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June 9th, 2021

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Bud Whiteye: a firsthand account of life at the Mohawk Institute DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

*Warning: graphic descriptions of abuse Bud Whiteye was literally kidnapped off the road when he was eight years old and forced to attend a residential school. Thus began his six-year nightmare at the Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, hundreds of kilometres from his home near Chatham, Ont. He and his brother were walking along the road when two strangers in business attire enticed them into their car with the promise of ice cream. Hours later, he was at the Mohawk Institute in Brantford. It was in the mid-1950s. He had no idea where he was or what was happening. His head was shaved as soon as he got there. Almost bald. “At least leave a little,” he said. Cutting off the long hair of Indigenous children just arriving at residential school was common practice, seen by some as a symbolic cutting off of the child’s connection to their culture. Upon arrival at the Mohawk Institute, Whiteye got into a fight almost immediately. Not by choice, he said. But that’s the way life was at the school – kids frequently got into fights with the other kids.

Bud Whiteye recalls his experience at the Mush Hole, pictured here, also known as the Mohawk InstiFILE tute Residential School in his book ‘A Dark Legacy -- A Primer on Residential Schools’..

There were no toys at the school except a lone swing set that the kids would fight over for a chance to play with. Oftentimes, the kids fashioned their own toys using scraps they could find from the local dump. Whiteye was forced to stop speaking his traditional language while he learned things like English, Social Studies and Arithmetic. In addition to schooling, Whiteye had farm duties. He milked the cows on the farm attached to the school. Ironically, while he milked fresh milk from the cows, he and the other kids were forced to drink powdered milk. Not once did they get to drink the fresh milk from the cows. “It tasted like someone put a burnt cigarette into it,” he said of the powdered

milk. Every morning, the kids had to be up at 7 a.m., dressed and ready for breakfast in the basement where they would eat a nauseating meal of sticky porridge and two slices of plain bread every day for the duration of their time at the school. It was freezing in the basement, Whiteye recalls. The whole school was cold, in fact, he said. The kids would warm themselves up by going into the shower room and running hot water over their hands. He was always hungry. He and the other kids would forage at the local dump for scraps to supplement the meagre diet they were fed at the Mush Hole – the name given to the Mohawk Institute in reference to the gelatinous porridge they were endlessly forced

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to eat for breakfast lest they starved. “I hated the way it felt in my throat,” said Whiteye. The kids nicknamed the breakfast room where they ate, “The Mush Room.” He remembers his first beating clearly. It was for one minor infraction that he had no idea was even against the rules. He was playing in front of the barn with a schoolmate. It was the first of many beatings, he said. He can’t remember who beat him. The school’s principal, Mr. Zimmerman, is a dark, treacherous figure in the memories of many kids who attended the Mush Hole. The kids nicknamed him “Skin” – a reference to the beatings he used to dole out haphazardly, unexpectedly and brutally. Years later, when Whiteye was 27, he and his

brother tracked down Zimmerman in Brantford with a mind to give him a dose of his own medicine. The boys were strong young men. Zimmerman was a pathetic figure in a wheelchair, wrapped in shawls, hooked up to an oxygen tank. He was now the helpless child and the two men could get their revenge. “I couldn’t bring myself to do it,” said Whiteye. “I kinda felt pity for him.” A pity that Zimmerman never showed to any of the helpless children he abused all those years at the Mush Hole. Whiteye’s experience gets worse. Not only was he hungry, deprived of love, deprived of food, and culturally and physically abused, he was raped repeatedly. He can’t remember who the perpetrator was. It was always in the dark. “I’d be lying on my back and felt their weight on top of me,” which prevented him from turning around to see who the monster attacking him was. The attacks were so brutal, he bled. After every attack, he found it hard to look in the eyes of his peers – wondering if they could look into his eyes and know what happened to him the night before, something he was deeply ashamed of. It took years, until 2003, before Whiteye could finally open up and talk about his experience when he penned, “A Dark Legacy – A Primer on Residential

Schools - his heartbreaking and graphic memoir about his time at the Mush Hole. And although Whiteye struggled with alcoholism as he tried to numb the pain and memories, he became a prominent journalist, working for the London Free Press, the Sarnia Observer, and various CBC affiliates across Canada. He covered the Oka Crisis in 1990 and became a respected journalist. Whiteye quit drinking for good 10 years ago. Writing the book was both a painful and cathartic experience for Whiteye, he said. He goes into graphic detail about what he experienced at the Mush Hole but it’s something he believes all Canadians need to hear and understand. “It took the discovery of 215 children, bodies, for people to understand what we’ve been saying all these years,” he said, noting that every day Canadians seem to finally have “woken up” to the real horrors of residential schools and what they did to Indigenous people across the country. It’s been almost two weeks since ground-penetrating radar revealed the discovery of a hidden grave holding the remains of 215 children on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia. The news sent shockwaves around the world with renewed calls for apologies from the

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Ontario First Nations can’t touch millions in sovereign wealth fund DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Ontario First Nations have over $400 million worth of investments in Hydro One shares but they can’t withdraw a cent for at least another 10 years. Ron Jamieson, who sits on the board for the Ontario First Nations (OFN) Sovereign Wealth Fund representing Six Nations, provided an update on the fund’s impressive growth to Six Nations Elected Council’s finance meeting on Monday, demonstrating large gains since first investing in Hydro One shares in 2017.

The OFN purchased 14 million shares in 2017 with a $259 million loan, representing two per cent of Hydro One’s total shares. Each share was valued at $18 in 2017. Today, the shares are valued at $30. “We’re one of the top five shareholders in Hydro One,” said Jamieson. The OFN receives sizeable quarterly dividends from Hydro One, which are then re-invested for greater gains, said Jamieson. Toronto firm Connor, Clark and Lund is handling those investments. “Every time there’s a dividend payment, we have extra cash,” said Jamieson. “The shares continue to rise. Hydro One is operating

Firsthand account of life at the Mohawk Institute CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2

Catholic Church, restitution, and further investigation of residential schools across Canada to find any more similar hidden graves. Elected Chief Mark Hill has called on the federal government to provide the technology to search the grounds of the Mohawk Institute. There have long been whispers of graves around the Mohawk Institute. Whiteye says he doesn’t remember witnessing or hearing of any children actually dying on the school grounds. But he does

remember two boys who escaped the Mush Hole and hid out in a nearby corn field for 30 days, subsisting on raw, uncooked corn before they made their way back to the Mohawk Institute. Whiteye said the boys were brought upstairs to be disciplined and were never seen or heard from again. Nobody knows what happened to them. He whole heartedly supports the investigation into searching for any more hidden graves in Canada.

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a very efficient business. The shares are bieng looked upon favourably in the market. The dividend from utilities is pretty secure. That’s an important consideration.” Since 2017, the OFN has been able to pay down $14 million of the $259 million loan. “We’re wanting to get that down as quickly as we can.” The total value of the investments is $473 million, an increase of $144 million since 2017. The OFN receives quarterly dividends of about $3.4 million. Jamieson, however, issued a word of caution. “Nobody knows what the

stock market will eventually do. I’m sure that most of you are aware over the last couple years, shares have gone up pretty dramatically. Although we’re in wonderful shape today at ($30 per share) that could change. I just want people to be aware of that. It’s not a never-ending increase in value. It could fluctuate.” All shares are held in a trust account at Royal Bank. Coun. Wendy Johnson said the fallout from Covid is expected to hit markets in the fall and wondered if the OFN was prepared for that. “It’s difficult to project into the future what the share values will be. You’re absolutely right, Wendy, shares move up and down

with the vagaries of the market place,” he told the Councillor. But, he said, “It’s almost foolish to project too far into the future what it will be. There’s a motion by all the chiefs that the investment…must be held as it is for a period not less than 12 years or until the holdings are over $90 million, whichever comes first. We’re looking at a long-term situation here.” Jamieson praised investment manager Connor, Clark and Lund for keeping the OFN in such good shape. “They are just an outstanding group. They’re not affiliated with any bank. We thought that was

important to give us an independent look at how the investments were being managed. The board is very pleased with the work they’ve done.” The term of the loan is 25 years, said Jamieson, with 22 years left, and some chiefs have asked to cash out some of the money. “We simply can’t do that under the original chiefs’ resolution. We’re not allowed to do that for another 10 years at least.” Every quarter when we get a payment from Hydro One, the OFN makes an interest payment on the loan and has $1.7 million additionally each quarter that they pass to on to Connor, Clark and Lund to invest.


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June 9th, 2021

Allyship during discoveries like 215 children’s remains found at Kamloops residential school JACE KOBLUN

jace@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

When the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announced the discovery of the remains of 215 children at a former residential school site in Kamloops, B.C., it set off pledges and calls of action from the government to be better at reconciliation. But to many Indigenous people, including Theresa McCarthy, the discovery was not necessarily a surprise. “My reaction was similar to a lot of people who already knew this type of desecration existed. It renews your sense of grief and reignited it in new ways for everyone in North America,” said McCarthy, interim chair and associate professor of Indigenous Studies at Buffalo University, and associate dean for inclusive excellence. “We are for our families and relatives who have suffered within schools like this. It is such an atrocity and so heart-wrenching.” McCarthy said she knows allyship and reconciliation may look different to everyone, but to her, an ally is someone who has taken up a willingness to rethink their relationships with not only Indigenous people but also with

other important aspects to land and resources. “Hard to simply define the idea of an ally. To be an ally is being really open to reconstituting good relations. Good sustainable relations,” she said. To many Indigenous people today, there is no excuse as to why someone can not educate themselves on the truth behind Canada’s residential school system. “When we think back to when the public narrative about residential schools in Canada emerged, it didn’t emerge until the late 20th century. We have a lot more information going in now in terms of Indigenous documentation. “There really is no excuse as to why someone can’t find the information to educate themselves on these issues. There is an emphasis now on new curriculums, there is accessibility to all kinds of Indigenous artists, lawyers, doctors, writers who are successful in the public domain. We have our own experts teaching and sharing in communities. There simply is no shortage of places to go to learn and I don’t see any excuse for this anymore.” The current movement in Indigenous studies and education is moving away from only writing essays and papers that

DR. ANNETTE DELIO & DR. KATHLEEN LEONARD OPTOMETRISTS

Theresa McCarthy, interim chair and associate professor of Indigenous Studies at Buffalo University, and associate dean for incluSUBMITTED sive excellence.

stay between professors and students within institutions. McCarthy said Indigenous people are putting more out there now and are doing this to create public and accessible resources to keep the public engaged. “As we learn more from this discovery, it’s a reminder that even Indigenous bodies of land have continued to be subject to desecration. From the schoolyard itself to a vault of information locked up in a university, the truth was being hidden,” she said. McCarthy said she recently looked over the TRC recommendations, the missing children and burial pages in particular. And she said the recommendation should be looked at again and updated. “When you look at the recommendations, they do acknowledge burials and missing children, but I don’t think it has been as hard-hitting as this recent

discovery. This discovery never was unknown to Indigenous people. The survivors’ personal narratives and even their silence told you something devastating happened there. We already knew through their stories— and their silence.” The associate professor said she thinks Canadians are finally faced with acknowledging that Canada is not the haven for all people that they were led to believe. “With this discovery and other recent discoveries, people have had to finally compare themselves to what’s been going on in the U.S. with Trump and the era behind him. Canadians hold to these myths about Canada being this place that is much more progressive, peaceable, much less fraught with the kinds of tensions that exist in the U.S. That idea has been very jarring for some, especially when you consider the comparisons. This is the first time

I’ve ever seen residential schools become an international story. I think that is saying something about the conversations being had about it. And it is all connected.” When discoveries like this come to light, McCarthy said it is hard to know exactly what the response of a non-Indigenous person should be, but it all comes down to caring about making Indigenous lives better. “I don’t have all the answers or know exactly what they should do. Some people still think that Indigenous people have to do the work of educating them. It’s an ally’s job to not lean on another individual to teach them. Take up their own load and their share of the work. Again, all of these resources are out there.” Indigenous people have been on the front lines of seeing their land taken and seeing other rights placed above theirs for a long time. McCarthy said if this can happen to them then it can happen to you. “These things are frightening and not just to Indigenous people and POC but all of North America. It is not just Indigenous people affected by this discovery,” she said. McCarthy said it is necessary for the Indigenous voice to be the most important one heard in moments like this because these are their embodied experiences. “For so long Indigenous people have not had the authority to be the primary knowledge passers themselves. We weren’t given the authority to speak about our

own experiences or make decisions with their own best interests.” When it comes to calling on the government to continue ground radar scanning of other residential schools in the country, McCarthy encourages it. “I encourage it. I think Canada needs to have some binding laws that you can’t take, hide, or remove human remains of Indigenous people. Indigenous lands have always just been there for the taking and we need to disrupt that idea. Such a profound desecrating to think that this can be done without repercussion. “When I read those calls to action, allies become so concerned with calling upon the government to act. The government is supposed to be the people. So you have a very personal role ensuring accountability and justice too and you need to act on that. If it means holding your leaders accountable then so be it. People need to find themselves in that understanding.” If someone wants to better understand their role in reconciliation and how they can be a part of it, that individual should expect to be changed. “An individual willing to stand with an Indigenous community should be willing to be altered. Can’t think you’re going to be an ally then go back to looking and thinking at the world in the same way. Exposing yourself to Indigenous issues and ways of knowledge, you’re going to be altered,” said McCarthy.

fund justice committees that will develop culturally relevant processes to resolving conflicts in Indigenous communities. Ghislain Picard, chief of the Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador, took part in today’s news conference and said 25 per cent of the people detained in the country

are Indigenous when they only represent about four per cent of the general population. Lafreniere says the government wants to have a judicial system that is better adapted to meet the needs of First Nations, rather than expecting First Nations to adapt to the system.

Quebec invests $14 million to adapt justice system to First Nations communities

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MONTREAL — Quebec is investing $14 million over four years to adapt its justice system to the realities of Indigenous communities. Indigenous Affairs Minister Ian Lafreniere said today the money will go toward promoting community justice initiatives and reducing

the over-representation of Indigenous people in the justice system. He says the government will hire people to produce pre-sentencing reports on Indigenous offenders, which will take into account the specific difficulties experienced by First Nations people. The money will also


TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021

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Rule changes comes for the 2021 OJALL Season STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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ONTARIO—Last week, the Ontario Junior ‘A’ Lacrosse League (OJALL) announced today a series of rule changes to be implemented for the 2021 season. Commissioner Mark Grimes—who has been tasked with modernizing the league—recently met with Derek Keenan, Paul Day, Eddie Comeau and newly appointed advisor Ian Garrison to discuss a recommendation on National Lacrosse League (NLL) rule adaptations that would be a fit for Junior ‘A’ lacrosse. This distinguished group of well-known lacrosse leaders are members of the OJALL Advisory Board announced in August to provide counsel on lacrosse related matters and the league’s return to play plan. The advisors were tasked with assisting the league in everything from rule discussions to the development of players, coaches and officials. “We have some of the best minds in lacrosse behind the Ontario Junior ‘A’ Lacrosse League right

now,” said Grimes. “This is something the league has been discussing for a long time and I believe we are implementing the right rules, at the right time, with the right people at the table. Ontario Lacrosse has invested significant time and resources in the development of officials and they are going to be a key partner for us moving the league forward. Anyone can say ‘we are starting a new league with new rules’—we are doing it the right way.” “The conversations Mark and I have had with Derek, Eddie and Paul have been completely game and player focused. The rules we are looking at are all about enhancing athleticism, improving player safety, creating an exciting fast-paced brand of lacrosse and providing players, coaches and officials with opportunities to elevate themselves to the next level,” said Garrison. “We see great opportunities ahead.” The advisors were united on the nine (9) rule recommendations brought forward by the Commissioner and unanimously approved by the league’s Board of Governors on Wednesday night. Grimes has now

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been in touch with the British Columbia Junior ‘A’ Lacrosse League (BCJALL) and RMLL (Rocky Mountain Lacrosse League) commissioners— and looks forward to further discussions on aligning the leagues. Following is an over-

view of the changes: Four second count (vacate the crease), eight second count (advance the ball past half court), face off execution (non faceoff players on restraining lines), back court violations (possession remains in the offensive zone), too

many players (any violation results in a penalty), goalie stick dimensions (uniform regulations), delayed penalty mechanics (play continues until the defensive team gains possession regardless of shots on goal), loose ball in the crease (ball can be

scooped out by an offensive player but not batted into the net) and fast restarts (violations result in the ball being put down immediate and blown in upon the non-violating team gaining possession).

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The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Texting crisis response. Texting is available Monday to Friday from 8:30am - 4:00pm. A person seeking crisis support through text will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker and receive messages through text.

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June 9th, 2021

OPINION editor@tworowtimes.com

The early colonizer elites and intergenerational wealth from the systemic oppression of Indigenous people In BC, the first residential school ever constructed was the St. Euguene Mission school. This building was designed by Canadian architect Allan Keefer in 1911. The facility and it’s design were unusual for Canada’s Indian residential schools — that already had a regular design implemented across the country. So why was this residential school in particular commissioned with a special design — and why was Keefer, a junior designer with little experience under his belt, commissioned to do the work? To answer that, we have to look at the colonization of Upper Canada at it’s beginnings. William Hamilton Merritt is notoriously remembered as the colonizer who bankrupted the Six Nations people through the Grand River Navigation Company — a venture looking to build a small East to West canal joining the Welland Canal to improve the transport of goods in Upper Canada. Prior to his disastrous work with the Grand River Navigation Company, Merritt was one of the founders of the Welland Canal. The venture was part of a “canal fever” bandwagon that was sweeping Europe and North America — something that first generation land development colonizers in Ontario were trying jump in on. Another colonizer of Ontario, George Keefer, was part of the Welland Canal development in Upper Canada and founded a very profitable legacy off of Indigenous lands.

This design plan for the St. Eugene Mission Indian Residential School in BC was commissioned from Allan Keefer in 1911. Here we explore part of how the Keefer and other colonizing elite families in Upper Canada financially and professionally benefitted from the systemic oppression of Indigenous ARCHIVES CANADA people at Six Nations.

Keefer was a United Empire Loyalist who came to Upper Canada from New Jersey. He is remembered for flooding Six Nations territory along the Grand River during the construction of the Welland Canal. When construction began, the Welland Canal Company guaranteed landholders, including Six Nations, compensation for any lands, homes or structures that were destroyed due to flooding during construction of the Canal. Historical records suggest that white landowners were compensated as agreed but that the Six Nations were not. In 1836, Keefer, his sons and Merritt would all be subject to an inquiry for unjust enrichment, nepotism, fraud, neglect and carelessness while they served in leadership as Directors for the Welland Canal. In 1832, Merritt sought investors for the Grand River Navigation Company, but could not raise the capital to launch.

His project was opposed by John Brant, a Mohawk man and son of Captain Joseph Brant, who was concerned that Haudenosaunee lands and fisheries along the Grand River would be ruined in the construction of the canal. John Brant ran for an elected seat in the Upper Canadian legislative assembly and won. Something that drew the ire of Merritt — who had learned that Indigenous voices in politics standing up for land rights were preventing the work of colonizing Upper Canada. So Merritt took legal action against Brant, to nullify the Indigenous votes that got Brant fairly voted into office under the argument that impoverished Indigenous voters, by law, didn’t own enough assets to count as a voter. Merritt’s lawsuit was successful, Brant was removed from office and a by-election was called to fill the vacancy. Brant sought to run again in the by-election but in the meantime, he

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contracted cholera and died — leaving no strong voice for Six Nations to the government. Merritt ran in the by-election for Haldimand and won, claiming Brant’s former seat. Merritt became a majority shareholder in the Grand River Navigation Company, along with colonizer David Thompson — who was a co-investor with Merritt in the Welland Canal. Merritt convinced the Indian Department to invest Six Nations trust funds into the company. Six Nations historical reports in the Global Solutions accounting of the breech of trust claim against the federal government show that “Between 1834 and 1847, recorded transfers show more than £44,292 ($177,168) was taken from Six Nations Trust Funds by Crown Agents and invested into the Grand River Navigation Company through stock purchases. This was completed contrary to the repeated protests of Six

Nations.” At that time, from 1837-1845, colonizer Samuel Jarvis was operating as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Upper Canada. Jarvis was a part of the “Family Compact”, a group of elite Canadian families that collectively contributed to help one another politically and financially in colonizing Canada. Political leaders like Merritt and Jarvis took action to politically maneuver to prohibit Indigenous votes, restrict land rights of Indigenous people, and commission reports to develop the Indian Residential School system. While families like the Thompsons and Keefers used their positioning to quietly advance colonization and the oppression of Indigenous people through their specific areas of influence. In 1844, the Merritt’s, the Keefer’s and other influential families benefited from the passing of the Free Banking Act — legislation spearheaded by Merritt to allow investors to open community banks locally. The Merritts and Keefer’s launched the Niagara District Bank in St. Catherines, despite the accusations of unjust enrichment from the Welland Canal. The bank was sold to the Imperial Bank of Canada in the 1870’s — something that was later recorded as a big financial victory for shareholders. Simultaneously, the Indian Residential School system was being formalized in a report from the Bagot Commission in 1845. The report pro-

posed that separating Indigenous children from their parents was the best way to assimilate them into white culture. The report, and other initiatives propelled forward by Jarvis, rejected the instruction of Indigenous students in their own language and rejected day schools teaching the same subjects as white schools in favour of live-in residential schools restricting teaching to agricultural and industrial activities. The Commission recommended the Mohawk Institute in Brantford would be the model for all other industrial schools in Canada. The stage was set for white, elite colonizer families to quietly succeed and pass down intergenerational wealth while Indigenous families were being politically silenced, prosecuted, and legislated into family separation and religious persecution by those elites. The Keefer legacy is a case-in-point for how colonizers financially benefitted and passed a legacy of wealth trickling down to their descendants by overtly supporting and enabling the marginalization of Indigenous people in Ontario. George Keefer successfully colonized what is now Southern Ontario and left a legacy behind for his ten sons and five daughters. His financial success at the Welland Canal gave him the affluence to build mills that were fuelled by the power from the canal. He died in 1858 a very rich man, the founder

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June 9th, 2021

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day June 15

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Intergenerational wealth from Indigenous oppression continued of the town of Thorold where he built the Keefer family mansion, which today is known as the Keefer Mansion Inn. His descendants — Thomas Coltrin Keefer and Samuel Keefer — became noted civil engineers in Canada during the 1800s, securing the legacy of colonizing developments in Upper Canada in various other projects such as the building of Upper Canada College, the Cayuga Bridge Company, the Erie and Ontario Railroad Company and the Montreal Turnpike Trust and McGill College construction along with other members of the Family Compact group. Interesting to note is those same projects acquired investment by the Crown from Indian Agents from Six Nations trust with no repayment. According to the Global Solutions land rights accounting, Six Nations claims that $9000 was invested in the Welland Canal project without being repaid — with compounded interest that is listed as a current day val-

ue of $107,743,646,916. McGill College received an investment translating to $95,772,130,592 and the Erie & Ontario Railroad Company investment now sits at $105,349,343,651. A shocking $113,600 was invested in the Montreal Turnpike with no return to Six Nations, a system designed by Thomas Coltrin Keefer. That translates into $697,876,697,563 today. Samuel Keefer would go on to be one of Canada’s engineers in the department tasked to do consultations for the Hamilton to Port Dover Plank Road project. George Alexander Keefer, grandson of the first George, was another engineer who worked on the railways. He would take the family wealth and travel to British Columbia to colonize the west and build portions of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. He is noted as the founder of Keefers, BC and Keefer Lake, BC which occupies the territory of the Secwepemc, Stl’atl’imx, Okanagan and

Nlaka’pamux territories. This leads us to where we started. Allan Keefer, a grandson of Thomas Coltrin Keefer, was the architect of the first residential school in BC. The Department of Indian Affairs commissioned Keefer to design the St. Eugene Mission Residential School in 1911. Hiring Keefer was seen as an unnecessary move for the department, who had regular designs used for all residential schools across Canada — but seems in line with the kind of colonial opportunities that male descendants of white elites were finding within their reach. Keefer’s designs of the St. Euguene Mission Indian Residential School advanced his career. He was later hired as an in-house architect with the Department of Public Works — where he worked for the next 35 years. While there, he further developed on unceded indigenous lands in Ottawa that the Keefer family owned, founding the Rockcliffe Park subdivision.

June 9th, 2021


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PRIDE MONTH: Q & A on pronoun allyship JACE KOBLUN

jace@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Addressing a person with their pronouns is important when interacting with them, especially today when more people are learning about themselves and sharing who they are. The English language is constantly expanding and making room for people to identify their authentic selves. While this is Pride Month and a great time to learn about respecting everyone for who they are, it is necessary to celebrate and respect people for who they are all the time. The Two Row Times had a conversation with 21-year-old Ask Wen, a trans guy living in Newfoundland, shining a light on what it means for cisgender (cis) people to better understand what proper pronoun usage can look like. A cis person is an individual whose sense of personal identity and gender corresponds with the sex they were designated at birth. Ask wants to remind readers that everyone has a unique journey and that he is just one voice in this global conversation. Jace: What does it mean when individuals use pronouns other than he/him or she/her? Ask: If someone is using pronouns other than he or she, it can mean that they’re non-binary. But that’s not always the case. Cis people can use pronouns other than “she” and “he” and still be cis. Not all non-binary people identify as transgender and some non-binary people use “he” and/or “she” pronouns. Just because someone uses “she” or “he” pronouns, doesn’t mean they are always female or male. Some people use multiple pronouns. For example, an individual may use “she” and “they.” Jace: What are some pronouns you have seen used other than she/her or he/him? Ask: Besides they/them pronouns, I’ve seen ze/ hir the most. These are often called neopronouns, which include ones such as per/pers, ey/eim, fae/ faer. I want to add that the phrase “preferred pronouns” is not accurate.

Someone’s correct pronouns isn’t a preference, it’s a requirement if you want to respect someone. Jace: If comfortable sharing, can we talk about your pronouns? Ask: I used to identify as gender-fluid, then as non-binary trans masculine and used ey/eym pronouns. Now I’m figuring out that I don’t identify as non-binary, I identify as male and use he/him pronouns. I don’t use they/ them pronouns, so people who use they/them pronouns for me are incorrect. If they don’t know me then it’s good to hear them use they/them. It’s better than assuming male or female. Jace: When did you begin referring to yourself as he/him? Ask: I think it was junior high or high school, sometime in secondary school. Jace: What would you say to someone claiming people change their pronouns for attention? Ask: My answer to this may be a little snarky; well then pay attention. Respect changes in pronouns. Saying it’s for attention, while rude, is also harmful because you’re minimizing what the person is trying to say. The message that individual is hearing at that point is that it’s not safe to say who they are and be authentic by sharing what their pronouns are. And that’s going to affect a person’s mental health. Jace: Do pronouns play a role in an individual’s sexual orientation? Ask: No. Not really. Pronouns are about gender and sexual orientation is about what gender you’re attracted to sexually. Or romantic orientation for romantical attraction. It plays a role in the sense that pronouns help to indicate gender, but pronouns don’t always reflect a specific gender. Some people are attracted to specific gender(s), so it plays a role, but it’s not an absolute. Pronouns don’t define someone’s sexual orientation or gender. Jace: What does it mean to misgender someone? Ask: Misgendering is when you incorrectly identify and label someone’s gender. A really common one I come across is “hey guys” or “hey ladies.” Ev-

eryone in a group may look like a certain gender, but if someone isn’t, they’re being misgendered. Jace: Why is it important to respect an individual’s pronouns? Ask: It’s important for the same reason why it’s important to respect any individual. It helps people feel happy and healthy as well. Jace: How may an individual feel when you misgender them? Ask: When I get misgendered I actually feel physical pain, sort of the way people feel anxiety in their body. When I get misgendered it feels like an ache in my chest. I feel terrible, awful, physically. Mentally too. Feels so wrong. I imagine cis people feel it to some degree when they are misgendered, I think a good example of this is when someone has a certain hair type. Some men have long hair and women have short hair and them being called the wrong gender based on a hairstyle may be a way to begin to empathize. Jace: Why is it important to respect everyone’s journey instead of lumping them into a box? Ask: I believe that for every way I think someone could be, there’s likely someone else who breaks that preconception or doesn’t fit the idea. One example is non-binary lesbians, which at first sounded like a contradiction to me because I understood lesbians to be women who are attracted to women. One explanation I’ve heard from non-binary lesbians is that lesbians don’t always identify as women. There are lots of gender non-conforming lesbians, such as butch lesbians. Jace: How is it a privilege to not have to worry about which pronoun someone is going to use for you based on how they perceive your gender? Ask: Yes. It’s a privilege because it’s exhausting to be misgendered and knowing that you’re not going to be misgendered or not having to think about it, is something that not everyone can experience. As I’ve said already, misgendering is really painful, so the worry and the avoidance that comes with the fear of being misgendered im-

pacts a lot of my life. I’m on edge for a lot of everyday social situations, such as getting in a taxi, trying to get through a checkout at a grocery store, or ordering food at a restaurant. A lot of waiters and hosts try to make it personal or respectful by using gendered terms like “ma’am” but since it’s incorrect, it doesn’t feel great when they come up to the table and say “hey girls.” It’s also a privilege because I can’t really see that kind of security ever happening to me. It seems like if I feel the way that I feel forever, where I like wearing makeup and I like having long hair, it’s hard for people to understand that I’m not a woman because people associate those things with being a woman. So, it feels like I’m going to be misgendered my entire life. Jace: What ways do you respond when a stranger versus a friend misgenders you? Ask: While strangers misgendering me impacts my ability to go about dayto-day life, I’ve numbed myself to it and remind myself they don’t know because they’re strangers. When close friends misgender me its hurts because they should know, but I realize it’s not from a place of disrespect, it’s mostly just social conditioning. Friends are also really important because having friends that gender me correctly helps me keep going. Sure a lot of people are going to continue to misgender me, but my friends keep me going because they see who I

am. Even just one person would help someone a lot. Some people can’t tell their family but having a friend can really help. Jace: What is an individual’s role when a friend has come to them about changing their pronouns? Ask: Do your best to remember, adjust and normalize it. Practise using the correct pronouns as much as you can. Sometimes it can help to practise with another friend, like telling a story (that they’re cool with being shared) about the person who has new pronouns. Another important part is to not make excuses or apologies in advance. We usually already know that it’s difficult for people to remember and we know mistakes will happen. Saying something like “This is really hard for me, I’m not used to it and I’m sorry but I’m going to make mistakes,” is not necessary because most of us know it’s going to happen. Bringing it up doesn’t help and makes me feel bad about sharing my pronouns; like I’m being a burden. Jace: How do you respond when someone unintentionally misgenders you? If it’s someone I’m not going to see again my preference is to ignore it and leave as quickly as possible. If I correct the individual I risk them not being cool with it and I may not have the energy to explain or educate. If it’s someone I see occasionally like a bartender, then it’s really nice if a friend helps me correct them for me. If a friend does it, I find people

take it less personally. If I correct them, sometimes they think I’m more upset at them than I actually am, which drags out how uncomfortable the situation already can be. If it’s a friend, I need to remind myself they care about me. The best way for me to handle it is to immediately say “he” to correct it when it happens. Sometimes I don’t and I’ll end up thinking about it too much and wonder if the individual knew it happened or not. Jace: How should someone else respond when they accidentally misgender you? Ask: Try to make it as short as possible. If you catch yourself doing it you can kind of cut yourself off and use the right pronoun right away. So, if you say the wrong one, say the correct one immediately as a correction. Switch pronouns immediately. You can say a quick apology, like “he likes— no sorry, they like pancakes,” for example. Keep the conversation going and don’t put any more attention on the mistake or the person. I find that’s enough and what I appreciate the most. It’s unpleasant being misgendered and I want to forget about it and move on as fast as I can. I get it when people feel the need to make a more extended apology in which case, doing it in private at a later time is fine. But doing it in the middle of a conversation is stressful and it ends up feeling more about the person who made the mistake than the mistake itself. CONTINUED ON PAGE 13


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OPINION: 215 Children Who Were Loved By Kukdookaa Terri Brown, Residential School Survivor Last week, we learned of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the old Kamloops Indian Residential School. During the course of the TRC, we heard stories of children going missing or being killed as we moved from city to city. Among survivors, many stories were shared about friends disappearing and it was known they were killed, however survivors were not believed. I am not surprised that graves were found at schools across the country. However, I am surprised that 215 children’s remains were found at one school. I served 6 years with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) and the report refers to cultural genocide not genocide. The horrific crimes happened at the hands of Catholics. A Christian organization meant to help the poorest of the poor - not kill them. The families did not know of their demise and family members went to their graves without closure or knowledge of their passing. The evilness of their acts goes beyond measure. There has been no accountability or remorse from the Catholic Church During the 6 years of TRC, the Catholic Church entity was non compliant on several articles to the IRS Agreement whilst we were trying to document the truth about the schools. From the outset, the Catholics withheld school records that compensation claims were based upon. They said they were lost, stolen and burned in fires at various schools. Documents they kept were very detailed as they were replied upon to ensure cash flowed to the schools from the Federal Government. The Catholic Church likely destroyed the documents to cover up the horrific details of their crimes, such as what happened in Kamloops. In addition, Catholics did not pay their portion of the compensation to survivors as agreed to by church entities in the Indian Residential School

Agreement. The Government of Canada covered their portion because they could not hold them responsible. Every local church became its own entity, thus avoiding legal responsibility as a whole. An institution with the best real estate in Canada, stolen Indigenous Lands, did not pay and did not accept responsibility. One of the 94 Calls to Action by the TRC is that the Catholic Church issue an apology for Indian Residential Schools (IRS) and the harms caused to innocent children. To date the Pope has refused to apologize for the serious harms caused by the IRS. This reflects a lack of respect and accountability to Indigenous Peoples at the highest level. Catholics continue to devalue our very existence by denying the harms done against our Peoples. This is a continued pattern of dehumanization and racism. When individuals are reduced to a number, and they aim to “take the Indian out of the child”, they would not feel guilty for murder. Savages and heathens deserved conversion and assimilation under colonialism and patriarchy. Totally void of moral standards. The Catholic church did not take responsibility. The trauma and failure of the IAP The Independent Assessment Process (IAP) was a component of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. The IAP was supposedly a non-adversarial, out-ofcourt process to resolve claims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, and other wrongful acts that have caused serious psychological harm to former students of Indian Residential Schools. The process was everything it was not supposed to be. This compensation process caused unimaginable pain and mental and psychological anguish, leading to addictions and suicide. After providing testimony at the IAP, survivors were pressured under duress to sign a waiver to destroy all documents relating to their case. Survivors were told if they did not sign the waiver they would not qualify for

compensation. This pressure came immediately following the hearing and complainants signed in many cases without memory of doing so. The details given in the hearings by survivors was horrendous. They had to give a detailed account of horrific acts of sexual and physical abuse. The perpetrators were monsters and inflicted the worst forms of abuse imaginable upon innocent children. All documents from the IAP process will be destroyed in October of 2027. All evidence of crimes against humanity against helpless children will be erased from Canadian history. This is the

only place this evidence currently exists. No one takes responsibility. The IAP heard the most horrific details imaginable of abuse, torture, dehumanization and this will all go up in smoke. Documents will be destroyed and history will be rewritten to cover up genocide. The destruction of documents is compliant with the Supreme Court of Canada order. Shame. The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation unsuccessfully intervened in the case. Preservation of the IAP and the truth proved to be unpopular as the NCTR suffered multiple attacks from lawyers supposedly representing

survivors. What is needed now Survivors, families and communities need trauma informed support. Intergenerational survivors need help that is designed and managed by their communities. We don’t need organizations to decide for them or manage them any longer. It is time to decolonize this way of thinking that controls and limits communities’ abilities and resilience. The burial sites are crime scenes, and extensive investigations must be conducted to find out the painful details of the babies and children’s deaths. Do the right thing Canada. Let’s give the children the

respect and honour they never had in their short lives. During the TRC’s mandate, no charges were ever laid against perpetrators and they were given impunity by the colonizers who are complicit in the death of innocent children. No more protecting the abusers and murders if they are still alive. For those who are not, may they burn in the hell they created for us. There were around 150,000 children who attended the 139 Indian Residential Schools. The TRC reported there were 4,100 deaths at the schools, this did not include the 215 babies and children hidden in graves

Notice of Public Meeting

June 21, 2021

Paris Flood Risk Mitigation Public Information Centre #3

Engage with us! The County of Brant invites you to the third Public Meeting in the Paris Flood Mitigation Class Environmental Assessment (EA) study. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the meeting will be held online. The meeting purpose is to present the preferred alternative, provide a summary of work completed throughout the project, and discuss next steps to conclude the Environmental Assessment process. Your feedback is important and will help finalize the selection of the preferred alternative, potential phasing strategies, and measures to mitigate the impacts on the environment and community. The study is being completed as a ‘Schedule B’ project in accordance with the requirements of the Municipal Class EA (October 2000 as amended 2015). Upon completion of the study, a Project File Report will be prepared and posted for public review and comment. June 21, 2021 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm engagebrant.ca/parisfloodmitigation Public consultation is important for the success of this project. We’re interested in receiving your comments. Sign up to attend the virtual public meeting via Zoom to discuss the project with County staff. Interested community members can join the online meeting at any time; however, a presentation will be made early in the session and will be followed by a question-and-answer period. County staff will be available to address questions and concerns about the study during the moderated question period. All information for this project will be posted on the County’s website at engagebrant.ca/parisfloodmitigation. A recorded presentation will be posted ahead of the meeting date so that interested community members can view the information and submit questions ahead of the virtual meeting. A comment sheet and a link to sign up for the virtual public meeting will also be posted at this location on the County’s website. Comments and information regarding this Municipal Class Environmental Assessment are being collected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (1990). With the exception of personal information, all comments will be included as public input in the Project File Report which will be placed on the public record. Notices and updates will be posted on the County of Brant’s website, engagebrant.ca/parisfloodmitigation. For more information or if you wish to be placed on the project’s mailing list, please contact: Chris Moon, P.Eng. Senior Project Manager Ecosystem Recovery Inc. 80 Courtland Ave East Kitchener, Ontario N2G 2T8 T 519.621.1500 E chris.moon@ecosystemrecovery.ca

Clint Brown Public Works Technologist County of Brant 26 Park Avenue Burford, Ontario N0E 1A0 T 519.449.2451 x 2211 F 519.449.3382 E clint.brown@brant.ca


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13

PRIDE MONTH: Q & A on pronoun allyship continued Jace: Why is it important today for cis people to educate and teach themselves this information and not rely on their friends to educate them? Ask: It’s important because trans people have to live this every day. They don’t have a choice and it’s easy to get burnt out. I would advise people to make sure the information they’re looking at is actually from trans people and not, for example, from a textbook written by a cis author explaining what being transgender

is. The internet is great because there are a lot of resources created by trans people about trans people. So then the trans people in your life don’t have to repeat themselves to every person they meet. Jace: How does a cis person looking to be an ally become an ally? Ask: I look at allyship as helpful actions. Obviously caring about trans people is the first step. Learning from trans people would be the next step. Applying what they say are the best ways to respect

trans people. How to best respect a trans person is self-defined. If you’re not sure of something and it’s something that could be specific to them, you should ask them and listen if you’re corrected. Even if your information is from a trans person, whatever the trans person is telling you about themselves is the most relevant and most applicable information. Asking a person about themselves is also good because people change. So for example, if someone changes their pronouns,

you have to listen to that person and understand that what they’re saying is how you should be going about it at that time. Jace: How important is it to you to have allies? Ask: It’s important to have allies because going through life means you’re going to have to interact with people and the way things are set up right now, people aren’t all taught to understand and accept trans people as a default. Allies are important because they help make respecting trans people a

normal thing. It helps me as a trans person feel like there’s hope for a better life experience. My fear of being misgendered for my entire life is improved by having allies that gender me correctly. Ask is a part of the Gender Generations Project. It involves trans youth from ages 10 to 18 and trans adult mentors. The Gender Generations Project has two books launching in August 2021. It has stories, essays, art, and poetry from trans youth on topics including childhood, family, school, daily life, bodies and mental health. The first book is meant to be a toolkit for all young people on what supporting the trans community can look like. The second book is formatted more like a textbook. It has a lot of the same content but includes academic responses from scholars that provide context and ideas for concrete

actions. The books are important because most people have an idea of what being transgender is, but that image is not always formed out of information from trans people. It becomes an issue because people will inevitably run into trans people. They may be looking for support from a friend, trying to get through the grocery store without harassment, or being affected by laws made by people who don’t know what it means or what it is like to be trans. “We put a lot of ourselves onto these pages so reading it and listening to us when it’s about us is a step towards bringing our communities together,” said Ask. You can find more information and links to the books by visiting: www. gendergenerations.org.

215 Children Who Were Loved Continued from page 12 in Kamloops. This is also the case with the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry - no killers were held accountable. Killing with impunity seems to be the colonizer’s justice. While we knew all along that children were killed, we were not believed. It took ground penetrating radar to find the dear ones. This is genocide and sadly there are many such sites at former schools across Canada. The TRC asked for $1.5 million dollars to complete the search for missing children and was denied. Now we know why. The Federal Government covered up and denied that they are guilty of genocide against the Indigenous Peoples, and in this case the Catholic Church did the the killing. This is a national emergency. Our people need programs to heal and strengthen our fu-

ture generations to live happy healthy lives. We need to regroup and make a plan that will address our urgent health outcomes. Suicide, overdose, all addictions, incarceration, violence against Indigenous women and children and Indigenous racism is our pandemic. Are we survivors the lucky ones? We got to marry, have children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. Who are now facing the stark reality - they really meant to get rid of us. Genocide brings this discussion to a whole new level. We Indigenous Peoples are resilient but how much more can we take? Let’s be clear - we will rise... like smoke from grandfather’s campfire. We will rise. I am a survivor of the Indian Residential School and Indigenous genocide. In my mind it was always genocide.


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June 9th, 2021

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TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021

15

SPORTS

know the score.

An Interview with Jordan Marie Daniel, fourth-generation indigenous runner STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

A citizen of the Kul Wicasa Oyate, also known as the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe in South Dakota, Jordan Marie Brings Three White Horses Daniel is a passionate Indigenous advocate and long distance runner. In fact, she is a fourth-generation indigenous runner and tenacious human-rights advocate. She’s known for bringing global awareness to the missing and murdered indigenous women humanitarian crisis with a red handprint painted across her face, even as she raced in the 2019 Boston Marathon. And she’s a pioneer of intersectional activism that uses her athletic platform to raise awareness and prompt vital dialogue about important issues that aren’t secular to Indigenous people alone. Q: To begin the interview, we are in the midst of Tom Longboat and Global Running Day; what about running has made you feel most happy? A: Running make me feel most happy when I’m connecting with nature, my surroundings and enjoying the early memories of running with my grandfather, Nyal Brings – who took me on my first run. I’m a fourth generation runner – it’s been about connection, continuing family tradition, to representation, to finding the pure love and joy for myself, and now,

intersecting all of it, with raising awareness through running that gives me new purpose, determination and joy. Q: Understanding that you come from a line of runners, why do you think continuing generational running is important as an Indigenous person? A: It’s important to me as a Lakota and Indigenous runner to continue generational running because running is healing, running carries messages, running is prayer, running is tradition and running teaches you many life lessons. Traditionally, we have many Indigenous communities, long before settler colonialism arrived to our lands, that our ancestors ran to deliver those messages, ran to hunt and tire out their prey, running as coming of age for many, and so much more. Running is tradition and cultural – it’s part of who we are as Indigenous people. Ensuring that the knowledge and stories of the past and present, are carried with us for our future generations. What was the most fulfilling experience that came out of your athletic career currently? My most fulfilling experience, honestly, was finding my purpose with running by helping to raise awareness about the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, Two spirits and relatives, and other social issues impacting those continuously oppressed. Running the 2019 Boston Marathon and dedicating

Jordan Marie Daniel is a fourth generation indigenous runner and human rights advocate. SUBMITTED

26 miles to 26 missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls gave me new purpose in how I can be using my running platform to influence social change, informing those who may be unaware of these issues and how to support. Inspiring Rosalie Fish, as she puts it, is something I didn’t know would happen going into that run, but to help be that representation for our younger generations who then inspire so many more like she did, is one of my proudest moments. It brought us close as sisters. Q: You have created your own non-profit organization, ran the Boston Marathon, and continue on to utilize your platform as an advocate. Would you like to share your story on what has brought you on the path of Indigenous advocacy? A: I have known since I was in 8th grade that I’ve

wanted to be an advocate for my relatives, for Indigenous communities. That meant, moving to Washington, DC to lobby on the Hill and help create change systemically that would support and have respect for our communities, rather than to continuously oppress Indigenous peoples, folks of color and marginalized communities. It was growing up with the perspective based of experiences with racism, a hate crime, and seeing how Native people are treated outside of your own community in the U.S.. It broke my heart to see that after moving away from my family and community, to a rural town in Maine, that I was different, that were different, and that we were invisible and forgotten. In 2013, that dream came true to move to DC and advocate, came true. My first year and a half, I worked for a Native health centered advocacy non-

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profit and interned for a democratic Congressional representative. I was disheartened through those experiences to see the lack of representation of Indigenous peoples there, in the hallways of Congress and the amount of privilege that was there. I realized things were so slow moving and Indigenous peoples were still being pushed to the back burner of legislative discussions. So, I quit, and started working for the Administration for Native Americans in the Department of Health and Human Services in DC, where I was able to work closely with our communities. It was then, that I knew my place to advocate and support, was at the community-grassroots level. In 2016, I organized my first ‘run for water’ rally to welcome the Standing Rock youth to Piscataway lands / Washington DC, as they ran over 2,000 miles to

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oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline. That is where my heart work of community organizing began, and where Rising Hearts was founded. It’s continued ever since, centered in elevating Indigenous voices and what we are doing, as well as working with an intersectional approach on bringing communities together, to mobilize, to learn from each other’s lived experiences, and push for change from the ground up. Q: For the young athletes reading this article, what kind of advice would you give to them in terms of staying focused and meeting their goals? A: My advice for young athletes, is to trust the process of running. It can teach you structure, patience, and love. Listen to your body. Never be too hard on yourself. And never put pressure on yourself to find your purpose or have everything figured out. It can take years, as it did for me to find what I was meant to be doing. And just know, that whether you inspire one person or thousands, your impact in this world is needed. Always respect yourself. Love yourself! Beyond Daniel’s dream of running in the Olympic Marathon Trials, she would also like to represent her family by racing in USATF trail and mountain running national championships. Even still, her activism is intertwined with her athletic goals.


16

TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021

“It’s not just 215”: why Kyla Morris taped her stick orange STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

KAHNAWAKE, QUE. — Kyla Morris, a 20 yearold Psychology student at Dawson College, is a Moahwk, Wolf Clan athletes that plays as a winger for their QCHL Hockey Team, the Dawson Blues. In 2019, Morris noted that she was the only girl from Kahnawake playing college-level hockey, and maintained the left winger position and even moved to take over some time as centre in her time with the Blues. But in the month of September in 2018, the same month that hosts Orange Shirt Day, Morris taped her stick a bright orange for all of the “children who suffered, survived and all that has happened.” “That was in my first year at Dawson during the home opener,” she said. “I was a rookie and I was

new to the team and I wanted to do it even if no one else on the team was going to.” She posted the picture of her hitting the ice with the orange taped stick on June 1st of this year. But in her post, Morris noted that as a new comer to the team, she was subjected to passive aggression from her teammates. “The small little snickers and the laughs, I just had to overlook it and remember that I taped my stick orange for a reason and to remember that reason why I did it. I just had to overlook all of those girls and their comments.” “It’s really sad to think about how many children there were, but it’s even more sad to think about the fact that it’s not just 215. There are so many more children that need to be brought home and there’s a lot that needs to be done for this to happen,” she said. But nonetheless, the sport she loves and comb-

Kyla Morris taped her hockey stick orange in memory of students who went through Canada’s Indian Residential School system. “It’s really sad to think about how many children there were, but it’s even more sad to think about the fact that it’s not just 215. There are so many more children that need to be brought home and there’s a lot that needs to be done for this to happen,” she said. SUBMITTED

ing it with raising awareness brought forth her explanation of how hockey has impacted her life. “Honestly, I think that my life has revolved around hockey. It’s brought me so many places and has given me so many opportunities. “I started in Kahnawake really young, I think five

OTE is searching for a motivated Dispatcher who reports and works under the direction of the Logistics Manager. The candidate must be an excellent multitasker with exceptional communication and time management skills.

DISPATCHER

Type: Full-time Closing Date: June 16, 2021 Hours of Work: 40 hours weekly Wage: TBD Responsibilities will Include: • Work in a fast-paced environment for a rapidly growing Fuel Delivery Company • Must have transportation experience • Shift work may include some weekends and holidays, hours to be determined • Keep records, monitor drivers' daily logs for errors or violations and monitoring their working hours and equipment availability. • Keep tabs on the weather at all drivers' locations to be able to flag potential issues • Driver Payroll • Create all drivers’ schedules • Strong problem-solving skills required • Attention to detail is a must • Other duties as assigned Qualifications: • Experience in dispatching and planning • Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel Skills and Abilities: • Strong time management skills, ability to prioritize and meet deadlines • Excellent verbal and written communication skills • Ability to multi-task and work in a fast pace team environment • Mathematical and analytical skills

or six years old. Then I started in Peewee to play Double ‘AA’, double letters with girls in Montreal. Then after that, I started playing with a lot of different teams all over the place.” Morris said that she had a sports scholarship for hockey at the high school that she went to, and

played soccer as well as flag football. Some of her happiest memories were intertwined with spending time with her father while playing hockey. “It’s hard to choose one but I would say that my favourite memories are of the trips that I have gone on, and I would say that everyday, my father me

to the West Island to play hockey and riding with him every weekend to go play hockey. Or driving to Nova Scotia, it really made a difference and improved my relationship with my dad through my whole life,” she said. As for other Indigenous athletes that might find themselves in similar positions in their sports — wanting to raise awareness and possibly being subject of conversation amongst teammates — Morris believes that this advocacy is something that Indigenous athletes should do as part of being important role models to younger generations. “I think you’re there for a reason and your presence means a lot, so be an advocate for this cause, for all of those children. You should use our platform and you should give information to those that who don’t know what it is or aren’t educated on it,” she said.

OTE is searching for a motivated Inventory Planner Analyst who reports and works under the direction of the Logistics Manager. The candidate must be an excellent multitasker with exceptional communication and time management skills.

INVENTORY PLANNER ANALYST

Type: Full-time Closing Date: June 23, 2021 Hours of Work: 40 hours weekly Wage: TBD Responsibilities will Include: • Inventory analysis • Inventory oversight • Inventory balancing • Order planning • Working with customers and suppliers • Working with other departments • Representing OTE in a professional manner • Other duties as assigned Qualifications: • Experience in planning and Inventory • Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel

Skills and Abilities: • Strong time management skills, ability to prioritize and meet deadlines • Excellent verbal and written communication skills • Ability to multi-task and work in a fast pace team environment • Mathematical and analytical skills

As a First Nations Employer, we are committed to diversity and an inclusive workplace. We will recruit the best qualified candidates based on skills, experience, qualifications, and competencies required for the position. Interested candidates are encouraged to submit a resume outlining their qualifications and work experience to: Gary.loft@originaltradersenergy.com


TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021

17

J O B B O A R D Position

Employer/Location

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Unit Assistant Trainee Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Personal Support Worker PT Iroquois Lodge, Health Services (Multiple positions) Engagement Coordinator Administration, Health Services Project Manager Environmental, Central Administration Housekeeper FT Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Health Human Resources Administration, Health Services Coordinator Manager of Resources Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Gedeo Clinician – MCRRT Community Crisis, Health Services Alternative Care Resource Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Team Member Alternative Care Resource Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Support Worker Esadatgehs (Quality) Lead Administration, Health Services Registered Early Child Care Services, Social Services Childhood Educator PT Registered Early Childhood Child Care Services Educator (Multiple Positions) Truck Driver Roads, Public Works Portfolio Lead Administration, Health Services Family Services Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Data and Quality Assurance Analyst Child & Family Services Health Transformation Policy Analyst Administration, Health Services Anti-Bullying Task Force Lead Child & Youth, Health Services Speech Language Pathologist Child & Youth, Health Services Registered Nurse – Charge Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Epidemiologist Administration, Health Services SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Client Advisor Royal Bank of Canada, Ohsweken Branch Guest Curator Woodland Culture Centre Grocery/Produce/Stock Clerks Townline Variety and Gas – Townline Grocery Meat Cutter Townline Variety and Gas – Townline Grocery Baker Townline Variety and Gas – Townline Grocery Tow Truck Operator Mohawk Towing Construction Worker / Labourer Mohawk Towing Executive Assistant Ontario First Nations Technical Services Corporation (OFNTSC) Human Resource Manager Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Communications Coordinator Cook Cashier

Term

Contract (1 year) Part Time

Salary

TBD TBD

Closing Date

June 16, 2021 June 16, 2021

Contract Contract Contract Contract

TBD June 16, 2021 TBD June 16, 2021 TBD June 16, 2021 $75,000- June 16, 2021 $85,000 per annum Full Time TBD June 16, 2021 Full Time TBD June 16, 2021 Full Time TBD June 16, 2021 Full Time

TBD

June 16, 2021

Full Time Contract (Maternity) Full Time

TBD TBD

June 16, 2021 June 16, 2021

TBD

June 16, 2021

Full Time TBD Contract TBD Full Time TBD Full Time Up to $55,000 Contract TBD Contract TBD Contract TBD Full Time TBD Full Time TBD Part-time 30 hours/week Part-time Part-time Part-time Full-time Full-time Full-time

Native Horizons Treatment Centre Maracle Man’s Maracle Man’s

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Full-time

June 16, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021 June 23, 2021

TBD

Mid-June

TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Open until filled Open until filled Open until filled Open until filled Open until filled Open until filled

$51,313.50Open 73,346.50 per annum until filled Full-time TBD June 16, 2021 Part-time $16-$17/hr July 1, 2021 Part-time $15-$15.50 July 1, 2021

Position

Employer/Location

Term

Student

Maracle Man’s

Warehouse Team Leader Archaeological Monitor Family Support Worker

Grand River Enterprises Haudenosaunee Development Institute Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Lands, Membership and Research (LMR) Intern Community Consultation/Lands and Membership Officer Junior Policy Analyst/Writer

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Salary

Closing Date

Part-time

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

$14.75 July 1, 2021 $15.25/hr Full-time TBD June 18, 2021 Full-time TBD June 18, 2021 Contract $24.43 - June 17, 2021 $34.79/hr Contract $16.89 – June 17, 2021 $23.49/hr Full-time $43,969 - June 17, 2021 $62,329 per annum Full-time $23.43 - June 17, 2021 $34.78/hr Full-time, contract TBD June 17, 2021

Elementary Teacher – Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Junior/Intermediate Educational Assistant Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Contract TBD June 17, 2021 Kitchen Helper Sade:konih Contract $15.00/hr June 11, 2021 GREAT SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES Please be advised, interested candidates must be registered with the GREAT student office. Please contact Carly Martin at (519) 445-2222 ext. 3133 to get started! SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES SECONDARY STUDENT River Guide (2 positions) Grand River Rafting 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Camp Leader (2 positions) Parks and Recreation 8 weeks $14.25/ hr June 18, 2021 Maintenance Assistant Housing Department 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Landscaping Assistant Six Nations of the Grand River 8 weeks $14.25/ hr June 18, 2021 Development Corporation Building Maintenance Assistant Six Nations of the Grand River 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Development Corporation Grounds Crew Sandusk Golf Club 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Water Helper Kool Kidz Ice and Water 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 Ice Bagger/Packer Kool Kidz Ice and Water 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 Summer Library Assistant Six Nations Public Library 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 Sales Consultant/Inventory Clerk ILA Sports 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Summer Student Ontario First Nations Technical 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Services Corporation (OFNTSC) Forestry Labourer Kayanase 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Ground Maintenance Worker Kayanase 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Community Services Six Nations Police 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 22, 2021 Section Assistant Lawn Maintenance Assistant O-Dawgz Lawn Care 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. Only local positions are posted in the paper. For more positions in the surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn. com. Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


18 37

TWO ROW TIMES TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021 NOVEMBER 28TH, 2018

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Card of Thanks

Services

On March 20, 2021 our beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and uncle John Staats Sr. was called home to be with the Lord. Our family wishes to extend our sincere appreciation to all who helped and supported us during our time of loss. A special thanks to all of our extended family, relatives, friends and neighbours who showed their love and guidance, prior to and after the funeral in so many different ways including prayers, cards, flowers, monetary and food donations, all for which, we are really appreciative. Our gratitude goes out to all of the doctors, nurses, personal support workers who attended and treated John respectfully in his final days. To the many others who helped with the funeral service to make it truly memorable; Bill Lofthouse and his team at R.H.B. Anderson Funeral Home, Pastor Dan Montour, Six Nations Veterans, pallbearers and Dawn & Dylan. As it is impossible to thank all those concerned individually, please accept this as a token of our heartfelt appreciation; we are truly grateful. Sincerely, Hazel, John Jr. & Diane, Lesley & Ray, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

Adult Training

Metal Roofing Services

FREE TRAINING The Achievement Adult Learning Centre is accepting applications for ONLC’s online, Introduction to Digital Technology. The course is an interactive, beginner’s guide to digital and computer technology skills. It will help prepare adults entering into further education or employment.

Course begins: June 14, 2021. Space is limited.

If you would like more information, or to register, please email: angel.skye@ snpolytechnic.com, or text: 519-7575989.

519-774-9633

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ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

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905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

June 9th, 2021 DECEMBER 19TH, 2018

CLUES ACROSS 1. Most courageous 8. Insurance giant 13. Small trace left behind 14. In a way, signals 15. The same letter or sound at the beginning 19. The Great Lakes State 20. Engage in a contest 21. Drinks served to celebrate a birth (Spanish) 22. Manpower 23. Undivided 24. Strong, magnetic metal 25. People of Tanzania 26. Sorts 30. Cop car accessory 31. Trade 32. Sullen and ill-tempered 33. Distinctive practices 34. Motor vehicles 35. Electrodes 38. Polish river 39. Human feet 40. Make very hot 44. Toppin and Kenobi are two 45. Blackbird 46. One point west of due south 47. Large beer 48. Third stomachs 49. Rare Korean family name 50. Hectoliter 51. Aquatic invertebrate 55. Where we live 57. Poked holes in 58. Partner to ways 59. __ Ann CLUES DOWN 1. Expressions of approval

19 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 This week’s agenda is a clean slate, Aries, and that gives you plenty of time to rest and recharge. Spend a few moments each day to think only about yourself.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 The nature of a relationship with a close partner may get a bit confusing this week, Taurus. Do not react quickly to a situation without processing your thoughts first.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, focusing on spiritual things this week can help you get your priorities in order. It also may help you to slow down and smell the roses for a change.

2. Replace the interior of 3. Not awake 4. Roman numeral 7 5. Sun up in New York 6. Institute legal proceedings against 7. Bugs homeowners don’t want 8. Maltese-Italian composer 9. Very long period of time 10. Touchdown 11. Agents of downfall 12. Complacently or inanely foolish 16. Argentina capital Buenos __ 17. County in New Mexico 18. An electrically charged atom 22. New Zealand conifer 25. Type of brandy 27. Comments to the audi-

Answers for June 9th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

ence 28. Tears down 29. Gifts for the poor 30. More painful 32. Good friend 34. Lying in the same plane 35. Line in a polygon 36. Clouds of gas and dust 37. Norse god 38. Health care pro 40. Close tightly 41. One’s holdings 42. Became less intense 43. Wilco frontman 45. Woman (French) 48. Expresses delight 51. TV channel (abbr.) 52. Beverage 53. Unit of work or energy 54. Cleaning accessory 56. Dorm worker

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Your success and receptive attitude may make people skeptical of your purpose, Cancer. Some may even feel jealous. Continue to forge ahead with your plans.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Sometimes it is difficult to make up your mind, Leo. However, this week you will be at peace with all of your decisions and will not second-guess them at all.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, if you are feeling a little uncertain about things at the moment, you may just need a new perspective. Run some ideas by someone you can trust. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you will be confronted with a big decision this week. You should take the time to think about it and maybe mull over a few opinions from trusted friends.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, you may need to feel free of some burdens before you can focus on the best version of yourself. There are some obstacles arriving that stand in the way, but they can be resolved. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, share your vision of life with others who have similar goals. The camaraderie that results will help you to make a list of your collective priorities. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Life has taken a few twists and turns over the past few days, Capricorn. Luckily you have been able to go with the flow and change your plans on the fly.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, another peaceful and stress-free week is on the horizon. Even though things may not be taxing, take a day off if you can spare it and spend it having fun. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, before you can reach the summit, you have to cover a lot of ground and may stumble backwards a few times. Dig in your heels.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


20

TWO ROW TIMES

June 9th, 2021

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

For more information about the data visit the FAQ in the report at sixnationscovid19.ca. For any further questions about this data or report please email epidemiologist@sixnations.ca (Updated: 2021-06-08)

Status of Cases Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Red

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days?

Active Cases

Total in Self-isolation

Currently Hospitalized

0

8

0

Total Positive Results

Total Resolved

526

Date

0

0

03/Jun/2021

0

0

0

04/Jun/2021

0

0

07/Jun/2021

0

0

Total

0

0

06/Jun/2021

Deaths

0

0

05/Jun/2021

11

Resolved

01/Jun/2021 02/Jun/2021

Total Deaths

515

Positive Results

0

0

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

Core-Monitoring Indicators Indicators: Low risk This means indicator thresholds are generally in the low risk categories, showing signs of containment

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

For more information about the data visit the FAQ in the report at sixnationscovid19.ca. For any further questions about this data or report please email epidemiologist@sixnations.ca

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Red

Active Cases

Total in Self-isolation

Currently Hospitalized

0

8

0

Total Positive Results

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

526

515

11

0

0

03/Jun/2021

0

0

02/Jun/2021 04/Jun/2021 05/Jun/2021 06/Jun/2021 07/Jun/2021 Total

Six Nations

Brant County

SN Cases per 100,000

BCHU Cases per 100,000

0.00

51

Positive Resolved Deaths Results

01/Jun/2021

0 0 0 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 0

0

0

# of cases that have screened positive for a variant (Lineage unknown)

0

40

0

0

0%

0.35

Haldimand/Norfolk

Hamilton

Toronto

HNHU Cases per 100,000

HPH Cases per 100,000

TPH Cases per 100,000

19

64

47

What variants of concerns are in Six Nations?

0 0

Effective Reproduction Number

How do we compare to our surrounding areas?

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days? Date

% Positivity (7 day moving average)

How is level of risk measured? Each week we conduct a risk assessment to track our core monitoring indicators in Six Nations. Indicators are based on virus transmission, community health system capacity (Public Health, EMS, Assessment testing centre), our surrounding area health care system, and community compliance to the public health measures (isolation adherence, reports of gatherings, quarantine adherence). These measures we use as part of determining our alert level. For more information see the COVID-19 response framework.

(Updated: 2021-06-08)

Status of Cases

# of Cases Last 7 days

0 0

+

Total # of cases positive for B.1.1.7 (UK)

Total # of cases positive for (B.1.351))

19

30

=

Total # of cases who had a VOC

60

What trends are occurring in Six Nations?

0

How many daily new cases have we had?

How many total cases have we had?

Indicators: Low risk This means indicator thresholds are generally in the low risk categories, showing signs of containment

# of Cases Last 7 days

% Positivity (7 day moving average)

Effective Reproduction Number

0

0%

0.35

How is level of risk measured? Each week we conduct a risk assessment to track our core monitoring indicators in Six Nations. Indicators are based on virus transmission, community health system capacity (Public Health, EMS, Assessment testing centre), our surrounding area health care system, and community compliance to the public health measures (isolation adherence, reports of gatherings, quarantine adherence). These measures we use as part

Cumulative cases

Core-Monitoring Indicators

Positive Results

40

20

0

Jul 2020

Jan 2021 Date

500

0

Jul 2020

Jan 2021 Date

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