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SIX NATIONS — SNYC will be at the Six Nations Indigenous People’s Day festival in Ohsweken at the Six Nations Fairgrounds on Friday. The event begins at noon. For more information on the group’s roundtable discussions or surveys you can email sixnationsyouth@gmail.com or check out the group Six Nations Youth Council PHOTO BY NAHNDA GARLOW - SNYC on Facebook.

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June 19th, 2019

LOCAL

keeping you informed.

’What kind of leadership should we have?’ Six Nations Youth Council looking for feedback Inclusivity, diversity and culture the centre of SNYC’s ongoing youth advocacy work NAHNDA GARLOW

nahnda@tworowtimes.com

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SIX NATIONS — Six Nations Youth Council (SNYC) will be surveying guests at the Indigenous People’s Day celebration in Ohsweken on Friday — looking for feedback on what the community’s youth want in their community leaders. SNYC members Felecia White and Dean Hill spoke with TRT and said the council members are inviting youth in the community to have their voices and concerns heard during a roundtable discussion in the Dajoh Youth and Elders Centre in Ohsweken during Friday’s festivities. “Our main questions right now are about leadership. Our first question is asking what their definition of leadership is — if they are seeing that — and if not what they want to see in our community

for youth leadership. Do they want youth more in leadership do they want elders more? Rather than telling them what’s going to happen I want to ask them what they want to happen,” said Hill. White says those youth interested in giving feedback can complete the surveys and bring them into the SNYC roundtable discussions inside Dajoh for more information. Completed surveys will also be entered into a draw for an iPad. The SNYC is currently about 25 members ranging in age from 10 years old up to 29. “We’re a grassroots organization providing a voice for our youth that helps navigate toward impacts that are happening in our community as well.” said White. “Our portfolios are based around the medicine wheel and then within those categories we break them down into four sections: Emotional looks at emotional regu-

lation and mental health including LGBTQ matters; Intellectual, with education and knowledge; Spiritual includes language and culture and Physical looks at health and fitness with nutrition and the environment”. White says the hope of the youth council is to expand and incorporate issues that all council members are passionate about with a focus on inclusivity. Hill says the council members focus on advocacy for the subjects they are focused on. “We’re trying to figure out here what is most important to the youth down here right now and then cater to that and well slowly build onto each one of those aspects,” said Hill. “Right now we’re taking an advocate route where we’re taking in all the information that the youth are giving us and we can create a plan based off that information.” “Our original plan was to be as inclusive as possi-

ble so that we can get other input to see what our youth wanted in a youth council so we can use that toward bettering our community,” said White. To date the youth council has worked with the Community Plan team to assist in getting feedback from the young people for what kind of future they see for Six Nations as well as addressing current needs. They were also involved in planning and hosting the ReconciliACTION Anti-Racism Symposium in 2018. Hill said he joined the youth council because of a passion for leading change in the areas of health and fitness. “We need healthier eating,” said Hill. “Various chronic diseases among our members like Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease is very rampant down here. I know to target those two things definitely starts with the way we eat down here and physical fitness in general to build a more healthy

populace.” White says mental health concerns in young people is what brought her out to advocate with the youth council. “I recently did a documentary called not one more on youth suicide in our community and from there it really got an attachment with mental health supports and emotional regulation. I did presentations in school with my mom and health services that actually touched on the emotional regulation portion and helping youth identify their emotions before responding with them.” White identifies as a member of the LBGTQIA community and said that it was her personal discovery of her identity that also led her to advocate for inclusivity at Six Nations. “It’s not something I talked about with my friends. I realized that nobody among my friends wanted to talk about it,

nobody wanted to discuss it, nobody even wanted to know about it. I wanted to find a way for me to feel comfortable — and then on top of that I wanted to find a way for our youth to feel comfortable because I have cousins, little siblings and little cousins and they have these same feelings but they don’t have a place to feel like they belong,” said White.“I wanted to be able to provide an outlet for our youth as well not just within my family but for our other youth to have that outlet for acceptance.” SNYC will be at the Six Nations Indigenous People’s Day festival in Ohsweken at the Six Nations Fairgrounds on Friday. The event begins at noon. For more information on the group’s roundtable discussions or surveys you can email sixnationsyouth@gmail.com or check out the group Six Nations Youth Council SNYC on Facebook.

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June 19th, 2019

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June 19th, 2019

Indigenous “Signs of Welcome” unveiled at Hamilton Health Sciences NAHNDA GARLOW

nahnda@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

HAMILTON — New signs honouring the Indigenous territories where Hamilton Health Service providers treat their patients were unveiled at the Ron Joyce Chidlren’s Health Centre on June 13. The signs feature the works of local Indigenous artists Jay Havens, Philip Cote, Arnold Jacobs and Tracey Anthony. Officials with HHS say the installa-

A sign of land acknowledgement.

tions, known as “Signs of Welcome” are to “create a hospital environment that is welcoming and respectful of Indigenous culture and heritage.” Along with the signs of welcome, HHS developed

NATIONAL

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY FRIDAY

JUNE 21

The City of Brampton celebrates National Indigenous Peoples Day with performance, dance, storytelling, and more. Presented by The Indigenous Network.

12:30PM - 2PM

Ceremony and Community Performance

6PM - 10PM

Entertainment, including DJ Classic Roots and iskwē

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a land acknowledgement statement in cooperation with local Indigenous communities — which will be on permanent display along with the art. “It is a privilege to provide care on lands that Indigenous peoples have called home for thousands of years. We recognize and respect the presence and stewardship of all Indigenous peoples as keepers of this land,” reads the land acknowledgement. HHS officials say the art and land acknowledgements will be on display both in physical signage and digital signage throughout the HHS service facilities. Six Nations Chief Ava Hill of Six Nations of the Grand River, and Pat Mandy representing Chief R. Stacey Laforme of Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were in attendance to acknowledge the installations. “The Signs of Welcome are about more than displaying beautiful artwork,” says Rob MacIsaac, HHS President and CEO. “It’s

Arnold Jacobs – Deliverance of Sky Woman. Depicts Sky Woman, the mother goddess, descending PHOTO SUBMITTED to earth and on the back of Turtle Island.

about our organization getting better at listening to and learning from Indigenous communities.” MacIsaac said the request to make HHS more welcoming to Indigenous people came up through community engagement. ABOUT THE SIGNS OF WELCOME ARTISTS

Jay Havens – Elder with Smudge Bowl. Detail of a wall mural from Makayla’s Room, HHS’ first Indigenous family room at McMaster Children’s Hospital. Jay is a multi-disciplinary artist of Haudenosaunee-Mohawk and Scottish-Canadian ancestry, and a proud member of the

Six Nations of the Grand River, Bear Clan. Philip Cote – Moccasins. Adapted from the Moccasin Identifier Project, which aims to create a visual reminder to recognize and honour traditional territory of Indigenous peoples. Some of these images have been engraved into stone walls at Trillium Park (Ontario Place). Philip is Shawnee, Lakota, Potawatomi and Ojibway from Moose Deer Point First Nation. Arnold Jacobs – Deliverance of Sky Woman. Depicts Sky Woman, the mother goddess, descending to earth and on the back of Turtle Island, which becomes her home. Arnold is an Onondaga artist raised

within the traditional culture and language of Six Nations of the Grand River territory. Tracey Anthony – Turtle and Seven Generations. Includes the image of a turtle with a feather on its back depicting seven segments. This reflects the Seven Generations principle that the decisions we make today should result in a sustainable world seven generations into the future. The four legs represent the Four Directions such as those found in the Medicine Wheel. Tracey’s mother’s is Mississauga (Ojibway) from Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation and his father was Delaware from the Six Nations of the Grand River.


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June 19th, 2019

Dumped containers test positive for methamphetamine STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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BRANTFORD — Brantford Police say liquids recovered from barrels that were illegally dumped in the city February have been identified as drug lab byproducts of methamphetamine — and were likely byproducts of an illegal controlled drug lab. In a statment police say four separate incidents of illegally dumped material were reported in February. Two initial location were in the area of Spalding Ave and Golf Road. Another two locations were discovered a few dyes later int area of Edge Street and Glenwood Drive. All four locations contained the liquid byproducts and samples were went away for testing. Those samples tested positively as meth byproducts. Now police are sending out a warning to the public — saying not to approach any similar con-

The illegal dumping found in February has been confirmed to PHOTO SUBMITTED contain methamphetamine by tests.

Unit is continuing to investigate. Anyone with information about the illegally dumped material is asked to contact Sgt. Greg Stanley at 519-7560113 ext. 2286 or call Crimestoppers at 1-800222-TIPS.

tainers or illegal dumps similar to those discovered in February. Instead police are warning residents to contact police, the fire department or city officials to report the location of the dump site. The BPS Street Crime

Youth Life Promotion & Children’s Mental Health

Summer Camp July 29th

Ages 7-9

July 30th & 31st Ages 12-18

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Soapstone Carving

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Registration Fair: June 25th Social Services gym 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

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June 19th, 2019

OPINION editor@tworowtimes.com

Just how Canadian are the Raptors By Chezney Martin Earlier this week on Monday, the Toronto Raptors rode through hundreds of thousands of fans during their championship parade atop a double-decker bus. Enormous crowds of people lined the streets and packed Nathan Phillips Square next to City Hall to watch the team hoist the Larry O’Brien trophy after winning the NBA Finals last week. The city was celebrating the Raptors first eastern conference championship and first major championship in more than 20 years. And very quickly the win became a win for “Canada.” Headlines read “Canadian victory” after words like historic and monumental. The truth is that the Raptors are the only professional basketball team in the league that is based out of Canada. That is fact. But another fact is that one of the faces of the Raptors win, Kawhi Leonard, is American. In July of 2018, it was released that upon negotiations of trading Leonard for DeMar DeRozan with the Spurs, Leonard had no desire to play in Toronto. Kyle Lowry, another fan favourite, is also American and was born in Philadelphia. So taking a look at the Raptors 20182019 listing, it’s very easy to notice that out of the entire roster, none are listed as Canadian. A talent scout was reported saying that “Canada's first-ever NBA title will change the tone around basketball from coast to coast.” What is hindering about that statement is that the scout is saying that a team comprised of American players will change the tone for Canada as well. But what about Canadian basketball players? Looking at a listing online finds that there are only 13 in the NBA and none of them play for Toronto. Thus, Canada is taking credit for the efforts of athletes that aren’t Canadian. So rather than labelling the Raptors victory as “Canadian,” it should be labelled as a triumph for the only franchise that is based out of Canada. Maybe the credit should also go directly to the players as individual athletes that worked together and brought themselves to the word stage through sheer determination and physical

prowess at their sport. Maybe the higher ups that offered contracts to those athletes to sign with Toronto to create a killer line up should get a little recognition too. Many of the men that have flourished in the NBA are also men of colour. And they are men of colour that have worked hard and stuck to a grind that not many can in the athletics world, as they are statistically more likely to have started out with a direct disadvantage. Leonard’s mom, Kim Robertson, had to work during his freshman basketball tryouts at California’s Canyon Springs High School. So he missed the session and the school’s coach refused to let him on the team. He later found an AAU coach and mentor in Marvin Lea and transferred to Riverside’s Martin Luther King High School. He committed himself to basketball and earned a scholarship to San Diego State and bypassed the blue-chip programs that came after him later in the process. However, Leonard’s dad, Mark Leonard, was murdered in 2008 at his car wash in Compton, California. His father was working at the car wash he owned and was trying to finish early to watch his son play basketball when the tragedy occurred. Leonard was just 17 and now throughout the accolades he has since received for his performance in basketball, BR Magazine released that he lives very humbly, with his eyes not on money but on his goals. This “Canadian” labelling seems to bleed into everything that will make headlines. Even when an indigenous person living on this side of the border does anything exceptionally worth of recognition or award-winning, they are often labelled as “Canadian indigenous.” This gives the impression that Canada doesn’t and won’t outwardly mark anything or anyone as one of their own unless it makes the country look good. The country does this probably for the same reason that it hardly recognizes any of its blemishes. And as indigenous people know all too well, Canada has many. Let’s not forget how long it took the prime minister, who also sat on stage at the Raptors parade culmination, to use the word “genocide” in regards to MMIW.

Volume 6, Issue 45 Make advertising cheques payable to:

Garlow Media

Letters to the Editor

We want to print your opinion and your voice matters to us. Mail, E-mail or hand deliver a signed response to something you have read in the Two Row Times. Our e-mail address is editor@tworowtimes.com and our mailing address is Oneida Business Park Suite 124, 50 Generations Drive, Box 1, Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0.

Statement on Indigenous Peoples Day CELEBRATING OUR UNITY AND DIVERSITY Six Nations Elected Council Statement on Indigenous People’s Day

The Six Nations Elected Council would like to wish everyone a safe Solidarity & Unity Weekend. This weekend is about bringing our community together and celebrating our diversity through fun and interactive activities throughout the day Rain or Shine. It’s an opportunity for us as a community to share with one another and learn about how we have all contributed to our rich history. We are stronger together. Today is also a day to honour our people and our ancestors, and all those who have come before. Their leadership and incredible resilience have paved the path forward today, and for generations yet to come. This year is particularly special as we will be honouring our past and present NHL/WHA players during a Com-

memoration Ceremony. We are asking everyone to join us in honouring these individuals who continue to represent Six Nations at the highest level of sport. This ceremony will begin at 12p.m. on Friday June 21, 2019. To our neighbours, today and every day, we invite you to join with Indigenous peoples across the country to learn, recognize and celebrate the diverse cultures, contributions and achievements of the Indigenous people and territory you live on or close to. Building relationships on understanding and respect will support all of us moving forward and advancing our well-being and way of life. We are inviting everyone to join us at the Community Hall on Friday June 21, to honour our people and celebrate our diversity. In addition, if you cannot attend the Solidarity Day events, you can also celebrate our unity with Ganohkwasra at the Six Nations Unity Block Party on Saturday, June 22 at the Plaza and White Pines parking lot.

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Feature Column: Thunder Woman Speaks

Canadians can learn from Indigenous systems that recognized the power of the women By Rachel A. Snow The release of the final report of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) Inquiry has unleashed opposing views hijacked by the use of the term genocide. What is in the word genocide? Is the harm only contained in the carefully crafted and acceptable parameters found within mainstream whiteman made legal terms? Or can we define genocide as what we think of, immediately – the killing of a people. Genocide does not have to be viewed in the compartmentalized blinder-on fashion suggested by mainstream Canada. It can actually be seen in the history of the marginalization of Indigenous people in Canada - with specific attention to women. When the original settlers came to this land, did they bring women? Did the European settlers bring with them an understanding of the role of women? Well, the first settlers certainly were not women, and there are no reports of women accompanying Columbus et al. This is probably because in fifteenth century Europe, there was a clear understanding of the role of women. Women, in the settlers’ world, were inferior.

Women were unable to inherit or own property. In fact women were considered to be the property of their husbands. The first colonists arrived with this stereotypical view of women when they stumbled onto the territory now called Canada. Imagine the early settler surprise! They came upon a land of thriving people who were tall, healthy, spiritual, organized and where the role of women balanced the men for Indigenous people. Early settlers had no way of understanding that leadership could be found in highly complex systems that included matriarchal powers or the spiritual guidance of powerful medicine women. The early settlers saw camps where men came forward because then, Indigenous men went first to protect the children, the women, the elders and their way of life. With the strength of our Indigenous men clearly visible, first settler colonizers assumed that these powerful warriors ruled by force, with individualistic agendas. The early colonizers had no idea that leadership could be vested in the role of women. The early settlers could not see a society where grandmothers selected leadership. Early settler white males did not understand that our women owned the teepee, home

or living structure. Canadian systems have evolved based on primarily white male-driven institutions from their countries of origin. With this background, did the original settlers or their subsequent governments understand that the Indigenous systems were functioning differently? Countless reports, inquiries, studies and other works have been done with a colonial lens to understand “the Indian problem.” However, if there is a premise or threshold argument grounded in a white male paternalistic thinking, how can this approach ever solve problems where women are an integral part of the system? We must consider this carefully since evidence points to these very processes, institutions, and approaches as being the actual problem. We know that colonial policies of Indian removal, starvation and subjugation are the root behind current Indigenous-inherited poverty and trauma. But if you listen carefully to the narrative in mainstream media covering the MMIWG report, this clash of viewpoints is not newsworthy. We have entered into a debate of what currently constitutes “genocide”. Countless white male voices are asserting that “things may have hap-

pened in the past” but the definition of genocide remains the outright killing of individuals. Media talking heads are trying to downplay the term by calling the treatment of Indigenous women, a tragedy or “its own thing,” instead of recognizing it as a violation of human rights. So let’s look at this definition of genocide. Are First Nations currently fighting on the front lines or in courts to defend the last pieces of their lands, waters and territories from whiteman made encroachment through development? Yes. Do these First Nations have histories of tainted water, higher rates of cancer or mercury poisoning and hampered access to traditional or culturally relevant foods and plants? Yes. Do Canada’s own statistics reflect higher Indigenous suicides and lower Indigenous living standards? Yes. If you look through an Indigenous lens at the policies, legislations, court decisions, and institutions that dictate the lives of the Indigenous people on their own lands, you will see active, prolonged instruments of genocide applied everyday. Is it genocide to remove children from homes breaking the kinship, parenting and educations system that had existed pre-contact, while inflicting mental trauma and abuse

both sexual and physical? Yes. Was it genocide to use germ warfare with smallpox blankets to obliterate a people who were blocking settler access in the west? Yes. Is it genocide to have used native children for nutrition experiments, or subjected these same children to electric chairs in residential schools? Is it a genocidal action to sterilize women? Yes. Are these collective policies so ancient that today, the Indigenous have no living memory of these attacks? No. The Indigenous people carry the blood memory, words in our languages and the knowledge through oral history of these acts to kill our people. It is because of this lived experience that we understand the intent within similar policies or legislations that will continue this obliteration of who we are as Indigenous peoples. Evidence of crimes against Indigenous humanity happened because the initial settlers followed the doctrine of discovery thinking. They did not see the beauty in the women who held the backbone of each of our camps in place. They did not see the long line of grandmothers, who doctored, taught and guided the community back to the Creation stories. They did not see the women

who were warriors or the acceptance of LGBQT2 people in Indigenous societies. This has been the genocide. In a country where white men make the laws, interpret and apply the laws; can they see they have destroyed the Indigenous women’s role and voice in true indigenous governance and self-determining systems? Can they see that the very nature of their whiteman made systems have killed the equality of women in our Indigenous societies? If whitemen cannot acknowledge the worth and equality of white women; is it then willful blindness that prevents them from seeing, understanding or accepting that First Nations elevated their women recognizing their inherent power? Has there ever been a true understanding of the Indigenous nations that existed pre-colonization? If there is no true understanding, then there is no reconciliation. Canadians can learn from Indigenous systems that recognized the power of the women. Canada’s white patriarchy will not discuss threats to power and control. Instead, they build systems that continue to undermine, marginalize and kill Indigenous women. That is genocide.

/:gweh

a human R E L AT E D W O R D S :

editor@tworowtimes.com

h/:gweh - a man (lit.: he is a person) ag/:gweh - a woman (lit.: she is a person) CAYUGA LANGUAGE

SOURCE:English-Cayuga Dictionary, Frances Froman, Alfred Keye, Lottie Keye, Carrie Dyck


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June 19th, 2019

Six Nations General Council Briefs STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

In addition to Indigenous course offerings, Windsor Law hosts various speaker series, panels, walk-outs, pow wows, socials and round dances throughout the year while promoting awareness of legal, social and political issues as they relate to Indigenous peoples. Windsor Law is home to a vibrant community of Indigenous students, faculty and staff, and warmly welcomes applications from prospective Indigenous students and scholars. www.uwindsor.ca/law

OHSWEKEN — Six Nations Elected Council held a General Council meeting on June 18 and discussed several expense related decisions surrounding community building and infrastructure. SNEC approved $20,902.65 to replace the flow meter and sump pump at the East End Pump Station. Funds came from the Six Nations Public Works Reserve Funds and Clean Water and Wastewater Funds. Funding was approved for a new air conditioning unit at 37 Sunrise Court. The chiller cost is $67975.00 and was contracted to Carrier Corporation.

SNEC discussed a recommendation from the Building and Infrastructure Committee to increase the maximum loan amount through the Six Nations Housing program to $250,000 from $200,000 and also increasing the Renovations/ Repairs loan amount to $75,000 from $50,000. Councillor Carl Hill said there are currently 297 people waiting on the housing list, down from over 800 people. Councillor Helen Miller said the reduction in the list was not people that successfully built homes but several citizens who lost eligibility to access housing dollars because they didn’t qualify due to bad credit, low income or did not own property when their names came

PDF/X-1a:2003

Where next is up to all of us We’re proud to celebrate the heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding achievements of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

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up. SNEC members agreed there needs to be a solution to helping who don’t meet the current housing policy access housing. SNEC approved the increase and asserted the need to find a better solution to the community housing crisis — including raising the concern at an upcoming meeting with federal government officials. Funding was approved

for a new sanitation

truck. The truck will cost $196,388.00.

Renovations on a prop-

erty at 1849 4th Line were approved. The current

location is used for Social Services programming.

Total cost of renovations is $62,100.00.


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June 19th, 2019

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Trans Mountain pipeline expansion gets second green light from Ottawa CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

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OTTAWA — The federal Liberal government is giving the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion a second lease on life. ``Today I'm announcing that our government has approved the Trans Mountain expansion project going forward,'' Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told a news conference in Ottawa after markets closed Tuesday. ``This is a new decision. The company plans to have shovels in the ground this construction season.'' The decision to reapprove the project comes nine months after the Federal Court of Appeal ripped up the original federal approval, citing incomplete Indigenous consultations and a faulty environmental review. Trudeau says the court said the government needed to better. ``And you know what?''

Trudeau said. ``They were right.'' The Liberals ordered the National Energy Board to look at marine shipping impacts; Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi started another round of consultations with Indigenous communities affected by the project. Tuesday's decision also comes the day after the Liberals passed a motion in the House of Commons declaring climate change a national emergency that would require more cuts to emissions than have already been promised. In 2016, the National Energy Board said the production of another 590,000 barrels of oil, which would maximize the twinned pipeline's capacity, could generate 1417 million more tonnes of greenhouse gases each year, which means Canada would have to find ways to cut more from other sectors to meet and then exceed its current targets. Trudeau says he is sympathetic to concerns

about the environment and the need to transition to cleaner sources of energy, but says that in order to fund that transition, Canada needs to take advantage of its natural resources while they are still needed. ``The policies of the last century will not serve Canadians in this one,'' he said. The government has accepted the 156 conditions the National Energy Board put on the project approval, but is amending six of them to include requiring Indigenous communities to be involved in developing marine emergency response plans, mitigating potential impacts on sacred sites, and Indigenous involvement in post-construction environmental impact reporting. There are also eight new accommodations required to take into account Indigenous concerns, including working with some communities to potentially move the route.

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June 19th, 2019

849 Hwy 54 • Mon-Sun 6am 10pm • (519) 756-4825 Trans Mountain timeline: A look at key dates in the project's history

OTTAWA — Here are some November 2014: More recommends approval of to ``immediately employ government bid challengrisks to southern resident other key dates in the histhan 100 people are arthe pipeline, subject to 157 every tool available'' to stop ing a NEB ruling that allows killer whales. The NEB tory of the original project rested after they camp out conditions, concluding that the project. The coalition Kinder Morgan Canada to has until late February to facebook.com/ktgasconveiencecountrystyle and Kinder Morgan Canain a conservation area on it is in the public interest. defeats the B.C. Liberals bypass local bylaws. report back. da's controversial efforts to Burnaby Mountain, east of Nov. 29, 2016: Prime in a confidence motion a April 8, 2018: Kinder Sept. 26, 2018: The NEB expand its capacity: Vancouver, to block crews Minister Justin Trudeau month later, paving the way Morgan Canada suspends assigns a new panel to run October 1953: The Trans from conducting drilling approves the Trans Mounfor John Horgan to become non-essential spending on the hearings and sets deadMountain pipeline begins and survey work related tain expansion, part of a premier. the Trans Mountain expanlines for comments. shipping oil with an initial to the pipeline expansion. sweeping announcement Aug. 10, 2017: The B.C. sion project and sets a May Oct. 3, 2018: Natural Recapacity of 150,000 barrels Most of the charges are that also saw approval of NDP government hires for31 deadline to reach agree- sources Minister Amarjeet per day. The project initially later dropped. Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline mer judge Thomas Berger ments with stakeholders. Sohi hires former Supreme features four pump stations August 2015: The NEB replacement, but the end to provide legal advice as it May 29, 2018: Federal Court of Canada Justice along its 1,150-kilometre postpones public hearings of its Northern Gateway seeks intervener status in government announces Frank Iacobucci to oversee route and a marine dock after striking from the project. the legal challenges againstfacebook.com/ktgasconveiencecountrystyle deal to buy the pipeline a new round of Indigenous that connects loading record economic evidence Jan. 11, 2017: B.C. the project filed by municiand expansion project from consultations. No deadline facilities on the east side prepared by a Kinder MorPremier Christy Clark palities and First Nations. Kinder Morgan Canada for is set for the completion of of Edmonton with ocean gan consultant who was announces her support for Dec. 7, 2017: NEB allows $4.5 billion. the process. tankers in Burnaby, B.C. It to begin working for the the project, saying KindKinder Morgan Canada to Aug. 30, 2018: The Feb. 22, 2019: The NEB is expanded in 1957 and regulator. er Morgan has met five bypass Burnaby bylaws. Federal Court of Appeal recommends to cabinet 2008 to eventually pump Jan. 27, 2016: The federgovernment conditions Jan. 17, 2018: Kinder overturns the Trudeau that it approve the projup to 300,000 barrels of oil al Liberal government says including a revenue-sharMorgan Canada warns the government's approval of ect again, subject to 16 per day. assessments of pipeline ing agreement worth up to Trans Mountain expansion 100% theAuthentic pipeline expansion. In new conditions, and says Native Arts & Crafts Feb. 21, 2012: Kinder projects such as the Trans $1 billion. project could be a year a unanimous although an oil spill could Open 7 Days A Weekdecision by a We Buy and Sell Crafts of All Varieties Morgan Canada says it Mountain expansion will May 25, 2017: Kinder behind schedule. panel of three judges, the be significant, the project wants to expand the Trans now take into account the Morgan makes its final Jan. 30, 2018: B.C. govcourt says the NEB's review provides considerable Mountain pipeline after greenhouse gas emissions investment decision to pro- ernment moves to restrict of the project was so flawed benefits and there are receiving support from oil produced in the extraction ceed with the development, any increase in diluted that the federal governmeasures that can be taken shippers and will begin and processing of the oil now estimated to cost bitumen shipments until ment could not rely on it to minimize the effects. The public consultations. they carry. Proponents will $7.4 billion, subject to the it conducts more spill reas a basis for its decision to federal cabinet has 90 days Dec. 16, 2013: An also be required to improve successful public offering of sponse studies, a move that approve the expansion. _ until May 22 _ to respond application is made to the consultations with First Kinder Morgan Canada. increases the uncertainty Sept. 15, 2018: Natuwith a decision. WE ARE LOOKING TO FILL 3 POSITIONSMay WITH FULL TIME AND PART TIME OPTIONS AVAILABLE. WE ARE LOOKING National Energy Board Nations. 29, 2017: The B.C. for Trans Mountain. ral Resources Minister Apr. 18, 2019: Sohi FOR ENERGETIC, PROFESSIONAL, DEDICATED, MATURE PEOPLE TO JOIN OUR TEAM. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED 100% Authentic Native Arts & Crafts (NEB) to expand the Trans May 17, 2016: Ottawa NDP and Greens agree to March 23, 2018: Green Amarjeet Sohi orders the announces cabinet has de7 Days A Week PLEASE COME INappoints WITHa three-member A RESUME AND OUTtoAN APPLICATION WE ARE Open LOOKING TO We Buy and Sell Crafts of All Varieties Mountain pipeline. ConformFILL a coalition topple party Leader AS Elizabeth NEB to undertake aFILL new THESE cidedPOSITIONS to push the pipeline ASAP. WE LOOK FORWARD TO MEETING YOU AND BEST OF LUCK TO ALL APPLICANTS. struction is proposed to panel to conduct an envithe Liberal party, which May and NDP MP Kennedy environmental assessment decision back until June 18 begin in 2017, with the aim ronmental review of the could only manage a Stewart are arrested at a of the impact additional citing a need to take more of having oil flow through Trans Mountain expansion minority in the previous protest against the pipeline oil tankers off the coast of time to complete Indigethe expansion by December project. month's provincial elecexpansion; Federal Court British Columbia will have, nous consultations. 2019. May 29, 2016: The NEB tion. The parties agree of Appeal dismisses a B.C. with a specific focus on the n

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11

Activists' lawyers: Sheriff should defend anti protest laws against the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota in 2016 and 2017. North Dakota spent $38 million on policing those protests, which resulted in 761 arrests over a sixmonth span. The ACLU is suing South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg and Thom in federal court on behalf of activists. An attorney for Thom last month asked that the sheriff be dismissed from the lawsuit, saying he must enforce state laws but isn't responsible for defending them. Attorney Rebeca L. Mann also argued that Pennington County shouldn't have to defend state laws that it doesn't have the power to change. Plaintiffs' attorney Brendan Johnson countered in Tuesday's court filing that ``each time Thom makes a choice about the laws' meaning, as the highest official in the county for that action, he is doing so as a policymaker for Pennington

County.'' Johnson also argued that Thom must use his own discretion when enforcing the law, making him an ``appropriate defendant.'' Pennington County is one of eight South Dakota counties along the route of TC Energy's planned Keystone XL pipeline to move Canadian crude through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with lines to Gulf Coast refineries. The $8 billion project has the backing of President Donald Trump but is being fought in the courts by opponents. The ACLU of South Dakota, North Dakota and Wyoming said it named Thom as a defendant in the lawsuit because he's sheriff in the county in which the activists are working. Plaintiffs include the Rapid City-based NDN Collective non-profit, which advocates for indigenous peoples and climate change awareness.

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BISMARCK, ND — Attorneys for oil pipeline opponents are fighting a South Dakota sheriff's attempt to be dismissed as a defendant in a lawsuit challenging new state laws that aim to prevent disruptive demonstrations against the Keystone XL pipeline. Pennington County Sheriff Kevin Thom should remain a defendant in the suit spearheaded by the American Civil Liberties Union because he will be enforcing law that amounts to an unconstitutional infringement on free speech, an attorney for the plaintiffs argued in a Tuesday court filing. The Republican-backed legislation passed in March allows officials to pursue criminal or civil penalties from demonstrators who engage in ``riot boosting,'' which is defined in part as encouraging violence during a riot. Supporters of the legislation sought to head off protests of the Keystone XL like those mounted


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Opinion: On food sovereignty

By Gary Farmer Food is everything. Food and diet are probably 75% of our long term health care grades . Most of us are not really thinking about our long term health if you’re 19 and healthy and vibrant. The other 25% would be water quality, air quality and proximity to industrialization determines how long one might live. So living across from a pulp and paper mill is a health risk. Of course, I’m no doctor or scientist but that’s just common sense, the way I look at things. Course most of us don’t really think much about what we eat on a daily

basis. Some of us have carved out solid routines. I know one fella, because of his diabetes he eats the same meal every night. Mikey he likes it. People have changed their diets to the better in the last few years. Maybe more now than the 1960’s when mass produced fast food first got it’s start. So many suffer that potential of a lifelong diet of fast food. Some have no choice due to economic status. When you have not much money; you’re not buying organic food this week—or even good food like fresh vegetables. Some of us follow the body is sacred model and only ingest the right foods. The right foods vary with individual ideas about what to eat— but lately trends are much less starch, fat, sugar and dairy. Strong correlation between sugar and cancer. Less red meat because it’s harder to digest. And the old adage,“takes 6 acres

to feed a meat eater and 1/6 of an acre to feed a vegetarian.” A lot of vegetarians claim this adage as to why they resist the meat diet. A conscience choice to save over grazing and often exploiting indigenous lands especially in South America has been the argument. It’s harder growing food for yourself and for your family. Because it’s hard work putting in a garden and watching over it all summer. Of course, if you are not working and there’s not much game around or maybe your like me and don’t like walking in the bush shooting for deer; you ought to be putting in a garden— not much later than now. It’s still not to late and with the weather changing like it is, growing seasons are apt to shift some. Grateful to know we now have some public gardens CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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June 19th, 2019

Food sovereignty continued around Ohsweken, behind Grand River Employment and Training building. Last I checked there are still some plots available. In my travels I see lots of tribes, nations really examining their traditional diets of long ago. Roxanne Swentzell from Santa Clara Pueblo in New Mexico and the Pueblo food Experience, explored the importance of eating culturally appropriate foods as native people. She lead a small group of native folks through a pre-colonial inspired diet last winter to see what measurable health impacts on mind, body and spirit. It had positive and reaffirming confidence in our traditional foods and the need for them to be revitalized. "It is our youth that are hearing the call that our foods will help us find our way back to good health." Swentzell added. I remember long ago in the early 1980’s, Trent

University hosted a World Indigenous Theatre Festival I was a taxi driver well young actor helping out longtime friend, Jim Buller producing and i’m the transportation department—well driver of the participants. I’ll never forget the Aborigines from Australia, real bushmen, came to Canada. I distinctly remember, two weeks off their traditional diets and their glucose levels skyrocketed and we had to get them home early. Because they got into beer and fast food over here and loved for me to stop at McDonalds. Food security is a big issue in our over populated earth especially among indigenous peoples. I’ve spent time up north in remote communities in Ontario. Hard to believe we have approximately 136 reserve communities in Ontario alone. Many of them north north like Big Trout Lake where the only way in is by flight.

No roads in...from the highway. Most of food in the north is either canned or dried. Very little fresh food. Of course, they live primarily off wildlife and fish but less so today, as the times they are a changing. Luckily not a lot of fast food up north north. Which is probably our biggest health risk in the south of Canada where we live. The food up north is very pricey because of transportation by air or across the tundra with barges or snow machines. I’ve thought a lot about their food security and how could the north use something like aquaponics and begin farming in a climate like northern Ontario with an even shorter growing season than our own. But no, my thoughts are at home here on the big six where I figure the chicken wings at the Burger Barn are better than Buffalo.

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June 19th, 2019

NDP promise to expand universal health care

BANGARRA DANCE THEATRE

into a national pharmacare program as the first step towards a broader move which would eventually see universal dental, vision and hearing care. The policy comes in a new ``commitments document'' — dubbed A New Deal for People — which a party spokesman said will form the basis of the NDP

federal election platform. ``For the first time, every single Canadian can count on this,'' Singh said. ``If you need medication, if your loved one needs medication, you can get it — period. Paid for with your health card, not your credit card.'' The NDP proposal — unveiled Sunday at the

Ontario NDP convention in Hamilton — would see the pharmacare program start sooner than the date recently recommended by an expert panel. The panel said a national list of prescription drugs for pharmacare should be established by Jan. 1, 2022, and be expanded no later than Jan. 1, 2027.

Wednesday November 6 7:00 PM $60.00 Bangarra Dance Theatre is one of Australia’s leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Performing Arts companies, acclaimed worldwide for their moving performances, distinctive voice, and authentic story-telling. Led by Artistic Director Stephen Page, Bangarra’s unique dance technique is forged from over 65,000 years of culture, embodied with contemporary movement. SPIRIT is a powerful collection of dance stories from Bangarra’s 30-year repertoire. Set to a haunting score, audiences connect with stories and songlines drawn from all over Australia, in a celebration of First Nations Peoples’ unbroken connection to the land. “Bangarra dance is a triumph” Herald Sun.

MISSION SONGS PROJECT Special Guest Lacey Hill Thursday April 2 7:00 PM $44.00 Searching for the secular songs that were sung after church, Mission Songs Project explores the day to day life of the mission days, from cultural identity to love and loss. Mission Songs Project, led by Jessie Lloyd, revives contemporary Australian Indigenous songs from 1900 to 1999, focusing on the Christian missions, state run settlements and native camps where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were relocated, produced by Performing Lines.

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Singh said the plan would save families who already have insurance coverage $550 a year. ``Friends, we have a crisis in health care and it's time that changed,'' he said. ``It's time for the party that brought Medicare to Canada to take a next major step forward. It's time to bring Canadians a historic expansion of the services that health care covers.'' The 109-page document also contains promises to create 500,000 more affordable housing units, expand grant programs for post-secondary education and address the cost of cellphone service and highspeed broadband. The party is pledging to spend a billion dollars in 2020 to enhance child care across the country. The document also promises to restore doorto-door mail delivery to all communities that have lost it — which would cost $100 million — and to establish a gasoline-price watchdog to monitor fuel prices and prevent ``gouging.'' The party says it would raise government revenues to pay for its policies through a number of measures, including increasing corporate taxes and by creating a so-called ``wealth tax.'' Taxes on the richest Canadians — those with net worth of $20 million or more — would jump by one per cent, generating several billion dollars annually in

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revenue. ``The Liberals and Conservatives have been working for the people at the very top instead of working for you,'' Singh said. ``We are going to change that.'' The party would roll back corporate tax cuts provided by previous governments to 2010 levels, increasing to 18 per cent from the current 15, generating billions more dollars for government coffers a year. Singh said the party would also institute a 15 per cent foreign buyers tax on residential purchases to prevent housing markets from overheating. The NDP does not make a specific promise to balance the federal budget. ``In all cases, we will manage debt and deficits responsibly, borrowing when required to defend the services that Canadians and their families rely on, and moving to balance when prudent,'' the document says. Liberal MP Marc Miller said the government welcomed the NDP's support when it comes to taking action on national pharmacare, climate change and affordable housing. But Miller questioned the NDP timeline and how it would pay for the specific measures in its plan. ``We hope that the NDP will soon provide the details that Canadians expect from any national party about how it will pay for its promises,'' he said in a statement.

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HAMILTON — The federal NDP says it will fast-track a universal drug plan to ensure a late 2020 start date if elected this fall as part of an expansion of Canada's health-care system. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said if his party forms government after the October federal election, it will inject $10 billion annually

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June 19th, 2019

Activists want a racist San Francisco high school mural removed Depiction of dead Indigenous people glorifies genocide, manifest destiny

By Amna Khalid, Associate Professor of History, Carleton College and Jeffrey Aaron Snyder Associate Professor of Educational Studies, Carleton College For nearly a century, a massive mural by painter Victor Arnautoff titled “The Life of Washington” has lined the hallways of San Francisco’s George Washington High School. It may not be there much longer. The mural “glorifies slavery, genocide, colonization, manifest destiny, white supremacy [and] oppression.” So said Washington High School’s Reflection and Action Group, an ad-hoc committee formed late last year and made up of Native Americans from the community, students, school employees, local artists and historians. It identified two panels as especially offensive. One shows Washington pointing westward next to the body of a dead Native American. The other depicts slaves working in the fields of Mount Vernon. Because the work “traumatizes students and community members,” the group concluded that “the impact of this mural is greater than its intent ever was.” They are campaigning for its removal. The idea that impact matters more than intention has informed debates about everything from microaggressions to cultural appropriation. But when it comes to art, should impact matter more than intention? As historians committed to preserving our cultural

x.

PHOTO BY X

heritage – and as citizens invested in the power of art to engage the public – we see the growing chorus of voices favoring impact over intention as a dangerous trend, one that makes art more vulnerable to rejection, censorship or even destruction. A radical work for its time For most members of the Washington High School’s Reflection and Action Group, the only message “The Life of Washington” sends is one of crushing, dehumanizing oppression. What happens, though, when we examine the mural in the context of the life and times of the artist? Painter Victor Arnautoff was born in 1896 in a small village in present-day Ukraine. He emigrated to San Francisco in 1925, where he joined a leftist art collective. During the Great Depression he was a supporter of workers’ strikes and formally joined the Communist Party in 1937. He was even hauled before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1956 for drawing a

“Communist Conspiracy” cartoon that caricatured then-Vice President Nixon. In “The Life of Washington,” Arnautoff decided to place Native Americans, African Americans and working-class revolutionaries front and center in the four largest panels, relegating Washington to the margins. The slaves toiling in the Mount Vernon fields highlight a central paradox of America’s history: The nation was founded by men who championed liberty, freedom and equality, and yet owned slaves. Then there’s the striking image of the fallen Native American. The mural’s detractors say that it dismisses the humanity of indigenous peoples. But why must it necessarily be read as dehumanizing to Native Americans? Could it not instead be seen as throwing into sharp relief the inhumanity of the founding fathers? According to Arnautoff’s biographer, Robert W. Cherny, the image challenged the fallacy that “westward expansion had been into largely vacant

territory waiting for white pioneers to develop its full potential.” That the mural appears in a school is particularly important in this regard. For decades, the country’s educational institutions perpetuated national myths about American exceptionalism and American history as one long glorious march of forward progress. Up until the 1960s, the standard U.S. history curriculum ignored the country’s dark and terrifying history of racial violence, including enslavement and the slaughter of indigenous peoples. So drawing attention to the horrors inflicted on Native Americans and African Americans would have been a radical statement in 1930s America. Many of those in favor of scrapping the murals seem to believe that merely depicting past atrocities justifies them. In fact, the Action and Reflection Group concluded that the mural contravened the San Francisco Unified School District’s commitment to “social justice.” Quite to the contrary.

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In our view, the “Life of Washington” provides an invaluable opportunity for students to engage in a serious and sustained way with social justice issues. There’s a strong case to be made that Arnautoff is exposing – rather than celebrating – slavery and genocide. Moreover, those arguing for the mural’s removal are overlooking the fact that African Americans are not only portrayed as picking cotton and that Native Americans are not only depicted as victims of genocide. Rather Arnautoff is insisting that African Americans and indigeneous peoples were key historical actors in the making of the United States. Only the latest controversy The controversy over this mural is sadly not an isolated exception. Over the past several years, there have been dozens of cases where plays, poems, books, prints, paintings, sculptures, installations and other creative works have been shut down, canceled, removed or otherwise

censored based on snap judgments, social media swarms, ideologically motivated reasoning and obtuse interpretations of the art in question. In all of these cases, there has been little to no regard for the aspirations, aims and ambitions of the artists themselves. Their intentions have been treated along a spectrum that runs from indifference to contempt. To be clear, we are not saying that an artist’s intent is all that matters. How people interpret and respond to a work of art is inseparable from its raison d'etre. But disregarding the intentions of artists would place every significant creative work with a whiff of controversy in jeopardy because of its “problematic” or “offensive” content. In a world where intentionality and context are irrelevant, satire and irony would not only be incomprehensible but forbidden. Artist Kara Walker’s searing paper cuts depicting the horrific violence of slavery in the United States? Nothing more than a celebration of the white domination of black bodies. The pungent, explosive litany of racial slurs in Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing”? Just a vicious rehearsal of profoundly damaging ethnic stereotypes. Keegan-Michael Key’s brilliant sketch character Luther who serves as Obama’s “anger translator”? Simply a racist caricature of the “angry black man.” This article originally appeared on The Conversation.

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June 19th, 2019

Coming home: Navajo to get treaty that ended imprisonment FLAGSTAFF, AZ — A 150-year-old document that allowed Navajos to return to their homeland in the Four Corners region where Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado meet is destined for a permanent home at the tribe's museum. Navajos had been imprisoned at a desolate tract of land in eastern New Mexico before signing a treaty with the federal government in 1868. The United States signed hundreds of treaties with Native American tribes as acts of peace and friendship or to end wars, but the Navajos were unique in securing a return to their homeland bounded by four mountains they consider sacred. A Navajo legislative committee is expected to vote Tuesday to accept an original copy of the treaty that was believed to have been lost and is one of only three original copies. It had moved among cardboard boxes, chests and filing cabinets in the Manchester, Massachusetts, home of Indian Peace Commissioner Samuel F. Tappan, who helped negotiate the treaty. His great-grandniece,

x.

Clare ``Kitty'' Weaver, said she had seen it among Tappan's papers but only recently learned of its importance. Another copy of the treaty is in the National Archives, and last one was given to Barboncito, the last Navajo chief to surrender to military forces in 1866, but its whereabouts are unknown. Barboncito and thousands of Navajos had been

PHOTO BY X

forcibly marched to the Bosque Redondo reservation in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, after the military destroyed their crops and livestock. Tribal officials asked Weaver last year during a gathering for the 150th anniversary of the signing of the treaty if she would donate the Tappan copy to the Navajo Nation. ``There were two things I had to deal with: my head

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and my heart,'' said Weaver, who is writing a biography on Tappan. ``And my heart knew right away that it should go to the Navajos. And my head took a little more time because I wanted to be sure that the protocols were in place for housing the treaty.'' Under an agreement signed this month, the treaty must be kept in a climate-controlled environment under lock and alarm or live security. An archivist will check on it periodically, and it won't be displayed for more than six months total over a 10-year period. It also must be shared with a memorial site at Bosque Redondo and cannot be sold. Tribal law says the Navajo president cannot accept gifts or donations worth more than $1,000 without the legislative committee's approval. The Tappan treaty _ written on 17 pages of ledger paper, measuring 8 inches by 12 inches and tied with a faded red ribbon _ is valued at $10,000. Suzan Shown Harjo, guest curator of an exhibit on treaties at the National Museum of the American Indian, said treaties have

taken different forms, from being recorded on parchment or ledger paper to being depicted on beaded belts. Seeing original treaties connects people with their ancestors, whose DNA is on the historical records, she said. ``There's just sort of a wave of recognition that these are the people who signed this treaty for me, and these are the people who went through what they went through for me,'' said Harjo, who is Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee. ``They did it for my grandchildren, they did it for all the coming generations, whether it was a terrific treaty or a half-good treaty or some treaty, they did the best they could.'' Tappan and Gen. William T. Sherman negotiated a treaty with the Navajos as part of the Indian Peace Commission. Neither of them signed the copy being donated. Only one Navajo leader could sign his own name. The treaty marked the end of years of Navajo imprisonment. Those who couldn't keep up with the

journey to Bosque Redondo _ known as the Long Walk _ were killed. Disease, the harsh winters and unfamiliarity with how to prepare foods also led to deaths. Navajos call the land ``Hweeldi,'' meaning a place of suffering and fear. Sherman and Tappan planned to move the Navajos to land in present-day Kansas and Oklahoma, but those at Bosque Redondo were intent on going home. ``The bringing of us here has caused a great decrease in our numbers,'' Barboncito said at the time, according to historical documents. ``Many of us have died, also a great number of our animals. Our grandfathers had no idea of living in any other country except our own, and I do not think it is right for us to do so.'' The Navajo reservation now spans 27,000 square miles (69,930 square kilometres) in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah, and is the largest in the United States. Navajo President Jonathan Nez said having the Tappan treaty in the tribe's museum will ``magnify the resilience of our Navajo people.''


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June 19th, 2019

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strate their work outside of a traditional pow-wow gathering.” The week will open on Canada Day, which Lindsay says was chosen intentionally to in order to raise awareness of Indigenous fashion. “Its all about building

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Every year in Canada on June 21, people celebrate

National Indigenous People’s Day. The day is set aside to acknowledge the culture, traditions, and contributions of First Nations, Metis and Inuit people throughout history. The day has been through many name changes. It was initially celebrated by Indigenous communities as National Aboriginal Solidarity Day in 1982 by the

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National Indian Brotherhood, now known as the Assembly of First Nations. In 1995 Indigenous leaders called upon the federal government to create a national holiday to celebrate Indigenous culture and people. The Royal Commission on Aboriginal People that same year called for a national day to be designated to celebrate Indigenous culture. In 1996, the Governor General of Canada, Romeo LeBlanc, proclaimed June 21 each year as National Aboriginal Day. On June 21, 2017, Prime

June 19th, 2019

Minister Justin Trudeau announced the date would be renamed to National Indigenous Peoples Day.


NATIONAL INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY Learning about Six Nations of the Grand River

June 19th, 2019

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21

Six Nations of the Grand River is a First Nations community

and the home of six Iroquois nations that make up the members of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. The word Haudenosaunee means “People of the Longhouse” — a longhouse is a big house. It is build out of elm posts and bark. It is the style of homes our ancestors built.

The people of Six Nations traditionally come from the Finger Lakes region of New York State.

The Mohawk, Oneida, Ononda-

ga, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora people all have distinct

A long time ago the six nations didn’t get along. Our traditions say that a person was sent by the Creator to bring a message of peace to our people. That person today is known as the Peacemaker.

languages and family groups called clans.

In Haudenosaunee culture, every family belongs to a clan represented by an animal. Altogether there are nine clans: three air clans, three water clans and three earth clans. The clans are the Hawk, Snipe and

Heron; Turtle, Eel and Beaver; and the Bear, Wolf, and Deer.

He brought a message of unity and respect that was accepted by the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora. He brought the people together as the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and together they established a Great Law of Peace. To this day, when Haudenosaunee people come together they will say an opening address to remember the Great Law of Peace. It is called Ganohonyok, or the Thanksgiving address. It is a message to remind the people the importance of giving thanks for all of the things the Creator provides for us in the natural world and helps people

come together to a good place in their hearts, minds and spirits.


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June 19th, 2019

WE are THE PEOPLE of...

A Moose Hide emoji for Indigenous History Month This year, Twitter Canada invited an artist from Northern Ontario to design an emoji in celebration of Indigenous History Month. Janelle Waiwa from the Opwaaganisining First Nation in the Nishnabe Aski Nation territory was chosen. Waiwa says she is a self-taught award winning multimedia artist. This year Waiwa decided to capture the image of a piece of hide stretched out on a tanning frame as the Indigenous History Month emoji. For the month of June, in celebration of Indigenous History Month he moose hide frame will appear anytime you use these hashtags: #IndigenousHistoryMonth #IndigenousPeoplesDay #NIPDCanada #MoisHistoireAutochtone #JourneeNationalePeuplesAutochtones #JNPACanada

Follow us on TWITTER @tworowtimes

Aamjiwnaang Alderville Algonquins of PikwĂ kanagĂ n Animbiigoo Zaagi'igan Anishinaabek Anishinaabeg of Naongashiing Ardoch Algonquin Aroland Attawapiskat Batchewana Bearfoot Onondaga Bearskin Lake Beausoleil Beaverhouse Big Grassy Biinjitiwabik Zaaging Anishnabek Bkejwanong Brunswick House Caldwell Cat Lake Chapleau Cree Chippewa of the Thames Chippewas of Georgina Island Chippewas of Kettle & Stony Point Chippewas of Mnjikaning Chippewas of Nawash Chippewas of Saugeen Constance Lake Couchiching Curve Lake Deer Lake Delaware Dokis Eabametoong Eagle Lake Flying Post Fort Albany Fort Severn Fort William Garden River Ginoogaming Grassy Narrows Gull Bay Hiawatha Hornepayne Iskutewizaagegan Kasabonika Kashechewan Keewaywin Kingfisher Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug Koocheching Lac La Croix Lac Seul Lac des Mille Lacs Long Lake M'Chigeeng Magnetawan Marten Falls Matachewan Mattagami McDowell Lake Michipicoten Mishkeegogamang Missanabie Cree Mississauga Mississaugas of New Credit

Mississaugas of Scugog Island Mocreebec Mohawks of Akwesasne Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte Moose Cree Moose Deer Point Munsee-Delaware Muskrat Dam Lake Naicatchewenin Namaygoosisagagun Naotkamegwanning Anishinabe Neskantaga Nibinamik Nicickousemenecaning Nipissing North Caribou Lake North Spirit Lake Northwest Angle No. 33 Northwest Angle No. 37 Ochiichagwe'babigo'ining Ojibways of Onigaming Ojibways of the Pic River Oneida Nation of the Thames Pays Plat Pic Mobert Pikangikum Poplar Hill Poplar Point Rainy River Red Rock Sachigo Lake Sagamok Anishnawbek Sand Point Sandy Lake Saugeen Seine River Serpent River Shawanaga Sheguiandah Sheshegwaning Shoal Lake Six Nations of the Grand River Slate Falls Stanjikoming Sucker Creek Taykwa Tagamou Temagami Thessalon Wabaseemoong Wabigoon Wahgoshig Wahnapitae Wahta Wapekeka Wasauksing Wasauksing Washagamis Bay Wauzhushk Onigum Wawakapewin Webequie Weenusk Whitefish Lake Whitesand Whitewater Lake Wikwemikong Wunnumin Lake Zhiibaahaasing First Nation

...and we have OUR OWN stories to tell.

Support Independant Indigeneous Media www.tworowtimes.com www.jukasaradio.ca


June 19th, 2019

TWO ROW TIMES

QUIZ: SIX QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SIX NATIONS 1. The Six Nations of the Grand River are: a) First Nations b) Metis c) Inuit 2. What does the word “Haudenosaunee” mean? ____________________________________________________ 3. List the 9 clans of the Haudenosaunee people? ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ 4.Who was sent by the Creator and brought a message of unity and respect? ___________________________________________________________________________ 5. The people of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy established the: ___________________________________________________________________________ 6. The traditional thanksgiving address of the Haudenosaunee people is called the: ___________________________________________________________________________ Send your answers to TRT by 5:00 p.m. Monday, June 24, 2019 to 50 Generations Drive, Ohsweken, ON NOA 1M0 or via email: editor@tworowtimes.com for a chance to win a TRT Prize Pack!

Name:____________________________________________ Age: ________________________ Email :____________________________________Phone: ______________________________

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June 19th, 2019

Maine governor signs bill to ban Native American mascots

Maine Gov. Janet Mills speaks at the signing ceremony to establish Indigenous Peoples' Day, Friday, April 26, 2019, at the State House in Augusta, Maine. Several tribal leaders attended the event. PHOTO SUBMITTED

AUGUSTA, ME — Maine public schools and universities will soon ban the use of mascots and logos depicting Native Americans. Democratic Gov. Janet Mills' office says the bill she signed Thursday will become effective 90 days after the Legislature adjourns. Penobscot Nation Am-

Toby's Gas Bar would like to wish everyone a Happy Solidarity Day!

3706 1st Line Rd, Hagersville, Ontario N0A 1H0 905) 768-5188 Hours 6:00 AM - 10:00 PM

bassador Maulian Dana says the law is ``a huge step toward trust and respect'' for indigenous people. Democratic Rep. Benjamin Collings said members of tribal communities are people, not mascots. Mills' office says California, Oregon and Wisconsin have similar restrictions, while South Dakota, New

York and Michigan have called for the end of the use of mascots. Republican opponents have argued that local boards should decide such issues. The last Maine high school to use such a mascot, Skowhegan Area High School, voted to stop using it this year.


June 19th, 2019

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Celebrating

National Indigenous Day We recognize and celebrate the rich contributions First Nations, Inuit and MĂŠtis peoples have made to Canada. Northern College extends best wishes to our Indigenous students, communities, partners and staff.

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June 19th, 2019

MISSISSAUGAS OF THE CREDIT

33rd ANNUAL

CELEBRATION OF NATIONS INDIGENOUS ARTS GATHERING CALL FOR ARTISANS 6-8 September 2019 Submissions Due Friday 28 June 2019

Celebration of Nations is an annual gathering of Indigenous Arts, Culture, and Tradition in downtown St. Catharines. It is a part of a long-term vision of the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre, Kakekalanicks and the City of St. Catharines to build on the Two Row Wampum teaching that promotes all nations walking together, in parallel, with respect, compassion, and understanding to cultivate an inclusive community for our shared future.

AUGUST 24 & 25, 2019 LOVING MOTHER EARTH

Entertainment Night in Partnership with CKRZ 100.3FM

ENTERTAINMENT NIGHT FEATURING: RESILLUSION, BIG JOE, JOSH MILLER, MARK LAFORME AND DWAYNE LAFORME! August 23, 2019 from 5:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. Donations welcome and please bring a non-perishable food item for the local foodbank! Join us as we celebrate our culture with DRUMMING

DANCING

ARTS & CRAFTS

NATIVE PLANT GARDEN

EXHIBITS

New Credit Indian Reserve R.R. #6, Blue # 2789 Mississauga Road, Hagersville, Ontario For GPS coordinates: Long 80 deg 5 min 41 sec, Lat 43 deg 0 in 0 sec Bring your feast bundles and re-fillable water bottles; water stations will be on site Admission: $5/person - 6 years and under - FREE For further information contact the New Credit Cultural Committee @ (905) 768-3067 info@newcreditcc.ca

Now entering its second year, Celebration of Nations is opening an artisan market to showcase Indigenous-made arts and crafts. The artisan market will be located along the raceway of the Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts in the “backyard” of the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre. DETAILS •Celebration of Nations Artisan Market will be open to the public on Saturday 7 September 11am – 5pm // & Sunday 8 September 11 am – 5 pm •The Market will be part of a full program featuring free performances, activities, and food vendors in the backyard of the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre •REGULAR BOOTHS (10ft x 10ft) are available at $150 per vendor (fees include coverage, listing in programme, website listings, print media attention, out marketing, blogging, social media, on-site signage, and more.) Limited electricity is available for an additional $25 per space. Max. 300W usage. (Music/Audio not permitted). •Vendors guarantee that they have adequate liability and property insurance and assume full responsibility for any liability or damages that may occur while on the ‘host’ property. •All Vendors are responsible for appropriate permits, required product labels, and collection of all appropriate sales tax. Vendors are responsible for their own credit/debit services and related fees. •Vendors must be personally present during the event and able to commit to ALL scheduled hours of operations during the gathering. •Vendors must arrive ahead of the scheduled opening time to set up their tables. You must be fully set up and ready to sell by opening time. The tent will be open half an hour before opening time to set up. You must also stay to the end of the scheduled time even if you are sold out of product. •Vendors keep 100% of sales. Fees: $150 for the weekend Payment from approved vendors will be required on the first day of participation. Cheques are to be made to the City of St Catharines. Participants will be selected with consideration to diversity of medium, quality of work being sold, and available spaces. All applicants will be notified by Friday 26 July 2019

w w w.newcreditcc.c a

Ted Silverhand Native Seer Appearing at The Bears Inn, 1979 4th Line, Ohsweken, Six Nations Saturday, June 22 through Tuesday June 25 11AM - 6PM By Appointment Only

Please Contact Brenda@tedsilverhand.com or 250-739-0357

Bo

t u O d e k o

June 21 is National Indigenous Peoples Day This is a day to celebrate the diversity and strength of Indigenous peoples, languages and cultures. It’s a day for all Canadians to learn more about our shared history, recognize the many contributions of Indigenous peoples, and make a commitment to respect and reconciliation. The Assembly of First Nations is committed to promoting the political, economic, social and spiritual advancement of First Nations. By working together to revitalize our languages, take control of the education and well-being of our children, and restore our own laws and systems of governance, we build stronger nations for all of our citizens and a stronger country for all.

In strength and solidarity, the AFN wishes everyone a festive National Indigenous Peoples Day! The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nations in Canada. 55 Metcalfe Street, Suite 1600, Ottawa ON K1P 6L5 • Toll-free: 1.866.869.6789 www.afn.ca  Facebook: Assembly of First Nations / Assemblée des Premières Nations  Twitter: @ AFN_Updates


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'This road is just the beginning:' Isolated First Nation celebrates SHOAL LAKE — For the first time in his life, Chief Erwin Redsky won't have to fight for each small stone that lies along the 24-kilometre road that connects his First Nation to the outside world after more than a century. He looks down the long, wide gravel landlink and predicts it is his community's path to the future. ``This is Freedom Road,'' says the chief of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation with a smile. The road that provides a year-round tie to the Trans-Canada Highway is just the beginning of a long journey toward reconciliation in Canada, he says. ``Shoal Lake 40 has been that model of that broken relationship, and I think Shoal Lake 40 can be that model of that new relationship that needs to happen with Indigenous Peoples of this land,'' he said in an interview last week. The First Nation on the Manitoba-Ontario boundary is planning to hold a four-day grand opening for Freedom Road this

week. Shoal Lake was cut off from the mainland in 1915 during construction of an aqueduct that supplies Winnipeg with drinking water. Clean water flows to the capital city while dirty water is pushed to the reserve. Shoal Lake residents have been under a boil-water advisory for more than two decades, one of the longest in Canada. News reports from the time said the spot was largely uninhabited ``with the exception of a few Indians.'' Redsky said his First Nation has paid the ``price of water'' with their health, economy and even their lives. Members used ice roads in winter and an aging and often unreliable ferry in the summer. During the seasons in between, people risked their lives walking across the ice to get to and from the mainland. Most have a story of falling through the ice or of relatives who died during the treacherous trek.

BULLDOG TARGETS $70 - $525 SIZES 16”X19” UP TO 48”X48”

The First Nation spent decades trying to negotiate with provincial and federal governments, but their plight was finally brought to national attention with the opening of Winnipeg's Canadian Museum for Human Rights in 2014. Cuyler Cotton, a policy analyst who works with Shoal Lake 40, said the community's leadership pointed out the hypocrisy of having the reserve's water running through the museum's taps. Soon churches, students and citizens started to march in support of the First Nation. ``This was no longer an Indigenous story. This was the story of Winnipeg. This is the story of Canada,'' he said. Manitoba, the City of Winnipeg and the federal government finally reached a funding agreement in 2016. Construction of the road began the following year. ``Honestly, for me, I had to see it to believe it,'' said Roxanne Greene, a band councillor and organizer for the opening celebra-

tions. smile on every face. knowing that I had to walk ``Even though we had Ainsley Redsky, 16, said across just to get groceries announcements we were it feels like a weight has and see other people, see getting the funding, I had been lifted. She recalled my friends and stuff,'' she to see the shovel hit the trying to get to a hockey said. ground to believe it.'' practice in Kenora, Ont., It may be her past, she The first time Greene and walking across the said, but the road means drove on Freedom Road ice, holding all her gear, it's not her future. she cried. As the tires with her grandmother. ``It changed so much for rolled along, she realized ``It was really scary everyone.'' the road represents freedom and a new future. Family members who have left can easily return, a water treatment plant and new school for children can be constructed and summer powwows can be held, she said. Suicide is preventable. Anyone can make a difference. ``All of our powwows Suicide is preventable. Anyone can a difference. Suicide is preventable. Anyone can make a difference. Suicide canmake make difference. Suicideisispreventable. preventable. Anyone Anyone can make a adifference. that we have had previ Half-day training in suicide alertness skills ously were always held Half-day training in suicide alertness  Half-day in suicide alertness    Half-day training ininsuicide alertness skillsskills Half-day training suicide alertness skills  training Learn four basic steps to skills create a life-saving connection indoors during the winter  Learn Learn four basic steps to create a life-saving Learn four basic steps to create create life-saving connection    Learn basic steps to life-saving connection four basic steps to create a aalife-saving connection  four Widely used by professionals and theconnection general public because we didn't have Widely used byprofessionals professionals and the general public Widely by professionals and the general public    Widely used by andthe thegeneral general public  Widely used byused professionals and public the road access.'' Upcoming safeTALK training The long-awaited Upcoming safeTALKtraining training Upcoming safeTALK Upcoming safeTALK training Upcoming safeTALK training celebration is to include June 2019 PM - 8:00 PM Date: Date: June 25, 201925, 5:00 PM -5:00 8:00 PM Date: June 25, 2019 5:00 PM -PM 8:00 PM PM Date: June 25, 2019 - 8:00 a day to honour the men, Date: June 25, 2019 5:00 PM5:00 8:00 PM Location: 15 Crt, Sunrise Crt, Ohsweken, ON Location: 15 Sunrise Ohsweken, ON Location: 15 Sunrise Crt, Crt, Ohsweken, ON ON women, elders and youth Location: 15 Sunrise Ohsweken, Location: 15 Sunrise Crt, Ohsweken, ON Services Hosted by: Six Nations Child and Family Hosted by: SixChild Nations Child and Family Services of Shoal Lake 40. Plans Hosted by: by: Six Nations and and Family Services Hosted Six Nations Child Family Services Hosted by: Six Nations Child and Family Services include helicopter rides, a Cost: FREE fish fry, a talent show and Cost: FREE Cost: FREE Cost: FREE To inquire or register, call 519-445-0408 a concert featuring Ca- Cost: FREE To or inquire register, 519-445-0408 Toor inquire orcall register, call 519-445-0408 Toemail inquire or register, call 519-445-0408 bdoolittle@sixnations.ca nadian blues singer Billy To inquire or register, call 519-445-0408 or email bdoolittle@sixnations.ca or email bdoolittle@sixnations.ca Joe Green and folk rocker or email bdoolittle@sixnations.ca safeTALK works. Learn more and see the evidence at www.livingworks.net/safetalk or email bdoolittle@sixnations.ca Ernest Monias. BULLDOG TARGETS safeTALK works. Learn more and see the evidence at www.livingworks.net/safetalk safeTALK works. works. Learn more and see the www.livingworks.net/safetalk safeTALK Learn more andevidence see the at evidence at www.livingworks.net/safetalk The excitement in the $70safeTALK - $525 works. Learn more and see the evidence at www.livingworks.net/safetalk community is electric, FULL SELECTION OF Greene said, and there's aSIZES 16”X19”

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June 19th, 2019

June 28-30 2019 FREE ADMISSION

FESTIVAL

WILL BOUMA MPP – Brantford-Brant

HAPPY INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY

www.wcc.events WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE

184 Mohawk St. Brantford Ont. Alcohol & Drug Free Venue

96-101 Nelson St. • Brantford Ontario N3T 2X1 Tel: 519-759-0361 • Email: will.bouma@pc.ola.org Web: www.willbouma.ca


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June 19th, 2019

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MPs urged to act concerning coerced sterilization of Indigenous women OTTAWA — MPs on the House of Commons health committee heard grave concerns Thursday about ongoing sterilizations of Indigenous women without their consent — an issue also raised by the national inquiry tasked with examining violence against Indigenous women in its many forms. Alisa Lombard, a lawyer representing Indigenous women who allege they were coerced into sterilization procedures after childbirth, told the committee her clients live with emotional and physical trauma. ``They cannot have children,'' Lombard said. ``It was not their choice. They suffer.'' Lombard talked about one of her clients, known as D.D.S., who believed she had no choice but to sign a consent form moments after receiving an epidural at a Moose Jaw, Sask., hospital in December 2018. The federal government must now take very concrete measures on prevention, punishment and reparations for women who have gone through these ex-

periences, she said, adding that Canada has faced calls, including from the United Nations Committee Against Torture, to act. Lombard was questioned Thursday by Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette about how much Canadians care about the issue, given that it's been discussed, including in media reports, for more than two years. ``I guess we will find out,'' she replied. The women deserve accountability, agreed Francyne Joe, the president of the Native Women's Association of Canada who also testified. Earlier Thursday, Lombard said in an interview it is not surprising the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls included the issue among its findings. The commission, which released 231 recommendations last week, was asked by the federal government to probe all forms of violence against Indigenous women and girls. Lombard said ``obstetric violence'' clearly falls into that category, adding that

numerous parties with standing at the inquiry made submissions on the issue, including the vicechair of Saskatchewan's Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations. The inquiry's final report says that Alberta and B.C. both repealed provincial sterilization acts in the 1970s but Indigenous women across the coun-

try tell stories of coerced sterilizations that continue even today. It also notes the proposed class-action lawsuit on behalf of Indigenous women in Saskatchewan who have provided evidence they were sterilized without their consent. The proposed class was launched in 2017, naming the Saskatoon Health Au-

thority, the Saskatchewan government, the federal government and a handful of medical professionals as defendants. More than 100 women have since come forward with allegations. ``We believe that is only the tip of the iceberg,'' Melanie Omeniho, the president of Women of the Metis Nation, told the committee.

Metis women are not just concerned about doctors performing procedures, she added. She said coercion comes from other players in medical institutions and social workers as well. The health committee passed a motion on to call RCMP commissioner Brenda Lucki to testify on the issue.

SNCDT APPLICATION FOR 2020 FUNDING DEADLINE Friday, June 28, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. (no late applications will be accepted)

The Six Nations Community Development Trust application for 2020 funding deadline is fast approaching…Friday, June 28, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. Applications can be submitted via email, fax, snail mail, or in person. Please download our 2019 application from our website sixnationscommunitytrust.com or contact us at our office at 905-765-1236, email sntrust@sninternet.com or visit our office Suite 111 at the Oneida Business Park for a hard copy. Applicants must have Six Nations Members involvement in their organization and have a board or committee structure. We do not offer individual funding. Please email or call if you have any questions or require assistance. Oneida Business Park, 50 Generations Drive (corner of 4th line and Hwy #6). Box 7, Suite 111, Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-1236 fax: (905) 765-2755 Email: sntrust@sninternet.com

FRESH GOURMET BURGER CREATIONS DECADENT DESSERTS WEEKEND SPECIALS KIDS MENU ALL DAY BREAKFAST HOMEMADE PIES As seen on Food Network's "YOU GOTTA EAT HERE" Everyone Welcome Ample Parking Like us on FACEBOOK

Stop in for your BURGER BARN Fix Today!!! Dine in or Take out 3000 4th Line, Ohsweken www.burgerbarn.ca 519-445-0088 Open Everyday 8am-9pm Dine in or Takeout


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June 19th, 2019

Relationship with Metis Nation a model for reconciliation: Trudeau

Ojiibikens, Taiaiako’n Historical Preservation Society, and the High Park Nature Centre invite you to our

National Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration! Free for families and community, the celebration will include kid- friendly activities like planting, arts and crafts, and a feast! Learn more and register at www.highparknaturecentre.com/indigenous-programs Date & Time: Friday June 21, 2019, 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm Contact: 375 Colborne Lodge Drive, Toronto, ON, Canada, M6P 3K0 419-392-1748 naturecentre@highpark.org

CELEBRATION OF NATIONS

OTTAWA — The Canadian government's relationship with the Metis Nation is a tangible and concrete example of reconciliation, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Thursday. At a meeting known as the Crown-Metis Nation Summit held in Ottawa, Trudeau said reconciliation efforts will span generations but said the government has come a long way in working with the Metis Nation on long-standing challenges, including housing and post-secondary education. The meeting is the third since the Liberals came to power in 2015. ``I really want to put forward this relationship as the model of what reconciliation can be,'' Trudeau said at the beginning of the discussions, flanked by Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett and Metis National Council president Clement Chartier. Some people might talk about reconciliation as loosely as any other buzzword, said Chartier, but he stressed the Metis Nation

Canadian PM Justin Trudeau with Metis National Council PresiPHOTO BY X dent Clement Cartier.

has witnessed it in action with cabinet ministers who have been dedicated to working with the Metis on the path forward. Chartier said when he first met Trudeau, he tried to impress upon him it was critical to address the challenges facing Indigenous Peoples with respect for the unique needs of Metis, First Nations, and Inuit. He said that this approach has shown results

and went on to present Trudeau with the Order of the Metis Nation _ the highest award it has for people who have made a significant contribution to the Metis. Next year will mark 150 years since the Metis Nation joined Canada, Trudeau said Thursday, adding it is an important anniversary for all Canadians to celebrate this milestone and to reaffirm the commitment to work together.

PLUS FEATURED PROGRAMMING ALL YEAR ROUND!

The Grizzlies

Inuit youth in a small community gain a powerful sense of pride and purpose through the sport of lacrosse, in this true-story of tenacity, renewal, and inspiring resilience.

6 - 8 September 2019

Fri 21 June - Fri 5 July | The Film house *FREE SCREENING Fri 21 June at 6:30pm for National Indigenous Peoples Day.

AN ANNUAL WEEKEND GATHERING OF INDIGENOUS ARTS, CULTURE & TRADITION IN DOWNTOWN ST. CATHARINES

Mînowin

Mînowin

The Dancers of Damelahamid A stunning multimedia dance work by the celebrated troupe from Northwest British Columbia following their world premiere at the Tues National Arts Centre in Ottawa. 1 Oct 7:30pm

Tues 1 Oct 7:30pm | Partridge Hall

THE NEWEST LIGHT IN CANADA’S INDIGENOUS RENAISSANCE.”

- NPR (NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO)

Jeremy Dutcher

Winner of the prestigious 2018 Polaris Music Prize, this classically trained operatic tenor and composer blends his Wolastoq First Nation roots with classical, traditional and pop music to form something entirely new and breathtaking.

Thurs 3 Oct 7:30pm | Partridge Hall

HUFF

By Cliff Cardinal With his signature biting humour and raw, vivid imagery, Cliff Cardinal expertly portrays over a dozen characters in his captivating, award-winning solo theatre performance.

Thurs 21 Nov 8pm | Fri 22 Nov 8pm Sat 23 Nov 2pm + 8pm | Robertson Theatre PRESENTED BY

celebrationofnations.ca

FirstOntarioPAC.ca

“HUFF IS A HEARTBREAKER.” – TORONTOIST

MATURE CONTENT


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June 19th, 2019

KANATA FUELS - KANATA KARWASH - TIM HORTONS - KONVENIENCE PLUS

THE STAFF AT KANATA FUELS, KONVENIENCE PLUS AND KLASS A WISH ALL

A HAPPY SOLIDARITY DAY!

HAPPINESS IS...DRIVING YOUR CAR AFTER THE KARWASH. PURCHASES CAN BE MADE AT THE KIOSK.

892 Highway 54, Ohsweken

Like us on Facebook! Find us at “Kanata Fuels”

#ItsNotCleanUntilItsKanataClean

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June 19th, 2019

arts. culture. entertainment.

The Amazing Race shows off indigenous couple

Indigenous artwork featuring jingle dress dancers was featured on Google last week.

FILE PHOTO

Google 'doodle' by Ontario Ojibwe artist celebrates jingle dress dance STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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A brightly-coloured illustration celebrating the popular Indigenous jingle dress dance adorned Google's homepage on Saturday, courtesy of Ojibwe artist Joshua Mangeshig Pawis-Steckley. The illustration depicts two women dancing in jingle dresses, which the

search engine describes as filling the air with sounds like raindrops on a tin roof as metal ornaments jingle with dancers' intricate footwork. Pawis-Steckley says he hopes it carries the message that Anishinaabe culture is beautiful and Indigenous women are strong. He was excited when Google approached him in April with the idea of creating a so-called

Google Doodle about the dance, which is popular at competitive powwows in Canada and the United States. Pawis-Steckley splits his time between Vancouver and Wasauksing First Nation in Ontario and says he's not sure how Google found his work, but suspects designers might have noticed a series of different powwow dance illustrations he created last year.

He says he's received a flurry of messages and nearly doubled his Instagram followers since the doodle went live at midnight on Saturday. ``It's kind of unreal. Even on Instagram, I've never really got that much attention before. It all kind of exploded,'' Pawis-Steckley said, adding that he's glad to see support for Indigenous artists working in new mediums like graphic design.

Three indigenous organizations partner with Netflix STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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Netflix has announced new partnerships with three Indigenous cultural organizations in Canada to help foster and develop screen talent. The partnerships with imagineNATIVE which is the world's largest presenter of Indigenous screen content, the Indigenous Screen Office, and Wapikoni Mobile which is an organization that travels to Indigenous communities across Canada to offer filmmaking tools for youth were revealed last Tuesday night at the Banff World Media Festival. The initiative is part of a $25-million and five year commitment Netflix made in September 2017

Netflix has partnered with imagineNATIVE, Indigenous Screen OfPHOTO FILE fice and Wapikoni Mobile.

to invest in market development activities aimed at supporting the next generation of Canadian film creators. These new agreements bring the total number of partnerships to 14 that have been inked as part of that commitment, which focuses on underserved communities, including Indigenous, women and francophone creators.

In a statement, imagineNATIVE executive director Jason Ryle said the partnership with Netflix "marks one of the largest sponsorships in imagineNATIVE's history.” Cardin said while Netflix would want to hear about any projects that might come out of the partnerships, the company doesn't have anything built into the contracts

concerning so-called "first-look" or "right of first refusal" deals that would give the company an exclusive on productions. The agreement with imagineNATIVE — an organization that has its own institute and holds an annual film festival in Toronto — will involve six distinct activities aimed at Indigenous screenwriters, directors and producers. Those activities will include Indigenous producers' and directors' labs. The agreement with the Indigenous Screen Office will provide "second-phase support" for Indigenous projects, including key creative apprenticeships and cultural mentorships for directors, producers, screenwriters and show-runners.

STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The Amazing Race Canada has been a reality television competition series that features 10 teams competing in a gruelling race across Canada and the world for over 30 seasons. This year, the race will feature indigenous couple comprised of Navajo Anthony Johnson from Arizona and Cree James Makokis from Alberta. Not only are the current Edmonton residents seemingly perfectly matched for each other, but part of why they’re racing is to show young Indigenous people that there are people “like them” who are successful, as Johnson is a project consultant and Makokis is a doctor, while still committed to their cultural and spiritual beliefs. Johnson and Makokis met on Facebook after Johnson spotted Makokis as the center-fold in OUT Magazine. When the two met in person, sparks flew and they married in 2017. The duo are both driven to be strong voic-es for their community and good role models. Johnson attended Harvard and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics. His marriage to Makokis, and subsequent move to Alberta, has given him a new lease on life. Makokis has constantly dealt with the adversities in the medical industry related to being Indigenous and hopes to use the opportunity to educate. The pair started chatting and three years ago, for Johnson’s 30th birth-

day, Makokis travelled to Manhattan where they had “this awe-some New York romance.” While showcasing strong teamwork and their genuine love for each other is a top goal for this team, they also want to help educate the rest of Canada on Indigenous life. They say they’ve never had the opportunity to see how two people like them might interact together on television be-fore, and that their casting is a huge step in overall Canadian diversity. “Diversity is important because our world is diverse. The more people that we see, the more voices we hear about, the more history we learn from one another, the more our hearts open to humanity and the world,” Johnson said. “Our team motto is Ahkameyimok. It’s a [Cree] word you say to another person’s spirit to say, dig deep within yourself and find that element of your spirit, that true essence of yourself and exert it and do your best. When you do that, that’s when you achieve breakthrough re-sults. That’s when you overcome things that are in your path.” “It’s something elders say to younger people as encouragement,” Makokis explained. “We want to be positive. And we want others to learn a little about Indigenous languages and say something pretty easy that they could also use in their own life.” “It’s also just really fun to say!” adds Johnson. The series kicks off on Tuesday, July 2 at 9 p.m., on CTV.


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June 19th, 2019

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First Nations push for massive conservation area in northern B.C. CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

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LOWER POST, BC — First Nations in northern British Columbia are calling on the provincial government to endorse an ambitious proposal for a 40,000-square-kilometre conservation area to protect major watersheds and sensitive species. The proposal would cover the ancestral areas of three Kaska Dena First Nations and would be larger than Vancouver Island, taking up a massive section of north-central B.C. Premier John Horgan's government hasn't said whether it supports or opposes the idea after seven months of phone calls, letters and meetings with officials from various ministries, say the project's proponents. ``They've never said No, but they've never said Yes, and they've never said they would sit down and negotiate what it would look like. That's all we're asking at this point,'' said David Crampton of the Dena Kayeh Institute, which is spearheading the project. ``We're not sure why. We have no idea really what's going on in the background of all this.'' The First Nations have applied for $4 million in federal government funding for the project, known as the Kaska Indigenous Protected and Conserved Area, and now fear it won't receive funding because B.C. hasn't signed on. Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has been supportive, said Crampton. ``But she's drawing her reins in a little bit because of the complacency of the provincial government, at this point, to make any kind of move at all,'' he said. The provincial and federal governments did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The plan has been more than two decades in the making. Horgan was a staff member in B.C.'s New Democrat government in the 1990s, which worked with the Kaska to create

what was then one of the largest protected areas in the world, the Muskwa-Kechika Management Area. The proposed new conservation area includes part of the Muskwa-Kechika. The new area covers a vast, roadless area stretching to the Yukon border in the north, the slopes of the Rockies in the east, the Cassiar Mountains on the west, and to the Rocky Mountain Trench _ between the Rockies and the Cassiar _ in the south. Crampton said the proposal was carefully designed to avoid forestry and other resource extraction areas. It lies between natural gas deposits and the Site C dam project in the east, and mining and other resource projects in the west. In the most recent round of letters sent to various ministers, the Kaska Dena Council explained why the conservation area would not conflict with natural resource development, said Crampton. The council wrote to Forests Minister Doug Donaldson on May 3, saying it had come to their attention that ``there is a major concern within your ministry regarding possible tensions and conflict around forestry'' in the proposed protected area. ``We believe this is based on misinformation and a serious lack of understanding of our proposal in spite of our best efforts to keep both you and your officials well-informed and well-briefed,'' the letter says. ``We are worried that these concerns, never shared with us directly, are having a negative impact on your perception of our proposal.'' The Kaska controls logging in the forests surrounding the conservation area and there isn't any opportunity for forestry inside it, Crampton said. As for mining, Teck Resources holds a permit that covers a southeast corner of the conservation area, but it only actively operates outside the area, Crampton said. Teck said in a statement that it has not been contacted by the Kaska

about a conservation area and would be open to discussions about their proposed plans. The Kaska have applied for federal help from a $175-million fund designated for projects that help Canada meet a biodi-

versity target of protecting 17 per cent of land and inland water by 2020. The institute completed a 78-page conservation analysis, which detailed how the area is home to seven herds of northern woodland caribou, 10

major watersheds and 13 distinct ecosystems, said Corrine Porter, executive director of the Dena Kayeh Institute. Supporters also say the conservation area would create jobs for Kaska members, who could work

as guides or Indigenous guardians who patrol the land. ``We want to protect it for our cultural well-being,'' added Porter. ``It's just a really special area that we'd like to protect for future generations.''

Call for Submissions: Indigenous Artwork The Legislative Assembly of Ontario invites Ontario-based Indigenous wood artists to submit for consideration an Expression of Interest to design and carve a fixed art piece for the Legislative Chamber. Background As the seat of Ontario’s provincial parliament, the Legislative Building is a physical symbol representing our province. At the heart of the building is the Legislative Chamber where Members of Provincial Parliament meet to debate and pass bills on behalf of Ontarians.

For 125 years, Ontario’s Legislative Chamber has brought many people with different opinions together to seek consensus. The Chamber has a rich heritage and contains a number of intricate wood carvings set in mahogany and Canadian sycamore. Inspired by medieval architecture, renderings of gargoyles and mythical creatures are intended to scare away evil spirits, while Latin mottoes inscribed on pillars promote good governance. These pieces are beautiful and historically significant, but they lack representation from the province’s first peoples. Artist’s Assignment The purpose of this call for submissions is to incorporate Indigenous artwork into the Chamber. The artwork will serve as a permanent reminder of the history of Indigenous peoples in Ontario and symbolize new connections, relationships and opportunities being fostered today. The Legislative Assembly of Ontario is looking for a wood artist to design and carve a fixed art piece that will represent The Seven Grandfathers Teachings.

A mahogany panel will be located above the alcove framing the doors of the Legislative Chamber. The exposed area of the panel will be approximately 14 inches in height by 118 inches in length by 1.5 inches in thickness. One artist will be selected to design and carve this wood panel into a fixed art piece representing The Seven Grandfathers Teachings.

Commission Budget The budget for this commission is $20,000.00, which must cover all costs required to design and fabricate the art piece. The wooden panel will be provided to the selected artist. The Legislative Assembly of Ontario will be responsible for the staining and installation of the panel. The art piece will become the property of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. Submission Requirements Your submission must include all of the following components:

1. Expression of Interest Explain why you are interested in the opportunity. Tell us about your artwork and if you have created work for any other public space. Your Expression of Interest may be either a written submission or a short video. 2. Biography Submit a current biography or information about yourself. Include information such as your experience as an artist/ wood carver, any art training you have completed, public artwork on display and any other experience directly related to this opportunity. Include your name, mailing address, telephone number and email address. 3. Samples of Previous Artwork Submit a maximum of five (5) digital image files or photographs showing samples of wood carvings that you have completed or that are currently in progress. 4. Concept Drawing Provide a scale drawing or sketch of your proposed carving of the wood panel. Include an explanation/interpretation of how the proposed carving represents The Seven Grandfathers Teachings.

All submissions will become the property of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. Deadlines Submissions must be received by 11:59 p.m. (EST) on December 31, 2019.

Any questions must be received by 11:00 a.m. (EST) on December 10, 2019.

E-mail submissions to tday@ola.org (up to 10MB in attachments in .JPEG, .TIFF, or .PDF formats, links preferred) or mail to the following address: Trevor Day | Deputy Clerk & Executive Director, Legislative Services Legislative Assembly of Ontario 99 Wellesley Street West Toronto, Ontario M7A 1A2 Telephone: 416-325-3502 | Fax: 416-325-5848

Selection Criteria Submissions will be evaluated by an all-party panel. The evaluation will include assessing the artist’s experience, qualifications, previous artwork, and concept drawing and explanation. The decision of the panel is final. The successful artist must sign a written agreement with the Legislative Assembly of Ontario transferring all rights to the artwork. The Legislative Assembly of Ontario reserves the right to modify, amend or withdraw this call for submissions at any time without notice or compensation.


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June 19th, 2019

SPORTS

know the score.

Nolan, a part of the Stanley Cup win

Update on SNMLA’s Players of the Week CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Jordan Nolan has now taken part in the culmination of three NHL championship as the St. Louis Blues welcomed the cup after their PHOTO SUBMITTED win over the Boston Bruins last Wednesday.

By TRT Staff Garden River’s Jordan Nolan has reason to celebrate. As the St. Louis Blues beat the Boston Bruins 4-1 last Wednesday night in game seven of the Stanley Cup Final, the team won the trophy for the first time in franchise history. For Nolan, it’s the third time he’s been part of a Stanley Cup celebration. The 29-year-old, who is also a former member of the Ontario Hockey League’s Soo Greyhounds, was a part of a pair of Stanley Cup winners in Los Angeles. Nolan was a part of the Kings as the team won the Cup in 2012 and 2014. Nolan played with the Kings for six seasons before joining the Buffalo Sabres for the 2017-18 season and then joining the Blues this season. Nolan spent much of the 2018-19 season playing for former Greyhounds coach Drew Bannister with the Blues American

Hockey League affiliate, the San Antonio Rampage, but also suited up in 14 regular season games with the Blues where he picked up a pair of assists. In 59 games in San Antonio, Nolan scored 17 goals and 35 points. Nolan was called up from the Rampage prior to the Blues second round series against the Dallas Stars. As an Ojibwe athlete and as per tradition, each player on the winning team is awarded a day with the Stanley Cup, so this will be his third time bringing it to his home in Ontario.

SIX NATIONS — More young athletes have been chosen to shine through Jukasa Radio’s Players of the Week announcements, sponsored by Townline Gas and Variety, Bearpaw Gas and Convenience, and Warriors Athletics. In addition to over 25 previous athletes, another 15 have been recognized for week five and six. Week 5 on Saturday, June 8 recognized: goaltenders Emmett Styres and Hagwas Hill of the Midget 2 Team for their teamwork in net, Tyrese Staats of the Intermediate 1 Team for his effort as a captain, Bentley Crawford of the Tyke 1 Team for his new goal tending skills, Kaine

Reaching Week 6 of the Players of the Week has now recognized over 30 young athletes from the PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN Six Nations Minor Lacrosse Association.

Romaniuk of the Tyke 2 Team for his scoring abilities, Kawliga Maracle-Hill of the Novice 3 Team for making saves in net, Memphis McNaughton of the Peewee 1 Team for his defensive work, Dayton Flatt of the Peewee 2 Team for his work ethic, and Dayton VanEvery of the Bantam 3 Team for his dedication.

Week 6 on Saturday, June 15 recognized: Bentley Agoston of the Tyke 3 Team for his heart while playing, Kali Monture of the Peewee Girls Team for her goal scoring, Keafer Sandy of the Peewee 3 Team for his hits, Jade Hill of the Midget Girls Team for her team encouragement, Sylas Doolittle of

the Midget 3 Team for his never-give-up attitude, and Leon Henhawk of the Intermediate 2 Team for giving the game 100 per cent. The announcements are available to view on the Jukasa Radio Facebook Page and may be heard on Jukasa Radio at 93.5 f.m., during the 3-4 p.m., hour.

Grand River Attack hosts Becky Smith Memorial

HAGERSVILLE — This weekend the Grand River Attack will be hosting the Becky Smith Memorial Tournament, the teams annual home showcase, in Hagersville on Saturday and Sunday. During the weekend the local Six Nations Peewee Girls Team will play a feature game against the Girls Kitchener Peewee Braves, and a memorial buckets and gloves game will take place that will include previous players versus new players to the Attack. Little Miss Six Nations Kylen Demaria will also be doing the ball drop on Sundays championship game.

The Becky Smith Memorial Tournament will take place in Hagersville this weekend. The full schedule PHOTO SUBMITTED can be accessed through the Grand River Attack Facebook page.

CALL TODAY AND GET YOUR MEMBERSHIP.

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TWO ROW TIMES

June 19th, 2019

37

Chiefs play Cobourg, Brampton and Brooklin

On Sunday, June 9, the Chiefs visited the Cobourg Kodiaks and earned a win 13-8. While the following Tuesday, the Chiefs hosted the Brampton Excelsiors at the Iroquios Lacrosse Arena an came back from a seven point deficit to reach a tight loss 8-9. They looked to assert themselves when they play the Kodiaks again this past Tuesday at ILA and will visit Brooklin tonight. PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

SN Rivermen on a three-game win streak

WATERLOO — The Six Nations Rivermen have earned themselves a three-game win streak with away games that were lined up against the KW Velocity and the Ennismore James Gang. On June 4, they delivered a loss to the Velocity 12-7, while Saturday, June 15 they knocked the James Gang out with a win 9-4. The following Sunday allowed the Rivermen to claim another win 4-9, from the Velocity as they prepare for their next set of home games at the Gaylord Powless Arena, at 4 p.m., on Sunday June 23 versus the Brooklyn MerPHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN chants and Friday, June 28 at 8 p.m., against the Oakville Titans.

Rebels polish off a near perfect regular season CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — With a high lead, the Six Nations Rebels clipped the wings of the Windsor Clippers at home on Friday, June 14, ending their regular season with a final victory as they still on top of the South Western Conference. The first period opened with three consecutive goals from Dawit Martin, Owen Martin and Marshall Powless, leaving the Clippers to catch up as they returned twice. But in the second period, the Rebels went ahead with twice as many consecutive buries before the Clippers could answer. Wesley Whitlow came in with a double, while Tycie Cowan, Daylen Hill, Marshall Powless, and Justin Martin earned singles. The Clippers answered back with two, but each were cancelled out as Wesley Whitlow went for a hat-trick and Gutch Salinas

buried a single to close the period. In the third, Tycie Cowan went for his second and Marshall Powless went for a hat-trick. The Clippers returned once, but Chayton King, Daylen Hill, and Marshall Powless earned singles while Justin Martin made a double. This closed the contest 18-4 for the Rebels, which made up for their last game against the Clippers that ended in a close 11-9 earlier in April. The team is stacked with three top league scoring leaders in Marshall Powless on top (151points), Wesley Whitlow in sixth (102points) and Sidney Powless tied for eight (98points). And Chayton King who is on the board of career leaders for game-winning goals (17) and goals (170). As they sit on the top, the Rebels will enter play-off season suffering just one loss with hopes of returning the Founders Cup to Six Nations.

Referee battered by lacrosse coach leads to assault charge ORILLIA — Provincial police say they’ve charged a coach with assault after a lacrosse referee was allegedly assaulted in the West Orillia Sports Complex on Friday, June 14. Investigators say they were called to answer the report of the assault around 10 p.m., and found the male referee bleeding as a result of an alleged physical fight. The incident took place at Rotary Place,

a state-of-the-art twinpad arena that features two NHL-sized ice rinks, during a game between two out-of-town midget teams competing in the Boyd Balkwill Memorial Tournament. A Facebook post by the OLOA says, “to clarify, the referee was cornered in a hallway when he was beaten. This did not occur in front of an audience.” An additional comment says, “the man who was

assaulted wasn’t even reffing the game in question. He was attempting to (defuse) an irate coach and the coach felt the need to assault him.” Dwayne Palomaki, 47, who was charged with the assault, was acting as the trainer for the Innisfil midget team during the game in question. He was given a game misconduct for verbally berating the on-floor officials and was removed

from the game. Shortly thereafter, Gord Brown, the referee in chief, went to ensure the Palomaki had left the building. It's not clear how people became alerted to the incident but Brown was found in the hallway, bloodied, with facial trauma and requiring hospitalization. Palomaki, has been charged with assault causing bodily harm and he is scheduled to appear in court on July 23.

Referee Gord Brown was found beaten in a hallway after trying to FILE PHOTO defuse a tense situation at the West Orillia Arena.


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Four injured in shooting during Raptors Parade By TRT Staff

Arrows earn a handful of wins and a few losses STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

After hosting the Burlington Chiefs, the Arrows went out of town to rematch the Toronto Beaches on Thursday, June 6. Although the Beaches reached ahead by two goals, the Arrows came close with only two behind. Goals came from Travis Longboat (2), Owen S. Hill, Percy Booth, Ron John and Hodowas Smith. This closed the game 8-6. On Saturday, June 8, the Arrows went to visit the Oakville Buzz but were handed the same score of 6-8 for the Buzz. Goals came from Owen S. Hill, Jeremy Bomberry (3), Clay Scanlan, and Hodowas Smith. But their home game versus the Kitchener Braves gave them a strong win on Sunday, June 9 at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena. The first period gave the Arrows six goals one after the other with only one return from the Braves. Clay Scanlan, Jeremy Bomberry, travis Longboat, and

Arrows next game will take place on Thursday, June 20 at 8 p.m., within the Iroquois Lacrosse ArePHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN na.

Jake Rosa buried singles while Owen S. Hill earned a double. This opened the second period in the lead, as Ron John and Owen S. Hill earned early singles. But the Braves seemed keen on returning and made out with a five goal answer. This started the third period 8-6 for the Arrows, who went on to earn another five from Travis Longboat, Ron John, Owen S. Hill (2) and Dalton Thomas. The Braves answered once and this closed the match 13-7.

However, last Wednesday the Arrows met with the St. Catharines Athletics and were dealt a loss 6-13. Chase Scanlan earned himself a hat-trick, while Tehoka Nanticoke, Jayden Smith and Owen S. Hill earned singles. The following Saturday brought the Arrows to play the Braves again, but this time the Braves came ready to put up more of a fight. The game finalized with the Arrows on top 10-8 as goals came from Jeremy Bomberry (3), Owen S. Hill (2), Kevin Owen Hill (2), Ron

John, Tehoka Nanticoke and Jamie Dilks. The next night the Arrows hosted the Oakville Buzz for another rematch, but this time they took a defeat 5-7. Buries came from Owen S. Hill, Travis Longboat, Chase Scanlan and Tehoka Nanticoke with a double to finish the game. Currently sitting in the middle of standings, the Arrows still have a series of home games to look forward to. The next one will take place on Thursday, June 20 at 8 p.m., within the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena.

© Pierre Charron

After four people were injured Monday in a shooting during the Toronto Raptors' NBA Championship celebration, Canadian officials urged the public to not let it undermine a mostly peaceful commemoration of a historic win. "I hope all those injured in today's shooting have a speedy recovery and I'd like to thank the Toronto Police for acting so quickly," Prime Minister Trudeau said on Twitter. "We won't let this act of violence take away from the spirit of today's parade.” The victims of the gunfire suffered "non-life threatening" injuries in the shooting near the rally in Nathan Phillips Square, as the arrest of three individuals was quick and in two separate incidents connected to the shooting. It was insisted that the incident affected a small group of people during

an otherwise jubilant celebration as out of the thousands of people in at-tendance, the vast majority didn't even know it happened. Images on social media showed people running from the scene and many images suggested a “stampede” like reaction to the gunfire. Since, the names of the three men that were charged in connection to the gunfire were released. Shaquille Anthony Miller, 25, and Thaino Tous-saint, 20, appeared in court on Tuesday, charged with a string of fire-arms-related charges. The third man, 18-year-old Abdikarim Kerow, faces multiple charges stemming from an earlier incident. However, police say they are also looking to identify a person of interest who left the scene of the shooting who was described as caucasian, male, 5'9" to 6' with short, light brown hair and a heavy build.

June 19th, 2019

NOW OPEN What do Indigenous thinking and spirituality bring to the world of architecture? UNCEDED – Voices of the Land is a breathtaking multimedia installation that brings together the past, present and future of the Indigenous experience, as seen through the eyes and minds of 18 distinguished Indigenous architects and designers from across Turtle Island (North America). Led by world-renowned Canadian architect Douglas Cardinal, UNCEDED speaks to the contribution of Indigenous architects in shaping our world with their vision, creativity and technical skills — but above all through their connection to the land and traditional ways of knowing. 100 LAURIER STREET, GATINEAU QC

historymuseum.ca/unceded

unceded.ca

With support from

An exhibition developed by Douglas Cardinal Architect Inc. and adapted by the Canadian Museum of History.


TWO ROW TIMES

June 19th, 2019

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Majority agrees Indigenous women victims of 'genocide' but not on how or by whom National Indigenous People Day FRIDAY, JUNE 21st, SATURDAY, JUNE 22nd AND SUNDAY, JUNE 23rd, 2019 The Toronto Zoo is celebrating National Indigenous People’s Day and over 20 years of strong, vibrant cultures and traditions. The event is free with admission.

OTTAWA — A new poll suggests most Canadians agree that the murders and disappearances of Indigenous women amount to genocide. But the Leger poll also suggests there's disagreement about when it occurred and who is responsible. Fifty-three per cent of respondents agreed with the finding of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, which last week concluded that the tragedy is part of an ``ongoing genocide'' that

has been centuries in the making. But there was little consensus about what form that genocide took: 17 per cent blamed colonization and the loss of Indigenous lands to European settlers, 15 per cent blamed church-run residential schools and another 15 per cent pointed to the destruction of cultural identity and forced assimilation; just three per cent blamed racism. As to who is responsible, 32 per cent blamed Canada's British and French founders and 25

per cent blamed Catholic and Protestant churches; another 21 per cent said all Canadians share responsibility for the injustice while just one per cent blamed government. The poll of 1,528 Canadians randomly recruited from Leger's online panel was conducted between June 7 and 10 for the Association for Canadian Studies; polling experts say online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not generate a random sample of the population.

FIND ALL THE LATEST LOCAL NEWS ONLINE at tworowtimes.com SIX NATIONS POLICE Constable - Contract Position

Applications for a contract position for Constable with the Six Nations Police are now being called for. All applicants must fill out a standard application form available at the Six Nations Police Station.

Lynden

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Be 19 years of age or over and able to provide an official birth certificate or proof of age; Be physically and mentally able to perform the duties of the position having regard to your own safety and the safety of members of the public Have successfully completed at least 4 years of Secondary School education or its equivalent (official transcripts and diplomas will be required) Be of good moral character and habits, meaning that you are an individual other people would consider being trustworthy and having integrity, with no criminal record; certified by a physician to be fit for duty as a front line Six Nations Police Constable and able to pass physical tests which are required in the recruiting process Possess a valid driver’s license with no more than 6 accumulated demerit points, permitting you to drive an automobile in Ontario with full driving privileges Be able to pass a security clearance as well as background investigation, credit card and reference checks

If you have any criminal convictions under a Federal Statute you must obtain a pardon. Special Requirements – for the Six Nations Police Service, in order to address the unique and at times urgent needs of the Six Nations of the Grand River Community and Haudenosaunee culture, additional requirements include: -

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The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, On

Full Time

Community Wellness Worker Client Care Worker Trainee Aboriginal Patient Navigator Museum/Art Curator Youth in Transition Worker Nihdawin Family Support Worker Special Projects Worker Program Support Person – EarlyON Child & Family Programs Community Sport & Recreation Coordinator Facilitator (RECE) EarlyOn Child & Family Program HVAC Technician Temporary Carpenter (2 positions) Carpenter Registered Early Childhood Educator

TWO41 ROW TIM

TWO ROW 26 TIMES

June 19th, 2019

SALARY CLOSING DATE

$36,662.50 $51,350.50 Yr The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, On Full Time $32,953.50 $45,805.50 Yr The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, On Contract/ Matt Leave TBD Native Men’s Residence, Toronto, On Contract TBD De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Full Time $52,000 Ctre, Hamilton, On $56,000 Yr Woodland Cultural Centre Full Time TBD The Ontario Native Women’s Association Full Time TBD The Ontario Native Women’s Association Full Time TBD The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Contract $23.80 Hr The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Contract $15.01 Hr

June 20 2019

The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Contract

June 27 2019

The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Contract/ $40,297.50 Matt Leave $56,821.50 Yr Full Time $28.51 Hr Full Time $23.13 Hr Full Time $25.13 Hr Contract $36,662.50 $51,350.50 TBD TBD TBD TBD

June 27 2019

TBD Full Time Part Time

TBD TBD TBD

June 28 2019 July 5 2019 July 31 2019

Grand Erie District School Board Grand Erie District School Board Grand Erie District School Board The Mississaugas of the Credit

Ganigohi:yo Coordinator Niagara Regional Native Centre Homeward Bound Program Niagara Regional Native Centre Indigenous Case Management Specialist Indigenous Court Worker Niagara Regional Native Centre Finance Officer Grand River Employment & Training Inc. Language Teacher Grand River Employment and Training Inc.

$21.23 Hr

SUMMER DAZE MULTI FAMILY YARD Master of Business SALE Administration JUNE 21-22-23 Simon Fraser University, FRI. - SAT. 8 AM - 3 PM Vancouver British 7365 INDIAN Line Rd. Columbia (near Mohawk Rd.) Hundreds of items You set the bar high for including books, toys, each of us to follow. CD’s, movies, Christmas All the best in your new decorations, household endeavours.... items, huge selection of shoes & clothes (baby Love: Siblings, Nieces, to XXL), play house, Nephews and Great vacuum cleaner and Nieces, Nephews much more!

June 20 2019 June 20 2019 June 21 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 July 26 2019 June 27 2019 June 27 2019

June 27 2019 June 27 2019 June 27 2019 June 27 2019 June 28 2019 June 28 2019

POSITION

EMPLOYER/LOCATION

TERM

SALARY

CLOSING DATE

Therapy Services, Health Services Iroquois Lodge, Health Services O Gwadeni:deo, Social Services Administration, Social Services

Contract Part Time Full Time Full Time

$42.50 Hr $22.30 Hr $82,400 Yr TBD

June 19 2019 June 19 2019 June 19 2019 June 19 2019

Youth Life Promotions, Social Services Child & Family Services, Social Services Child & Family Services, Social Services O Gwadeni:deo, Social Services Justice Program, Justice Human Resources Central Administration Public Works Fire & Emergency Services Fire & Emergency Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Personal Support Health Services Personal Support Health Services Family Gatherings Social Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Ogwadeni:deo Social Services Therapy Services Health Services Child Care Services Social Services

Full Time Full Time Full Time Full Time Contract Contract Contract Part Time Full Time Full Time Full Time Full Time Part Time Contract Full Time Full Time Full Time Full Time Contract Full Time

TBD TBD TBD $58,000 with BSW $60,000 Yr TBD $45,000 Yr $25.50 Hr $25.50 Hr TBD TBD $21.00 Hr $21.00 Hr $22.00 Hr $46,367 Yr $41,200 Yr $48,690 Yr $56,650 Yr $39.56 Hr TBD

June 19, 2019 June 26, 2019 June 26, 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 June 26 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019 July 3 2019

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com

Yard Sales

Congrats to Claire Sault

June 20 2019

Speech Language Pathologist Food Service Supervisor Manager of Resources Aboriginal Alternate Dispute Resolution Coordinator School Social Worker (6 positions) Primary Prevention Services Worker Primary Prevention Support Worker Support Team Members 6 F/T Positions Community Standards/ Bylaw Worker Staffing Officer Community Energy Champion Firefighter Firefighter Intake Team Member (3 positions) Intake Unit Assistant Personal Support Services Personal Support Services Registered ECE Trainer/Training Coordinator Accounts Payable/ Payroll Clerk Data Base Research Support Urban Support Team Member (5 positions) Physiotherapist ( Contract) Resource Consultant Assistant

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Congratulations

Solidarity Event

HUGE YARD SALE 28 BICENTENNIAL National Indigenous Solidarity Day - Friday TRAIL June 21, 2019 FRIDAY & SATURDAY Nature Centre, High Park, Toronto. 3-7pm JUNE 21 & 22 Bus leaving at noon from Six Nations, Ohsweken 9 AM - 3 PM Planting zoo native species, Arts and Crafts activities, Lots of goodies for Dinner, Elder speakers - Teachings, Elder Helpers, everyone! Nature walks, Singing, Drumming and Dancing, Furniture, dresser, Land acknowledgment, Nan fan Treaty. tables, 2 captains beds Contact: 519-445-1745 or text 519-732-4856 (3 drawers), book cases, Sacred sites, Sacred fire, Tobacco offerings. Christmas items, garden art, cookbooks, lots of Hall Rentals fabric, bedding, towels and pies! Royal Canadian Legion Branch 90 1 only 2 year old T.V. 21 Oak St Brantford with built in CD player 519-752-0331 excellent condition. No Early Sales/No Holds

We are accepting

HALL RENTAL RESERVATIONS for your event

Buck and Doe - Birthdays - Holiday Parties Anniversaries Weddings - Family Reunions - Showers - Celebration of Life or ANY special event. Branch 90 has been serving the Brant County area since 1927 and will be happy to ensure your visit to us is a memorable one! We also have entertainment every Friday night and Karaoke Saturday evening.

Early Registration

Land Wanted to Rent

FARMER LOOKING TO RENT LAND 289-260-2452

For Sale

FOR SALE Mini Barns - Picnic Tables - Benches Call 905 - 768 - 4413 2304 Third Line

Delivery

289-698-1022

Early Fall Dance Registration Thursday June 20, 2019, 4:30-6:30 pm Michelle Farmer’s Studio of Dance & Modelling 1824 4th Line Ohsweken , 519-717-9099 45th Anniversary Season

Please recycle this newspaper


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TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

June28TH, 19th,2018 2019 NOVEMBER

Obituaries

Obituaries

Thank You

LaBine: Debra Joyce nee: Hill

CAYUGA: Daniel Raymond “Dan Ho”

Peacefully at the Juravinski H o s p i t a l , Hamilton on Sunday, June 16, 2019 at the age of 59 years. Beloved wife of 38 years to Jim LaBine. Loving mother of Victoria, and Roy. Dear grandmother of Elizabeth. Daughter of the late Marlin & Joyce (Bomberry) Hill. Sister of Carol, Cam, Rob, and the late George. Also survived by and will be lovingly remembered by many nieces, nephews, and friends. The family will honour her life with visitation at Styres Funeral Home, 1798 4th Line, Ohsweken on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 pm. where funeral service will be held on Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at 3 pm. Interment at the Salvation Army Cemetery. Evening Service 7 pm. Tuesday. www.rhbanderson.com

Peacefully surrounded by family at the Brantford General Hospital on Tuesday June 11, 2019. Best friend and partner of Karen Henhawk. Loving father of Crystal (John), and Victoria (Ryan). Stepfather of Kerri, Jill, and the late Wade. Much loved son of Pat, and the late Donald. Brother of the late Gary (Pam), and Marshall (Linda). Uncle of Wyatt, Hayley, Michael, Jarred, and Jordan. Also survived by many great nieces and great nephews. Papa of Sean and Ascension, Kiana, Elaina and Smilia, Hayden, Haylee, AJ, Olivia, Lemmy, and Kinsley. The family will honour his life with visitation at Styres Funeral Home, 1798 4th Line Rd., Ohsweken on Friday, June 14, 2019 from 2 - 6 pm. with cremation to follow. www.rhbanderson.com

Our Six Nations Community Members proudly recognize the following persons who were the Original community members who raised the funds and built the Six Nations Sports and Cultural Memorial Centre ( 1969 - 1972).

WILLIAMS: LESLIE DEAN

Peacefully at the Stedman Community Hospice, Brantford on Saturday June 15, 2019 at the age of 69 years. Son of the late Cecil & Charlotte Williams. Loving brother of Verna, Vaughn (Bonnie), June, Merlyn, Dawne, Lori, Shelley (Joe), Guy (Nancy), and the late Vernon, Karen, and Meryl. Will be missed also by many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. At his request cremation has taken place. www.rhbanderson.com

Hill’s Snack Bar Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Coming Events

Fish & Chip Supper At St. Luke’s Church 1246 Onondaga Road SATURDAY June 29/19 3:30 - 6:30pm Adults - $10.00 Child (6-12) - $5.00 Also Hotdogs and Fries Available Preschoolers Free Strawberry Shortcake for Dessert - Takeouts Available

Golden Spoon Fundraiser Helping seniors in our community Hot Turkey Dinner Thursday, June 27, 2019 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. Eat in or take out Youth Centre Pentecostal Church 1527 Fourth Line, Ohsweken Adult $10. Child $5. Food donations accepted up until June 19th. Call Lesley 647236-3842

Joe Montour, Welby Johnson, John Burnham, Vera Styres, Sidney Henhawk, William Montour, Don Monture, Ron Monture, Albert Smoke, Anita Hill, Willie Henhawk, Hughie Smith, Russell Moses, Rollie Smith, Walter ‘Wuddy’ Green, Ross Powless (Band Rep.), Ed Poodry, Victor Porter, Hubert Skye, Arnold Thomas, Alton VanEvery, Gloria Williams, Arnold Jacobs, Ambrose Johnson, Seymour Thomas and Company, Dave Smith, Charlie Thomas, Winnie Thomas, Larry Curley, Albert ‘Bun’ Montour, Ken Davis, Freddie General, Maynard ‘Jick’ Anderson, Wm. H. White (Band Rep.), Bill Squires, Boss Squires, Russell Davis, Norma Davis, Mike Miller, Lillian Miller, Florence Martin, Steve Williams, Dougal Curley, Cameron Davis, Cecil Davis, Albert ‘Bun’ Montour, Freddie General

We apologize if any names have been missed. Our thanks also goes out to those we have missed. The Six Nations Sports & Cultural Memorial Centre is a symbol of cooperation and hard work among community members from all parts of our Six Nations Reserve as well as the many nonnatives living in the surrounding areas especially Brantford, Caledonia, and Hagersville. Chi-Miigwech from Sandy Sault I have so much that I want to say to everyone that I’m finding it hard to write a thank-you letter. I’d get started then the tears would start to flow. I’m so overwhelmed by all the love, support and strength I’ve received from not only family and friends but also from both the New Credit, Six Nations communities and also from people that I don’t even know. I didn’t think that this wold be such a hard and emotional letter to write. I just can’t thank everyone enough for all that they’ve done for me and for helping me get through this. You all are my strength to keep pushing to beat the “big C”, which I will do. I’d also like to thank everyone who attended my benefit. Thank-you to all the vendors, bands, people who donated for the penny table, door prizes and all the hard working volunteers, my family and friends. It was such a beautiful day. Last but not least, I’d like to thank my Mama and my rockhead sisters, Dianne and Lorianne for always being here for me. They’ve been by my side through it all. Love you so much. Thank you again to each & every one of you for all your Prayers, Love, Strength & support. My heart is filled with so much love for you all. Chi-Miigwech


TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES TWO

June 19th,19TH, 2019 2018 DECEMBER

CLUES ACROSS 1. Drains 5. Cleveland baseball team 10. Leans in for apples 14. Language spoken in India 15. Norwegian parish 16. Wings 17. “Family City, USA” 18. Prague 19. Tottenham footballer Alli 20. Cakes 22. A way to save for retirement 23. Good gosh! 24. HBO Dust Bowl series 27. ELO drummer Bevan 30. Kids’ game 31. Computer giant 32. Luxury automaker 35. Made disappear 37. Mandela’s party 38. Greek personification of Earth 39. Semitic lords 40. Where to put groceries 41. Healthy lunch 42. Greek mountain 43. Disfigure 44. Ramble on 45. Partner to carrot 46. Figure 47. Mock 48. Former CIA 49. Salts 52. Bleated 55. Never sleeps 56. Cavalry sword 60. Scottish island 61. Cyprinid fishes 63. Italian seaport 64. Fruit tree 65. Old World lizard 66. U. of Miami mascot 67. Gentlemen 68. Cover with drops, as with dew 69. Don’t stick it out

CLUES DOWN 1. Broken branch 2. A distinctive quality surrounding someone 3. Commoner 4. It can be poisonous

43 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Pull out all the emotional stops this week, Aries. Things seemingly tug at your heartstrings more so than in the past, and it’s okay to have a few tears develop during a sad movie. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, kick communication up a notch if you want to get things done. Write things out if you need a cheat sheet, then pull together all of the key players.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Money is a priority this week, and you have to put your focus on finances, Gemini. Have you reconciled your checking account lately? See where you are spending and saving.

5. Recipe measurement 6. Eager 7. City in Finland 8. Acting appropriately 9. Pitching stat 10. Cops wear one 11. Evergreen genus 12. Lacking hair 13. Witnesses 21. Supplies to excess 23. This street produces nightmares 25. Cool! 26. Basics 27. Type of jazz 28. Remove 29. Seaport in Finland 32. Large formation of aircraft 33. You should eat three every day 34. Dips feet into 36. Patti Hearst’s captors

Answers for June 19th, 2019 Crossword Puzzle

37. Swiss river 38. Talk 40. Humorous conversation 41. Gurus 43. Actress Gretchen 44. Hitters need one 46. Offer 47. Flower cluster 49. The Navy has them 50. Palmlike plant 51. Vaccine developer 52. Guys (slang) 53. Jai __, sport 54. Assert 57. Beloved movie pig 58. __ Clapton, musician 59. Gamble 61. Hit lightly 62. Carpenter’s tool

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Don’t overthink things too much, Cancer. Try to go with the flow as much as possible. Situations with coworkers could take an unexpected turn. Be on the lookout. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 You are in need of a break this week, Leo. However, there are many demands on your time and focus. Devote this weekend to self-care and R&R.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 The first half of the week lights up your friendships and long-term aspirations, Virgo. Try putting the two together so you can have more balance in your life. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, career stars are shining brightly for you and all eyes are on you. Use this opportunity to really showcase your talents. People with power may be watching.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, inspiration is in big supply this week, but be sure to watch out for those who might try to dissuade you. Keep plans on the down low if you have a great idea.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you might get a little off course in the next few days. But all it will take is a little correction to have your plans and goals line up once again. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Relationships take center stage this week, Capricorn. You are getting pulled in many different directions, but you may love being busy and the energy that requires.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Work and health take the helm this week, Aquarius. Are you running yourself ragged or not feeling 100 percent? It might be time to really focus on schedule adjustments.

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS AT

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES

Oneida Business Park ♦ 50 Generations Drive Suite 124 (at the back of the building) MON - FRI 10-4 or email us at tworowtimes@gmail.com

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Good old fashioned fun is on the horizon, Pisces. Use the warm weather as an opportunity to go to a drive-in movie or attend a local carnival.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 construction@sitnbull.ca


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