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HAGERSVILLE — As Mother’s Day was only a few days away, Kindergarten students from Lloyd S. King Elementary School of the Missisaugas of the New Credit First Nations were invited to visit the Hagersville Secondary School Green House to make a decorated flower pot with a planted perennial flower to later give to a prominent woman in their lives on Friday, May 11. Full CAW 2018 section starting on page 13. PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

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keeping you informed.

Mothers Day in Full Bloom Lloyd S. King Students learn about gardening and flower planting for mom CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

Two injured in collision NEW CREDIT — Haldimand County OPP is investigating a single vehicle roll over collision where both occupants sustained injuries at a Mississauga's of the New Credit First Nation, Ontario address. OPP, Haldimand Fire Services and Paramedics responded to Mississauga Road near Ojibway Road early Friday morning where it was reported a vehicle had skidded off the road and rolled over, trapping both occupants. Haldimand County paramedics transported the 30-year-old female driver to a local area hospital and subsequently by Air Ornge Ambulance to an out of town hospital. It was later determined her injuries were non-life threatening. Haldimand County paramedics transported the 27-year-old male passenger to a local area hospital with non-life threatening injuries. OPP investigation, thus far, has determined a vehicle was travelling east bound on Mississauga Road when the driver lost control causing the vehicle to skid off the roadway and collide in the ditch where it rolled over.

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HAGERSVILLE — As Mother’s Day quickly approached last week, Kindergarten students from Lloyd S. King Elementary School of the Missisaugas of the New Credit First Nations were invited to visit the Hagersville Secondary School Green House last Friday to make gifts to celebrate a prominent woman in their lives. The students were directed on how to make a key chain and how to plant an orange perennial flower under the guidance of Miss P. Zadanyi, Mr. T Barker and their high school students. The younger students were also taken on a walk through the green house and also given the opportunity to taste garlic from the outside garden. They were then able to take their decorated and planted flower pots home after a morning full of listening, learning and appreciation.

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The Creator’s Game author thanks the Six Nations community Allan Downey visits Ohsweken and acknowledges the Haudenosaunee CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OHSWEKEN — Allan Downey, author of The Creator’s Game: Lacrosse, Identity, and Indigenous Nationhood, visited the Six Nations community in a meet-and-greet held at the Six Nations Polytechnic in the Banquet Room on Wednesday, May 9. Downey is of the Dakelh, Nak’azdii Whut’en and is a lacrosse player himself — his visit allowed him to go over some of the information on the history and development of lacrosse found within his book. But he was quick to point out that much of the information came from prominent lacrosse figures from Six Nations, of which he is thankful for. “I just want to give a heart felt thank you to the entire community here,”

said Downey. “This community has been really fantastic to me and I’ll continue to be here and be present in sharing this knowledge and this information and to learn from more people. And I’m really looking forward to being in the community more,” he said. He explained his sharing of the information within the community as a part of his own responsibility that he undertook in writing the work over ten years ago, using “reciprocity and accountability” as his main virtues as the author. “That means being able to share the work amongst indigenous youth, especially Haudenosaunee youth,” he said. Downey also serves as an assistant professor in the Department of History and Classical Studies at McGill University and he splits his time throughout the year to work with indigenous youth, indigenous

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An old photo was on exhibit at Polytech. PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

communities and youth organizations. “I’ve gone across the country sharing the work with indigenous youth and correctional facilities culture centres, high schools and I keep going into Haudenosaunee communities to share it,” he said. “It is the most meaningful thing to me, to be able to share this because it’s the communities story and it’s also the people from this community that helped me put it together. I think it’s important that I’m sharing the work that we were able to compile.” But his devotion to compile the work and put in the effort to bring it to fruition came from his own connection to the game. Downey explained that he began playing lacrosse when he was 10 years old and later earned a lacrosse scholarship which led him to play at the professional level. Living in Waterloo, it was also easy for him to know that Haudenosaunee communities were where lacrosse thrived. “I connected to it as an indigenous youth, so I knew growing up that this was an indigenous game. And being able to have that opportunity to play an indigenous game as an indigenous youth living in an urban setting; it really kind of helped me power my identity as an indigenous person.” Lacrosse also helped him to connect with his home

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CHEZNEY MARTIN

PHOTO

community in Central British Columbia, where he worked with youth as well. The work in itself is a powerful collection of both history and evolution for both indigenous nations, the sport of lacrosse and Canada. Within it’s bindings are even the explanation as to how lacrosse migrated to the indigenous Nations in B.C., and why indigenous players were once banned from playing they own sport. Michael Dawson, a professor of history and associate vice-president of St. Thomas University described the work as “provocative, creative and ambitious.” “It offers a unique window into the history of colonialism, the inner workings of residential schools, the development of indigenous nationalism, the emergence of modern sport in Canada and the gendered dynamics of lacrosse’s political, social, and spiritual importance. I’m a big fan of this book,” wrote Dawson.

OPP gear up for Provincial & National Traffic Safety Campaigns

ORILLIA, ON - With motorcycles and off-road vehicles expected in large numbers over the Victoria Day Long Weekend, the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) is raising red flags on what its investigations reveal about these seasonal riders. Ahead of the weekend, the OPP is reminding road users about the historically tragic motorcycle season on OPP-patrolled roads last year. Over and above marking a ten-year high, what made last year's 48 motorcyclist deaths particularly tragic was the fact that almost

half (22) of the motorcycle drivers were not the at-fault driver. Among the top contributing factors in the deaths were alcohol/ drug impairment (6), improper turn (6), excessive speed (5) and fail to yield (5). Off the road, history repeated itself last year when nine (9) of the 22 off-road vehicle drivers who died were found not wearing a helmet. The same number of deaths occurred in 2016 with the same number of victims found without a helmet. The leading primary cause was loss of control, with

15 of the fatalities being attributed to this cause over the two-year period. Ahead of its long weekend motorcycle and off-road vehicle safety initiatives, the OPP is also taking part in the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police-led Canada Road Safety Week. From May 15 to 21, 2018, the OPP and its Canadian policing partners will conduct an education and enforcement campaign aimed at the Big Four causal factors in road deaths (impaired, distracted and aggressive driving, lack of occupant restraint).

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MAY 16TH, 2018

Celebrating the gift of corn

Major event hosted by Chandra Maracle converges at Six Nations Community Hall CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — “The Law is in the Seed”: A Community ‘Cornvergence’ commenced within the Six Nations Community Hall to bring together a celebration for the gift of corn to Turtle Island on Thursday, May 10. Headed by Chandra Maracle, founder of Kakhwa’on:we/Real People Eat Real Food, the event welcomed faces from the surrounding area reaching as far as Toronto to enjoy the day celebrating corn through creativity, food and culture.

“I called this a ‘cornvergance’ because it isn’t a conference, it’s an anti-conference because it’s more of a ‘let’s move, let’s eat, let’s hear words from fabulous people and not sit all day long’ kind of event,” said Maracle. “It’s about community, it’s about culture and creativity,” she said. “It’s a celebration.” The event featured Amber Meadow Adams, who spoke about the research regarding the significance of corn in the Haudenosaunee Creation Story, Rick Hill, who explored corn and maintaining a thriving society, Gary Farmer, who discussed a documentary he directed in 1996 titled

The Gift which celebrates the gift of corn, and Ian Mosby, who presented his research on the long-term health effects of malnutrition and hunger that was present in residential schools. Throughout the day performances were also offered by Tehahenteh Frank Miller, who offered the opening and closing, Santee Smith, who performed a dance that incorporated themes of corn and culture, and Eddie Thomas, who led three traditional Haudenosaunee social dances. The food aspect of the meals served for attendees included the freshly prepared and ground

heirloom corn varieties from Maizal Quesadilla Cafe as well as samples of traditional corn bread and lyed corn from Bonnie Skye. Several Six Nations artisans including Sapling and Flint and Everything Cornhusk also set up their works featuring corn to showcase to visitors. “I would say that it is a celebration of life through corn today,” said Maracle. “If you start talking about corn, inevitably you’re going to start talking about everything else because it’s related to everything else.” “Particularly, in a Haudenosaunee context, corn is the most mentioned plant in the Cre-

It was a packed room at the Community Hall for the event that was held to celebrate the gift of corn.

PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

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Chandra Maracle founder of Real People Eat Real Food poses PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN with a painting that was raffled.

ation Story and it is also, in my opinion, what allowed Haudenosaunee governance and culture to thrive post-Great Law.” And her opinion may not be far off the mark as corn is believed to have been developed from a wild grass called Teosinte which was originally growing in Central America 7,000 years ago, and then later became the foundation for many indigenous agricultural diets. And just as corn connected indigenous people through trade and diet in the past, Maracle noted that it connected people through the event in the same way. “We have quite the mix of people here today,” she said. “We have people coming from Onondaga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Buffalo, lots of people from Six Nations, we have Brantford, Guelph, London, Toronto and Waterloo. So, in a way this ‘cornvergence’ is calling for a converging of people from all over for this common theme.” Maracle explained that planning the event was quite the task, but as she noticed the effect of the

day upon attendees, she said it was “exactly” what she had hoped for. “As I’m watching people, either watching the performances, listening to the speakers and seeing everyones faces; everyone is either totally engaged or smiling and laughing and it is exactly what I wanted.” The culmination of her inspiration to celebrate corn through the ‘cornvergence’ was one that paid off as the event seen well over a hundred attendees.

SIX NATIONS JUSTICE DEPARTMENT FRIDAY MAY 25, 2018 | 1:00 PM 1721 Chiefswood Road Iroquois Plaza Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 RSVP: 226-227-2192 The food aspect of the meals served for attendees included the freshly prepared and ground heirloom corn varieties from Maizal Quesadilla Cafe as well as samples of traditional corn bread and PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN lyed corn from Bonnie Skye. .


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Why the 1841 “surrender” is bogus

Lynden

Canadas title claim may be totally fabricated JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — On Christmas Day, 1794, Superintendent General and Inspector General of Indian Affairs directed that there be specific regulations to be followed for the legal alienation of Indian Lands stating, “No lands are therefore to be purchased of the Indians, but by the Superintendent General and Inspector General of Indian Affairs, or in his absence, the Deputy Superintendent General or a person especially commissioned for that purpose by the Commander in Chief.” It was also ordered that “All purchases are to be made in Public Council with great solemnity and ceremony, according to the ancient usage and customs of the Indians. The principal Chiefs and leading Men of the Nations to whom the land belongs, being first assembled.” This practice was accepted and reaffirmed in 1812 when again it was declared that the legal alienation of land, which was referred to as the unanimous practice of the Iroquois Confederacy was to be adhered to “with great solemnity and ceremony.” To make the transaction legal, 50 chiefs’ signatures of the Five Nations were to be affixed to the Deed of Conveyance along with a survey map outlining the area to be conveyed. In 1829, Canada arbitrarily decided that Six Nations should not have

the right to dispose of or sell their lands at all, but the Governor General recommend they lease instead, which was Joseph Brant’s original idea back in 1780’s and 90’s to create perpetual income for his people while retaining the land itself. Nine days later, the Chiefs Council of Six Nations, expressed interest to a proposal to surrender land to be set aside from the rest of the Haldimand tract to become a centre where squatters residing on Indian land, could live and own their own land. That 807-acre site was surveyed and in 1830, became Brant’s Ford (Brantford). A report from Deputy Warden Marcus Blair informed the government that Six Nations has decided it will not surrender any more of its land outside of a lease. Therefor making the outright purchase of Indian land virtually impossible stating that the better to lease the land from Six Nations than not having access to any of it. When Six Nations began pressuring newly appointed Lieutenant-Governor Sir Francis Bond-Head, who arrived from England knowing nothing of agreements and treaties made it these strange people, was put under pressure by Six Nations to fulfill promises made by Sir Isaac Brock, and General Darling and others to remove all squatters from their land. The Chiefs were advised by Sir John Colborne in 1838, that they should surrender more land around what is now

Lorne Bridge to accommodate those settlers and squatters he promised Six Nations he was going to aggressively remove from Six Nations land, which did not happen despite an act of parliament passed to remove squatters from Six Nations Haldimand Tract land, not yet sold. On one hand, John W. Gwynne was instructed in 1840 to endorse this order, but at the same time, Government Trustee of Indian lands William Hepburn was actively promoting settlement of non-surrendered land with a future promise that they would get first right of refusal “when” these lands become available. Other speculator/politicians were doing the same for great personal gain. Seeing he may be missing out on the gravel train, Samuel Jarvis, now Superintendent of Indian Affairs, recommends to the Chiefs that they consolidate in one or two places to more safely evict the squatters or offer leases and to make the governance of Six Nations easier. That leads us up to the so-called, 1841 surrender of all of the Haldimand Tract in exchange for a few acres near the Tuscarora Village along the Grand River, across the river from the 1784 Mohawk Village established by Joseph Brant’s Mohawks and others about 2,500 in total following the American Revolution.

survivors were not given opportunity to object to the deal initially and that the federal government did not do enough to hear their stories of being adopted out to non indigenous families. The deal will see each of the 20,000 survivors receive between 25,000 to 50,000 dollars by the summer of 2019. Some critics are arguing that the 90 day period

to opt out of accepting the settlement is too short. According to those critics if 2000 of the victims agree to opt out the deal becomes void. Critics say accepting the deal as is would waive the rights of some survivors to sue for the sexual and physical abuse they experienced while in care.

Next Week - Why the 1841 surrender is bogus - part 2.

Group of 60s Scoop survivors object to settlement STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

TORONTO — Some of the survivors of the 60s scoop say they are not okay with the settlement process are are objecting to a $750 million dollar deal struck between the federal government and Canadian lawyers. Coleen Rajotte says

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MAY 16TH, 2018

OPINION editor@tworowtimes.com

Letter to the Editor

Obligatory eating

Reduce the stigma of suicide

EDITORIAL BY NAHNDA GARLOW Fewer things are more distinctly Six Nations than Bread and Cheese Day. For those of you who don’t have a clue what I am talking about, allow me to explain. Bread and Cheese Day is a day where the Six Nations people all go to the middle of our reserve a.k.a. “the village”, stand in a massive line up and wait to receive a piece of bread and a piece of cheese. Literally. This is done by the Elected Council, who funds all this bread and cheese, distributing it in honour of the relationship between the British Crown and the Six Nations as was done annually by Queen Victoria up until her death. I’m not talking cheese sandwich size pieces of bread or cheese, no sir-ee bob. Each man, woman, and child who stands in that line up gets a chunk of cheese that is about the size of a pound of butter, and a big hunk of bread that is about three sandwiches worth! Now, within the heritage of the Haudenosaune also rests a tradition within ceremonial feasts that says when you are invited to a feast, you must eat all of the food presented to you. Although Bread and Cheese Day is not a ceremonial feast per se,

it still is a “ceremony” of sorts where the Elected Council distributes this food annually to people who are willing participants, as recognition of the relationship between the British Crown and the Haudenosaune people. It is my hypothesis that because many of us at Six Nations are hardwired to associate ceremonial feasts with obligatory eating, that this is why so many of us end up stuffed to the gills with bread and cheese on Victoria Day. Every single year that I have known “Uncle Gary” (whose shall remain anonymous in order to protect his identity) he comes over to visit after he gets his bread and cheese. Uncle Gary will go through the line not once, but twice to receive his annual gift. This happens around noontime. By 4pm “Uncle Gary” will stop by the family homestead where we are usually gathered gwissing out on corn soup and scones. You know, normal Haudenosaune stuff. Come the next day, “Uncle Gary” always comes by, rooting through the medicine cabinet, looking for anything he can find to help his ailing tummy, which is, as he puts it, “all bound up” because he ate nearly all the cheese gift given.

After nine years I have learned that I should always have a bottle of Metamucil ready for Bread and Cheese Day. The wiser of the Haudenosaune, the mothers, let everyone have a taste of the bread and cheese once it is given, and are usually armed with plastic grocery bags, or even better yet – a cooler – to keep the gifts in. They take this stuff home and make epic grilled cheese sandwiches for supper and say a quiet prayer of thanks to the Creator for this gift. Some of the more glum tales of Bread and Cheese Day come from those of us who suffer from either a lactose or gluten intolerance. Sadly, Bread and Cheese Day for us is a mere longing for the good old days before dietary intolerance set in. Ironically, celebrating our current relationship with the British Crown also carries the distinct flavour of developed intolerance and mournful longing for the past wouldn’t you say? However, not to rain on anyone’s Bread and Cheese Day Parade go ahead and get in that line, armed with your plastic grocery bag and a bottle of Metamucil if needed.

Brightening the Spirit - Breaking the Silence Suicide Awareness Committee formed in 2014. We are a committee of volunteers both native and non-native. We are non-denominational. Persons of faith or no faith are welcome to attend meetings held on the first Thursday of each month at 10am at the Dajoh Youth & Elders Building in Ohsweken. Our efforts are directed towards “reducing the stigma of suicide and helping individuals to explore life promoting strategies: from the pain and grief of suicide. We offer awareness activities and support through sharing circles and creative pathways to healing. During the month of May we are hosting a social Friday May 18 at the Veterans Hall in Ohsweken. On Monday, May 21 we are selling raffle tickets for a barbecue, lawn chairs and two deer hides. We are seeking input by way of a small survey in order to determine the need for a suicide prevention strategy. In 2014 the World Health Organization urged all countries to develop

national suicide strategies. Quebec has had one since 1998 but their statistical data does not include aboriginal populations, which opted out of the provincial strategy. Brightening the Spirit - Breaking the Silence Suicide Awareness Committee is hoping to encourage community agencies and the Six Nations Elected Council to help develop our own suicide prevention strategy. This would require community consultations and money, and perhaps take 2-3 years to complete but the effort would be worth it. A strategy developed by Six Nations could very well serve as a model for other Aboriginal communities struggling with severe suicide rates. We are seeking support for continued efforts towards reducing suicide rates and addressing suicidology in the Six Nations territory. Please visit our display at Great & Cheese and remember our Social on Friday.

Dorothy Russell-Patterson

HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY BREAD AND CHEESE ! From all of us at the Two Row Times. Volume 5, Issue 40

Publisher: Jonathan Garlow Editor: Nahnda Garlow Head of Production: Dave LaForce Senior Writer & Sports Editor: Jim Windle Oneida Business Park Suite 124 Arts & Culture Editor: Chezney Martin Website Manager: Benjamin Doolittle 50 Generations Drive, Box 1 Advertising Sales Co-ordinator: Marshall Lank Advertising Sales Executive: Rachel Binek Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0 Distribution Manager: Tim Reynolds Distribution: Logan Martin-King Make advertising cheques payable to:

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MAY 16TH, 2018

9

Thunder Woman Speaks

A Canadian constitution (3 of 6)

‘White Paper: The Remix’ is not authentic First Nations governance

Discussing the Privy Council, Parliament and Senate

COLUMNIST RACHEL A. SNOW

rachelannsnow634@gmail.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The Federal government under Trudeau has rolled out a rights framework legislation, which can more easily be understood as the White paper of 2018. Recognition and implementation of First Nation rights is to signal “change in the relationship between the government and the original people.” How many times have these same words be spoken by federal governments or other paternalistic agencies? The original people are tired of change that is only in statements, documents or pretentious pieces of legislation. This is not that hard to communicate: it has been said repeatedly by original people for generations. It is past 500 years since the first settlers came to this land and still the original people remain misunderstood. The original people had systems of governance that included the Creator in all actions. This governance system has become colonized and bastardized to the extent that our “leadership” themselves

are now failing the land, the waters and the people. We are a collective people who survived with a respect for the Creator and all life. We did this without ownership. We did this without hierarchies. We did this without property or monetary systems. Repeatedly I have stated that mainstream ‘whitethink’ is trying to reconcile with Indigenous worldviews — which is impossible. Why is it that a system of capitalism that forced settlers to seek a new life across the waters remains the system advocated by their settler descendants? Is there not another reason why settlers were led across the waters? Could it be to learn from another people that all our actions are connected and interrelated? Currently the federal government is misleading the Canadian public stating that they are trying new approaches to the “Indian problem”. Successive Canadian governments keep rebranding, repackaging and hijacking Indigenous terms, which will not solve “the Indian problem”. The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) recently had an emergency special

meeting in Gatineau, Quebec to deal with Trudeau’s proposed Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Legislation. Firstly, it is important to mention that the AFN is an advocacy organization. They are not a nation and are in fact an offshoot of the incorporated National Indian Brotherhood structure. The AFN is responsible for maintaining communication lines with federal agencies to ensure that the historic relationship of two peoples going forward continues. It is a communication and organizational entity only. Original leaders who formed the National Indian Brotherhood (NIB) knew that a unified voice was needed for the Indigenous when Trudeau the older came out with the 1969 White Paper. These original leaders were traditional, spiritual, and hereditary leaders who knew they were servants to their people. It has taken the mainstream fifty years to corrupt this kind of leadership. Today’s First Nation “leadership” resembles non First Nation CEO top down hierarchical thinking, not the grassroots

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

The following is part three of a six part interview by George Barr, KING’S Council, with R. Rogers Smith sometime in the mid 1940’s and on “Ligue pour l’Union Federale”, 822 Sherbrooke Est, Mtl. (Acquired from the Ka-Nee-Ka-Neet collection) Question s by G. H. Barr, King’s Council. Answers by R. Rogers Smith. Mr. Barr: Who appoints these parties to the Imperial Privy Council for Canada and how are they paid? Mr. Smith: They are appointed by His Majesty and of the 319 members who compose the Imperial Privy Council for the Empire the lowest remuneration that they are eligible to receive is L2,000 per year.

Q: Who are the present occupants of those positions for Canada resident in London? A: Lord Beaverbrook, Lord Greenwood and Lord (R. B.) Bennett. In the House of Commons of Canada we had the Rt. Hon. W. L. MacKenzie King; in the Senate the Rt. Hon. Arthur (15 minutes of fame) Meighen and Rt. Hon. George Graham. In the supreme court, Sir Lyman P. Duff. Q: Who of these parties are still functioning?

A: The three in London and the Rt. Hon. MacKenzie King in Canada. The other who are not actually exercising an office in Canada are still members of the Government of Canada by virtue of being members of the Imperial Privy council for Canada, all of whose names are to be found in the parliamentary guide. There would appear to be an anomaly here; for instance, in the case of Arthur Meighen, he is no longer a member of the House of Commons of Senate of Canada but he is still listed as a member of the Imperial privy Council and since no man in Canada can occupy that position unless he is a member of one of these bodies, he is by virtue of the appointment which has never been revoked technically a member of the Government of Canada although not holding any elective position. Q: Is there not a Canadian Privy Council as well as the Imperial Privy Council for Canada? A: There is! This council is nominally composed of around 150 members -150 members of whom are summoned and appointed by the governor general and members thereof may be from time to time removed by the governor

general. In order to ascertain how many are appointed and how many are removed from time to time, compare the list in 1935 with the present list. Q: What will that disclose? A: It would at least disclose that the Duke of Windsor was a member in 1935 and was removed from the Privy Council by Lord Tweedsmuir.

Q: Is it true then that men were appointed to and removed from this important body without reference to any elective authority in Canada? A: Yes! Although it is the practice for the governor general to summons and appoint the heads of what is commonly known as the “cabinet”. To make myself clearer-suppose that the C. C. F. were elected with a majority in Canada, a number of those-around18would be summonsed and appointed by the governor general to form a cabinet.

Q: To make it clear, you speak of 18 forming a cabinet. Is the cabinet a separate and distinct body from that called the government, men who are the minister of the CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

ganú·nya* Base: -nuny-

editor@tworowtimes.com

Dance. ONONDAGA LANGUAGE SOURCE: Onondaga-English Dictionary, Hanni Woodbury


10

TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

Opinion: Reading the stories you’ve already heard New book tackles rape culture through short stories

Notice of Public Information Centre #4 Environmental Assessment to Increase the Biggars Lane Landfill Disposal Capacity to Meet County’s Disposal Requirements to Year 2050

The Project: The County of Brant is undertaking an environmental assessment (EA) under the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act (EAA) to secure additional solid waste disposal capacity within the County of Brant, based on the approved Terms of Reference (TOR) and conditions of approval for the undertaking. The County is seeking EAA approval to increase the Biggars Lane Landfill disposal capacity to meet the County’s disposal requirements to the year 2050. Biggars Lane Landfill is located in the County of Brant, Ontario, as shown below:

The Process: In May 2015, the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) approved the TOR for additional solid waste disposal capacity through expansion of the Biggars Lane Landfill. The approved TOR outlines the County’s framework and work plan for fulfilling the EAA requirements during the preparation of the EA. Information on this project is available at: http://www.brant.ca/en/explore-our-services/Solid-Waste-Environmental-Assessment.asp

Public Information Centre (PIC) #4: Members of the Public are invited to attend PIC#4 the purpose of which is to provide an update on the project since the PIC#3 (held on March 29, 2016) and an opportunity for the Public to provide input. Information at PIC#4 will include an overview of the purpose of the EA and the EA process, a description of the four expansion alternative methods at the Biggars Lane Landfill site, the results of assessment studies investigating the alternative methods and predicted impacts on the environment, the evaluation of the alternative methods, and the preliminary preferred alternative method. Members of the public, agencies, Indigenous communities and other interested persons are encouraged to actively participate in the planning of this undertaking by attending PIC#4 or contacting staff directly with information, comments or questions. Consultation opportunities planned throughout the EA process will be announced in local newspapers, through the County website at: http://www.brant.ca/en/explore-ourservices/Solid-Waste-Environmental-Assessment.asp and by direct e-mail/mail out to those on the Project Contact List. Public Information Centre #4 will be held at: Date:

Wednesday May 16, 2018

Time:

4:30 – 7:30pm

Location:

Oakland Community Centre 3 King Street North, Oakland

In addition to attending the consultation events, you are invited to submit your comments about the proposed undertaking and the EA process by mail, e-mail or fax to the contacts provided below. If you would like to be added to the Project Contact List or have projectrelated questions, please contact: James R. Hollingsworth, P.Eng. R.J. Burnside & Associates Limited 1465 Pickering Parkway, Suite 200 Pickering, ON L1V 7G7 Telephone: (800) 265-9662 email: jamie.hollingsworth@rjburnside.com

Matthew D’Hondt, C.E.T. Corporation of the County of Brant 26 Park Avenue, P.O. Box 160 Burford, ON NOE 1AO Telephone: (519) 449-2451 Fax: (519) 449-3382 email: solidwasteEA@brant.ca

Under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Environmental Assessment Act, unless otherwise stated in the submission, any personal information such as name, address, telephone number and property location included in a submission will become part of the public record files for this matter and will be released, if requested, to any person. First Posted: April 27, 2018

CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

There are two kinds of readers: those of us that are required to read by means of education or otherwise and those of us that read even after being required to, to escape or to further our own perspective of any given subject. Between non-fiction and fiction, most readers simply gravitate to the unknown; be it for knowledge or what-have-you. But for any reader, what can be difficult to read is a story that resonates with our own. And what makes stories that we relate to sometimes very hard to read is the fact that not only do we identify with them, but we find ourselves re-living our own experiences and sometimes our own traumas while being forced to recognize that we were not alone in those experiences. That is exactly what the compilation of dispatches from rape culture collected by Roxane Gay have done. Under the title of “Not That Bad,” with its yellow underline beneath the “that,” the 339 pages tell stories that we have already heard. “It was comforting, perhaps, to tell myself that what I went through “wasn’t that bad,’” wrote Gay in her introduction. When she was 12 years old, Gay was a victim of gang-rape. She is, in fact, the author of World of Wakanda for Marvel, and for this collection of dispatches she brought together over 25 essay authors to create an anthology that is both honest and deeply personal. Her own story is among them. But the thing about reading content of this subject is that after the

Not That Bad is a collection of short stories written by women PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN edited by Roxane Gay.

#Me-Too movement was sparked by the Harvey Weinstein story; every nook and cranny of media is currently flowing with stories, poems and quotes of women sharing their accounts. Their stories are so prevalent to us now that they aren’t new; they’ve become like episodes of Law and Order, so we know what happens next. This makes it easy to question why a book would be needed to hold a bunch of essays on the subject in the first place. That rallies an even easier answer; it was compiled because of how pre-cious the voices in each story are, and how badly they need a tangible platform to be presented in. Even though each story should be hard to read for all readers. This is because even if a reader has not experienced what these stories tell, they are forced to imagine someone that has — someone they have never met before, but might look like someone they know, someone they love. And that in itself can be terrifying. The reader is forced to identify with the voices in the stories and the only

escape from their hauntingly honest accounts is to put the book down. If this sounds morbid to you, then I’m sure you’re wondering ‘why read it then?’ Imagine if you wrote one of the stories and that the account was yours to tell. Imagine how much courage it would take to actually write the story down and share it with the world. Imagine how much healing occurred by putting that story to words. Now, imagine why the actual author would want someone to read it. From the outside, the simple reason to read the stories is for the fact of understanding the perspectives as many readers would do. The anthology covers more than just another rape story though; it covers the exploration of the rape epidemic among refugees, child molestation, street harassments and more. So just as any reader would; read to broaden your perspective of the world we live in, and read for those that were brave enough to want you to read their stories — even though you’ve already heard them.

STAY UP TO DATE ONLINE at tworowtimes.com


TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

crown? A: A distinction should be drawn between government and parliament. The governor general is the governor of Canada. The House of Commons and the Senate of Canada, and the Privy Council for Canada, as well as the Lieutenant Governors of the Provinces and the Legislatures of the Provinces were to aid and advise the governor general in the government. It may be said that all of these bodies were members of different standing in a kind of “Ladies Aid” for their constituted powers are no greater than the powers that the Ladies Aid are able to exercise as a body of the United Church. House of Commons, being the elected representatives of the people. It should be held in mind that the House of Commons are elected by and only by British subjects. These words “British subject” occur 11 times in the Elections Act. Anybody not admitting to be a British subject can be challenged at the polls. Q: Can it be said then that the House of Commons is

elected not by all the Canadian people because there are Canadians who do not qualify as British subjects, people actually born in Canada? Does not this indicate, Mr. Smith, that there should be something to establish the status of the Canadian citizen in order that he, in that capacity, may vote to elect his own Parliament? Is it not true that on the taking of the census, it has been repeatedly stated, and the enumerators are instructed not to list any person as a Canadian citizen, or one of Canadian nationality because there is no such thing? Is not that true? A: Yes! Census takers are instructed not to accept the answer Canadian. Q: So that we have no Canadian citizenship? No Canadian nationality and no Canadian flag? A: Insofar as Canadian citizenship and Canadian nationality are concerned, you are correct, but we have what may be said to be a Canadian flag, on which was granted in 1625 by Charles I to the only territory in Canada at that time under the British monarch, namely,

Nova Scotia, which I have previously explained took in what is not “Gaspe, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, as well as the present Province of Nova Scotia”, and for this reason we cannot say that the Maritimes have no flag, and I think if the colonists in Quebec, after the capitulation of 1763, had stated that they would fly the flag which had been granted to the Maritimes, I cannot conceive of the Imperial authorities having any objection. THE SENATE: Certain men who are qualified by property and standing in their community may be from time to time summonsed and appointed as Senators by the Governor General. He shall, subject to the provisions of the B. N. A. Act, hold his place in the Senate for life. If a vacancy happens by resignation, death or otherwise, the Governor General shall by summons to a fit and qualified person fill the vacancy and the Governor General may from time to time, by instrument under the Great Seal of Canada, appoint a Senator to be Speaker of the Senate and may remove him and ap-

point another in his stead.

Q: As part of the House of Commons we have the Government or Cabinet Ministers or Ministers of the Crown, each of whom is given the power to administer the affairs of a certain department. Just what, in brief?. How are they constituted? A: It should be remembered that in this connection Canada was a Dominion and “a Dominion” is defined by Lord Thring in section 18, para. 3, of the Interpretations Act (Imperial) as follows; “The expression “Colony” shall mean any of her Majesty’s Dominions (exclusive of the British islands and British India) and where parts of such Dominions are under both a Central Legislature and Local Legislatures, all parts under the Central Legislature shall, for the purpose of this definition, be deemed to be one colony” so that, in answer to your question, I would say that the Cabinet of the house of Commons, or any members of the House of Commons, have no more power or authority than have the members of any

11 Legislative Assembly of any of the British Colonies. The function of a Legislature of a Colony is to aid and advise the governor, who is the government, and the Cabinet is to administer affairs in any department to which he is appointed by the Governor General. But it cannot be remotely said that either the Legislative Assembly of Canada nor the House of Commons of Canada, are responsible to the Canadian people-they are responsible only to the Governor General. Q: Am I to take it from what you say that they have no power to make laws? It is recognized by both the House of Commons, the Senate as well as the Legislatures of the Provinces, they cannot enact any measure unless it is assented to by the Governor General or by the Lieutenant Governor of a Legislature-as the case may be. So that while they may introduce legislation and enact laws, such laws do not become effective or, in fact, become law until they receive such assent? A: You are correct! But I would like to draw to your attention that: “It shall not

be lawful for the house of Commons to adopt or pass any vote, resolution, address or Bill for the appropriation of any part of the public revenue, or of any tax or impost, to any purpose that has not been first recommended to that House by message of the Governor General in the session in which such vote, resolution, address, or Bill is proposed”-Section 54 British North America Act.

Q: In common practice, that is expressed something as follows: “all money-bills-must originate with the government”. So that, insofar as the expenditure of public money is concerned, it originates with the Governor General and can only become effective after passing the House and the Senate and the Assent of the Governor General? A: Correct! –Only the salary of the governor General is the first charge against the consolidated revenues of Canada after the expenses of collection are paid. His salary amounts to $48,666.66 per year and expenses. This is the fact in this regard as given by the Auditor General of Canada.


12

TWO ROW TIMES AFN chief Shawn Atleo was forced to step down when he was talking to then Prime Minister Harper about passing education legislation without grassroots consultation. Current national chief Bellegarde has done the same thing. While Atleo had educa-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

voices that spiritually worked together for the good of all our relations across this land. This is not only sad, it is frightening for the grassroots people who have vested interests going forward in our future generations. The past national

tion offloading to the provinces (Bill C-33 First Nation Control of First Nation Education Act), Bellegarde is doing the exact same thing. The only difference is that this same process has two bills going forward in “Indian” education and in Indigenous language. No

MAY 16TH, 2018

one is asking for Bellegarde to step down. What is the reasoning? Part of the reasoning, is that “leadership” has been complicit in the education legislation. Another part of the acceptance is that “leadership” really does not have the understanding of what

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these pieces of legislation entail. In 1969, the historic traditional leaders conducted ceremonies, prayed and asked for spiritual guidance to take on Trudeau the older’s agenda. They took trains, planes and drove to Ottawa to make a stance. They did this with only landline phones over incredible distances because their hearts and words were fighting for the future of their people. Since this time, Canada through Indian Affairs has interfered and assisted in delaying or determining governance in communities. This is true in all areas including development. The First Nations have the ability to form businesses on reserve. It is the hoops and bureaucratic wrangling in the Indian Act that prevented businesses from forming. BUT if First Nations now designate and start to privatize their land, economic development is suddenly a good thing. Federal control over Indians and their lives makes problems then pitches solutions. Governance has been carefully monitored by Indian Affairs. Originally two year time lines were given for elected chief and councils. By the time a chief or council got in, understood their role, it was time for a re-election. Then Indian Affairs began seeing election challenges and had to deal with chiefs speaking for the good of their people. This was worrisome. Indian Affairs introduced the term “custom” into the Indian Act election sections so that

Youth stabbed in Brantford

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editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

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Bands could “customize” the time that their council held office. It was also meant to lull or trick the people into thinking that a custom election “was the way things were always done”. Usually bands went from two-year terms to three or four year terms under this “custom” heading. Some bands still conduct their elections under Indian Affairs guidelines. Therefore, is this governance that produces six hundred chiefs or “leaders” from the First Nation bands across Canada, an accurate representation of our traditional governance structures? No it is not. They are Indian Act chiefs elected through a system set up by the Federal Government. This is how the Canadian people are being tricked. Federal problems that showcase fancy meetings headdress wearing chiefs and grandiose announcements are not solutions from the original people themselves. There are the “treaty-talking” chiefs that want money to flow, while their egos shine and hopefully get a taxfree way to grow grass. These would be the kind of chiefs you find at the AFN. Real leadership is our big picture, original visionary thinkers who still live in our communities. They are the final vestiges of the hereditary clans and chiefs that are trying to keep the original people going forward with the original ancestors hopes, dreams and blood memory.

BRANTFORD — Brantford Police are looking for information from the public after a youth was stabbed. Paramedics were called to a Palace Street residence Saturday be-

cause of a stabbing that occurred at the home. A 16 year old male was was sent to hospital and treated for his injuries related to the incident — he was reported to be in stable condition. Police are looking to talk to anyone with information about this incident.


TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

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MAY 16TH, 2018

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MAY 16TH, 2018

TWO ROW TIMES

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TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

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TWO ROW TIMES

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018 25TH ANNIVERSARY OPEN HOUSE Come and celebrate our 25th Anniversary. You will have an opportunity to collect 4 stamps in 1 location. Games, prizes and light refreshments. TIME 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Polytechnic, 2160 Fourth Line CONTACT Kensi McNaughton, 519-445-0023

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2018 A MONTH IN MY MOCS Come out and meet Ontario Works Staff and learn about walking a month in the mocs of an individual living off of a fixed income. Door prizes and refreshments will be available. TIME 11:00 am - 2:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Ontario Works (12 Sunrise Court) CONTACT Tahlia Bomberry, 519-445-2084 GRAND RIVER GOVERNANCE GATHERINGS INFO TABLE Come learn about the work the GGG has been doing, be part of our fundraising and survey data collection and learn how you can participate in our work! Visit our website at www.grandrivergovernance.com TIME 11:00 am - 2:00 pm LOCATION Iroquois Village Plaza CONTACT Dakota Brant, 519-732-5577 COMMUNITY FUNDRAISER Prize Bingo $5 card. BBQ $5 meal. Free cake and door prize draw. Raffle $2 each or 10 for $10. All proceeds to be donated to Gaweni:yo School Construction Fund. TIME 11:00 am - 4:00 pm LOCATION Gathering Place by the Grand (2593 Chiefswood Rd) CONTACT Tabitha Curley, 519-753-1950 x6420 ANNUAL ABORIGINAL MIDWIFERY AND BIRTHDAY PARTY Open to all community members. Celebrate the new coming faces. 1350 Sour Springs Rd TIME 11:00 am - 3:00 pm LOCATION Tsi Non:we Ionnakeratstha Ona:srahsta (Six Nations Maternal & Child Care Centre) CONTACT Julie Wilson / Amelia Anderson, 519-445-4922 SIX NATIONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TRUST OFFICE OPEN HOUSE & SIX NATIONS GAMING OFFICE OPEN HOUSE Information pamphlets, promotional item give aways and free draws. Six Nations Community Development Trust & Six Nations Gaming Commission TIME 11:30 am - 2:00 pm (Both Events)

LOCATION Oneida Business Park (50 Generations Drive - Suite 111) CONTACT(S) Melanie Bomberry, Six Nations Community Development Trust 905-765-1236 Melanie Bomberry, Six Nations Gaming Commission- 905-765-1490

BBQ FREE BBQ & draws. Come and see what we’ve been up to! TIME 11:00 am - 1:00 pm LOCATION Firehall No. 1 CONTACT Mauvereen Bomberry, 519-770-8753

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BBQ OPEN HOUSE, BBQ AND FREE DRAWS. TIME 11:30 am - 2:00 pm LOCATION Indspire, Oneida Business Park (50 Generations Drive) CONTACT Shyla Williams, 519-445-3013

OPEN HOUSE Free BBQ, trees and door prize. Land rights info and consultation info booths. TIME 11:00 am - 2:00 pm LOCATION Tourism Building (2498 Chiefswood Rd), CONTACT Six Nations Lands & Resources Tammy Hill, 519-753-0665

SA

JUKASA RADIO 93.5FM 3RD ANNUAL START 2 SUMMER FREE BBQ Free BBQ, contest prize draws, register for the Putting Contest on-site, register for draws. Enjoy live entertainment, meet our DJs, get a picture, visit with our Sponsor’s Booths, play games for prizes. Check out the Jukasa Speedway sprint cars. Bring the kids for face painting. Have some delicious food and a cold drink at Jukasa Radio #Start2Summer to kick off your long weekend!! TIME 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm LOCATION 3326 Sixth Line Rd (at the corner of Sixth Line and Cayuga Rd) CONTACT Sherri Staats, 905-296-1270

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SIX NATIONS MARKETPLACE Come on down to party with Poppy from the Trolls! She will be available for photo opportunities with the kids! Please bring a non-perishable food donation! TIME 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm LOCATION 50 Generations Drive CONTACT John General, info@sixnationsmarketplace.com

FR Vis win fou TIM LO Ch CO Co

LANGUAGE/ART SHOW The Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo Language Immersion School is hosting a Cayuga/Mohawk Language/ART Show. The children will be doing singing, skits and ART! The school has been running for 31 years and teaches our children our way of life as Haudenonsaunee people. They learn ceremonies, songs and dance along with the language. Our high school is OSSD approved and many students are outstanding leaders and mentors in the community. TIME 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm LOCATION Gathering Place by the Grand CONTACT Kari Miller, 905-768-7203 x215

OU Kic che Ma Ple TIM LO Ge CO ma

FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH AND OPEN HOUSE All ages welcome! Let your inner kid out by competing in our side-walk chalk human art challenge, real-life hungry hungry hippo games and our dress-up photo-booth. Then head inside for our GREAT Summer Student Office Open House and Summer Student Job Fair. Take a tour of our trades school and enjoy having fun with our Ogwehoweh Skills & Trades Centre staff at the open house. Light food and refreshments available for sale. TIME 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm LOCATION GREAT Opportunity Centre CONTACT Arielle Monture, 519-445-2222 LADIES NIGHT Every month on the third Thursday is Ladies Night at the Market. Leave the kids at home, come shop, eat and hang out with your friends while playing a round of Tupperware Bingo or receiving a complimentary hand massage with every purchase. Please bring non-perishable food donation! TIME 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Marketplace (50 Generations Drive) CONTACT John General / Milissa Sandy, info@sixnationsmarketplace.com

FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018 BREAKFASD Join the Degowadihsnye Program for a FREE breakfast and to learn more about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). There will be door prizes and interactive games! TIME 9:00 am - 11:00 am, LOCATION Community Hall CONTACT New Directions Group - Jocelyne Byrne, 519-445-2947 MOBILE CANCER SCREENING COACH The Mobile Coach provides free on-site cancer screening services including mammograms for breast screening (ages 50-74), pap tests for cervical screening (ages 21-69) and take home tests for colon screening (ages 50-74). TIME 9:00 am - 3:00 pm LOCATION Iroquois Village Plaza CONTACT 905-975-4467 ACCESSIBILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

OUTSIDE MOVIE NIGHT FREE family BBQ and movie night. Promo giveaways - will have a free draw. TIME 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm LOCATION Dajoh CONTACT Ogwadeni:deo - Bernadette Maracle, 519-445-1864 FISH FRY Come enjoy bluegrass music while eating delicious fish ‘n chips. Freewill offering / $12

CO $5 TIM LO CO Lei

SIX AN An Ba and info TIM LO CO x22

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Six Nations Community Awareness Week Event


ATURDAY, MAY 19, 2018

OMMUNITY YARD SALE 5 per table to set up. Call to book a table. ME 8:00 am - 12:00 pm (NOON) OCATION Community Hall ONTACT Six Nations Parks & Recreation igh Thompson, 519-445-4311 x5226

RAIL-WIDE YARD SALE ome on out and find some amazing deals awesome treasures. Let’s make this year’s ail-Wide Yardsale bigger than ever!! ME 8:00 am - 3:00 pm OCATION Bicentennial & Moccasin Trail ONTACT Bri General, 226-920-9302

UR SUSTENANCE OUTDOOR MARKET ome to our first outdoor Market for the 018 Season! New vendors always elcome. ME 9:00 am - 1:00 pm OCATION 2676 Fourth Line ONTACT Our Sustenance - Adrianne ckers, 519-445-2011

REE TOURS sit sites for a free tour and enter draw to n “on the water” experience package for ur! ME 10:00 am - 3:00 pm OCATION Six Nations Tourism, Mohawk hapel, NHS Chiefswood, Gathering Place ONTACT Six Nations Tourism Cultural oordinators, 519-758-5444

UTDOOR MARKET ck off to the Summer by coming by and ecking out or event joining our outdoor arket! Spaces also available for rent! ease bring non-perishable food donation! ME 10:00 am - 6:00 pm OCATION Six Nations Marketplace (50 enerations Drive) ONTACT John General, info@sixnationsarketplace.com

X NATIONS HEALTH FOUNDATION NNUAL BBQ AND BAKE SALE nnual BBQ with hamburgs and hotdogs. ake sale with delicious homemade pies d baked goods. Health Foundation ormation. ME 11:00 am - 2:00 pm OCATION Six Nations Veteran’s Park ONTACT A. Darlene Davis, 519-445-2226 254

UNDAY, MAY 20, 2018

RAIL-WIDE YARD SALE ome on out and find some amazing deals

or awesome treasures. Let’s make this year’s Trail-Wide Yardsale bigger than ever!! TIME 8:00 am - 3:00 pm LOCATION Bicentennial & Moccasin Trail CONTACT Bri General, 226-920-9302 GROUP OF SIX - YOUTH ART SHOW Six talented youth display their artwork. Meet the artists! Support the youth! Come celebrate the creative young people from our community! TIME 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm LOCATION Everything Cornhusk (Village Plaza) CONTACT Elizabeth Doxtater, 519-717-2644 BADGES, BASEBALL, BREAD AND CHEESE SIX NATIONS EMERGENCY SERVICES BASEBALL TOURNAMENT (SN POLICE, SN FIRE, SN PARAMEDICS, SN PUBLIC WORKS COMMUNITY EVENT) Come cheer on your favourite community emergency services team, as they compete with local youth, in a friendly tournament. Get an upclose look at our emergency services vehicles and display booths. Grab a burger or dog for a small fee, with all proceeds to the Six Nations Food Bank. TIME 10:00 am - 2:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Ball Diamonds, Ohsweken 1738 4th Line Road CONTACT Cst. Jana Miller, Community Services Officer, 519-445-4191 CKRZ MUSIC FESTIVAL Free family event. MC Janet Rogers, Co-MC Diane Kahoko, Cale Crowe, Crown Lands, Mark LaForme, Dwayne LaForme & Boogie Blues Band, Rez Dawgz, Joshua Miller & Pappy Johns Band, Featuring: Big Joe Blues Band & Big Joe TIME 12:00 pm - 7:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Parks & Recreation (outdoors) CONTACT Kimberly Logan 519-445-4140

MONDAY, MAY 21, 2018 BAKE SALE & BBQ Come enjoy excellent pies and other goodies. BBQ starts at 11:30am. Vendors welcome 10x10 space for only $10. Must supply their own tables, chairs and coverings. TIME 8:30 am - 2:00 pm weken LOCATION Ohsweken Baptist Church (1862 Fourth Line) CONTACT Linda Lewis BREAD & CHEESE AFTER PARTY Aleria McKay, Miss Teen Ontario 2019 invites you to

ts May 16 - May 22

join her as we hold our first Annual Bread & Cheese After Party. Come by for this free event. We will have a reptile zoo, VanEvery Party Rentals will have bouncies on-site. This is a party you don’t want to miss. Please bring non-perishable food donation! TIME 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm LOCATION Six Nations Marketplace (50 Generations Drive) CONTACTJohn General / Shantel VanEvery info@sixnationsmarketplace.com SIX NATIONS JR. A ARROWS LACROSSE GAME ARROWS VS ST. CATHARINES TIME 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm LOCATION Iroquois Lacrosse Arena CONTACT Ginger P Smith 519-445-4567

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 2018 MOBILE CANCER SCREENING COACH The Mobile Coach provides free on-site cancer screening services including mammograms for breast screening (ages 50-74), pap tests for cervical screening (ages 21-69) and take home tests for colon screening (ages 50-74). TIME 9:00 am - 3:00 pm LOCATION Iroquois Village Plaza CONTACT 905-975-4467 BBQ & PRIZE DRAW BBQ, raffle draws, door prizes and program information. TIME 11:30 am - 1:30 pm LOCATION Housing / Lands & Membership - 67 Bicentennial Trail CONTACT Karen Bomberry, 519-445-2235 KARAOKE Come and sing for us! Our residents enjoy music and it’s far more entertaining when you share your voice, especially the older country songs! TIME 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm LOCATION Iroquois Lodge CONTACT Dawn Russell 519-445-2224

RADIO 93.5 FM

r takeout. ME 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm OCATION 1585 Mohawk Rd (at Fourth ne) ONTACT Grand River United Church - Rev. usan Beaver, 519-445-0955


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Indigenous Multimedia Print - Web - Social

519-900-5535 info@garlowmedia.com

MAY 16TH, 2018


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MAY 16TH, 2018

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Annual Bread & Cheese Concert in the Park Joan Elliott Bits of Bluegrass James & Debbie MacDonald

NCFC Worship Team Rob Montour Pastor Ken & Sonya Sault

TIMBER MAR MART YOUR LOCAL BUILDING CENTER

The Griffith Family, Nashville Tennessee

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Sun. May 20, 2018 5:30pm

Veterans Park, Ohsweken Free BBQ Bouncy Castles Hosted by the New Credit Fellowship Centre

Ohsweken Clinic Ohsweken Clinic offers: • Opioid Addiction Treatment Specialists: Physicians, Pharmacists and Staff. • Ohsweken Clinic has a warm, inviting, non-judgmental atmosphere. • Switching from another clinic is easy; staff will take care of this for you. • Patient referrals and walk- ins accepted. • Ohsweken pharmacy welcomes all prescriptions.

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Monday 9-5, Tuesday 9-2, Wednesday 9-2, Thursday 9-2, Friday 12-6, Saturday and Sunday CLOSED

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F) 519-445-0131

Monday 9-5, Tuesday 9-5, Wednesday 9-5, Thursday 9-5, Friday 9-6, Saturday 10-1, Sunday 10-1.


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The history of Six Nations annual Bread & Cheese tradition By Jim Windle

Photo: Jayson Koblun

Six Nations opens its arms to its neighbours this week during the annual Community Awareness Week of activities and fun. The weeklong celebration coincides with Monday’s Bread and Cheese Day, known better off-reserve as Victoria Day. Bread and Cheese Day is an annual “gathering of the Nations” as it were,

as Six Nations families from across Turtle Island come home to get reacquainted with friends and relatives. The population at Ohsweken usually quadruples that day with a fair and the annual Six Nations Arrows Express lacrosse game Monday afternoon at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena.

Queen Victoria started the tradition of giving gifts to each member of “Her Majesty’s Faithful Allies”, the Haudenosaunee (aka Six Nations), in both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Initially the gift was in the form of blankets. The practice stopped upon the death of the Queen in 1901. But after the

forced take over of the traditional government by the RCMP in 1924, the Dominion of Canada, through the newly imposed Elected Band Council, started the practice again as an act of public relations, but with a twist. Rather than blankets, the gift became a token gift of a loaf of fresh bread and a block of cheese. In more recent years, as a cost cutting measure, the amount of bread and cheese given each community member was reduced, but as far as the people of Six Nations who still celebrate that day are concerned, it’s really not as much about the bread and cheese as it is a recognition of the relationship that exists between the British Crown and the Haudenosaunee, and it has become the social event of the year. Community Awareness Week, which runs Saturday May 12 to May 25, is more of a celebration of today’s Six Nations community, its people, its businesses, its services and its sports teams. The neighbouring communities are invited to come see and experience who Six Nations is as a community and to help celebrate our joint history and relationship together. For locals, Community Awareness is also a time to promote and gather information about the many programs and services that positively impact them. But, like Bread and Cheese Day, it is also a time to visit friends and relatives, play a few games and have a few laughs.


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MAY 16TH, 2018

TACO SUPPER & SOCIAL/CAKE WALK Friday May 18, 2018 4-7pm Sour Springs Longhouse

$10

Dine in or Take Out Includes a Drink and Dessert Cup Will also have Corn Soup, Ham and Scone for sale

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MAY 16TH, 2018


ACE

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arts. culture. entertainment.

Third season of Guilt Free Zone on its way

The Guilt Free Zone is hosted by Six Nations own Derek Miller and is now on for its third season. SUBMITED PHOTO

CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Guilt Free Zone (GFZ) is a comedy, variety and performance series airing on APTN that features top notch Canadian performers gracing the stage of a speakeasy, while behind the scenes the characters of GFZ partake in hilarious and curious hi jinx. Anchored by the comic stylings of some of Canada’s best improv actors, the show first aired in 2016 with Derek Miller being dubbed “the Jimmy Falon of Indian Country,” and the show will now return with it’s third sea-son on Wednesday, May, 23. Writer and Director of the show Darrell Dennis explained that the comedy in this season has kicked it up a notch. “For the third season there is more of a comedy variety,” he said. He explained that the show has used spoofing for comedy and utilized the show as a means of leaving guilt behind and showcasing an in-

dige-nous perspective. But he noted that creating the show wasn’t as easy as it will appear on screen. “There are thirteen episodes but we pretty much shoot an entire episode a day, so we’ve really got to be on top of it and we can’t mess around. There are four cameras and actors and the crew — with the work you have to really think outside of the box in order to hold the show togeth-er.” ‘I’ve learned things that I hadn’t known before as a writer and a director,” he said. As the third season premiere is quickly approaching, Dennis explained that it isn’t just the comedy, but the talent that the show has become known for that he hopes viewers will appreciate the most of. “The main thing that we try to do now that we’ve started to get more tal-ent to the show and it’s not just an APTN audience, you know people all across Canada of all different backgrounds are finding the show and starting to get really

excited about it,” he said. “So what I think people should take away from the show is the incredible amount of talent and comedy and performing that indigenous people have that the rest of Canada hasn’t really been able to experience.” Host of the show and Six Nations native Derek Miller explained that the work itself is something to be proud of. “The first two seasons were definitely different from each other,” he said. “But it’s really a collaborative effort and I’m really excited about be-ing a part of such a big thing,” he said. “I mean it takes a lot of people to get this thing done, the whole collaborative process is what I really like and I really like being a part of it.” “I’ve learned a ton, even the craft of acting is such a unique process and I’m able to learn from really experienced people.” As for the role he plays in the series, for the third season he hoped to add some more flavour of his own. “I’m hoping to bring

a bit more of my own character to it and I like to in-corporate some stories from the Rez into that and kind of carry on that sort of deal,” he said. But along with playing the part, he himself appreciates the talent and the opportunity that the show has been able to provide rather than just the comedic satires and improv. “In the comedy bits I hope viewers just have fun with it,” he said. “The thing that’s been really consistent is the music and the talent on the show and having the ability to nurture that sort of thing is really cool, I mean to try to give a platform to indigenous artists to come and showcase their abilities. We’re very rich in that way across Canada and especially on Six Nations, we’re such a blessed community in that way,” he said. If you’d like to enjoy some comedy and great talent for an evening, tune in to APTN on Wednesday, May 23 at 10:30 p.m., to see the premiere of the long awaited third season.

Miller channels Link Wray JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — Double Juno award winner Derek Miller will be the headliner at Club NV in Brantford this Friday night. Miller has added another page in his lengthy list of awards, nominations and accolades from some of the biggest names in the industry. He appears in the award-winning documentary, “Rumble - the Indians who rocked the world” which honours a long list of Native Amer-

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN THE TWO ROW TIMES! CALL 519-900-5535

ican singers and musicians that have strongly influenced the evolution of the blues and of rock music. Miller plays the part of his boyhood idol Link Wray in telling the story. Miller performed before tens-of-millions of TV viewers and 10’s of thousands of people live as part of the closing ceremonies of the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver. He has toured with Buffy Sainte-Marie, appeared with Robbie Roberson, recorded with Willy Nelson, and regularly headlines festival shows.


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Marvel Announces Teen Inuk Superhero CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

11:00AM – 3:00PM

Marvel Comics has recently announced its plans for a new superhe-ro named Snowguard, who is an Inuk teenager from Pangnirtung, Nunavut. With her real name being Amka Aliyak and her face donning tradi-tional tattoos, Marvel writer Jim Zub introduced the character as “independent, courageous and headstrong” in a CBC interview at the end of last month. Zub describes Aliyak’s story as beginning with the decision to in-vestigate a mysterious factory that popped up near her community overnight. "What she discovers there is a villain using the spiritual energy of the land to fuel his plans for conquest," said Zub. "Amka tries to re-lease the spirits (Sila) that have been captured and in the course of that ends up becoming empowered with their energy.” Her connection with the spirits, the Sila, give her the ability to change forms and take on animal traits and this concept came from Nyla Innuksuk, an Inuit film producer that heavily influenced the creation of Snowguard. "Our myths and legends are full of spirits and characters that take both human and animal forms, so I was excited to see how those elements could be interpreted within the structure of a graphic novel,” said Innuksuk. But not only offering

Snowguard, the Inuk Super-hero.

her cultural knowledge, Innuksuk also added that the story, although fictional, is one that needs to be told. "I was really excited to hear that there would be an Inuk superhero in the Marvel Universe," she says. "Amka is an activist and cares about real issues. In the Arctic there are a lot of things to fight for; food security, environmental impact, social issues, lack of re-sources, etcetera. To see a young woman fighting for her commu-nity is the kind of story that needs to be told.” Aliyak will be meeting the Champions, a Marvel superhero group comprised of teen versions of the Hulk, Spider-Man and Ms. Mar-vel, in late June. Zub has high hopes for her to become a standing frontline member of the Champions, and Innuksuk is eager to have youth see

IMAGE BY MARVEL

an Inuk woman portrayed as a hero. "Indigenous women are often represented in mainstream media as victims," she observes, "and to see a powerful young person who is fighting back against what she sees as wrong has the potential to make a real difference.” The empowering force of Snowguard is hoped to be a highly antici-pated addition to the Marvel universe.

Concept art for Snowguard. IMAGE BY MARVEL

NEED HELP? CALL NOW

MOBILE LOCATED BESIDE THE OHSWEKEN SPEEDWAY (519) 445-4545 1935 CHIEFSWOOD RD.

CRISIS RESPONSE Toll Free 1-866-445-2204

or 519-445-2204 24 hours a day | 7 days a week


MAY 16TH, 2018

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SPORTS

know the score.

Elementary School Lacrosse Tournament

Kawenni:io/Gaweniyo Elementary School took home the championship for the Primary Division at the Elementary School Lacrosse Tournament held at the Ohsweken Fields on Wednesday, May 9, after PHOTOS BY CHEZNEY MARTIN defeating Jamieson Elementary.

J.C. Hill defeated I.L. Thomas 3-4 in the Intermediate Division for the Elementary School Lacrosse Tournament hosted at the Ohsweken Fields last Wednesday. PHOTOS BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

Let us add the perfect touch of beauty and elegance to any special occasion. bouquets • centerpieces • gifts • events 1721 Chiefswood Rd. Ohsweken Ontario

(519) 445-9210 STORE HOURS: MON - FRI 9-5 PM SAT 10-2 PM CLOSED SUNDAYS


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Six hosts Nations Lacrosse Tournament CHEZNEY MARTIN

chezney@tworowtimes.com

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SIX NATIONS — A great weekend of lacrosse was provided for players and spectators from Thursday, May 10 to Sunday, May 13 in the form of the Nations Lacrosse Tournament held at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena and the Gaylord Powless Arena. Divisions from Novice to Junior were allowed game play versus other Haudenosaunee nation teams as well as visiting teams from the West Coast. The Six Nations Junior/ Intermediate Girls Team took home gold after de-feating the All Nations Junior/Intermediate Girls Team 5-2. The Oneida Novice Boys Team won bronze after defeating the Six Na-tions

North Shore Indians put up a good fight. PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

Novice Boys 2 Team 9-2, while the Six Nations Novice Boys 1 Team won gold with a final score of 4-2 over the Tuscarora Novice Boys Team. The Tyendinega Peewee Boys Team won bronze

versus the Six Nations Peewee Boys 3 Team, while the Oneida Peewee Boys Team won gold over the Six Nations Peewee 2 Team. The Oneida Bantam Boys Team won bronze

A lot of hustle and back and forth throughout the game showed a lot of determination from both the PHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN North Shore Indians and the Mohawk Militia.

over the Six Nations bantam Boys 2 Team, while the Six Nations Bantam Boys 1 Team won 6-5 over the Akwesasne Bantams Boys Team. The Six Nations Junior/ Intermediate Boys 2 Team

The Mohawk Militia (black/white jerseys) closed their championship game 8-6 versus the North Shore Indians (red/blue jerseys) for the PHOTO BY X Junior/Intermediate Division last Sunday.

won bronze versus the Six Nations Junior/Intermediate Boys 1 team with a final score of 8-7. The finale of the tournament matched up the final two teams in the junior/intermediate division: the North Shore Indians of British Columbia and the Mohawk Militia of Six Nations. With scoring from Marshall Powless, Luke Montoure, Owen Martin and Damonie Thomas and assists from Montoure, Lindyn Hill, Justin Martin, Dawit Martin, Owen Martin, Ross Hill and Thunder Hill, the game was

se-cured by the Mohawk Militia 8-6. During the tournament, four set of lacrosse equipment were stolen from players of the Akwesasne Bantam 1 Boys Team. They were later re-placed in full by Curt Styres, Trisha Jamieson, the Six Nations Rebels La-crosse Organization and Brian Miller, and Darcy Powless and Skahen-dowaneh Swamp lent the players equipment in the mean time. Each of the teams were sent off with well wishes and safe travels.

Playing at home might have given the Mohawk Militia a bit of an advantage, but both teams provided an excellent show. PHOTO BY

CHEZNEY MARTIN


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SN Warriors’ have a perfect 4-0 start Titans crush Rivermen 18-5 in Oakville Jr. C team now in lead tie for Western Division JIM WINDLE

JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

jim@tworowtimes.com

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SIX NATIONS — After four games in the Jr. C Six Nations Warriors are suddenly tied for first place in the Western Division, leap-frogging over Mimico and into a tie with first place the Wilmott Wild. The Wild has played one more games as of Monday. The game began with Mimico ahead 1-0 before the first minute of the game, but Landon General and Trey Jimmerson, tied and went ahead 2-1 by the end of the frame. It was 5-2 after two periods with Jordan Myke, Texas Powless, and Matt Miller scoring. The Warriors just kept the pressure on in the third period with Jimmerson, Emmitt Smith, Tryrese Staats, Miller and Miller with two, put the lid on the game doubling up on Mimico, 10-5. The SN Warriors outlasted the Wilmott Wild 10-9 at the Plattsville Arena, Thursday, May 10th. The Warriors were led by Bryson Staats with three goals and two assists as Six Nations young Warriors have been nothing short of impressive.

The Six Nations Jr. C Warriors are off to a great start with a 4-0 record so far. The Warriors are fit, well coached and fast, and a PHOTO BY JIM WINDLE very exciting team to watch.

They are a fast thinking group of guys to go with their fast feet and although their exuberant style has had desired results, it has also brought about a few gaffs which have cost them a few goals but so far anyway, not games. Josh Daley has started in the Six Nations net twice so far this season winning both in one-goal affairs. In other area Jr. C action, the Brantford Warriors defeated the Halton Hills Bulldogs with a convincing 10-2 final score. The Dogs kept it close in the first period sand-

wiching a Halton goal between two Brantford goals scored by Jaden Drage and a short-hander by Nick DAmico. Brantford took over in the second frame as Ryan Door, Quinn Drysdale, Ethan Guimond, Travis Scott and Caleb Wells ballooned the margin to 7-2 after 40 minutes of play. Three more third period goals scored by Conner Merritt, Scott and Drage , and a fight between Brantford’s Danny Attridge and Halton Hills’ Michael Pierog sent the Brantford fans home happy.

Rebels looking better every game Six Nations holds perfect 10 for the season JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

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SIX NATIONS — The visiting Niagara Thunderhawks were victimized for the third time this season Friday night as the Six Nation Rebels continue to dominate the early Jr. B season before a large Six Nations crowd. The 18-7 crushing of the Thunderhawks keeps the Rebels perfect season, perfect with 10 wins in 10 games, averaging 13-7 goals per game. Niagara’s Aidan Buis struck early with back-toback goals scored at 1:17 and at 3:39, but the confidence gained was quickly lost when Riley Miller, Trey Jimerson, Chayton King and Austin Giles, with two, finished the first

period with the Rebels up 6-2, and 11-4 by the end of the second. Four more Six Nations goals opened the third period to set the hook deep, The Rebels and the Thunderhawks traded goals in the last half of the third period for the 18-7 Rebels win. It was a fast a cleanly played game with only three minor penalties called all game, two by Six Nations and one against Niagara. Gates Abrams scored four for Six Nations, and several others recorded multi-point games, including Austin Giles (3G,4A), Mason Hill (1G,2A), call up Matthew Miller (1G,2A), Justin Martin (2G,2A), Riley Miller (1G,1A), Tanner Baldin (5A), Adam Martin (1G,1A), Chayton King (2G,2A), Garret Vyse-

Square (1G,6A), and Trey Jimerson (2G,3A). Daniel Hill earned the win in goal. Coach Miles General is very pleased with his young charge already and why not. The early season is looking bright with a 10-0 season so far. But sophomore coach Miles General is not one to ease off and take anything for granted as he and his coaching staff are in a continuous state of sharpening up special teams, player cardio, and transitional speed. The Rebels see action next Friday, May 18th, when the Point Edward Pacers visit the ILA for an 8 pm start before taking the bus to Owen Sound for a 4 pm match with the North Stars.

OAKVILLE — After weekend action in the Sr. B, the Six Nations Rivermen find themselves tied for second place with the Owen Sound Stars with two wins and one loss, after three games into the season. The Six Nations Rivermen started well against the Oakville Titans Sunday at the Toronto Rock Athletic Centre but it didn’t finish well for them as the Titans manhandled the Rivermen 18-5. Tom Montour and Rayce Vyse scored a little

more than a minute apart to at 3:23 and at 4:46, but that awoke the Titans who responded with three goals before Tom Montour closed the first period to draw even at 3-3. After Oakville’s Eddie Renaud and Six Nations Joe Maracle Jr. traded early second period markers, it was all Oakville with a sting on five unanswered goals before Danton Miller broke it at 16:11 when it was 9-5 for the Titans. Undaunted, the Titans banged in goals the last three goals of the second period and kept going with six third period goals for the 18-5 final. The Rivermen were as-

sessed nine straight penalties across three periods including the last three of the game assessed to Montour for slashing, and two to Murray Porter, plus a five minute major. The Rivermen will be seeking revenge when the Titans come to Six Nations, Friday May 18, at 8 pm at the Gaylord Powless Arena. A win will move the Rivermen into a tie for first place with the Titans. The Rivermen will be led by cousins Roger and Rayce Vyse who are one and two on the Rivermen points list. Rayce has three goals and six assists, and Roger has two goals and six assists.

Wind storm puts races on delay Speedway postponed to Wednesday

JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

HED: DEK: Speedway postponed to Wednesday By Clinton Geoffrey

OHSWEKEN – This Friday’s Lucas Oil Test and Tune night scheduled for Friday, May 11 has been postponed until next Wednesday, May 16. “Unfortunately the weather has put us behind schedule,” said speedway owner Glenn Styres. “Last week’s violent wind storm damaged the new catch fencing that was being built, and we need a few more days to get back on track.” Practice has been rescheduled for next Wednesday, May

16. All cars competing at Ohsweken in 2018 are welcome to test on the lightning-fast 3/8mile clay oval, including the track’s four weekly divisions, the Kool KidzCorr/Pak 360 Sprint Cars, Strickland’s GMC Crate Sprint Cars, Middleport Mechanical Thunder Stocks and HRW Automotive Mini Stocks. The pit gate will open at 5:00 pm for competitors at a cost of $25 per driver and $10 per crew member. Cars are scheduled to be on track beginning at 6:00 pm. Practice will alternate for divisions. Due to ongoing construction on the property, the main grandstand will be closed to spectators. Ohsweken fans can watch Lucas Oil Test and Tune

night live online free of charge via the track’s Livestream on the Speedway’s website. Ohsweken Speedway’s 2018 Friday Night Excitement schedule kicks off on Friday, May 18 with the Ackland Insurance 23rd annual season opener, featuring the inaugural race for the Action Sprint Tour, Ontario’s new travelling Crate Sprint Car Tour. The Kool Kidz-Corr/Pak 360 Sprint Cars, the Middleport Mechanical Thunder Stocks and HRW Automotive Mini Stocks will all be in action for their season debut. Race time is 7:30 pm for opening night and all season long. For the full 2018 schedule of events, visit www.ohswekenspeedway.ca.

2018 Arrows debut at Bread and Cheese game JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — Again this year, the Six Nations Arrows have waited until Bread and Cheese Day (Victoria Day) to begin their Jr. Lacrosse season to coincide with one of the biggest days on the Six Nations Reserve. The 2018 season opener for the Arrows will be played at

3 pm, Monday, May 21st, at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena and the St.Catharines Athletics will be the opposition. Last season the Arrows finished the regular season with an 18-2-0 record for a league-leading 36 points in the 40 game schedule. They took out the Toronto Beaches three games straight before doing the same to the Whitby Warriors in the semi’s

before being shocked by the Mimico Mountaineers who defeated them three straight games for the league title. The arrows will not be happy until they bring the Minto Cup back to Six Nations, but it all starts on Bread and Cheese Day. Elsewhere around the league where the season is underway, Mimico, the Toronto Beaches and the Kitchener-Waterloo Braves have one win each.


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TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

GRAND RIVER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION OFFICE 2018 DEADLINE CALENDAR for

Feb. 1st Application Deadline for Summer semester Apply on-line! Fall Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Winter course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due. Levels 3 & 4 provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. May 1st Application Deadline for Fall or Fall/Winter semester(s) Apply on-line! Winter Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Summer course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due. Levels 3 & 4 provide Letter of Good Academic Standing.

Aysen, who is in his first year in the Kids division wrestled well all tournament.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Two Six Nations youth do well at national wrestling championships STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — This past weekend two Six Nations athletes travelled to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island to compete in the Canada East Youth Wrestling Championships. The Canada East competition is the highest level of wrestling for grades one through eight and is considered the National Championship for Youth Wrestling in Canada. Aysen and Kaidyn Lickers who have been wrestling for four years represented the Discipline Wrestling Club in the Kids and Novice divisions respectively. Aysen, who is in his first year in the Kids division wrestled well all tournament and received some very questionable calls during his bronze medal match vs. a competitor from P.E.I. The P.E.I official missed a fourpoint shoulder throw that would have given Lickers the match.

12:05am May 2nd to 9am July 1st Registry is OFF LINE Aug 1st Document Deadline: ALL Fall applicants who fail to provide the required documentation by this deadline WILL BE Cancelled. Official Transcripts are due from students for previous application period. And Community Service Activity forms are due from 1st time funded students. Oct. 1st Application Deadline for Winter semester – Apply on-line! Summer Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Fall course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due. Levels 3 & 4 provide Letter of Good Academic Standing.

NO EXCEPTIONS FOR LATE APPLICATIONS. OUR POLICY WILL BE STRICTLY ADHERED TO. STUDENTS MUST APPLY ON-LINE

CONNECT HEARINGour–website CALEDONIA Please, check the local newspapers, at www.grpseo.org FaceBook or give us 5” a call at (519) 445-2219 × 6.5” 05/09/18for more information. EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW

Kaidyn (centre) went 4-0 and outscored his opponents 42-2 SUBMITTED HOTO throughout the tournament.

In the end, he gained valuable experience against older high-level wrestlers and came away with a 4th place finish. Kaidyn, who is in his second year of the Novice division came into the tournament as the Ontario Champion and made the gold medal match vs. a grappler from New Brunswick. In the final Lickers went to work early quickly defeating his opponent 10-0 to have his hand raised as the National

Champion. Kaidyn went 4-0 and outscored his opponents 42-2 throughout the tournament. Aysen and Kaidyn will continue to train with the Discipline Wrestling Club in Stoney Creek until the new Discipline gym opens in Ancaster this summer. The new gym is expected to be bigger and will hopefully welcome more athletes from Six Nations who wish to try the sport of Wrestling.

PHOTO: The return of Cody Jamieson to the Rochester Knighthawks after having to sit out most of last season due to injury, has been obvious all season long. But it is in the playoffs where his power really shines. He scored three and assisted on one to lead the Knighthawks past the Georgia Swarm in a close 9-8 win. The NLL finals begin in Saskatchewan next Saturday with Game 2 at the Blue Cross Centre. There will be a tiebreaker game 3 if necessary. Submitted Photo

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Call to book your FREE hearing test* today. 905.765.8607 connecthearing.ca FNA, VAC, WCB, WSIB, WorkSafeBC, ADP & ODSP accepted. Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC. *Free hearing tests are only applicable for customers over 50 years of age. No purchase required. Some conditions may apply. †Based on national physician referrals over the tenure of the corporation’s Canadian business operations compared to the disclosed referral count of leading competitors.


TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

31

NATION

all our relations.

Ban solitary confinement for mentally ill, Indigenous inmates: rights groups CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OTTAWA — Three civil rights organizations joined forces Monday to voice their concern over the ongoing use of indefinite solitary confinement for prison inmates _ a practice they say is akin to torture and a violation of human rights. The Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the John Howard Society and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association are calling for a hard 15-day cap to be placed on the use of solitary confinement _ or 'administrative segregation,' as it is officially known. The groups also want to see a full ban on

segregation of inmates who are mentally ill and for Indigenous offenders. They are highly critical of the federal government for mounting an appeal against a British Columbia Supreme Court ruling in January that struck down Canada's law on indefinite solitary confinement. ``We are here to expose the truth, and the truth is that the government of Canada is fighting in the courts for the right to put mentally ill and Indigenous people in a torture box,'' said Michael Bryant, executive director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. The Trudeau government promised to restrict long-term solitary confinement for federal

inmates following the inquest into the death of teenager Ashley Smith, who died by self-strangulation after spending more than 1,000 days in segregation. The Liberal government introduced Bill C-56 last year to phase in a cap on the number of days an inmate can be held in solitary confinement, starting at 21 days and eventually moving to 15. But such caps would only apply to cases of disciplinary segregation, not for administrative segregation, which involve different processes, Bryant said. Meanwhile, both the B.C. Supreme Court and the Ontario Superior Court have delivered decisions saying administra-

tive solitary confinement is inhumane and, in the Ontario decision, unconstitutional if longer than five days. Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale's office has said an appeal is necessary to examine the two court decisions, as they come to some differing conclusions. ``While these matters remain before the court, we are reviewing all recent court judgments; we will identify any further and better ideas that need to be incorporated in our reform package. But we have been proactive from the beginning and our work is already well advanced,'' Goodale has said. But Catherine Latimer of the John Howard Soci-

ety said legal delays are leaving prisoners vulnerable. ``This is not a legal game. Delays in implementing the needed reforms result in more, and often irreparable, harm to individuals. The federal government needs to put in place an administrative segregation regime that respects the charter now.'' Lawrence DaSilva served 19 years in federal jail for carjacking and kidnapping a Bay Street lawyer. He spent over 2,500 days in solitary confinement during his prison term, including one stretch that lasted 587 consecutive days. He says he now suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result

of the psychological harm caused by spending so much time alone in a prison cell. Decisions on when someone is placed into administrative segregation and how long they stay are made without due process and without the opportunity for inmates to have legal counsel to make representations, DaSilva said. ``The helplessness that you feel based on why you're there, regardless of whether you have mental illness or not, these situations can rapidly develop,'' he said. ``Your rights are illusory. You do not have them. You're just stuck.''

them, it doesn't happen for their benefit,'' he said. ``And their interactions with the justice system have historically and contemporaneously been so negative that there's a lot of fear.'' That may change if a Gladue report is written in their case, which requires getting in touch with an offender, their family and community, Walker said. ``It's a very delicate and awkward conversation to phone somebody and introduce yourself ? and then proceed with some very, very personal questions, questions that they wouldn't discuss with their closest friends and family members,'' he said. The accused is also interviewed and it's often the first time they think deeply about how they ended up in trouble, Walker said. ``Gladue report writers are sometimes the first contact that these individuals have with the criminal justice system who aren't immediately making them feel as though they are a criminal, making them feel as though they're being listened to.'' But some in the justice

system say the reports have been underutilized. Signa Daum Shanks, a lawyer and director of Indigenous outreach at Osgoode Hall law school in Toronto, said Gladue principles should be applied whenever an accused has Indigenous heritage, but it's ``stunning'' how often lawyers decide the background information isn't relevant to a particular case. Courts are consistently provided with context about an accused, she said, such as if someone is struggling with English. But that doesn't always happen with Indigenous people, despite the Supreme Court ruling, Daum Shanks said. It's ``gut-wrenching'' that the data in those reports isn't making its way into courtrooms, where judges could use it to tailor sentences that could help prevent crimes from happening again, she said. Gladue principles are not intended to add an element of sympathy in sentencing an Indigenous person. ``It's about making sure some things don't happen again.'' There are still signif-

icant misconceptions about what Gladue principles are, even among people working in the criminal justice system, said lawyer Michelle Brass. ``It's not a get-out-ofjail-free card, for example. It's not a creation of a second justice system,'' she said. Brass is working with the Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan to research how and when the reports are used by looking at about 250 cases across that province. Part of the project's aim is dispelling misunderstandings by providing education for those in the justice system. At stake, Brass said, is the continued overrepresentation of Indigenous people in jails and prisons. Data from Correctional Service Canada shows Aboriginal people made up about 18 per cent of all federal inmates in 2001, but accounted for less than three per cent of the country's total population. Indigenous offenders made up 23 per cent of the total offender population last year. About five per cent of people across the country identified as

being Aboriginal in the 2016 census. For years, there's been a substantial need for more Gladue reports across B.C., said Mark Benton, executive director of the Legal Services Society, the province's legal aid office. The society traditionally used non-governmental funding for the reports and, with each report costing about $1,740 and taking about eight weeks to complete, there was only enough money for about 80 per year. Funding was dedicated to writing Gladue reports last year by the province, Benton said. In 2017, there were 131 Gladue reports written in B.C. and about 400 will be produced this year. Benton said he was concerned about the system a year ago, but now there's real progress being made in B.C. ``I believe that we're headed in the right direction now and I believe there are people who are in a position to make the needed changes who are committed to doing that,'' he said. Some other jurisdictions are focusing on

better utilizing Gladue reports, too. Earlier this year, Yukon set aside $530,000 for a pilot project to train writers based in the territory to produce standardized reports and cover the costs of writing them. Reports had previously been written by untrained personnel, which led to uneven quality and some reports were tossed from court, causing delays in the justice system, the government said. ``Yukon First Nations are over represented in the criminal justice system and it is our hope that a Gladue report program will assist in raising awareness and understanding about the unique systemic factors faced by First Nations, while recommending restorative and healing options,'' Grand Chief Peter Johnston of the Council of Yukon First Nations said in a statement. But there's still work to be done when it comes to implementing the Gladue decision, Benton said, including the lack of national standards for the reports. The ruling affects all

Work still needed years after landmark ruling on Indigenous sentencing: lawyers CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

VANCOUVER — Nearly two decades after a landmark court decision on sentencing Indigenous offenders, lawyers say there are no national standards for implementing the ruling and too many Aboriginal people are still behind bars. The Supreme Court of Canada's Gladue decision in 1999 said judges must take note of systemic or background factors when determining a sentence for Indigenous offenders in order to address their ``serious overrepresentation'' in prison. Indigenous people often feel removed from the justice system, said Mitch Walker, vice-president of the Gladue Writers Society of British Columbia, which promotes the best practices for writing Gladue reports that lay out the Indigenous background of an accused in pre-sentencing. ``For First Nations people, justice just kind of happens to them. It doesn't happen with them, it doesn't happen for

CONTINUED ON PAGE 33


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MAY 16TH, 2018

PROJECT PARTNERS

NIAGARA REINFORCEMENT LINE PROJECT UPDATE

WHO IS A6N UTILITIES? A6N is a joint venture between Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation (51%) and

The Niagara Reinforcement Line (NRL) is set to be completed by local

Aecon Group Inc. (49%). The company performs

company A6N. The Hydro One project will be completed in conjunction with Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation, Six Nations Elected Council, and Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. The project will create in both short and long-term benefits to the local communities.

utility-related work in Southwestern Ontario. Like all investments under the umbrella of SNGRDC, net free revenues flow to the Economic Development Trust for investment in community priorities. This means when A6N is profitable, the Six Nations Community as a whole benefits.

60 EMPLOYEES

WORKFORCE 80% ABORIGINAL

HOW WILL THE SIX NATIONS COMMUNITY BENEFIT? Employment

The Niagara Reinforcement line is a 76-km, double circuit 230 kilovolt (kV), electricity transmission line runs from Allanburg Transformer Station (TS) in the City of Thorold to the Middleport TS in the County of Haldimand.

NRL CONSTRUCTION TIMELINE YIELD

May 2018 Summer 2018 Spring 2019

Pre-Construction: Prepare approx. 8 km section of the transmission corridor for construction.

Construction Begins: A6N on-site for approximately 14 months.

Commercial Operation: Niagara Reinforcement Line completed. Increased supply reliability.

10,000-15,000 Hours of Labour

Profits from Construction ultimately flow to the EDT

Elevated Business Profile for A6N

Development & Training for A6N Employees

Financial Benefits

“25% ownership in NRL will produce not less than $40 million over the next 48 years”

Think about it like this… If you know someone who is graduating high school or about to turn 18,

The NRL investment will generate funds for the community throughout their entire adult life. When they reach the age of retirement, the physical asset will still hold significant value which Six Nations can then sell or reinvest in.

Additional Benefits Providing for Future Generations

CONTACT INFO

The 300-Megawatt energy set-aside will potentially trigger up to $500 million of new investment, contracting and employment opportunities.

If you have a comment, question or concern, please contact governance@sndevcorp.ca or call 519-753-1950.

Increased energy supply and reliability for Six Nations and neighbouring communities.

For more information on Six Nations’ involvement in the NRL project please visit www.snfuture.com/project.php?id=19

Sharing for the Benefit of the Whole Protecting Mother Earth Increased transfer capability will allow for additional renewable energy generation to be connected in the area, allowing Six Nations to participate in the global shift towards producing cleaner energy.

GROWING OUR COMMUNITY’S FUTURE


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MAY 16TH, 2018

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

of Canada, he said, so there's an expectation for a common approach across the country. The federal Justice Department said it's up to each jurisdiction to determine how to implement the Gladue principles in the Supreme Court decision. The department runs

the Indigenous justice program, which includes projects that raise awareness about the Gladue decision. Many details in Gladue reports could be standardized, Benton said, including what they should include, who's qualified to write them and how long they should take to prepare. ``As always in Canada,

there is some benefit to a diversity of approaches when it comes to how justice works,'' he said. ``But I think after basically 20 years since the Gladue decision, it would be timely for a consolidation of the best practices to come together. And I think many of us are hoping that the federal government will take that on.''

Indigenous Peoples need help with dementia, Algonquin elder urges conference CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OTTAWA — An Algonquin elder described Monday how shocked she was to learn — almost by accident — that a routine nursing-home visit with her ailing father would be their last. Annie Smith St-Georges told a national conference on dementia how her father's worsening condition resulted in him being moved from the First Nations reserve he called home in Maniwaki, Que., to a nearby long-term care facility. She visited him every two weeks, making the trek either by bus or with her husband, she said. And yet nobody called to inform the family that he was dying _ something she only learned when she laid eyes on him during that last visit in 2003. Smith St-Georges described finding her father, eyes thick and glossy, with a morphine patch on his chest. ``I walked into the room and he had a big patch on him. And nobody notified us ? to spend that quality last moment with him. I grabbed a nurse and I said, 'What's this?'?'Oh, he's dying,' and she took off. I said, 'Who ordered this?' Nobody told us,'' she recalled. ``When somebody leaves, it's big _ it's huge, and it's a big goodbye.

They will never come back again to say hi to you. So I rocked him to sleep. I had that moment, at least.'' Smith St-Georges told her story to about 200 health care professionals, caregivers, researchers and people with dementia at Monday's conference in Ottawa, hosted by Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor. Her father, who was 89 when he died, had lived on a reserve for his entire life, but the moment he was transferred from a hospital to a nursing home off-reserve, he lost access to services, she said in an interview. ``Her dad was not able to get any services from the reserve off-reserve. Even though he spent all his life teaching [traditions and language],'' added her husband, Andre-Robert. She described how, emaciated, he suffered from bed sores, but had no way of acquiring a softer mattress because he was no longer living on the reserve. The federal government needs to do more for Indigenous people who lose access to services, said Smith St-Georges, who wonders how many other First Nations people have had the same experience. And families with loved ones with dementia need help to ensure they aren't moved too far away, she

added. ``I still feel hurt about it and this is very emotional for me,'' she said. ``How guilty I felt and how bad I felt of how he was treated in the last moments of his life. He did not believe in that. ``This is where I would like to see improvement of our people being served in a proper way.'' Petitpas Taylor invited Smith St-Georges to join her new advisory board on dementia, a measure aimed at developing a national strategy for the condition. The board will be cochaired by Dr. William E. Reichman of the Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation and Pauline Tardif, the CEO of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. ``When we look at Indigenous services we certainly need to make sure Indigenous communities receive the services they need,'' Petitpas Taylor said in response to a question about Smith St-Georges' experience at the nursing home. ``We heard from a variety of speakers who talked about inconsistencies of services available in our country and those are the types of things we need to address,'' she said. Petitpas Taylor said she hopes the advisory board will report back next spring.

33

J O B

POSITION Communications & Marketing Assistant Elementary Teacher

Acting HR Generalist Administrative Assistant Secondary School Teacher Educational Assistant Vice Principal/Teacher Acting HR Generalist Project Coordinator Historical Interpreter Cultural Interpreter-Tourism Financial Controller Gas Attendants Cashiers Supply Educational Assistants Recruitment & Selection Coordinator Programs Administrative Support Strategic Partnership Lead

POSITION Advanced Care Paramedic 2 positions Groundskeeper Life Promotion Summer Student Day Camp Leader 3 positions Secondary Day Camp Leader Communications Officer

B O A R D

EMPLOYER/LOCATION Indspire

TERM TBD

SALARY CLOSING DATE TBD May 28, 2018

The Mississaugas of The New Credit First Nation

Full Time

Six Nations Of The Grand River Development Corporation Grand River Employment & Training Inc./Kayanase

Contract

Six Nations Polytechnic/Brantford Six Nations Polytechnic/Brantford Six Nations Polytechnic/Brantford Six Nations of The Grand Rive Dev Corp AECON, Six Nations Six Nations of The Grand River Dev. Corp. Six Nations of The Grand River Dev. Corp. Six Nations of The Grand River Dev. Corp. New Credit Variety & Gas Bar New Credit Variety & Gas Bar Standing Stone School, Oneida Nation of the Thames Oneida Nation of the Thames

School Year School Year School Year Contract Contract Contract Contract Full Time FT/PT FT/PT Term / F/T Full Time

TBD May 17, 2018, 12:00 p.m. TBD May 18, 2018, 4:30 p.m. TBD May 18, 2018, 4:00 p.m. TBD May 25, 2018 TBD May 25, 2018 TBD May 25, 2018 TBD May 18, 2018 TBD Until Fil ed TBD Until Fil ed TBD Until Fil ed TBD Until Fil ed TBD May 25, 2018 TBD May 25, 2018 TBD May 16, 2018 $20. Hr. May 16, 2018

Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board Contract Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board Contract

TBD May 28, 2018 TBD May 28, 2018

EMPLOYER/LOCATION Paramedic Services Health Services

Parks & Recreation Administration, Health Services Child & Family Services Social Services Child & Family Services Social Services Policy & Communications Central Administration Family Support Worker Family Support Unit Social Services Secretary Family Support Unit Social Services Supportive Parenting Worker Family Support Unit Social Services Life Skil s Coach Family Support Unit Social Services Children’s Mental Health Worker Administration Social Services Case Manager Administration Grand River Ontario Works Child & Youth Worker Health Promotions Health Services Housekeeper Iroquois Lodge health Services Food Service Worker Iroquois Lodge Health Services Director of Policy & Policy & Communications Communications Central Administration Youth Life Promotion Advisor Administration Social Services Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Contract

TERM Full time

Contract (May-Nov) Contract Contract (Summer) Contract (Summer) Contract (Maternity)

SALARY CLOSING DATE $41.04 hr. May 16, 2018

$15.50 hr. $14.00 hr. $14.00 hr. $14.50 hr. TBD

May 16 2018 May 16, 2018 May 16, 2018 May 16, 2018 May 16, 2018

Contract TBD On Going Until Fil ed Full Time TBD On Going Until Fil ed Full Time TBD On Going Until Fil ed Full Time TBD On Going Until Fil ed Full Time TBD May 23, 2018 Full Time TBD May 23, 2018 Contract (Maternity) $20.00 hr. May 23, 2018 Full Time TBD May 23, 2018 Part Time TBD May 23, 2018 Full Time TBD On Going Until Fil ed Full Time

TBD On Going Until Fil ed

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


34 2

ATTN:

TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

MAY25TH, 16TH, 2018 APRIL

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituaries

Coming Events

Coming Events

LEHMAN: Leah Gayle

May 21-22-2018

Peacefully surrounded by family & friends at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Hamilton on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at the age of 60 years. Beloved daughter of Lawrence & the late Belda (Doxtator) Lehman. Loving sister of Tim (Liz), Joan (late Charlie), and Sandi (Mike). Dear aunt of Braedon, Kelly, Keely, and Kaiden. Leah is also survived by her aunts, uncles, and cousins. She will forever be lovingly remembered by her special girls and by many as a special auntie. Funeral service will be held at Styres Funeral Home, 1798 4th Line Rd., Ohsweken on Saturday May 12, 2018 at 10:30 am. with visiting from 9 am. until service time. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Ganokwasra Family Assault Support Services, P.O. Box 250, 1781 Chiefswood Rd., Ohsweken. www.rhbanderson.com

Revival Service’s at Six Nations Pentecostal Church. 1527-4th Rd. Ohsweken, ON Speaker James MacDonald from Moosonee, ON. Special music - Taylors from Constance Lake 7pm nightly. Refreshments after services. More info - Pastor Andrew SacKaney 519.752.7296

OPEN JAM CHIEFSWOOD FELLOWSHIP SAT MAY 19 AT 1 PM 506 4TH LINE 6 KM WEST OF OHSWEKEN, SIX NATIONS DOOR PRIZES....50/50 DRAW....SILENT AUCTION BRING YOUR INSTRUMENT AND A FRIEND AND ENJOY THE BEST IN LOCAL TALENT POT LUCK LUNCH INFO....... PHIL 905 768 5442

Come and be blessed. Everyone welcome.

Please recycle this newspaper

HEALING NATIONS, NATURALLY... 2023 Chiefswood Road Ohsweken, Ontario

519-445-4554

Onondaga Beaver & Deer Fundraiser Friday May 18th Sour Springs Longhouse Taco Supper 4pm-7pm Social & Cakewalk 7:30pm Price: $10.00 (Taco, drink, dessert cup) Dine in or Take out available Also- Corn Soup / Ham & Scone Loonie Table / Raffle Draw True Blues Matinee Guests Dwayne Laforme Boogie Blues Band May 12th - Front Man, Mike McDonald 2-6 Special Guest Mike Doyle May 26th - Front Man, Darran Poole 2-6 Special Guest, Al Lerman Branch 90 Legion 21 Oak Street Brantford, Ontario

Yard Sale

Yard Sale Saturday May 19, 2018 8am to 3pm at 3172 Fourth Line, Six Nations. Household items, Handmade baby quilts for girls & boys, knitted items, ladies clothes, books, men’s coats. Rain or shine. Hot dog and drinks for sale.

Puppies Wanted

WANTED: Puppies for good homes. Will pay for your pups or we'll pay you a finder's fee. Call (289) 377-9623

Fundraiser

Contact Timarah @ 289-659-6916 for tickets Mark Hill 519-758-4282 & https://www.gofundme.com/lets-cure-tucker

Mobile Home for Sale

Great Mobile Home For Sale 2 Bedroom- 14x70 - CSA MUST BE MOVED Call 905 765 2425 or text 537 9425

Hall Rentals

Royal Canadian Legion Branch 90, 21 Oak St Brantford 519-752-0331

We are accepting

HALL RENTAL RESERVATIONS for your event

Buck and Doe - Birthdays - Holiday Parties - Anniversaries Weddings - Family Reunions - Showers - Celebration of Life or ANY special event. Branch 90 has been serving the Brant County area since 1927 and will be happy to ensure your visit to us is a memorable one! We also have entertainment every Friday night and Karaoke Saturday evening.


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

MAY MAY 16TH, 16TH, 2018 2018

CLUES ACROSS 1. Small lump 4. Helps little firms 7. A way of performing 12. Lawyers 15. Stirred up 16. Believed in 18. The Bay State (abbr.) 19. Makes computers 20. Sodium 21. As fast as can be done (abbr.) 24. Institute legal proceedings against 27. More compact 30. Ethiopian river 31. Quantitative fact 33. No (Scottish) 34. A concession of no great value 35. Tony-winning actress Daisy 37. More (Spanish) 39. Russian space station 41. Helicopter 42. At the peak 44. Makes ecstatically happy 47. Excellent 48. Material body 49. The Golden State (abbr.) 50. A unit of plane angle 52. Argon 53. Fancy 56. Fried mixture of meat and spices 61. How green plants use sunlight 63. Without wills 64. Unhappy 65. Meat from a pig’s leg CLUES DOWN 1. Mentor 2. Lyric poems 3. A dry cold north wind in Switzerland 4. Trapped 5. Used for road surfacing 6. Cuckoos 7. Prefix “away from”

35 31

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, soon you will be able to clarify your thinking and articulate your needs to others. Until then, you need to wait for an opportunity to share your point of view.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, if you have been struggling with a challenging situation, you’ll get some much-needed support this week. Use the break to treat yourself to something special.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Some epic action may be on tap for you this week, Gemini. You may have to slow things down if everything is moving too quickly. A lively group of people will join you. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, a surge of energy may have you working overtime to complete a task. Just come up for a breather once in a while. Such respites can prove rejuvenating.

8. Seth McFarlane comedy 9. Not out 10. “The Simpsons” bus driver 11. Popular HBO drama (abbr.) 12. Acclaimed Indian physicist 13. Removes 14. One-name NBA player 17. Revolutionary women 22. Smell 23. Ground-dwelling songbird 24. Midway between south and southeast 25. American state 26. Keen 28. Khoikhoin peoples 29. Int’l defense organization 32. Samoan money

Answers for May 16, 2018 Crossword Puzzle

36. A sign of assent 38. One from Somalia 40. Boat race 43. Trims 44. French coins 45. Indigenous Scandinavian 46. Flew alone 51. Loch where a “monster” lives 54. Japanese title 55. Pros and __ 56. Present in all living cells 57. Something to scratch 58. Branch of Islam 59. Appear 60. Former CIA 62. Yukon Territory

SUDOKU

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Distant lands may be calling you, Leo. So be sure your passport is in order and set up those discount fare alerts to your email. It’s time to get away for some R&R.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, be careful what you wish for, as you may just get everything you desire. It’s uncertain how things may turn out, so be ready to make changes as needed. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Is love in the air, Libra? If you are feeling more amorous than usual, you may be ready for a new relationship or ready to add some spice to your current one.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Health, wisdom and wealth could be in your sights, Scorpio. Why not throw in being well-liked as well? This is your time to soar. Enjoy the ride while it lasts.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Devote more time to self-care right now, Sagittarius. You may need some time to yourself to recharge. When you are done, you can once again be a person of action.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, you may be feeling a little wild this week or ready to just hang around in your pajamas and relax. Either way works as long as you’re happy doing it. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Your powers of persuasion are dialed up, Aquarius. You can convince others of just about anything you want them to do right now. Use this skill wisely.

Experience Iroquois Culture & Hospitality at this Gracious Country Inn

THE BEAR’S INN

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 construction@sitnbull.ca

More than a place to stay...

1979 4th Line Road, Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 P.O. Box 187, Six Nations of the Grand River Tel: (519) 445-4133 • E-Mail: innkeeper@thebearsinn.com www.thebearsinn.com

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, a love of fine things could find you in financial peril if you are not careful with spending. Set limits on how much you treat yourself.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


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TWO ROW TIMES

MAY 16TH, 2018

Two Row Times  

May 16, 2018

Two Row Times  

May 16, 2018

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