufflinks

Look through your jewelry today.

414-546-1818

Play Bingo Every Day!

Doors Open at 7:30 am & 4:30 pm Morning Sessions: 9:30 & 11:00 am Evening Sessions: 6:30 & 8:00 pm

U P TO $2500 IN P RIZE S !!!

414-321-0220

CA$H PAID • TOP PRICES Autos • Trucks • Vans

Running OR Not Serving 4 County Area Prompt Courteous Service Pickup 7 days/wk Tow/Flat Bed Sevice

Call Don

414-305-3341

4515 W. Forest Home Ave. Greenfield www.unitedseniorsofwisconsin.org

Senior Handyman Licensed, insured, needs work, carpentry, porches, siding, kitchen, bath, rec-rooms, vinyl replacement windows, doors, glass block, drain cleaning, electrical, gutters, tiling, painting, staining, reasonable, reliable, no job too small, senior/veterans discounts.

262-784-7940

Advertise

HERE

This could be your ad!

Call Saran Piehl,

262-367-5303 xt12


24B • 50PLUS • MAY 2014

Thanks to our Sponsors! Seniorfest 2014

50 Plus News Magazine May  

2014

Advertisement