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THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY March 3rd, 2021 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

Positive Covid cases hit record levels on Six Nations DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Update as of:

This page will be updated daily.

3/2/21 13:30

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days?

TWO ROW TIMES

519-445-0088

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black Note: Active cases are the number of confirmed cases minus the number of resolved cases and deaths.

Active Cases

Currently Hospitalized

Total Cases

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

116

4

367

248

3

How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total?

2/24/2021

15

2/25/2021

36

2/26/2021

12

2/27/2021

26

2/28/2021

12

3/1/2021

3

3/2/2021

1

Total (Last 7 days)

105

New Lab confirmed

40

300 200 100 0

New Lab confirmed

How many new people are becoming sick with COVID-19?

400

Cumulative cases

Six Nations Public Health Services is sounding the alarm and begging people to stay home as the community grapples with a record 116 active cases of the virus this week. It’s the highest number of positive cases on the territory since the pandemic was declared a year ago. Four Six Nations people are currently battling the virus in hospital. Three people have died. The spike in cases caused Six Nations of the Grand River (SNGR) and Six Nations Health Services to urge people to stay home and only go out when necessary. “Our healthcare workers are overwhelmed,” read a press release from SNGR on Monday. “They are working diligently to keep our community safe, perform an increasing amount of Covid-19 tests, and conduct contact tracing. We owe it to them to follow public health guidelines to prevent any further spread of Covid-19 within the community.” Six Nations has been in alert level black – the most restrictive Covid alert level for the commu-

Date

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

Mar 2021

Date reported

30

This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak is progressing over time.

20 10 0 Apr 2020

Jul 2020

Oct 2020

Jan 2021

Date reported

Six Nations residents watched as COVID-19 positivity rates consistently increased over the weekend with four people now in hospital. At least one person is reported to be on a ventilator. There are currently 116 positive cases with no announcements from Elected Council, Indigenous Servcies Canada or the province as to when Six Nations will get it's desperately needed vaccines.

nity – since January. Level black means most businesses are shuttered for the time being, aside from essential services. Although there is no official statement on what caused the recent spike in cases, SNGR has asked the community to “avoid gatherings of any size outside of your immediate household.” Public health is also encouraging people to self-isolate if they’ve been exposed to someone with Covid-19 and to only leave their homes if absolutely

necessary, encouraging online shopping and the use of curbside pick-up for essential items. “Following these guidelines is more crucial than ever as the case count within the community continues to rise. Each swab is being monitored for variants of concern. While none have been identified, we are concerned about the rapid spread of the virus.” Six Nations declared a state of emergency almost a year ago after the World Health Organization

deemed Covid-19 a global pandemic in mid-March, citing repeatedly the vulnerability of Six Nations people and their high rates of underlying health conditions that could make Covid outcomes worse for the community. Despite that, Six Nations was not prioritized for the Covid-19 vaccine as were remote northern First Nations in Ontario. Only health care workers, frontline workers and elders in long-term and assisted living facilities have received the Covid

vaccine on Six Nations. The adult urban indigenous population in Brantford recieved doses this week ahead of Six Nations on-reserve elders seeing any vaccines. Six Nations Health Services did not respond to numerous requests for comment questioning why case counts rose rapidly, when the vaccine rollout will begin for the rest of the community and why Six Nations is behind schedule. PM42686517


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LOCAL

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March 3rd, 2021

keeping you informed.

Six Nations language commission needs permanent funding DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The Six Nations Language Commission will be able to finish out the academic year, thanks to $200,000 in emergency funding from Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council. The SNLC, which aims to preserve Haudenosaunee languages by producing fluent or near-fluent speakers, sought the extra funds from SNGR last week, but lamented its lack of permanent funding from any source, making it difficult to retain staff and language students. The emergency funding will see the commission through to May. “Language is our identity,” said SNLC Chair Karen Sandy. “We are unique and distinct from our neighbours because of our language and culture. Creating second language speakers is urgent because as we lose more first language speakers, it endangers our languages and puts them more at risk.” The commission receives sporadic funding yearly from elected council, as well as grants from local organizations. But Sandy believes language programming

Indigenous language speakers, instructors and learners will see additional funding to finish the 2021 year but further investments are needed to make language learning tenable.

should be a permanent part of the elected council budget. “It’s been difficult to plan with piecemeal funding. We continue to seek out other sources of funding. Until we secure funding, the language commission should be considered a regular, yearly, line item on council’s budgets.” Mohawk Language teacher Brian Maracle said because the commission only gets funding once a year, it’s hard to retain staff who seek more permanent and secure employment. “We can’t offer that right now. We need to have some assurance we can provide our employees more than eight months of employment. It’s no way to save a language just to go from one eight-month program to another. We’re making tremendous progress with the Mohawk program.”

He said the commission is often asked for advice from across the country because of its track record in producing speakers. “The way we teach is unique in that we get results. We create speakers. We need to become an established entity within the council funding structure.” Elected Chief Mark Hill said council supports the commission and preservation of Haudenosaunee languages and that council will look into providing them with permanent funding. “I don’t think it’s a matter of us not funding or approving funding for it. We know that we need to support our languages and we speak about it all the time. Our languages and culture is what separates our identity. I don’t think that’s the matter. The language commission has the support from this council.” Coun. Wendy Johnson

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noted that when money is tight, language programs are often the last to get funded and council needs to change that thinking. Coun. Helen Miller questioned whether the language programs were actually producing any speakers, saying she hasn’t seen any statistics that detail the number of graduates every year. Sandy said they produce speakers every year, but their programs only run for two years, resulting in “intermediate low” speakers. To create advanced speakers, she said, they’d need funding for three and four-year programs. Students who do become advanced speakers end up investing their own time and money after graduating to reach that level of proficiency. “That’s how we get a lot of the speakers,” said Sandy. Language students get about 2,000 hours of instruction per year. A twoyear program would turn a novice student into an intermediate-low speaker , said Sandy. Coun. Johnson suggested the commission seek funding from federal sources. "There is no reason our language commission should be hurting for funding," she said.

Over half polled oppose Arrowdale sale DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

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Over half the Brantford residents polled in a recent survey oppose the controversial sale of Arrowdale Golf Course. The Friends of Arrowdale, a citizen’s group that banded together to fight city council’s sale of the property, delivered a petition to Brantford City Hall last week, which they say represents about 55 per cent of city residents saying no to the sale. Others argue the sale cannot move forward because it sits on unceded Six Nations land and that both Six Nations and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were not properly notified of the impending sale according to the stipulations of the Grand River Notification Agreement (GRNA). Eric Gillespie, a lawyer for citizen’s group “Know Your City”, argued at a virtual hearing in December 2020 that Six Nations and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were not notified of the sale in a timely manner. They were notified after the sale was complete, contrary to the GRNA, he said. The GRNA is a voluntary agreement between

Six Nations, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, the City of Brantford, Brant County, Haldimand County and the Grand River Conservation Authority. The agreement asks that each party notify each other on matters of common interest on the lands in each county/territory. Brantford resident Elisabeth Chernichenko told the Two Row Times the petition, “refute(s) the opinions of Brantford city councillors to the effect of ‘no one caring’ or the amount not being significant enough to not sell. The statistics tell a very different story.” Over 8,000 people were contacted during a doorto-door campaign last year, and the results were analyzed by a statistician at Simon Fraser University. Out of those, 7,871 did not want the sale to proceed. The results translate to about 55,000 residents of the city, or 55 per cent, opposing the sale, according to Friends of Arrowdale. “We are hoping that these irrefutable figures show council exactly how many are opposed to this decision,” said Kailee Poisson, president of Friends of Arrowdale. The City of Brantford has said it wants to sell the former golf course to make room for more housing.

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Six Nations library funding on hold until council budget this spring DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

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The Six Nations Public Library walked away from elected council’s general finance meeting Monday not knowing when its budget for the upcoming fiscal year will be approved. The library, which is the largest and oldest First Nations public library in the world, needs $222,000 to operate in 2021-2022 and relies mostly on elected council for its annual funding. Feather Maracle, director of the Six Nations Public Library, said it’s a “hub of enlightenment” that has continued to serve the community throughout the pandemic. “Since Covid, the library has continued to play a very active role behind closed doors,” said Maracle. Staff has continued to serve about 10 to 15 customers per day in person, and more online via email. They’ve provided

contactless pick-up and quarantine returned items for 72 hours after drop off to allow for decontamination. The SNPL also provides community members with printing, scanning and copying services, which Maracle said have been especially needed for people applying for the federal Indian Day School Settlement. The SNPL also provides IT support to the community, said Maracle, as well as board games, puzzles, “de-stress” kits, and cursive writing kits to help both kids and adults improve their penmanship. Those programs help people keep busy when their Internet is down and reduces screen time, she said. The SNPL also offers audiobooks, games and puzzles to residents of Iroquois Lodge, Six Nations’ long-term care home. The library has three permanent and two parttime staff members. It’s been closed to the public since the start of the

pandemic, but staff have remained on site. “Throughout all of Covid we have continued to provide information for people around the world,” said Maracle. Coun. Helen Miller said it’s important to continue funding the library, especially after the provincial government slashed library funding in half in 2019. “It’s imperative to make sure our library keeps running. Six Nations is one of the most fortunate communities to have a library. I think we need to be really supportive of the library. I think (Feather has) done a great job keeping the library going through Covid. It’s not an easy job to do for anybody. Unfortunately, they get no money. They have no money other than depending on us, council.” Council said it would look into the library’s funding request when it makes all of their budget decisions this spring.

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Iroquois Lodge enduring outbreak STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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OHSWEKEN - Iroquois Lodge is experiencing an outbreak of COVID-19. The long-term care home on Six Nations of the Grand River notified Ohsweken Public Health that two of its staff members tested positive for COVID-19. The positive test results were discovered as a result of the facility’s surveillance testing. SNGR said in a statement that heightened safety measures have been implemented at Iroquois Lodge and says the affected staff members have been directed by Ohsweken Public Health to self-isolate while confirmation testing is completed to identify whether or not an official outbreak must be reported to the Ministry of Long

Term Care. Staff Members of Iroquois Lodge have reached out to resident family members to notify them of the outbreak protocol. Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council is urging the community to continue to follow health and safety guidelines to prevent any further spread of COVID-19 within the territory. This includes staying home as much as possible, practicing social distancing, wearing a mask, frequent hand washing, and avoiding large gatherings. It is also strongly encouraged that community members get tested for COVID-19 if they are experiencing symptoms or think they may have been exposed to the virus. It is possible to contract the virus and not have any symptoms while still being contagious.

Pandemic recovery funding on the way for Woodland Cultural Centre STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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BRANTFORD — Woodland Cultural Centre, the home of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School, will receive pandemic recovery funding from the Ontario government. In Brantford-Brant, two organizations — WCC and Outside Looking In will be given financial assistance issued by the Arts Recovery Support Fund to help the arts community get through COVID-19 lockdowns. “The Woodland Cultural Centre is extremely thankful for receiving funding from the Arts Recovery Support Fund” said Janis Monture, Executive Director. “As we move into the recovery stage from this

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March 3rd, 2021

pandemic, this funding will assist Woodland in being able to sustain our operations, create new programmes and prepare to re-open once it is safe to do so. Woodland looks very forward to welcoming everyone back to our programming spaces and to engage with our visitors once again”.  The total contribution from Ontario into the Arts Recovery Support Fund is $24 million dollars divided amongst 140 organizations like the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Stratford Festival, Shaw Festival and the National Ballet of Canada. It includes an additional $1 million to provide support directly to artists and creators from across Ontario. The funding is being administered by the Ontario Arts Council. A list of all 140 recipients and the

amounts being contributed to each organization was not listed by press time. “This support will help organizations like Outside Looking In and the Woodland Cultural Centre to continue to make important contributions to our community, while building the groundwork for long-term economic recovery,” said MPP Will Bouma. “Artists and creators have been deeply impacted by the pandemic but continue to work hard every day to keep our communities engaged and connected. Providing the help they need will make a real difference in the lives of individuals in Brantford-Brant and their families.” “Ontario’s arts sector, like so many of the province’s heritage, sport, tourism and culture

industries, was among the first and hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is a ‘high-touch’ sector that depends on gatherings of people, and will take the longest to recover,” said Minister MacLeod. “That is why I am proud that our government is providing much-needed support through initiatives like the Arts Recovery Support Fund. Arts and cultural festivals, live musicians, writers, filmmakers, art galleries, and dance and theatre companies are vital to the cultural fabric of this province. They also play an important role in the mental health and well-being of Ontarians and an equally important role in the province’s economic and social recovery.” Their website is https://woodlandculturalcentre.ca/


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March 3rd, 2021

5

Local restaurant cleans, reopens after two staff Single vehicle crash members test positive for COVID-19 sends man to hospital STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OHSWEKEN — One of the most popular local restaurants is reopening and implementing additional safety measures after closing its doors over the weekend due to two staff members testing positive for COVID-19. Management for Maracle Man’s Delivery and Take-Out announced the closure on the restaurant’s Facebook page on February 25, saying two staff members who worked at the location a week prior, on February 20, tested positive for COVID-19. The restaurant reopened on March 1 after all staff were able to produce negative COVID tests. As a precaution, all staff who worked directly with the members who tested positive were required to do a full 14 day quarantine before returning to

work. “The employees who were not in direct contact with the positive cases weren’t required to get tested or to quarantine but our management asked them to get tested to be sure no one else had covid 19. Thankfully all of their tests came back negative and they are cleared to come back to work if they wish to do so,” said the restaurants management in a post to social media. Maracle Man’s says they have health and safety protocols in place including staff following physical distancing protocols, masks and gloves are worn at all times and are only offering curb side pick-up for orders. Staff members are also undergoing temperature checks before shifts and payments are being accepted as exact cash, or debit payment by tap or e-transfer. The statement goes on

STAFF REPORT

                           editor@tworowtimes.com TWO ROW TIMES

Maracle Mans closed down to clean this weekend after two staff tested positive for COVID-19. Everything is fine now and they have PHOTO OBTAINED BY TRT reopened.

to say, “We are confident that we can safely provide our service to the community. We are putting every safety measure possible in place so customers and

employees feel confident and safe with our service . We would like to thank everyone for your patients and understanding. Please stay safe.”

            CALEDONIA — OPP are investigating a single-vehicle collision that sent a 21-year-old driver to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.  The crash occurred on March 1 on the Highway 6 Bypass south of Argyle Street in Caledonia just after 7:00 p.m.. A witness told police a single vehicle had rolled over and the driver had been ejected. First responders attended the scene and took the driver to an out-of-town hospital via ambulance with serious but non-life-threatening injuries.  OPP investigation, thus far, has determined a green pickup truck being driven by the 21-yearold driver was traveling southbound on Highway

Police are investigating a single vehicle accident that happened south of Argyle Street PHOTO on the bypass.

6 Bypass when it crossed the centre line and hit a steel guard rail. The vehicle rolled several times landing on its roof and the driver was ejected. Highway 6 was closed between Greens Road and Fourth Line for approximately five hours while emergency crews were on scene. OPP continue to investigate and is asking anyone who may have witnessed the collision or who may have any information to assist with the investigation to contact them at 1-888-310-1122.


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OPINION

March 3rd, 2021

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Diversity and inclusion are critical to decolonizing Haudenosaunee identity NAHNDA GARLOW

nahnda@tworowtimes.com

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Human DNA is a fascinating science to explore. Each human has a specific code within their DNA that comes directly from their mother, called maternal DNA or mtDNA think of it as your specific genetic branch of the human family tree. According to genetic researchers — each human has 23 pairs of chromosomes within your DNA. These pairs shuffle about each time a new human DNA is created - however mtDNA is not shuffled. It is retained as an exact copy of the maternal DNA in every single person in your direct maternal line. Everyone in your lineage: your mother, brother, sister, aunt, grandmother - will all share the same mtDNA. Quite poetically, we all carry pieces of our mothers inside the very first bit of creation that exists in our bodies. Science groups people together with identical mtDNA into something called haplogroups. A haplogroup is a genetic population group who share genetic ancestry all the way back to where it began. At the very essence of human cellular makeup - we are all matrilineal. It’s a beautiful part of scientific discovery that perfectly compliments the Haudenosaunee historical practise of following the lineage of our mothers in assigning clans and nationhood.

The interesting difference between the two however, is that our Haudenosaunee social history is a story of adoption. Traditionally, if a woman was welcomed into Haudenosaunee society and bore children to a Haudenosaunee male, their children would be adopted and fused into the clan and nationhood of their father. In contrast - a person’s mtDNA is non-transferrable. So while we may claim Haudenosaunee clan membership and nationhood, often a person’s mtDNA will tell a different story. Take for example a man who was born and raised to two Mohawk people from a Mohawk reserve. His parents are Mohawk, his grandparents were Mohawk, but a singular great-grandmother was Scottish. That Mohawk family, three generations down, now carries the mtDNA of that singular Scottish granny. It only takes one female ancestor of variance to alter your haplogroup. Does that make the Mohawk family in this example less Haudenosaunee? On the flip side - what would make someone more Haudenosaunee? If a woman bears the pure mtDNA of Haudenosaunee lineage - and then marries a Jamaican man, bears Jamaican children, who bear Jamaican grandchildren - are they now more Haudenosaunee because of their mtDNA? In contrast - would they be accepted as undisputed

members of clan families and granted nationhood because of the lone Haudenosaunee female ancestor? It’s an interesting thing to think about. At the core of who we are — genetics — women matter so much. But in the social constructs of who we are as communities and nations and clans - the definitions of which woman’s nationhood counts flips and flops depending on who you ask. Are you really a Cayuga or a Delaware in disguise? And who gets the say on who belongs and who doesn’t? Is it adoption, maternal lineage, or social preference that gets you a spot on the clan list? If you look to social media to determine who counts as a Haudenosaunee woman they might even give you a totally different requirement. The waters are muddy and the variance is vast. As we move into International Women’s Day - it is important to examine our own communities and look at how we can smash internal stereotypes on what is required to define someone as a Haudenosaunee woman. What are the standards we place on Haudenosaunee women who bring forth the faces yet to come? What kind of messaging are we as a community giving to them about inclusion, or rather, exclusion when it comes to finding a partner to have children with if they want to retain Haudenosaunee nationhood and clan belonging? And is that messaging good

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for people’s well-being overall? What kind of work are we doing as a community to embrace diverse women? Those who are not born biologically female but emerge as women throughout the course of their lives and self-discovery. Is there a place for them in the Haudenosaunee world today? Do we put out messaging in our community that reinforces cis-gendered ideals and diminishes gender diversity? Does that kind of downplaying or exclusion affect members of our community who are gender diverse? How can we be more conscious as a community in our organizations, departments, businesses and social spaces to make it safe for women of all gender expressions and sexual orientations. And how can we hold space to value the children of women of diverse gender expressions and sexual orientations? They are all Haudenosaunee. These are important decolonization questions for Six Nations and the surrounding region to consider in looking at how to move forward as inclusive and diverse communities - celebrating indigenous women and keeping them safe. If you have stories about how your family, organization or group are working to create inclusive spaces for Haudenosaunee women we’d like to hear from you. Drop us a line: editor@tworowtimes.com.

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March 3rd, 2021

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Update as of:

This page wil be updated daily.

3/2/21 13:30

Date

Update as of:

Six Nations COVID-19 Update Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

This page will be updated daily.

3/2/21 13:30

resolved cases and deaths.

Cases

Currently Hospi talized Currently

Note: Active cases are the number of confirmed cases minus the number of resolved cases and deaths.

Total Cases

Hospitalized

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

116 367 248 248 33 116 44 367 400

Total Cases

Total Resolved

COVID-19 How many people have become iinfected nfected wiwithth COVI D-19 iinn total?

40

Total Deaths

300

300

200

200

100

12

2/24/2021

15

2/27/2021 2/25/2021

2636

2/28/2021 2/26/2021

1212

2/27/2021 3/1/2021

263

3/2/2021

1

2/28/2021

12

3/1/2021

3

Total (Last 7 days) 3/2/2021

1051

Total (Last 7 days)

105

becoming COVID-19? How many new people are becomi ng sisickck wiwithth COVI D-19?

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

Mar 2021

30

30

20

This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak This is an isepiprogressing demic curve,overthistime. shows us how the

outbreak is progressing over time.

20

10

100

Apr 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported 0

2/26/2021 

New Lab 36 confirmed

40 New Lab New confirmed Lab confirmed

Cumulative Cumulative cases cases

400

1000

New Lab confirmed

How many cases have we had in the 2/24/2021 last 7 days? 15 Date 2/25/2021

Note: Active cases are theBlack number of confirmed cases minus the number of Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level:

Active Cases Active

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days?

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Date reported

Oct 2020

Jan 2021

Date reported Nov 2020

Jan 2021

Mar 2021

0 Apr 2020

Jul 2020

Oct 2020

Date reported

Jan 2021

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March 3rd, 2021

6 Dr. Seuss books won't be published for racist images Donate to show your support

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Two arrested, facing drug charges STAFF REPORT

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SIX NATIONS — Police say a child was found sleeping next to a computer tablet with drug residue on it during a search warrant executed at a home on River Road. On February 23, Six Nations Police investigated the home with warrants for Criminal Code and Controlled Drugs and Substances Act violations. When police entered the home they found the sleeping child in a room with fentanyl paraphernalia that was easily accessible

to the child. Police say Six Nations child protection agency Ogwadeni:deo was contacted to assist with the child’s needs. The mother of the child attended the residence and was arrested. Another male was in the home sleeping in a separate room. He was also arrested. As a result of the search the police seized an amount of fentanyl, firearm ammunition they say was not safely stored and a stolen pick up truck. A 24 year old male has been arrested and charged with Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking - Fentanyl, Fail to Provide Necessaries of

Life - Child, Careless Use of ammunition , Tampering with Vehicle Identification Number, Possession of Stolen Property Under $5,000 X2. A 28 year old female was arrested and charged with Fail to Provide Necessaries of Life-Child, Possession of Fentanyl, Careless use of ammunition, Tampering with Vehicle Identification Number and Possession of Stolen Property Under $5,000. The male was held for a formal bail hearing. The female was released on a Form 10 Undertaking. Names are being withheld to protect the identity of the child.

BOSTON — Six Dr. Seuss books — including ``And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street'' and ``If I Ran the Zoo'' — will stop being published because of racist and insensitive imagery, the business that preserves and protects the author's legacy said Tuesday. ``These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,'' Dr. Seuss Enterprises told The Associated Press in a statement that coincided with the late author and illustrator's birthday. ``Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises' catalogue represents and supports all communities and families,'' it said. The other books affected are ``McElligot's Pool,'' ``On Beyond Zebra!,'' ``Scrambled Eggs Super!,'' and ``The Cat's Quizzer.'' The decision to cease publication and sales of the books was made last year after months of discussion, the company, which was founded by Seuss' family, told AP. ``Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalogue of titles,'' it said. In ``And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,'' an Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat, holding chopsticks, and eating from a bowl. ``If I Ran the Zoo'' includes a drawing of two bare-footed African men wearing what appear to be grass skirts with their hair tied above their heads. Books by Dr. Seuss — who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904 — have been translated into dozens of languages as well as in braille and are sold in more than 100 countries. He died in 1991. He remains popular, earning an estimated $33 million before taxes in 2020, up from just $9.5

million five years ago, the company said. Forbes listed him No. 2 on its highest-paid dead celebrities of 2020, behind only the late pop star Michael Jackson. Random House Children Books, Dr. Seuss' publisher, issued a brief statement Tuesday: ``We respect the decision of Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) and the work of the panel that reviewed this content last year, and their recommendation.'' As adored as Dr. Seuss is by millions around the world for the positive values in many of his works, including environmentalism and tolerance, there has been increasing criticism in recent years over the way Blacks, Asians and others are drawn in some of his most beloved children's books, as well as in his earlier advertising and propaganda illustrations. The National Education Association, which founded Read Across America Day in 1998 and deliberately aligned it with Geisel's birthday, has for several years deemphasized Seuss and encouraged a more diverse reading list for children. School districts across the country have also moved away from Dr. Seuss, prompting Loudoun County, Virginia, schools just outside Washington, D.C., to douse rumours last month that they were banning the books entirely. ``Research in recent years has revealed strong racial undertones in many books written/illustrated by Dr. Seuss,'' the school district said in a statement. In 2017, a school librarian in Cambridge, Massachusetts, criticized a gift of 10 Seuss books from first lady Melania Trump, saying many of his works were ``steeped in racist propaganda, caricatures, and harmful stereotypes.'' In 2018, a Dr. Seuss museum in his hometown of Springfield removed a mural that included an Asian stereotype. ``The Cat in the Hat,'' one of Seuss' most popular books, has received criticism, too, but will continue to be published for now. Dr. Seuss Enterprises, however, said it is ``committed to listening and learning and will continue

to review our entire portfolio.'' The move to cease publication of the books drew immediate reaction on social media from those who called it another example of ``cancel culture.'' ``We've now got foundations book burning the authors to whom they are dedicated. Well done, everyone,'' conservative commentator and author Ben Shapiro tweeted. Others approved of the decision. ``The books we share with our children matter. Books shape their world view and tell them how to relate to the people, places, and ideas around them. As grown-ups, we have to examine the worldview we are creating for our children, including carefully re-examining our favourites,'' Rebekah Fitzsimmons, an assistant teaching professor at Carnegie Mellon University, tweeted. Numerous other popular children's series have been criticized in recent years for alleged racism. In the 2007 book, ``Should We Burn Babar?,'' the author and educator Herbert R. Kohl contended that the ``Babar the Elephant'' books were celebrations of colonialism because of how the title character leaves the jungle and later returns to ``civilize'' his fellow animals. One of the books, ``Babar's Travels,'' was removed from the shelves of a British library in 2012 because of its alleged stereotypes of Africans. Critics also have faulted the ``Curious George'' books for their premise of a white man bringing home a monkey from Africa. And Laura Ingalls Wilder's portrayals of Native Americans in her ``Little House On the Prairie'' novels have been faulted so often that the American Library Association removed her name in 2018 from a lifetime achievement award it gives out each year. The association still gives out the Geisel Award for ``the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year.''


TWO ROW TIMES

March 3rd, 2021

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March 3rd, 2021

Author taking a 'breather' after closing the book on Trickster trilogy CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

For author Eden Robinson, saying goodbye to the ``Trickster'' trilogy feels like a ``mutual breakup.'' For the past decade, Robinson says the supernatural book series had been occupying her mind from the moment she wakes up, to those last hazy thoughts while drifting off to sleep. As ``Return of the Trickster'' hit shelves Tuesday, Robinson, who is from the Haisla and Heiltsuk First Nations, said the culmination of her coming-of-age tale about a young Indigenous man grappling with his magical family history has created a conscious void. ``It's left a huge hole where I wake up and go, 'Oh, yeah, that's done.' And go to sleep and go, 'Oh, I don't really have a book yet.''' Normally, Robinson

Eden Robinson has been writing the Trickster Trilogy for the last ten years. The author says she is taking a break from writing as CBC pulls the plug on the second season of Trickster due to the conPHOTO OBTAINED BY TRT troversial Michelle Latimer.

said she'd move on to her next writing project. But for now, the Kitamaat Village, B.C.-based writer feels like she could use a ``breather'' as she closes the book on ``Trickster'' amid the fallout from the cancellation of the TV adaptation of her series. ``It's like a mutual breakup,'' said Robinson, 53. ``You have to be alone

by yourself.'' In January, CBC pulled the plug on the second season of the ``Trickster'' series, which premiered to positive buzz last fall, after a CBC News report questioned co-creator Michelle Latimer's claims of Indigenous identity. The public broadcaster said the decision to end ``Trickster'' was made in

consultation with members of the creative team, including Robinson, who in a statement said seeing a young, Indigenous cast ``soar'' was ``one of the best parts of 2020'' for her. Ahead of the show's debut last October, Robinson told The Canadian Press she kept picturing the actors as their characters

while writing ``Return of the Trickster.'' Robinson said releasing the book with the knowledge that those visions won't be realized feels ``surreal.'' She declined to comment further on the cancellation of the CBC series. But Robinson she's had her fill of the film and TV world for a while. ``That was enough,'' she said. ``I'm done.'' Robinson's preferred medium is the page. But in crafting the supernatural final showdown in ``Return of the Trickster,'' the author said she sought to emulate the oral tradition of one-upmanship that shaped the trickster stories she was raised on. ``When I'm listening to two storytellers battling back and forth, it's always thrilling,'' said Robinson. ``I was hoping to have that same sense in the last book, that we've gone as far up as we can go.'' The final installment of the trilogy raises the

stakes for protagonist Jared _ who like his biological father, is a shape-shifting, dimension-trotting trickster _ as he faces off against his ogress aunt and her pack of organ-gobbling coy wolves. Jared is joined in this battle by a motley crew of mythical beings, including a witch, a sasquatch and an octopus monster. Robinson said Jared's strength lies not only in his supernatural abilities, but the connections he's made throughout the series. She feels the same is true of her own success, which she said wouldn't be possible without the support of her community. ``With the Haisla and Heiltsuk, you are an individual, but you're also thoroughly enmeshed in your community,'' said Robinson. ``If you're given a big name, you have a lot of status, but you also have a lot of crushing responsibility.''

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March 3rd, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

The Haudenosaunee People have had a long tradition of law and justice in their communities, and a tradition of hearing from all of the People in the community, on issues of importance. In that spirit, the Justice Department is reaching out to the you as we develop our strategic plan, which will guide us through the next five years of delivering services to Six Nations’ members. We will be asking questions to understand the community's expectations for how the Justice department delivers its' services and does its' work. The information we gather will inform that work moving forward. We invite you to share your thoughts by filling out the community survey through the link below https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QDZT8HT

The results of the survey will be discussed at a virtual town hall meeting on March 24, 2021 6pm to 8pm. Hard copies will be distributed to all households for those who do not wish to do the survey online.

Contact Jayne Mallin mallinjayne@gmail.com for more information

13


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March 3rd, 2021

ESTHETICS

WORK READY INDIGENOUS TRADES EXPERIENCE

COURSE STARTS MARCH 22, 2021

APRIL 12, 2021

Are you interested in a career in esthetics?

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Work Ready Indigenous Trades Experience [W.R.I.T.E.] is a 3-month multi-disciplinary trades program, providing participants with a blended learning environment of theory, safety certifications, and hands-on training.

COURSE OUTLINE This Certificate program provides the participant with the necessary skills to become a Professional Esthetician, as well as the tools and confidence to open your own spa. Listed below are the courses being provided: 

Professional Basic Pedicure/Spa Pedicure  Esthetics Body Care  Spa Business Intro  Esthetics-Waxing  Esthetics Make-Up Artistry Level 1 Professional Basic Manicure/Spa Manicure  Skin Care

The program consists of multiple Union and Non-Union trades organizations providing meaningful training that will allow participants to make an informed decision about a career path in the trades. Students will complete the majority of the training at OSTTC’s Multi-Trades building in Ohsweken, as well as travelling to various employer sites for workplace training. The various trades involved in the program that will be assisting in delivering training both at OSTTC and on their worksites include: Welding, Electrical, Heavy Equipment Operator, Boilermaker, Insulators, Steamfitters & Plumbers, Construction, Millwright, Automotive, and Safety Training.

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 Grade 12 or equivalent Comfortable lifting heavy weight, manual labour, and working in all weather conditions  18 Years of Age or Older  Have exemplary marks in Math & Science (Upgrading may be required)  Complete an Academic Assessment

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March 3rd, 2021

SPORTS

TWO ROW TIMES

15

know the score.

Lou Sockalexis: The original Cleveland “Indian” JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The first Indigenous player to break baseball’s “Red Barrier” was Louis Sockalexis, a 25-year-old member of the Penobscot Nation of Maine. He learned the game while attending a residential school. He was born on the Penobscot reservation on October 25th, 1871. Louis (Sox) Sockalexis, a pitcher and fielder, played in his first professional baseball game on April 22nd, 1897, suiting up for the Cleveland Spiders. He was an impressive-looking man with size and a ready smile. In an interview, Baseball Hall of Fame manager, Hughie Jennings, once referred to Sockalexis specifically. “No other player (besides Louis Sockalexis) ever crowded so many remarkable accomplishments into such a short time,” he said. Sockalexis played only two pro seasons with the Spiders before the team disbanded in 1899, and moved but left his mark as the first American Native to play professional baseball. But soon there would be others. According to the team website, after the Spiders franchise owner moved some of his best players to another league, they became the Cleveland Browns but would change its name again to the Cleveland Indians in memorial to Sackalexis after his death in 1919. The controversy over the team name lately had caused today’s owners of

Ed Pinnance was from Walpole Island and played for Philly in PHOTO OBTAINED BY TRT 1903.

the franchise to change its name. One of the suggestions being floated is a return to the name the “Cleveland Spiders.” Many others would follow using baseball as a means of escape from the reservation. Bill Phyle, a Lakota, was born in 1875, was a pitcher/third baseman from 1898 to 1899 for the Chicago Orphans franchise, then traded to the New York Giants in 1901, and then the St. Louis Cardinals in 1906. On September 17, 1898, he pitched a shutout on his Major League debut with a 9-0 win over the Washington Senators. After retiring as an active player, Phyle became an umpire, and died in Los Angeles, in 1953, at age 78. In 1903 there was Ed Pinnance, an Ojibwe from Walpole Island, nicknamed “Peanuts” who pitched for the Philadelphia Athletics. In 162 games, he finished the season with a 2.57 ERA. Lou Bruce was a pitcher and fielder, a pureblood Mohawk born at St. Regis, NY, January 16th, 1877.  According to a contemporary news article which appeared in the

Blue Jays debut for 2021 JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

Toronto Star, “Not even the redoubtable Jimmy Casey, in the heyday of his popularity in Toronto, was ever as warm a favourite as Louis Bruce, the clever hurler and utility man of the Toronto Club. Bruce is a natural ballplayer. While small in stature, he has tremendous strength and stamina, and unquestioned ability. His remarkable pitching since he played with the Toronto Club has created a sensation. He is also one of the leading batsmen of the Canadian Eastern League and probably without a peer as an emergency hitter.” He played in only 30 pro games but is remembered more for his Toronto years. Bruce was known as a two-way player for the Toronto Maple Leafs of what is now the Inter-county Baseball League from 1901 to 1904. In 1902, as a pitcher, he went 18-2, and the next year, he was 12-4. As a hitter, he was over .300 from 1901 to 1903 with a peak in 1903 when he hit .356 in 100 games. He played pro or semipro between 1900 and 1907, and is said to have saved up his money to finance his education. He came from a line of Mohawk Chiefs including his father John, who served in the Canadian Military as part of a contingent of 60 Mohawks in the expedition that attempted to rescue General Charles Gordon when he was besieged in Khartoum, Sudan. John Bruce served as a boatman, won two medals, and traveled the world. Lou Bruce died in 1968.

TWO ROW TIMES

TORONTO - The 2021 edition of the Toronto Blue Jays debuted a lot of new faces and some favourites from last season this past weekend. The COVID-19 situation has made the league revamp its entire schedule, but the preseason is now officially open as the Blue Jays took on the New York Yankees Sunday afternoon. The Jays came out with a 6-4 win on 10 hits, and one error. T.J. Zeuch earned the win on the mound as they displayed some very encouraging results, especially from their new blood. Among the veterans returning is a trim and ready Vlad Guerriel who admits letting himself get out of shape last season and arrived at training

Rough Buff

By Jim Windle BUFFALO — The Buffalo Sabres are doing everything but scoring as of late. Following back-to-back 3-0 losses against the Philadelphia Flyers over the weekend, the Sabres are in last place in the east with a 6-10 and three record for 15 points, one point behind New Jersey who holds two games in hand. The loss dropped the Sabres to 2-5-1 since returning from a 15-day pause on Feb. 15. Buffalo will play the Rangers at Madison Square Gardens Tuesday, March 2nd.

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camp this year lighter and faster. The same can be said about first baseman Rowdy Tellez who looks leaner this year as well. The Jays took flight early, scoring two runs in the top of the first inning thanks to a ground-rule double to right field by Rowdy Tellez bringing home Bo Bichette and Marcus Semien. Jonathan Davis came home in the top of the second for a 3-0 Toronto lead. Davis singled to centre in the third inning scoring Guerrero and sending Tellez to second. The Jays kept the ball rolling in their direction in the fourth inning when Guerrero singled to left to score Otto Lopez for a 5-0 lead. The Yankees got on the scoreboard in the bottom of the fourth, thanks to a fielding error by Lopez

and it was 5-1. Then the Yankees exploded with a 386 foot home run to right field to make it 5-3followed by another home run to deep right field smacked by Mike Tauchman and it was now a 5-4 contest with the Yankees coming on. It was another long-ball in the top of the seventh inning that new Jay, Logan Warmoth hammered for the Jays to put a little distance between them. Three Toronto putouts in the bottom of the inning salted the 6-4 Toronto win. Looking ahead, Tuesday, Mar. 2nd, the Jays take on Phillie, Wednesday, the Yankees return. The pre-season will see most teams play daily until the regular season begins April 1, 2021 through October 3rd when the playoffs begin.

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16

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March 3rd, 2021

Maple Leafs love February JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

J O B Position

Employer/Location

B O A R D Term

Salary

Closing Date

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Maintenance Housing Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Director of Care Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Intake and Crisis Response Worker Child & Family Services, Social Services Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Resident Support Attendant Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract (6-month) TBD March 3, 2021 Intake Team Member Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Personal Support Worker Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD March 3, 2021 (multiple positions) Registered Nurse – Charge Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD March 3, 2021 Cultural Language Instructor Child Care Services, Social Services Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Registered Practical Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Supportive Housing Case Manager Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Contract TBD March 3, 2021 Senior Financial Analyst Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 Manager of Resources Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD March 10, 2021 Support Staff Child Care Services, Social Services Contract TBD March 10, 2021 Community Support Worker Community Support Services, Health Services Part-time TBD March 10, 2021 Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services Contract (6-month) TBD March 10, 2021 Registered Nurse – Diabetes Education Diabetes Education Program, Health Services Contract (maternity) TBD March 10, 2021 Health Transformation Community Administration, Health Services Contract TBD March 10, 2021 Engagement Coordinator Urban Unit Assistant Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD March 10, 2021 Cannabis Addiction Outreach Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Contract TBD March 10, 2021 Worker (2 positions) COVID Response Nurse School Nurses, Health Services Contract TBD March 10, 2021 (multiple positions) Scheduler LTC/HCC, Health Services Full-time TBD March 10, 2021 Registered Practical Nurse LTC/HCC, Health Services Part-time TBD March 10, 2021 Community Educator Health Promotions, Health Services Full-time TBD March 10, 2021 General Counsel to SNGREC Administration, Central Administration Contract TBD March 10, 2021 Supportive Housing Case Manager Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Contract TBD March 10, 2021 Secretary/Clerk Child Care Services, Social Services Part-time TBD March 17, 2021 Lands Use Officer Lands Resources Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 Maintenance Worker Stoneridge, Social Services Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 Personal Support Worker (2 positions) Personal Support Services, Health Services Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 Registered Early Childhood Educator Child Care Services, Social Services Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 (multiple positions) Gedeo Clinician Community Crisis, Health Services Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 Financial CIC Benefits Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD March 17, 2021 Assistant Water Plant Operator Water/Sewer, Public Works Contract TBD March 17, 2021 Administrative Assistant Egwodiyadagenda Land Based Healing Centre, Health Services Contract TBD March 17, 2021 Screener Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD March 17 2021 Housekeeper (2 positions) Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part-time TBD March 17, 2021 SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Casual Bus Driver’s GRETI, Ogwehoweh Skil s and Trades Training Centre Part-time $20.00-$30.00/hour On-going recruitment Special Project Coordinator Ogwehoweh Skil s and Trades Training Centre (OSTTC) Full-time, contract TBD Until filled Children’s Mental Health Worker Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time $47,641.50 - $67,837.50 March 4, 2021 Policy Analyst Writer Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Contract $47,641.50 - $67,837.50 March 4, 2021 Peacekeepers Coordinator Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time $21.25/hour March 4, 2021 Manager of Human Resources Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time $51,313.50-73,346.50 March 11, 2021 Manager, Business Process Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time TBD March 3, 2021 & Student Systems Development Officer – Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time TBD March 5, 2021 Institutional Advancement Payroll/Personnel Grand River Enterprises Unknown TBD Until filled Administrator Assistant Security PM Shift Supervisor Grand River Enterprises Full-time TBD Until filled The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. Only local positions are posted in the paper. For more positions in the surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn.com. Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

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TORONTO - To say the Toronto Maple Leafs are hot, is like saying Ghost Peppers are “kinda spicy”. February was very kind to the Leafs, but the fire started in January with a 4-3 win over the Edmonton Oilers, Jan 28th. They picked another point on the 30th with an OT loss versus the Oilers. Then came a very busy February when they took 19 of a possible 24 points into March1st, which they also won 3-0 against the Oilers. All three Leaf goalies have been great throughout. The Toronto Maple Leafs were still without goalie Frederik Anderson in the lineup, when the Leafs went up against the Oilers of Edmonton, Sunday afternoon. It was a battle of first versus second in the North division and in the end, the Leafs opened more distance between the two in the North Division rivalry.  Jack Campbell got the

call to duty in the Leafs net and turned in a hard earned, 30 save, 4-0 shutout win. In fact the Leafs have been hot as a pistol in February with nine wins and two losses. Saturday night’s game was a fast moving and close checking game with neither side giving the other very little time with the puck making for a fast game. William Nylander continued his good fortune in front of the net by scoring Toronto’s first goal after netting the tying and the winning OT goal the night before.  Nylander nestled one just inside the stick-side post assisted by Mitch Marner, to open the scoring at 14:13 of the first period. Marner added one of his own with a powerplay goal at 15:50 from John Tavaris and Joe Thornton, who was iffy to start the game after a lower body injury. Around halfway into the second, Leaf defenceman Jimmy Vesey dove headlong to poke a loose puck in his own zone up to Vesey who relayed to

a speeding Jason Spezza who made it a 3-0 game. Campbell’s shutout was nearly lost later in the frame when he was helped out by the crossbar, but the shutout remained still intact. At 13:34 of the third, Jack Hyman scored his fifth of the season from Pierre Engvall and Jake Muzzin with a rocket wrist shot to the top gloveside, for the 4-0 final and Campbell’s third shut out of the season. The win puts the Leafs firmly in first place in the North division with 16 wins, four losses, and two OT losses for 34 points as of Monday morning. Edmonton falls to 14-9-0 for 28 points, and a game in hand.  Toronto’s dominance of Edmonton continues Wednesday before opening a two-game stand against the Vancouver Canucks, then eastward to Winnipeg for three.  Over this past month and a few days, the Toronto Maple Leafs have outscored their opponents, 60-28.

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March 3rd, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

17

W

comm

VIRTUAL WELLNESS SERIES

presents

“TRADITIONAL CEREMONIES AS MEDICINE” with

TOM PORTER

JOIN US! SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2021

3 PM

Special guest Tom Porter shares his knowledge about the importance of attending our traditional ceremonies & how they came to be! PARTICIPANTS: Pre-register by emailing sncoas@sixnations.ca to be entered into a draw to win 1 of 10 Wellness Boxes!* NOTE: This event will be live-streamed on ZOOM and Facebook, encouraging you to enjoy with those within your household.

* Registration closes 1 hour before start of event

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TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

March 3rd, 2018 2021 NOVEMBER 28TH,

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituary

Obituary

MARTIN: Norma Gail nee: Henhawk

Bradley, Robert G. of North Tonawanda, entered into rest on February 23, 2021. Beloved husband of Vivian J. (nee Maracle) Bradley; devoted father of Scott Maracle, Michele Maracle, Robert (Ashie John) Bradley, Melissa (Pamela) Bradley, and Michael (Rachelle Reuben) Bradley and the late Tracy (Guy) General, the late Monica Maracle and the late William Longboat; survived by several loving grandchildren and great grandchildren; dear brother of Judy (Danny) Montour, William (Brenda) Bradley, James (late Lynn) Bradley and Ken (Sue) Bradley. Relatives and friends may visit the LOMBARDO FUNERAL HOME (Northtowns Chapel) 885 Niagara Falls Blvd. on Saturday from 3-8 PM, where a service will be held at 7 PM. There will be visitation at the Hyde & Mott Chapel, 60 Main St. S., Hagersville on Sunday from 6-8 p.m. (must register by calling 905-768-5733). A private family service & burial will be held on Monday, March 1, 2021 at Hyde & Mott Chapel. www.rhbanderson.com

Peacefully at home on Wednesday February 24, 2021 at the age of 72 years. Beloved wife of 54 years to Cecil Martin. Loving mother of Kerry (Joy), Nancy, Tammy (Derrick), and Blayne (Rachel). Dear grandma of Paul, John, Chris, Colt, Levi, Becky, Mickenzie, Connor, Neo, Corey, and Jody. Great grandma to Kairo “Gussy”, Diesel “Dio”, and Iceal “Iceman”. Sister of Helen, John, Willie, and Florence “DeeDee”. Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by parents Roy & Phyllis (Hess) Henhawk, and siblings Roy Jr., Ozzie, Mary, Jean, Irma, Roger, and Rod. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at a later date. The family extends a sincere thank you to the Six Nations Dialysis Unit, doctors, nurses, and personal support workers for their care. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Six Nations Dialysis Unit (make cheques payable to St. Joseph’s Healthcare) c/o 1745 Chiefswood Rd., Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0, attn: Yolanda Berghegen. Arrangements by Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken. www.rhbanderson. com “She now has her angel wings.”

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TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

March 3rd, 2021 DECEMBER 19TH, 2018

CLUES ACROSS 1. One of Noah’s sons 5. Openings 11. Rising from the dead 14. Expressions for humorous effect 15. North American country 18. Flowed over 19. Tags 21. Long-lasting light bulb 23. Off-Broadway theater award 24. Khoikhoi peoples 28. Beloved movie pig 29. South Dakota 30. Tai language 32. Get free of 33. Afflict 35. Transmits genetic information from DNA 36. Commercials 39. Digits 41. Expression of sympathy 42. Bleats 44. Swiss Nobel Peace Prize winner 46. Vegetable 47. Turf 49. Disorganized in character 52. Takes 56. Rules over 58. More fervid 60. Sweet drink 62. Cry loudly 63. A friendly nation CLUES DOWN 1. A title of respect in India 2. His and __ 3. Employee stock owner-

19 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Expect to be in high demand this week, Aries. You have the time and energy to give to others, so make the most of each chance to lend someone a helping hand. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Now is a good time to focus on your relationships, Taurus. There may be a close friend who can use a little more attention from a confidante and you can fill that role.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 There is work to be done, Gemini. If your work space is a tad chaotic, then hunker down somewhere less hectic. This can provide the right environment for focus.

ship plan 4. A type of bond (abbr.) 5. Acting as if you are 6. Affirmative 7. Not caps 8. Type of medication 9. Monetary unit 10. Private school in New York 12. Small stream 13. A person of wealth 16. Exclude 17. Someone who vouches for you 20. Vegetable part 22. Gov’t lawyer 25. Term to address a woman 26. Swiss river 27. About senator 29. __ Paulo, city

Answers for March 3rd, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

31. Native American tribe 34. “Titanic” actor 36. Campaign for students’ rights (abbr.) 37. Capital of Senegal 38. Slang for military leader 40. Football’s big game 43. Women who threw themselves on funeral pyres 45. Equally 48. Forest animal 50. Heavy stoves 51. Releasing hormone (abbr.) 53. Song 54. Type of pickle 55. Offer in return for money 57. Soviet Socialist Republic 58. Burns wood (abbr.) 59. Beloved singer Charles 61. Three-toed sloth

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, make a habit of finding the silver lining to any situation. This shift in attitude can bring more positivity and sunshine into your life, particularly when you need it most.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Shift your focus to your home life, Leo. Find various ways to make things more pleasant at home so it can be the respite that it should be. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 You are usually better at focusing on the tasks at hand than most other astrological signs, Virgo. Don’t be hard on yourself if you get a tad distracted in the next few days.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Get a firm grasp on your finances this week, Libra. Start browsing your bank accounts so you have a better idea of your spending. This way you can better plan for the future. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Normally you are very good at keeping your emotions in check, Scorpio. However, letting others see what’s beneath the surface can be beneficial to you in the weeks to come. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Take your foot off of the accelerator, Sagittarius. You don’t have to race to the finish line; enjoy the scenery for a change. Stop as many times as you can along the way. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, no matter how much time you want to devote to your personal goals, you just may find that other activities require much more attention than you anticipated.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, don’t be surprised if you have your patience tested a bit this week, especially at the workplace. You’ll find a way to come out shining, however. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Take a big, deep breath and focus on all the good things in your life, Pisces. This will help you ride out any rough spots that crop up.

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TWO ROW TIMES

March 3rd, 2021

Since 1994 the Indigenous Diabetes Health ,

Circle (IDHC) worked to build diabetes wellness capacity for Indigenous people in Ontario.

Our solution is conscious, holistic and long-term — seven generations long. We express Indigenous culture and spirituality in all that we do. Our approach expresses Indigenous power. Women are agents of change. Our creation story was given to us by Woman. In our creation story, Woman will remember the teachings first, awaken first, heal first, stand strong and speak her voice again. And so today at IDHC, women play key roles in the healing of our communities — with the support of our men — as was prophesied. We prayed for change, we hoped for change, and we worked toward change. And now we are seeing change. This may be a challenging and stressful time for many Indigenous people and communities due to social, political, and economic factors that exacerbate many pre-existing problems. The emerging issues from COVID-19 have a significant impact on Indigenous peoples who have co-morbid medical conditions such as diabetes, as well as people who need to work while also having to care for their family members. Look to IDHC for community collaborations, programs, resources and a dedicated team of frontline workers that remain at your service.

Grandmother Renée Thomas-Hill

Northern Region Sudbury, ON 289-668-0551

Southern Region Hamilton ON 905-388-6010

Eastern Region Curve Lake First Na�on ON 613-697-6604

Central Region Barrie, ON 705-220-8910

Western Region Ohsweken ON 519-750-0893

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